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Southeast » Development News | Includes TX, OK, LA, MS, AL, GA, NC, SC, VA, TN, KY.



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Old January 10th, 2012, 04:23 PM   #1
CVG
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New State Population Estimates

http://www.census.gov/popest/data/st...011/index.html
http://www.census.gov/newsroom/relea.../cb11-215.html

Estimated 15 month growth rate from 4/1/10 to 7/1/11, county and metro estimates have not been released yet. Texas leading the way as the only state in the country to have an estimated growth rate of over 2% for the 15 months, LA and OK picking up steam, but not sure what is happening in AL. Also the South has 4 of the top 5 states in overall numeric growth with TX, FL, GA, and NC joining CA in the top 5.


2 Texas: 25,674,681 ( 529,120 ) [ 2.1 ]
4 Florida: 19,057,542 ( 256,231 ) [ 1.4 ]
9 Georgia: 9,815,210 ( 127,550 ) [ 1.3 ]
10 North Carolina: 9,656,401 ( 120,926 ) [ 1.3 ]
12 Virginia: 8,096,604 ( 95,574 ) [ 1.2 ]
17 Tennessee: 6,403,353 ( 57,243 ) [ 0.9 ]
23 Alabama: 4,802,740 ( 23,005 ) [ 0.5 ]
24 South Carolina: 4,679,230 ( 53,866 ) [ 1.2 ]
25 Louisiana: 4,574,836 ( 41,464 ) [ 0.9 ]
26 Kentucky: 4,369,356 ( 29,994 ) [ 0.7 ]
28 Oklahoma: 3,791,508 ( 40,154 ) [ 1.1 ]
31 Mississippi: 2,978,512 ( 11,215 ) [ 0.4 ]
32 Arkansas: 2,937,979 ( 22,058 ) [ 0.8 ]
37 West Virginia: 1,855,364 ( 2,368 ) [ 0.1 ]

Last edited by CVG; January 10th, 2012 at 04:28 PM.
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Old January 10th, 2012, 04:45 PM   #2
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trends seem to point to NC leaping over GA this decade.
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Old January 10th, 2012, 07:06 PM   #3
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Florida will surpass NY State soon.

New York 19,465,157

Florida 19,057,542

By some estimates, growth in the NYC area has slowed to a trickle while Upstate NY continues to shed people. South Florida's comeback and the steady improvement in the state's economy should see Florida pass NY by 2015.
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Old January 11th, 2012, 09:04 AM   #4
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GA and NC will both pass MI before the next census and may very well edge past OH as well.
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Old January 11th, 2012, 02:59 PM   #5
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Looks like Texas will remain the most populated state in the South for decades to come.
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Old January 11th, 2012, 06:25 PM   #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Rail Claimore View Post
GA and NC will both pass MI before the next census and may very well edge past OH as well.
As a staunch right-to-work supporter I both favor and expect this.

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Originally Posted by ohpenn View Post
trends seem to point to NC leaping over GA this decade.
Definitely. Access to DC, greater investment in transportation infrastructure and wider variety of metro areas will all contribute to this.

The amazing thing about GA is that it's achieved this with still only one prominent metro area. Most other metro areas are along the State line (Augusta, Columbus, Dalton, Savannah...), so when people talk about the 2 Georgia syndrome they're not kidding - Atlanta is a different animal.

This could be a great boon if they can further increase the city's density and preserve the rural character elsewhere, but I do wish Savannah and Macon could grow more, as well. State would be wise to pump goods production in Macon in hopefully secondary growth would remain in-state.

Perhaps this growth will have a strong upward tick on the ACC fan-base, as well! We need it given the smaller schools in the conference.
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Old January 11th, 2012, 08:10 PM   #7
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Looks like Texas will remain the most populated state in the South for decades to come.


Texas will become the largest state in the US period. Probably around 2030.
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Old January 12th, 2012, 02:22 AM   #8
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Quote:
As a staunch right-to-work supporter I both favor and expect this.
what does your preference have to do with a state's population?

Quote:
Definitely. Access to DC, greater investment in transportation infrastructure and wider variety of metro areas will all contribute to this.
Greater investment in education and research too.

GA (where I live) does not invest and really have little vision. Atlanta has good things going for it, but it's all despite how backwards the state is.
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Old January 12th, 2012, 04:41 PM   #9
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Originally Posted by ohpenn View Post
what does your preference have to do with a state's population?
The trends impact political and economic movement, as in the term "voting with your/their feet." Seeing states with policies more in line with those I support experience positive growth, then, suggests at least passive or indirect support of the same. So while these trends are surely due to several factors, it does indicate that on some level businesses are reacting to these policies. Thus, my appreciation for what the numbers are revealing.

