daily menu » rate the banner | guess the city | one on oneforums map | privacy policy | DMCA | news magazine | posting guidelines

Go Back   SkyscraperCity > European Forums > UK & Ireland Architecture Forums > Projects and Construction > North East England > Newcastle Metro Area

Newcastle Metro Area For Newcastle, N Tyneside, Gateshead, S Tyneside, South Northumberland



Global Announcement

As a general reminder, please respect others and respect copyrights. Go here to familiarize yourself with our posting policy.


Reply

 
Thread Tools
Old May 16th, 2013, 12:11 AM   #461
Newcastle Historian
Moderator and Archivist
 
Newcastle Historian's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2006
Location: Newcastle upon Tyne
Posts: 17,988
Likes (Received): 557

Quote:
Originally Posted by Ken O'Heed View Post
Lot of good information in these re "the past"

Tyne and Wear Specialist Conservation Team: Annual Reports

http://www.newcastle.gov.uk/environm...on-team-annual

Unfortunately nothing added to the site since the 2010/11 report

KEN

Excellent Reports, indeed.

They can always be accessed via their listing (under 'Conservation') on Section 09 of our forum Websites Listing Thread.
Newcastle Historian no está en línea   Reply With Quote

Sponsored Links
 
Old May 16th, 2013, 09:31 AM   #462
Steve Ellwood
Moderator
 
Steve Ellwood's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Location: Newcastle Upon Tyne/Whitley Bay
Posts: 14,809
Likes (Received): 912

Quote:
Originally Posted by Andym View Post
A Neolithic dug out canoe was discovered in Dunston in 1912- it would seem Gateshead has evidence of occupation from the earliest times as does Newcastle.
As for few historic buildings in Gateshead, this would stem from its lower status and very small size until the industrial revolution. The lack of earlier development was stifled by Newcastles control of all river trade from the Norman conquest onwards.
Discovery of such artefacts demonstrates only that humans were in the area - the rub is when evidence of actual habitation is found.
__________________
Regards

Steve Ellwood
www.steve-ellwood.org.uk
Steve Ellwood está en línea ahora   Reply With Quote
Old May 16th, 2013, 09:39 AM   #463
Squipper
Registered User
 
Squipper's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2012
Posts: 2,193
Likes (Received): 127

Quote:
Originally Posted by Steve Ellwood View Post
Discovery of such artefacts demonstrates only that humans were in the area - the rub is when evidence of actual habitation is found.
My post was indeed pointing towards a settlement. As long as there's been a bridge over the Tyne since Roman times there would have been folk 'passing through'. Any evidence of more than casual agriculture before the 12th century appear to be non existent.
__________________


Squipper
Royal Air Force
Survival Equipment Fitter
Squipper no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old May 16th, 2013, 09:56 AM   #464
Steve Ellwood
Moderator
 
Steve Ellwood's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Location: Newcastle Upon Tyne/Whitley Bay
Posts: 14,809
Likes (Received): 912

Quote:
Originally Posted by Squipper View Post
My post was indeed pointing towards a settlement. As long as there's been a bridge over the Tyne since Roman times there would have been folk 'passing through'. Any evidence of more than casual agriculture before the 12th century appear to be non existent.
Andym did make this observation yesterday though:

Quote:
Originally Posted by Andym View Post
Heslop in his book Digging Deeper also says a possible Bronze Age enclosure was found during construction of the sage
The book points out "In 2001 two large ditches of a massive enclosure were found beneath St Mary's church, revealed during the building of the Sage Gateshead. Further work would be needed to confirm the date of the site." This was during excavations of Robson's Yard and the assumption is that the enclosure was Neolithic.

This is a photograph of that archaeological dig, May 2000:


Image hosted on http://ellwood.fototime.com/Gateshead%20Town%20Centre
__________________
Regards

Steve Ellwood
www.steve-ellwood.org.uk
Steve Ellwood está en línea ahora   Reply With Quote
Old May 16th, 2013, 10:15 AM   #465
Squipper
Registered User
 
Squipper's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2012
Posts: 2,193
Likes (Received): 127

Quote:
Originally Posted by Steve Ellwood View Post
Andym did make this observation yesterday though:



The book points out "In 2001 two large ditches of a massive enclosure were found beneath St Mary's church, revealed during the building of the Sage Gateshead. Further work would be needed to confirm the date of the site." This was during excavations of Robson's Yard and the assumption is that the enclosure was Neolithic.

