daily menu » rate the banner | guess the city | one on oneforums map | privacy policy | DMCA | news magazine

Go Back   SkyscraperCity > Infrastructure and Mobility Forums > General Developments and Discussions

General Developments and Discussions » Bridges | Cycling | Maritime



Reply

 
Thread Tools
Old May 2nd, 2006, 05:28 PM   #1
hkskyline
Hong Kong
 
hkskyline's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2002
Posts: 75,201
Likes (Received): 6465

Can Ethanol Reduce American Oil Dependence?

Ethanol may not be answer to US oil dependence: critics

DETROIT, Michigan, May 2, 2006 (AFP) - As concerns mount over soaring gasoline prices and the United States' dependence on foreign oil, ethanol is emerging as a controversial balm for the nation's growing energy problem.

Politicians and automakers say the corn-based biofuel can reduce demand for gasoline. By using more ethanol, advocates say, gasoline (petrol) prices would come down, air quality would improve, and American farmers would benefit.

But some critics say there are far more effective alternatives than a fuel which requires massive energy inputs to produce.

"I wish ethanol were everything that advocates say it is, but it is terrible that this has been latched on to and proposed to be a solution to our liquid fuels problem," said David Pimentel, a Cornell University ecology and agricultural sciences professor.

Not only does ethanol require 30 percent more energy input than what is produced, Pimentel said, but crop pesticides and fertilizers cause water pollution and other environmental problems.

At the same time, he said, farmers stand to receive billions in federal subsidies.

For its part, the National Ethanol Vehicle Coalition said ethanol production has become less energy-intensive over the last 20 years, and will continue to improve.

There are two types of ethanol gasoline: E10, a blend which contains 10 percent ethanol, can be used in any vehicle and is already used in 40 percent of all gasoline sold in the United States; and E85, a blend which uses 85 percent ethanol and requires specially made vehicles.

Although automakers are on board, even touting their products, the question is whether consumers will warm to vehicles that require a different fuel and engine.

A J.D. Power and Associates' study reported that only 7.23 percent of all new car buyers last year said that "environmental impact" was a key factor in their buying decision.

Added Pimentel: "I think the public will buy into it, but only until the facts get out. They'll find out that this is not solving our energy problem."

There are other challenges. For one, ethanol achieves lower mileage than traditional gasoline, according to www.fueleconomy.gov .

The website shows, for example, that a 2006 Chevy Monte Carlo can travel a combined 25 miles (40 kilometers) per gallon on gasoline, but only 19 miles (31 kilometers) per gallon on E85. By comparison, a 2006 Toyota Prius hybrid gets 55 miles (88 kilometers) per gallon.

Another problem is the lack of infrastructure. There are about 180,000 gasoline stations in the United States, but only 600 or so ethanol stations, according to the National Ethanol Vehicle Coalition.

Most of those are in the Midwest. The number of ethanol stations is expected to grow to 2,000 this year, thanks to a tax credit for station owners who install E85 pumps.

Some say it's worth it.

President George W. Bush said he wants to increase ethanol production to replace 30 percent of gasoline demand by 2030 in order to stanch the nation's growing reliance on foreign oil.

In January, two Midwestern senators sponsored a bill that would require automakers to annually increase the number of vehicles capable of burning E85 until nearly all vehicles are so equipped.

General Motors Corp., still smarting from being late to market on hybrid technology, has launched an ad campaign touting ethanol. Hybrid leader Toyota Motor recently said it would consider building ethanol-friendly vehicles.

Chrysler Corp. plans to add three new vehicles to its lineup of E85 flexible-fuel vehicles this fall: The Jeep Grand Cherokee and Commander SUVs, and the Dodge Dakota pickup.

The manufacturer expects to sell 250,000 E85-fueled vehicles in 2007 and 500,000 in 2008. Nearly all of the company's E85 vehicles have been sold to fleet customers -- at least half of those to government agencies -- but the new versions will be sold directly to consumers.

