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Old February 23rd, 2005, 08:24 AM   #1
renell
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Maritime News and Discussions

6 firms eye Pasig River ferry service
Inquirer News Service

SIX PRIVATE companies are interested in running ferry services along the Pasig River once the government completes the construction of 13 boat stations from Manila to Marikina City.

Budget Secretary Emilia Boncodin said the national government would finance the construction of the 13 ferry stations, but would leave the ferry operations to the private sector.

Building each station would cost between P3 and P4 million, she said. The government would charge ferry operators a fee each time they dock at the stations. This early, there are plans to put up stations all the way to Laguna Lake.

"We will not repeat the mistakes of the past. The previous ferry projects were designed to fail," said the budget chief. The government is now on its third attempt to revive the ferry system.

Boncodin, Transport Secretary Leandro Mendoza and a representative of Metropolitan Manila Development Authority Chair Bayani Fernando signed a memorandum of agreement Wednesday to launch the ystem, one of the priority projects of the Arroyo administration.

"There are six groups interested in the ferry project. But we would know the final list by next month," said Transport Undersecretary Agustin Bengzon.

He said interested parties would have to invest about P5 million for each vesselthat plies the Pasig River.

Mendoza said the government would provide incentives to ferry operators such as exemptions from franchise fees and other charges. The operators could also qualify for import tax and tariff exemption.

Bengzon said the Pasig River ferry stations could be operational by the end of the year.

The stations would be equipped with amenities like air-conditioning, comfortable waiting areas, a ticketing system, scanners and metal detectors, comfort rooms, vendo machines and elevators for the disabled.

Reviving ferry services along the Pasig River would provide an alternative mode of transport and help decongest the traffic-choked roads of Metro Manila.
http://news.inq7.net/metro/index.ph...&story_id=11645

http://news.inq7.net/metro/index.ph...&story_id=25538
-----------------------------------------------------------
from sandrin.

now... here goes anything that moves people and their materials, using waterways from rivers to seas.

Last edited by kiretoce; November 10th, 2007 at 03:26 PM.
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Old February 23rd, 2005, 08:29 AM   #2
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i hope this will turn out good and prove to be successful. and with that also boost efforts to clean up the Pasig River.

can't wait to see how this works out...!
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Old February 23rd, 2005, 11:35 AM   #3
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yeah I hope so... just like the time of the Piso Para Sa Pasig program of Ming Ramos
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Old February 23rd, 2005, 01:07 PM   #4
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Thanks for the thread Renell. The Pasig River has been serving Manila even before the Spaniards arrived. It is the vein of Manila.

MANILA (PNA) – Plans are afoot to revive the once-popular ferry service along the Pasig River, and have it operating before the year ends.

In the plan, an initial 17 loading and unloading stations will be constructed along the stretch of the Pasig River and a major tributary, the Marikina River. The cost of constructing one station is estimated at R3 million.

Some 5,000 squatter families situated along the river banks will have to be relocated before the project is started.

Pasig River Rehabilitation Commission (PRRC) chair Emilia Boncodin, Transportation Secretary Leandro Mendoza and Cesar Lacuna of the Metro Manila Development Authority (MMDA) have signed a Memorandum of Agreement (MoA) for the 15-year span project.

The ferry service is expected to help decongest Manila megalopolis and achieve some of the goals set by President Arroyo early in her second term, according to MMDA.

The ferry service was in operation during the term of former President Fidel V. Ramos, with then First Lady Amelita Ramos overseeing the histroric river’s rehabilitation. It was a well-patronized service despite the sometimes unpleasant odor emanating from the Pasig’s murky waters.

It saved passengers from the madness of Metro Manila’s vehicular traffic.

Lacuna said the ferry boats to be used are air-conditioned and each is large enough to accommodate from between 50 and 100 passengers. "As such, passengers do not have to worry about being sprayed with foul water as the ferry traverses the Pasig," Lacuna said.

The stations are to be built at the Del Pan Bridge, Jones Bridge, MacArthur Bridge, Arroceros, Nagtahan, Polytechnic University of the Philippines (PUP), and Sta. Ana, all in Manila.