This is a photograph of that archaeological dig, May 2000:

Image hosted on http://ellwood.fototime.com/Gateshead%20Town%20Centre
Quote:
Perhaps not surprisingly, in view of the 1960s and earlier
transformations, no archaeological excavation had taken
place in Gateshead prior to the recent excavation of the
Tyne Hilton site on Bottle Bank and the Sage Gateshead
site to the east.
Early prehistoric settlement in the area is hard to find.
However, it is now becoming clear that the major river
valleys of the region - among them the neighbouring
rivers to the south, the Tees and the Wear - were focuses
for major ritual (and presumably settlement) activity from
the Neolithic period (c. 4000 - 2000 BC) onwards. Air
photography of the Wear valley sites and recent large scale
excavation in the Aire valley show that these complexes
of monuments included substantial earthwork enclosure
‘henges’, together with timber circles and burial mounds.
The use of these monuments continued through the early
Bronze Age, extended into the middle Bronze Age (1500
BC), and may have lasted into the pre-Roman Iron Age.
Although the evidence is yet to be found, it is likely that
another major prehistoric ritual complex was located
somewhere along the lower Tyne. Favoured locations
tend to be low-lying areas adjacent to rivers, often within
the confluences of tributary streams, which would suggest
a location to the west of the Tyne Gorge.


http://www.gateshead.gov.uk/Document...GorgeStudy.pdf

A lot of 'mights' and 'maybes', they don't appear to have made much effort to follow through with investigations.




__________________


Squipper
Royal Air Force
Survival Equipment Fitter

Steve Ellwood liked this post
Squipper no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old May 16th, 2013, 12:02 PM   #466
Andym
Registered User
 
Join Date: Mar 2008
Posts: 477
Likes (Received): 47

Archaeology is not an exact science and like most research small pieces of evidence such as evidence of habitation add to build a complete picture. As an academic in the field has published this work it would seem to be "current best evidence". I would guess the extent of digs are determined by the time and cash available as well as the likely significance of any finds which in this case probably wasnt in favour of further investigation
Andym no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old May 16th, 2013, 03:58 PM   #467
Chess1
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jul 2010
Posts: 250
Likes (Received): 8

One of my favourite programmes is Time Team and there is always a great deal of assumption...But, an assumptive opinion is better than no opinion...At least it gives the opportunity to challenge and debate which can only be a good thing.
Chess1 no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old May 16th, 2013, 08:16 PM   #468
Steve Ellwood
Moderator
 
Steve Ellwood's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Location: Newcastle Upon Tyne/Whitley Bay
Posts: 14,809
Likes (Received): 912

Quote:
Originally Posted by Chess1 View Post
One of my favourite programmes is Time Team and there is always a great deal of assumption...But, an assumptive opinion is better than no opinion...At least it gives the opportunity to challenge and debate which can only be a good thing.
Worst decision C4 ever made was taking Time Team off the air
__________________
Regards

Steve Ellwood
www.steve-ellwood.org.uk
Steve Ellwood está en línea ahora   Reply With Quote
Old May 18th, 2013, 01:17 AM   #469
No Opinion
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jun 2010
Posts: 424
Likes (Received): 103

Quote:
One of my favourite programmes is Time Team and there is always a great deal of assumption...But, an assumptive opinion is better than no opinion...At least it gives the opportunity to challenge and debate which can only be a good thing.
Hey, what did I do?
No Opinion no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old May 22nd, 2013, 06:22 PM   #470
Squipper
Registered User
 
Squipper's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2012
Posts: 2,193
Likes (Received): 127

Park House, Park Lane, Gateshead

Demolished in 1996 after standing derelict after a fire in 1992. Was listed grade 2.
Traditionally it was the home of the Lord of the Manor of Gateshead. In the nineteenth century it was rented by a number of industrialists including Christian Allhusen.
In 1716 bishop Crewe leased the estate of Gateshead Park and the manor of Gateshead to William Cotesworth for a term of twenty-one years. The manor subsequently was held under a succession of similar leases. The old buildings at the west end of the later hall are part of a mansion built by Coatsworth about 1723. The estate soon passed into the hands of the Ellisons, one of whom, Henry Ellison, of Hebburn, in 1729, married one of the daughters and co-heirs of William Coatsworth. The more modern house was built, in 1730, by Henry Ellison.
Described as a fine red brick mansion in Flemish bond with stone dressings. Three storeys, seven bays.
The building had been in industrial use for many years, forming part of Clarke Chapman's factory. Sir Charles Parsons developed the design of the first steam turbine in secret in this building.
The outside walls of Gateshead Park House were still standing in 1973 with little, if any left of the original interior.
The site was later part of the Victoria Engineering Works (in 1882 the company was called Clarke, Chapman and Gurney).
On November 10th 1891 Park House was gutted by fire. The fine staircase shown in W.H. Knowles' "Vestiges of Newcastle and Gateshead", along with the oak panelling, were destroyed.
Park House is shown on the 1st edition Ordnance Survey map as an isolated stately home within its own grounds. By the second edition it had been incorporated within the Sunbeam Lamp Works (HER 4360) which lay just north of the main Victoria Engineering Works buildings.
The house is mentioned in Charlotte Bronte's novel, " Jane Eyre," as the residence of the heroine's aunt (Gateshead House).