By the end of this year Ford Motor Co. will have sold two million E85 vehicles.

Earlier this year Ford introduced the Escape Hybrid E85, a research vehicle that marries hybrid electric power and flex-fuel capability, and is said to produce 25 percent less carbon dioxide than a gasoline-fueled Escape hybrid.

In all there are about six million E85-compatible vehicles on the road.
__________________
Hong Kong Photo Gallery - Click Here for the Hong Kong Galleries

World Photo Gallery - | St. Petersburg | Moscow | Istanbul | Dubai | Shanghai | Sydney | Hanoi | Bangkok | Prague

New York, London, Seoul, Taipei, Mumbai, Tokyo, Iceland, Rocky Mountains, Angkor Wat, and much more!
hkskyline no está en línea   Reply With Quote

Sponsored Links
 
Old May 2nd, 2006, 05:57 PM   #2
hkth
Registered User
 
Join Date: Sep 2005
Posts: 2,458
Likes (Received): 23

The MOST PRATICAL WAY for US Gov't to reduce oil dependence is to put more resources on the public transportation instead of private transportation!
hkth no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old May 3rd, 2006, 04:37 AM   #3
ChicagoSkyline
BANNED
 
Join Date: Feb 2005
Location: Chicago[Naperville-SW Suburb] + Miami[Miami Beach & South Beach]
Posts: 2,185
Likes (Received): 0

Yes, I think that it will, just matter of time that we Americans taking alternatives!
ChicagoSkyline no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old May 3rd, 2006, 05:13 AM   #4
jamesinclair
Registered User
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Posts: 217
Likes (Received): 8

A few mistakes:

"There are two types of ethanol gasoline: E10, a blend which contains 10 percent ethanol, can be used in any vehicle and is already used in 40 percent of all gasoline sold in the United States; and E85, a blend which uses 85 percent ethanol and requires specially made vehicles."

In the US maybe. Brasil mixes all gasoline with 20-25% ethanol depending on the season, and the one labled ethanol is 95% ethanol, 5% water.

"Hybrid leader Toyota Motor recently said it would consider building ethanol-friendly vehicles. "

Theyre launching their first ethanol models in Brasil this year. All theyd have to do was expand the line to include cars shipped to the US.
jamesinclair no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old May 3rd, 2006, 05:18 AM   #5
DonQui
BANNED
 
DonQui's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2005
Location: The Free City-State of New York
Posts: 6,187
Likes (Received): 0

I don't think it can make a significant enough dent.

We need to be thinking more long term.

And even if ethanol would reduce, it would still not deal with carbon dioxide emissions.
DonQui no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old May 3rd, 2006, 05:23 AM   #6
ChicagoSkyline
BANNED
 
Join Date: Feb 2005
Location: Chicago[Naperville-SW Suburb] + Miami[Miami Beach & South Beach]
Posts: 2,185
Likes (Received): 0

Quote:
Originally Posted by DonQui
I don't think it can make a significant enough dent.

We need to be thinking more long term.

And even if ethanol would reduce, it would still not deal with carbon dioxide emissions.
While you are thinking, those big oil companies continue to gualp down billions and billions of dollars each day. Maybe we should just dreaming...
ChicagoSkyline no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old May 3rd, 2006, 05:24 AM   #7
DonQui
BANNED
 
DonQui's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2005
Location: The Free City-State of New York
Posts: 6,187
Likes (Received): 0

Quote:
Originally Posted by ChicagoSkyline
While you are thinking, those big oil companies continue to gualp down billions and billions of dollars each day. Maybe we should just dreaming...
huh?
DonQui no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old May 3rd, 2006, 06:12 AM   #8
grzes
BANNED
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Location: on ur ice, scaring ur netminders
Posts: 268
Likes (Received): 0

Quote:
Originally Posted by DonQui
I don't think it can make a significant enough dent.

We need to be thinking more long term.