The Marcos Bridge and Sta. Elena, in Marikina City will have two platforms each, one in Valenzuela, Poblacion, and Guadalupe in Makati City, Lambingan Bridge and Hulo in Mandaluyong City, and Bambang in Pasig City. The service may be extended to along the Laguna Lake an the Manila Bay areas.

The stations will be equipped with viewing decks and seats for waiting passengers, comfort rooms, closed circuit television and scanners for security, turnstile and ticketing booths, vending machines and telephone booths, and a 24-hour security service. Facilities for the handicapped will also be installed.

The problem on whether the boats could smoothly travel through the garbage-filled river is now being addressed, according to Mendoza. He said the river’s floor is being cleared of sunken derelicts.

"The project to rehabilitate Pasig River is a 15-year program. And despite the limited achievement we have so far made, we are improving the river. At least we’re making sure that endemic creatures in the water are preserved," Lacuna stressed.

Lacuna said that in 2002, the MMDA cleared about 21,000 cubic meters of waste in the Metro’s drainage. Last year, this went down to 13,000 cubic meters. "It means our clearing operation is successful," he said. "This will enable us to build parks along the river banks."

According to Boncodin, projects to make the Pasig River ferry service an alternative mode of transport in Metro Manila failed partly because the propellers of the boats often jammed the vessels.

To date, at least 21 parties have signified joining the bidding for this project.

Boncodin said about 5,000 families situated along the river banks will have to move away and their houses demolished. Their relocation is being coordinated with local government agencies.
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Old February 23rd, 2005, 03:14 PM   #5
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The Pasig River is the vein the pumps blood into the Heart of Manila.
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Old February 23rd, 2005, 05:31 PM   #6
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Speaking of water based transportations, what about those inter-island ferries and passenger cruise ships? Are there any improvements to those modes of transportation? Or is traveling by air amongst the islands edging out travel by sea.
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Old February 23rd, 2005, 06:11 PM   #7
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Yes, I want to see a Visayas Inter-island Cruise. From Western Panay (IloIlo, Cebu, Bohol etc.) to Eastern Bicol Mighty Mayon. Central Philippines Islands have alot to offer, we only need more hotels. Travelling by sea more relaxing methinks.

Oh and please revive the Manila Bay-Subic Ferry cruise.
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Old February 23rd, 2005, 07:28 PM   #8
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/\ @sandrin, you must have "sea legs," I get queasy when I'm out to sea....I'm a certified "landlubber."
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Old February 24th, 2005, 04:01 AM   #9
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well... I really hope that Pasig River is revived and life return to it....

I guess the latest development on our inter-island ferries is GMA's Nautical Highway that connects the Batangas City port to Mindoro, Panay, Negros, Cebu, and Mindanao islands.... also I heard before of the development of Manila South Harbor into an international Cruise ship port....

Riding RO-ROs and ferries are indeed convenient but air flight is a lot much faster...
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Old February 24th, 2005, 07:00 AM   #10
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But I'm sure quite a lot of people love to bring their cars from Luzon to some island in Visayas, especially since our rail systems are still on the developing side and I'm sure not everyone loves a bus trip.
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Old February 28th, 2005, 02:49 AM   #11
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kiretoce
/\ @sandrin, you must have "sea legs," I get queasy when I'm out to sea....I'm a certified "landlubber."
It's only a matter of getting used to. The next time you go to the beach, wear a pair of fins and snorkle and submerged. Float and be one with the movement of the wave. When you ride the Banca, concentrate on the fresh air instead of the wavy movement of the Banca and don't panic.
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Old March 11th, 2005, 09:35 PM   #12
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Shipbuilding: Sailing back to the glory days
Joan Orendain