It's a wonder it lasted as long as it did, part of the basement was used by the Fabrication Shop and welding (all types) was a daily feature. I worked there for 6 months in 1982 and remember the house well, it housed the drawing and photographic offices.


http://isee.gateshead.gov.uk/Local%2...s/GL000276.jpg


http://isee.gateshead.gov.uk/detail....use&record=225


http://isee.gateshead.gov.uk/detail....use&record=225


http://isee.gateshead.gov.uk/detail....use&record=225


http://isee.gateshead.gov.uk/Local%2...s/GL003377.jpg




Steve
__________________


Squipper
Royal Air Force
Survival Equipment Fitter

Last edited by Squipper; May 23rd, 2013 at 11:00 AM.
Squipper no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old May 22nd, 2013, 09:43 PM   #471
Steve Ellwood
Moderator
 
Steve Ellwood's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Location: Newcastle Upon Tyne/Whitley Bay
Posts: 14,809
Likes (Received): 912

Quote:
Originally Posted by Squipper View Post
Park House, Park Lane, Gateshead

Demolished in 1996 after standing derelict after a fire in 1992. Was listed grade 2.
Traditionally it was the home of the Lord of the Manor of Gateshead. In the nineteenth century it was rented by a number of industrialists including Christian Allhusen.
In 1716 bishop Crewe leased the estate of Gateshead Park and the manor of Gateshead to William Cotesworth for a term of twenty-one years. The manor subsequently was held under a succession of similar leases. The old buildings at the west end of the later hall are part of a mansion built by Coatsworth about 1723. The estate soon passed into the hands of the Ellisons, one of whom, Henry Ellison, of Hebburn, in 1729, married one of the daughters and co-heirs of William Coatsworth. The more modern house was built, in 1730, by Henry Ellison.
Described as a fine red brick mansion in Flemish bond with stone dressings. Three storeys, seven bays.
The building had been in industrial use for many years, forming part of Clarke Chapman's factory. Sir Charles Parsons developed the design of the first steam turbine in secret in this building.
The outside walls of Gateshead Park House were still standing in 1973 with little, if any left of the original interior.
The site was later part of the Victoria Engineering Works (in 1882 the company was called Clarke, Chapman and Gurney).
On November 10th 1891 Park House was gutted by fire. The fine staircase shown in W.H. Knowles' "Vestiges of Newcastle and Gateshead", along with the oak panelling, were destroyed.
Park House is shown on the 1st edition Ordnance Survey map as an isolated stately home within its own grounds. By the second edition it had been incorporated within the Sunbeam Lamp Works (HER 4360) which lay just north of the main Victoria Engineering Works buildings.
The house is mentioned in Charlotte Bronte's novel, " Jane Eyre," as the residence of the heroine's aunt (Gateshead House).

It's a wonder it lasted as long as it did, part of the basement was used by the Fabrication Shop and welding (all types) was a daily feature. I worked there for 6 months in 1982 and remember the house well, it housed the drawing and photographic offices.

Photos courtesy of iseegateshead

Steve
A real shame when a building like that is demolished.

Rather confusing as Gateshead also had/has a Park House at Saltwell Park?
__________________
Regards

Steve Ellwood
www.steve-ellwood.org.uk
Steve Ellwood está en línea ahora   Reply With Quote
Old May 22nd, 2013, 10:02 PM   #472
Squipper
Registered User
 
Squipper's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2012
Posts: 2,193
Likes (Received): 127

Quote:
Originally Posted by Steve Ellwood View Post
A real shame when a building like that is demolished.

Rather confusing as Gateshead also had/has a Park House at Saltwell Park?
That was it's original name I believe yes but tends to be called Saltwell Towers by most people now.
__________________


Squipper
Royal Air Force
Survival Equipment Fitter
Squipper no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old May 22nd, 2013, 10:51 PM   #473
alf stone
Registered User
 
Join Date: Feb 2010
Posts: 1,219
Likes (Received): 100

I have always known it as Saltwell Towers or the museum as we called when I was a kid but when I look on old maps it is always referred to as Saltwell Mansion. I can't remember ever hearing it called Park House.
alf stone no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old May 22nd, 2013, 11:54 PM   #474
Squipper
Registered User
 