Quote:
Greater investment in education and research too.

GA (where I live) does not invest and really have little vision. Atlanta has good things going for it, but it's all despite how backwards the state is.
Indeed. As a near-lifelong resident of north GA it pains me that the public education system is continually stifled. There are plenty of great schools and school districts, but no where near the State directed push to improve instruction across the board like you have elsewhere.

And it's not even a matter of money as much as it is administrative and curricula related. The one Elem school advisory board I serve with has shwon me how many stupid reporting requirements and instructional requirements dictate what happens, meaning even above-average teachers can be handcuffed depending on the subject. Hopefully the early results from the charter schools will inspire further evolution on this front.
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Old January 12th, 2012, 05:53 PM   #10
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Quote:
The trends impact political and economic movement, as in the term "voting with your/their feet." Seeing states with policies more in line with those I support experience positive growth, then, suggests at least passive or indirect support of the same. So while these trends are surely due to several factors, it does indicate that on some level businesses are reacting to these policies. Thus, my appreciation for what the numbers are revealing.
People move for a variety of reasons. One reason people move from NYC, Boston, and CA cities is that decades high housing costs. They are incredibly expensive. A modest house in CA can cost $700,000.

They are not moving the South because they support Southern States' race to the bottom or dog whistle policies.
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Old January 12th, 2012, 06:21 PM   #11
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ohpenn View Post
People move for a variety of reasons.
A point I also noted. Climate, following children, lower taxes, cost of living, etc.
Quote:
They are not moving the South because they support Southern States' race to the bottom or dog whistle policies.
I'll make fun of the Deep South as quick as the next guy, but in my dealings with community and economic planning I've seen much of this play out and disagree. From GE moving hundreds of jobs to Atlanta from my hometown of Schenectady, NY, to KIA's recent plant south of Atlanta, GA and NC especially have done well enough that they've seen strong growth economically and population-wise. There are plenty of schools systems outside the south with equally inane management, they simply have (IMO) a deeper culture of community support for education. Even then it's far from perfect and there are plenty of Rednecks outside SEC-land. To say nothing of the national-scale changes to US demographics, and the very rapid change in educational needs since the industrial age. Bottom line, I'd scarcely portray it as a race to the bottom, let alone make it exclusive to the south. But if that's your perspective...
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Old January 15th, 2012, 11:49 PM   #12
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GunnerJacket View Post
As a staunch right-to-work supporter I both favor and expect this.

Definitely. Access to DC, greater investment in transportation infrastructure and wider variety of metro areas will all contribute to this.

The amazing thing about GA is that it's achieved this with still only one prominent metro area. Most other metro areas are along the State line (Augusta, Columbus, Dalton, Savannah...), so when people talk about the 2 Georgia syndrome they're not kidding - Atlanta is a different animal.

I do wish Savannah and Macon could grow more, as well. State would be wise to pump goods production in Macon in hopefully secondary growth would remain in-state.
Dalton is a metro area?

Oh, and Savannah is currently seeing plenty of growth. Effingham county has ballooned in population in recent years and Pooler (one of Savannah's nearby cities) has tripled its population over the last ten years, and let's not forget that dredging project that's being planned for the Savannah River.
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Old January 16th, 2012, 08:34 PM   #13
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ohpenn View Post
People move for a variety of reasons. One reason people move from NYC, Boston, and CA cities is that decades high housing costs. They are incredibly expensive. A modest house in CA can cost $700,000.

They are not moving the South because they support Southern States' race to the bottom or dog whistle policies.
Amen, and thankfully states like North Carolina and Virginia are trending longterm toward a more progressive cultural and political climate because of in-migration, the 2010 election notwithstanding.
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Old January 17th, 2012, 02:39 AM   #14
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GunnerJacket View Post
The trends impact political and economic movement, as in the term "voting with your/their feet." Seeing states with policies more in line with those I support experience positive growth, then, suggests at least passive or indirect support of the same. So while these trends are surely due to several factors, it does indicate that on some level businesses are reacting to these policies. Thus, my appreciation for what the numbers are revealing.

Indeed. As a near-lifelong resident of north GA it pains me that the public education system is continually stifled. There are plenty of great schools and school districts, but no where near the State directed push to improve instruction across the board like you have elsewhere.