THE GLORY days of Philippine shipbuilding were in the 16th and 17th centuries, when the country led the rest of the Orient in the seafaring trade.
Three-masted Spanish galleons loaded with treasure, which swashbuckling English pirates plundered, were constructed in Cavite, Iloilo, Pangasinan, Sorsogon, Masbate, Albay, Mindoro and Cebu.
Made of Philippine mahogany, the cannonballs of marauding buccaneers merely bounced off the galleons' hardwood decks.
In modern times, by virtue of geography, we are dependent on ships for domestic and overseas transport, fishing, defense, offshore patrol, customs interdiction, and search and rescue activities.
The demand for ships is great, but most, if not all, of the steel-hulled ships plying our waters are imported, largely as second-hand reconditioned ships.
The boatbuilding industry remains strong, as in the days of yore. Shipwrights still build wooden-hulled boats that provide short-distance transportation services for passengers, and outriggers for fishermen.
There are several local shipyards capable of building steel-hulled vessels, but the domestic demand is limited to small steel-hulled vessels such as barges, tugboats and fishing vessels.
Two companies based in Cebu-Tsuneishi Heavy Industries Inc, and FBMA Babcock Marine Inc.-are successful shipbuilders catering to the export market.
Tsuneishi builds bulk carriers, while the FBMA builds high-speed catamarans. Both are joint venture companies, where the foreign partners provide the technology, experience and access to the global market, while the local partners provide the land, skilled labor and local market access.
Most of the shipbuilding firms in the country are engaged in ship repair, servicing the second hand fleet where they make good returns.
These include firms such as: Keppel Philippines Inc., with shipyards in Batangas and Cebu; Subic Shipyard & Engineering Inc. located in Zambales; and Philippine Iron Construction & Marine Works Inc. in Northern Mindanao.
Largest in the world
South Korea, which has the largest shipbuilding industry in the world, has captured 56.2 percent of the world's new orders for ships.
Their order books over the next two years are full. Japan trails Korea by half at 26.6 percent, and Europe is a poor third at 11.3 percent.
The Philippine picture could change, though, as a few good men work quietly in their government offices to try to make the shipbuilding dream happen.
The lone Philippine delegate to the shipbuilding conferences organized by the Organization for Economic Development and Cooperation Special Negotiating Group (OECD-SNG), was Agustin Bengzon, an undersecretary of the Department of Transportation and Communication.
Bengzon attended the conferences to learn how other countries developed their shipbuilding industry.
Special niche
The Philippines, Bengzon learned, could carve out its own market niche in the shipbuilding industry. Also, he found out that European shipyards enjoyed generous grants, government support measures and subsidies.
Our special niche, focusing on building small ships of 5,000 deadweight tons or less, could fly, with government setting policy directions and providing a favorable investment climate.
Bengzon announced the good news at the BIMP-EAGA (or the Brunei, Indonesia, Malaysia, and the Philippines-East Asean Growth Area) Philippine Exhibition and Conference.
He also discussed shipbuilding opportunities for the region.
In a memo to his boss, Secretary Leandro Mendoza, Bengzon noted that the Philippines needed to craft a policy and an action program to upgrade the country's shipbuilding industry.
Policy paper
Mendoza then directed Bengzon to prioritize the development of the local shipbuilding industry and tasked him to oversee the formulation of a policy paper and action program.
Mendoza's decision was recognized by President Macapagal-Arroyo in her 10-point agenda. The President encouraged the "growth of the national shipbuilding's industry" as a specific project for job and wealth creation.
Bengzon and Vicente T. Suazo Jr., Maritime Industry Authority (Marina) administrator, have started conducting dialogues with shipbuilding companies in the NCR, Iloilo, Cebu and Cagayan de Oro.
The dialogues provided a forum for the comprehensive exchange of ideas-to produce a viable action program.
Bengzon said that recent events have contributed to the development of Philippine shipbuilding.
The existing domestic demand for ships, the availability of local funds, and our shipbuilding capability are determining the shape of the shipbuilding industry, he said.
Huge demand
There is a demand for the following type of vessels:
Roll-On/Roll-Off vessels. Ninety-six are needed for the 48 identified routes along the Ro-Ro Terminal System. The Roll-On/Roll-Off Terminal System is a component of the Development Bank of the Philippines' Sustainable Logistics Development Program (RRTS-SLDP). The SLDP is a collaboration between government and the private sector to bring about cost-effective ways of moving goods and people.
Vessels of various types. At least 120 are needed. The vessels are part of the Philippine Navy's 15-year acquisition program.
Multi-role response vessels. Around 311, ranging in size from 15 to 125 meters and other types of vessels. The vessels will be acquired by the Philippine Coast Guard over a 15-year period.
Allocation
Also, there is a demand for aging domestic merchant and deep sea fishing fleets, where 57 vessels may be over 30 years old and 128 vessels may be up to 26 years old.
To pay for all this, Bengzon cited the DBP allocation of P12 billion for the procurement of Ro-Ro vessels under the RRTS-SLDP.
The DBP, in collaboration with the National Development Corp. has also established the NDC-Maritime Equity Corp., a ship financing facility.
"I commend DBP chair Vitaliano Nañagas II and former Department of Trade and Industry Secretary Cesar Purisima for recognizing the need to establish a ship financing and leasing facility jointly with the NDC to address the financing requirements needed to support the shipbuilding program," Bengzon said.
Given the number of ships to be built and the magnitude of the funding required, more than one financing and leasing firm may be needed to cater to both the public and the private sectors' requirements, he said.
Investors for this new ship financing and leasing company could also come from financial institutions, insurance and fund-management groups, and venture capitalists.
(To be continued)
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Old March 12th, 2005, 03:11 AM   #13
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sandrin
Yes, I want to see a Visayas Inter-island Cruise. From Western Panay (IloIlo, Cebu, Bohol etc.) to Eastern Bicol Mighty Mayon. Central Philippines Islands have alot to offer, we only need more hotels. Travelling by sea more relaxing methinks.