And even if ethanol would reduce, it would still not deal with carbon dioxide emissions.
We don't really need it to make a huge dent, we just need an alternative to fuels in use now. I've got a V6 right now, and it only takes supreme, so gas easily costs 35-40USD. It's not much, but the rate at which it's increasing is insane, and those like me who drive about 240-300 miles a week really feel the effects. I think the good idea (as someone else mentioned in a seperate thread) is for cities to improve public transportation, something that can be wildly popular if cleaned up in certain cities.
grzes no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old May 3rd, 2006, 08:03 AM   #9
ChicagoSkyline
BANNED
 
Join Date: Feb 2005
Location: Chicago[Naperville-SW Suburb] + Miami[Miami Beach & South Beach]
Posts: 2,185
Likes (Received): 0

Quote:
Originally Posted by grzes
We don't really need it to make a huge dent, we just need an alternative to fuels in use now. I've got a V6 right now, and it only takes supreme, so gas easily costs 35-40USD. It's not much, but the rate at which it's increasing is insane, and those like me who drive about 240-300 miles a week really feel the effects. I think the good idea (as someone else mentioned in a seperate thread) is for cities to improve public transportation, something that can be wildly popular if cleaned up in certain cities.
I totally agree, it can be a great alternative, since our total dependence on foreign oil can reduce to the point that they will cut back the price to lure back the oil consumption.
Yes, by vitalizing our metro and suburbian public transportations like railway and buses and also reduce our consumption as well!
ChicagoSkyline no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old May 3rd, 2006, 03:00 PM   #10
miamicanes
Registered User
 
Join Date: Oct 2002
Location: Miami
Posts: 929
Likes (Received): 48

Or we could just begin wholesale drilling throughout Alaska, and become the biggest oil-exporting nation on earth. I mean, please. Alaska might be pretty, but how many of us are *really* ever going to personally set foot anywhere within a thousand miles of it?

Personally, I think it would be rather nice to have gas that's nearly free, abolish the IRS, and see every American citizen get a check for a thousand dollars or more every month in oil revenue dividends like Kuwaiti citizens do. Yeah, it's possible. Read the Alaska reports *very* carefully. The area proposed for active drilling in ANWR right this minute (whose small potential is used to justify "it's not worth the cost because it's only x million barrels of oil) is microscopic. If, in fact, wholesale drilling took place throughout the area and not just within that tiny area, it's believed that there's enough oil up there to make the Saudi oil fields look dry by comparison.

If nothing else, it would be amusing to watch every greenie on Earth have a stroke and spontaneously combust at the thought of free gas for Americans, with enough surplus to enable a Hummer in every new Chinese single family home's 3-car garage in its future sprawling suburban megalopoli, with 16-lane freeways every 5-10 miles and Texas-like 6-8 lane "arterial freeways" every mile lined with strip malls and fast food restaurants that make Houston look like a model for compact transit-oriented dense urban "Smart Growth" by comparison
miamicanes no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old May 3rd, 2006, 09:41 PM   #11
sl64
Registered User
 
Join Date: May 2006
Posts: 161
Likes (Received): 0

Quote:
Originally Posted by miamicanes
Or we could just begin wholesale drilling throughout Alaska, and become the biggest oil-exporting nation on earth. I mean, please. Alaska might be pretty, but how many of us are *really* ever going to personally set foot anywhere within a thousand miles of it?
The US can drill every square inch of Alaska and it still won't export as much oil as Saudi Arabia... and the US would probably use most of the oil domestically and not export it in any event.