And it's not even a matter of money as much as it is administrative and curricula related. The one Elem school advisory board I serve with has shwon me how many stupid reporting requirements and instructional requirements dictate what happens, meaning even above-average teachers can be handcuffed depending on the subject. Hopefully the early results from the charter schools will inspire further evolution on this front.
Are you suggesting that NC is any better than GA? Because, let me tell you, it isn't...NC has fallen to 49th in per pupil spending (just above MS) due to the Republican-controlled legislature. This fact alone is a good indication that the state of NC is no more invested in public education than the state of GA.
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Old January 17th, 2012, 02:42 AM   #15
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Amen, and thankfully states like North Carolina and Virginia are trending longterm toward a more progressive cultural and political climate because of in-migration, the 2010 election notwithstanding.
NC had been making great progress in recent years, but the recent election (as you stated above) has really reversed some of the previous gains. The feud between the governor and the legislature is worse than the one in DC.
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Old January 17th, 2012, 06:09 PM   #16
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Dalton is a metro area?
It's part of metro Chattanooga and was trending very strongly upward until the textiles bust. The growth around Dalton was where people began to suspect metro Atlanta would reach metro Chattanooga w/in 20 years, but that's tailed off.

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Are you suggesting that NC is any better than GA? Because, let me tell you, it isn't...NC has fallen to 49th in per pupil spending (just above MS) due to the Republican-controlled legislature. This fact alone is a good indication that the state of NC is no more invested in public education than the state of GA.
Well spending alone isn't the telling factor, but I'm not saying NC is far beyond GA in this capacity. What they're seeing, though, at least around Raleigh and Charlotte, is a lot of support from the locals for investing in education overall - facilities, political clout, volunteerism, etc. Raleigh had a big campaign some years ago to get the whole metro area on-board with wanting to be known as an education-oriented community. Even if mostly superficial it was a good build off their research-triangle reputation, and I've found the people there as a whole are more attuned to the needs of the primary system than many I've met around Atlanta.

Or put another way, it feels more selective to school districts here, whereas there it's more broad based. It even lured my cousin and her family from New Jersey and they're thrilled with their local system.

But it's semantics, really. Neither is as bad as many portray, but both are lacking compared to the best examples.
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Old January 18th, 2012, 12:28 AM   #17
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Aside from local school districts, NC has been far more invested in its state public university system than GA.
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Old January 18th, 2012, 01:38 AM   #18
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Originally Posted by GunnerJacket View Post
It's part of metro Chattanooga and was trending very strongly upward until the textiles bust. The growth around Dalton was where people began to suspect metro Atlanta would reach metro Chattanooga w/in 20 years, but that's tailed off.

Well spending alone isn't the telling factor, but I'm not saying NC is far beyond GA in this capacity. What they're seeing, though, at least around Raleigh and Charlotte, is a lot of support from the locals for investing in education overall - facilities, political clout, volunteerism, etc. Raleigh had a big campaign some years ago to get the whole metro area on-board with wanting to be known as an education-oriented community. Even if mostly superficial it was a good build off their research-triangle reputation, and I've found the people there as a whole are more attuned to the needs of the primary system than many I've met around Atlanta.

Or put another way, it feels more selective to school districts here, whereas there it's more broad based. It even lured my cousin and her family from New Jersey and they're thrilled with their local system.

But it's semantics, really. Neither is as bad as many portray, but both are lacking compared to the best examples.
I realize that spending isn't the only telling factor, but it's an important one. As a current resident of NC and a teacher in the public schools, I can tell you that it is just as selective to school districts in NC as it is in Georgia...and the people in NC are no more attuned to the needs of the system than they are in GA. I'm not sure where you are getting your information about NC schools, but the Wake and Mecklenburg systems are just as spotty when it comes to progress and investment as anywhere in Georgia - your cousin's personal experience notwithstanding.

No school system is as bad as some people portray it to be. I'm convinced that a motivated, semi-intelligent student can be successful in ANY school or school system...it's not about the overall test scores or the "failing" schools, but about each individual student and the parental support that he/she receives.
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Old January 18th, 2012, 01:39 AM   #19
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Aside from local school districts, NC has been far more invested in its state public university system than GA.
Well, yes...that's a different story.
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Old January 18th, 2012, 05:34 PM   #20
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< Warning: Temporary threadjack ahead! >

WeimieLvr,

Kudos on your chosen profession, doubly so if you're male as I wish more men were in the ranks to balance kids' social perceptions and responses to leadership. (I've tought Sunday School for 8 years! Does that count for something?!!)

As such I'd be curious about your thoughts on this: I've argued that school size is as important if not moreso than class size, and think kids tend to respond better to smaller school environments. Put another way, our rush to high schools (for example) with 2-4k kids is somewhat counterintuitive to educational principles by reinforcing the perception of mass-production-scale and rote learning. The kids feel more a number than a valued child, and the environments become too industrial. I'm not saying it's absolute, but that it'd be better if we could cap school sizes at much, much smaller scales that kids recognize more faces and feel more like students than cattle. Thoughts?
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