Oh and please revive the Manila Bay-Subic Ferry cruise.

Sandrin, I really agree with you. The whole Visayan cruise thing would be what that region (and the country) needs. They always say that the downside of the Philippines is that it's not connected (therefore not that united) because of too many islands, right? Well, use technology and all the options out there to fix it! And it would boost tourism. Just look at the Caribbean region. A lot of them have cruises from island countries to islands countries and even cruises in one country itself. And I also agree with your Manila Bay-Subic ferry cruise. I heard about this before but I didn't know that it's not running now. It should be! Especially with all the developments and tourism going on with the Subic area as well as Manila always being a tourist site, there should be a huge ferry back and forth! And Corregidor Island as well.
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Old March 12th, 2005, 03:24 AM   #14
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^ I also hope the ferry service from Manila Bay to Subic Bay will be revived soon like the on-going Pasig River Ferry Service revival.

Our Islands are the best!

"I think it's really nice to go back home" - it's the constant expression of my officemate who recently came back from almost 1 month's vacation in Cavite-Tagaytay-Bulacan. My friend who married a Canadian and now living in Toronto uttered the same phrase.
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Old June 15th, 2005, 08:00 PM   #15
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Air Phil, SuperCat team up to boost interconnectivity
June 16, 2005

Interconnectivity from Manila to Cebu to Ormoc is now seamless with the team-up between an aircraft and fast craft.

Air Philippines and SuperCat Fast Ferry Corporation have recently forged an intermodal connection called Island Program that will make interconnectivity and transfers seamless from Manila to Cebu to Ormoc and back.

Passengers from Manila bound for Cebu and Ormoc may book with either Air Philippines or SuperCat ticketing offices for air, sea and land transfers from airport to seaport under the one-stop-island ticketing scheme.

Air Philippines for the Visayas chief Jay Coching said the tie-up aims to benefit business travelers who make airport-to-port transfers a seamless imperative.

What is integral in this team up is the commonality between aircraft and fast craft, that is, both have speed, interconnectivity and reliability.

Timing and schedule rationalization were crucial in this team up. Air Philippines and SuperCat spare business and tourist travelers common apprehensions of delayed schedules.

SuperCat has been known to establish tie-ups with airlines because it can match with airline benchmarks in safety, reliability and service.
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Old June 16th, 2005, 08:38 AM   #16
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Alright there seems to be plans for a ferry service long time ago... but how about real action? any yet?
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Old July 22nd, 2005, 11:36 AM   #17
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bump..

whoah check out what I found, I don't think I've seen it before
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Old July 22nd, 2005, 12:16 PM   #18
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di ba iyan iyung mga luma na

anyway may nasunog na superferry last month yata
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Old July 22nd, 2005, 03:41 PM   #19
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It said "proposed ferry stations." I wonder what happened to the proposal?
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Old July 23rd, 2005, 06:34 AM   #20
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hope this get push through
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