I think ethanol is promising in the relative short term, to help keep soaring oil prices in check somewhat. Of course, right now using ethanol would drive prices up even more (considering that it's more expensive to produce and the one-time costs of revamping the infrastructure that would be reflected in the price). As the technology develops and becomes more efficient to produce, I think oil-ethanol blends will be useful. However I say relative short term because ethanol is simply not a long-term substitute for oil, which is what we should really be looking for.
sl64 no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old May 4th, 2006, 04:13 AM   #12
grzes
BANNED
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Location: on ur ice, scaring ur netminders
Posts: 268
Likes (Received): 0

I have nothing against free gas, but hybrids (at least in the US) were created to help fight the problem of pollution which is why they are such a viable alternative to "regular" vehicles. They were in production before the price increases back when gas was still under $3 (weren't those the days?). An increase of SUVs and Hummers would actually be disasterous to us, because it would create a "mini" Los Angeles everwhere because of high smog concentrations in large cities. Another piece of the puzzle is how do we bring down fuel (not oil based gas) prices, thus decreasing all relative costs and reduce vehicle emission (that's where Global Warming picks up).

P.S. It's illegal to drill in or build on wildlife reserves, the government will block it. The current regulations (like Integrated Waste Management and Garden cities) are being passed to help fight pollution and make the mass population aware of our environmental footprint and to try to right at least some of the wrongs.

Edit : Toyota is slowly becoming more of an option when it comes time for me to buy my first "new" car... probably will be a hybrid.

Last edited by grzes; May 4th, 2006 at 04:20 AM.
grzes no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old May 5th, 2006, 05:05 PM   #13
czm3
Automobile lover
 
czm3's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2004
Location: NYC/Miami
Posts: 387
Likes (Received): 142

Ethanol isnt effective as it requires more energy to produce, then it returns.

Biodiesel is a different story. Its usually made from soybeans, and actually icreases mileage over regular diesel. It also acts as a lubricant and saves money on maintainence.

www.biodiesel.org

Hybrids arnt the answer as nobody has begun to discuss the cost and environmental ramifications of all those old spent batteries. They also produce more NOx emissions than regular cars.
czm3 no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old May 5th, 2006, 07:29 PM   #14
Xusein
Xornimo
 
Xusein's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2005
Location: Seattle
Posts: 25,547
Likes (Received): 3358

Isn't Ethanol one of the reasons that gas prices are so high right now?
Xusein no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old May 7th, 2006, 03:49 AM   #15
FM 2258
Registered User
 
FM 2258's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2004
Location: Austin
Posts: 5,056
Likes (Received): 319

Quote:
Originally Posted by czm3
Ethanol isnt effective as it requires more energy to produce, then it returns.

Biodiesel is a different story. Its usually made from soybeans, and actually icreases mileage over regular diesel. It also acts as a lubricant and saves money on maintainence.

www.biodiesel.org

Hybrids arnt the answer as nobody has begun to discuss the cost and environmental ramifications of all those old spent batteries. They also produce more NOx emissions than regular cars.

Yeah, if it takes more energy to make ethanol I don't see the point of producing it. Maybe we should make cars that run on small nuclear reactors.

Seriously though, I think when we get fusion energy to work it will solve most of our future energy problems.
FM 2258 no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old May 8th, 2006, 03:28 PM   #16
Paddington
Registered User
 
Paddington's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: The Southland
Posts: 4,508
Likes (Received): 803

I've heard that ethanol is not economically viable.

In between the tractors harvesting the corn and the trucks dropping it off at the plant, the process to create ethanol uses more in fossil fuels than it gives back in ethanol equivalents.

The only reason we use some of it right now is because the government heavily subsidizes it.

But if we talk about massively increasing the use of ethanol from whatever meager amount it is right now, to significatly reducing oil by double digit figures, then those subsidies will no longer be viable.
Paddington no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old May 8th, 2006, 05:24 PM   #17
aswnl
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jun 2004
Location: near Amsterdam (NL)
Posts: 781
Likes (Received): 14

Quote:
Originally Posted by hkth
The MOST PRATICAL WAY for US Gov't to reduce oil dependence is to put more resources on the public transportation instead of private transportation!
blah blah

Question: why uses the US that much oil just for heating houses ?
I.m.h.o. a lot of oil could be saved by just deploying more city-warming installations (e.g. in powerplants). That's far more fuel-effective than every house it's own oiltank...
aswnl no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old December 7th, 2006, 04:29 AM   #18
hkskyline
Hong Kong
 
hkskyline's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2002
Posts: 75,201
Likes (Received): 6465

U.S. says ethanol use to double by 2012
By Tom Doggett

WASHINGTON, Dec 5 (Reuters) - U.S. ethanol demand is expected to more than double by 2012 to 11.2 billion gallons a year, exceeding the 7.5 billion gallon requirement under a U.S. energy law, the federal Energy Information Administration said on Tuesday.

The government is pushing more ethanol use to blend into gasoline as a way to domestic motor fuel supplies and make the U.S. less dependent on foreign oil supplies.

U.S. demand for ethanol has also jumped as the oil industry uses it as a replacement for gasoline additive MTBE, a suspected carcinogen banned in several states.

Ethanol demand by 2030 is seen reaching 14.6 billion gallons a year, equal to about 8 percent of expected total gasoline consumption by volume at that time, the Energy Department's analytical arm said.

"The ethanol supply is expected to be produced from both corn and cellulose feedstocks...but domestically grown corn is expected to be the primary source, accounting for 13.6 billion gallons of ethanol production in 2030," the EIA said.

Current U.S. ethanol production is roughly 5.121 billion gallons per year (gpy), or about 334,000 barrels per day, according to the Renewable Fuels Association, roughly 1.2 billion gpy below demand. [ID:nN27543610]

Plans for new ethanol plants already in the books will make up for this shortfall, but some of the projects may take years to come on line. In the meantime, shortfalls are expected to be made up through imports.

The agency is also forecasting more cars and trucks will be on the highways in the years ahead that run on both traditional gasoline and motor fuel that is 85 percent ethanol.

Sales of these flex-fuel vehicles are expected to reach 2 million a year in 2030, or 10 percent of total sales of new light-duty vehicles.

In addition to ethanol, the EIA said demand for other alternative energy sources like biodiesel and liquid fuels made from coal is projected to increase substantially, in part, because of higher prices for traditional fuels.

Tax breaks and other financial incentives included in last year's energy law will also help alternative energy sources grow.

Nonetheless, traditional energy sources, such as crude oil, natural gas and burned coal, are projected to provide about the same 86 percent share of total U.S. energy supply in 2030 as is the current case, absent any changes in current laws and regulations, the EIA said.
__________________
Hong Kong Photo Gallery - Click Here for the Hong Kong Galleries

World Photo Gallery - | St. Petersburg | Moscow | Istanbul | Dubai | Shanghai | Sydney | Hanoi | Bangkok | Prague

New York, London, Seoul, Taipei, Mumbai, Tokyo, Iceland, Rocky Mountains, Angkor Wat, and much more!
hkskyline no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old December 7th, 2006, 05:09 AM   #19
hkskyline
Hong Kong
 
hkskyline's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2002
Posts: 75,201
Likes (Received): 6465

US ethanol faces distribution obstacles - expert
By Carey Gillam

KANSAS CITY, Mo., Dec 4 (Reuters)- Ethanol, darling of U.S. corn producers, is facing distribution challenges as production skyrockets in a quest to wean America from its dependence on foreign oil, an industry expert said on Monday.

The majority of ethanol is shipped in single rail cars, but as production booms, unit train facilities - both current and proposed - are expected to prove woefully inadequate, Steve Bleyl, CEO of the Renewable Products Marketing Group, told a conference of National Grain and Feed Association executives meeting in Kansas City.

"It will get delivered but it won't be as efficient. And the bottom line is if we can't be efficient, we're going to get higher expenses," Bleyl said in an interview.

Ethanol is an alternative fuel produced in the United States mostly by fermenting and distilling corn. It can be blended with gasoline to reduce harmful emissions.

Increased demand for ethanol has helped push corn prices to a 10-year high and U.S. stockpiles are now expected to be halved in the coming year. Ethanol is forecast to consume 20 percent of this year's corn crop.

There currently are only four existing unit-train receiving facilities to handle ethanol, two on each coast, and 10 to 12 currently proposed, including facilities in Dallas and Atlanta.

In comparison, there are over 1,000 such facilities for gasoline, and oil companies remain the dominant force for infrastructure expansion, Bleyl said.

Currently there are 107 operating ethanol plants, with 44 under construction, and nine expansions aimed at increasing currently estimated 5 billion gallons of ethanol production by more than 3 billion gallons in the next 18 months.

Investors are examining the issue and evaluating many options for rail as well as barge options, ethanol plant locations and other factors, according to Bleyl said.

But investors are largely reluctant to put too much capital into new facilities until the volume is large enough to support the investments. And until sufficient facilities exist, delivery will be less efficient and more costly, keeping some pressure on supplies.

"It's the chicken and the egg. Production is one thing but you've got to get it delivered," Bleyl said.

Talk of an ethanol pipeline is similarly problematic, he said. "You've got to make sure you've got the volume. It's a huge hurdle."

ProExporter Network principal Bill Hudson, who also spoke to conference attendees, said that despite delivery obstacles, ethanol should become increasingly attractive as an fuel alternative.

Ethanol prices are forecast to trend substantially lower than pump prices for gasoline between now and 2015, Hudson said.
__________________
Hong Kong Photo Gallery - Click Here for the Hong Kong Galleries

World Photo Gallery - | St. Petersburg | Moscow | Istanbul | Dubai | Shanghai | Sydney | Hanoi | Bangkok | Prague

New York, London, Seoul, Taipei, Mumbai, Tokyo, Iceland, Rocky Mountains, Angkor Wat, and much more!
hkskyline no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old August 2nd, 2007, 02:51 PM   #20
hkskyline
Hong Kong
 
hkskyline's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2002
Posts: 75,201
Likes (Received): 6465

Ethanol Makers Join Food Vs. Fuel Debate
2 August 2007

JOHNSTON, Iowa (AP) - Ethanol producers are clamoring over food industry claims that prices on everything from popcorn to soda are skyrocketing because of the rising demand for corn to make the renewable fuel.

Ethanol backers in Iowa focused their ire on the industry, particularly the popcorn market, during a news conference here Wednesday.

"We're here today to pop the popcorn propaganda bubble," said Monte Shaw, executive director of the Iowa Renewable Fuels Association.

Standing in front of 11 large plastic bags containing 38.5 pounds of popcorn, Shaw claimed a person could buy that amount directly from a farmer for $5. He pointed to a bag of movie theater popcorn on a nearby table and said it costs the consumer just as much, if not more.

Some food companies argue that escalating corn prices, sparked by the increasing demand for ethanol, has forced them to raise prices for items containing corn, including meat and dairy products from animals that are fed the grain. It's been dubbed the "food-versus-fuel debate."

When it comes to popcorn, Shaw said, recent claims that movie-goers will pay 25 cents more per bag of popcorn because of the ethanol demand is ridiculous.

The $5 bucket of movie popcorn, he said, contains just .15 pounds of corn before popping. Based on 9-cents-per-pound rate that farmers made on the corn last year, that bucket contained slightly more than a penny of popcorn, he said. Higher corn prices means the moviegoer is getting about 2 cents of popcorn per bucket, he said.

"It just shows that there's no way that that small increase in the price of popcorn that the farmer gets justifies the large increases that they're talking about at the movie theater," he said. "And, this is true for so many other things."

For example, a six-pack of soda contains just 6 cents worth of corn sweeter -- or about a penny a can, said Craig Floss, chief executive officer of the Iowa Corn Promotion Board and the Iowa Corn Growers Association.

"So if your six-pack of soda is going up any more than about six cents in this food-versus-fuel debate, than somebody else is profiting, and it certainly isn't the huge profits going to the Iowa corn grower," he said.

Tracy Boever, a spokeswoman for the American Pop Corn Co. in Sioux City, which makes Jolly Time brand popcorn, said the company hasn't been blaming anyone for higher prices, but "the fact remains that there are only so many acres of land and the popcorn industry, along with others, are competing for those acres."

The company's president, Garrett Smith, recently told The Des Moines Register that the demand for corn has led to a 65 percent increase in contract costs to get farmers to plant his product -- the highest increase he's seen in 30 years.

"The reality is that we have not raised our prices, nor do we set movie theater concession prices," Boever said.

Shaw said consumers should instead look at transportation costs when it comes to rising food prices.

"So with the price of gasoline going up, and the price of diesel fuel going up, that probably has a bigger impact on the price at the grocery store and the movie theater than what the farmer is getting," he said.

--------

On the Net:

Iowa Renewable Fuels Association: http://www.iowarfa.org

------

WAPAKONETA, Ohio (AP) -- Petting zoos, wagon rides and other forms of agritourism are flourishing in Ohio, but public relations specialists suggest that farmers hoping to attract visitors become savvy in marketing and business regulations.

"It's doing your homework," said Louise Mikesell-Wireman, marketing specialist for the Toledo-based Center for Innovative Food Technology. "And it's knowing how to market your product. A lot of farmers are great at what they do, but they're not marketers."

More than 6,200 Ohio farms sold corn, strawberries and other products and services to the public right from the farm in 2002, up from 5,800 farms in 1997, according to the U.S. Census of Agriculture. They posted more than $37 million in direct sales, up from $30 million.

One of them was Carl Young, who operates Young's Jersey Dairy.

With nearly 300 employees who oversee educational tours, miniature golf, a go-cart track, gift shop and restaurant, the operation attracts nearly 1.3 million visitors each year.

Young's son, Ben, said the key to the family's success was starting small and growing slowly. He said agritourism typically begins with a roadside stand, then expands to include interactive attractions, such as pick-your-own produce, and finally graduates to year-round activities that require parking lots and restrooms.

Young said one of the biggest challenges is public relations.

"Someone has to be there to greet the guests and make them feel welcome, and the farmers themselves can't always do that if they're working," he said.

Once the infrastructure is in place, farmers need to determine how much advertising they can afford.

Those who cannot afford radio, television or newspaper advertising should seek out a good desktop publishing system and go the route of homemade newsletters, fliers and Web sites, said Mikesell-Wireman. Farmers may also want to entice visitors by offering free roadside samples or special discounts, she said.

Mikesell-Wireman said farmers often encounter roadblocks in trying to start an agritourism venture because they are unaware of the regulations.

Even a simple venture, such as an apple orchard opened to the public, comes with concerns, she said.

For example, if students make field trips to a farm during school days, roads must be a certain width to allow bus access. Water from a well might be the natural choice for farmers in some areas, but the smell of sulfur is often a turnoff for visitors from the city, she said.
__________________
Hong Kong Photo Gallery - Click Here for the Hong Kong Galleries

World Photo Gallery - | St. Petersburg | Moscow | Istanbul | Dubai | Shanghai | Sydney | Hanoi | Bangkok | Prague

New York, London, Seoul, Taipei, Mumbai, Tokyo, Iceland, Rocky Mountains, Angkor Wat, and much more!
hkskyline no está en línea   Reply With Quote


Reply

Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off



All times are GMT +2. The time now is 08:30 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
Feedback Buttons provided by Advanced Post Thanks / Like v3.2.5 (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2014 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.

vBulletin Optimisation provided by vB Optimise (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2014 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.

SkyscraperCity ☆ In Urbanity We trust ☆ about us | privacy policy | DMCA policy

Hosted by Blacksun, dedicated to this site too!
Forum server management by DaiTengu