Squipper's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2012
Posts: 2,193
Likes (Received): 127

Quote:
Originally Posted by alf stone View Post
I have always known it as Saltwell Towers or the museum as we called when I was a kid but when I look on old maps it is always referred to as Saltwell Mansion. I can't remember ever hearing it called Park House.
Most of the Victorian postcards refer to it as 'Park House' Alf:



Pic courtesy of Pictures Of Gateshead

Steve
__________________


Squipper
Royal Air Force
Survival Equipment Fitter
Squipper no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old May 23rd, 2013, 11:19 AM   #475
Steve Ellwood
Moderator
 
Steve Ellwood's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Location: Newcastle Upon Tyne/Whitley Bay
Posts: 14,809
Likes (Received): 912

Saltwell Park Tour

Quote:
Originally Posted by Squipper View Post
Most of the Victorian postcards refer to it as 'Park House' Alf:



Pic courtesy of Pictures Of Gateshead

Steve
Shameless plug for anyone interested in learning more about Saltwell Park - Newcastle Association of City Guides has a walk entitled Saltwell Park Stroll this coming Sunday, 26th May 2.30 pm meeting at the park entrance opposite the Little Theatre at the corner of Saltwell View and East Park Road, Gateshead.

"Walk around this beautiful Victorian park discovering stories of the past and present. Find out the oddities of Saltwell Towers, the tale of the park's oldest inhabitant and the story of the disappearing bandstand."
__________________
Regards

Steve Ellwood
www.steve-ellwood.org.uk
Steve Ellwood está en línea ahora   Reply With Quote
Old May 23rd, 2013, 06:56 PM   #476
alf stone
Registered User
 
Join Date: Feb 2010
Posts: 1,219
Likes (Received): 100

Quote:
Originally Posted by Squipper View Post
Most of the Victorian postcards refer to it as 'Park House' Alf:


Steve
Steve, I hadn't noticed that before. I looked at my copy of Gateshead's Grand Houses by Sandra Brack (Gateshead Local History Society) and it says "originally known as Saltwell Mansion and Saltwell Park House". So take your pick.
alf stone no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old May 24th, 2013, 12:39 PM   #477
Ken O'Heed
Registered User
 
Join Date: Sep 2011
Posts: 5,692
Likes (Received): 367

Temperance Bars ( and Hall), South Shields area

Following on from discussion 24/05/13 AM about Temperance Bars on "Historic Newcastle" thread:-

These picture (with associated information about them) on http://www.southtynesideimages.org.uk/newsite/index.php after input of "temperance" into search

Laygate Lane corner with Frederick Street, building removed for the purpose of tramway tracks. Policeman standing in foreground, Temperance Bar selling Hunt's Botanic drinks can be seen centre of phot, 1906



AND

East Holborn with Prats Bank far left, the Temperance Hotel in between the two shops with Bread Lane on the right, in 1934



AND

Thrift Street looking through to the old Town Hall in Market Place. In 1901 some of the premises were occupied by J Ranson (grocer) G Best (Temperance Hotel) T Hudson (chemist), 1901



AND

A view of the Market Place from the South East corner, looking North. The old Town Hall is in the centre of the square. Showing in the distance is Harding's Hill (R.W. Corner and the Brass Fouder's Co.). Whitfield's Fish and Chips van can be seen to the left, and on the right "Geordie" Drakes Newspaper van. King Street corner is on the right with Croftons Store. Union Alley goes away on the left with the Temperance Hotel on the corner.



AND

Gospel Temperance Hall and Shoton's shop in Wallis Street, with housing further down bank which led into Coronation Street. The Gospel Temperance Hall later became the Alexandra Theatre, circa 1010



KEN
Ken O'Heed está en línea ahora   Reply With Quote
Old May 24th, 2013, 01:01 PM   #478
Newcastle Historian
Moderator and Archivist
 
Newcastle Historian's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2006
Location: Newcastle upon Tyne
Posts: 17,988
Likes (Received): 557



Thanks Ken.

The above post has now been added to the "ever increasing" list of links to information about this subject on the forum.

The below 'list of links' is already quite a bit longer than the equivalent list I posted (only) earlier this morning, on the Historic Newcastle thread . . .

Quote:
TEMPERANCE PUBS / TEMPERANCE HOTELS - IN THE NEWCASTLE AREA . . .

The 'New Milk' Temperance Bar - Felling
http://www.skyscrapercity.com/showpo...postcount=1645
Clarendon House, Clayton Street West - Originally built in 1896 as a Temperance Hotel
http://www.skyscrapercity.com/showpo...postcount=1646
Possible Temperance bars near Manors Station and in Bath Lane
http://www.skyscrapercity.com/showpo...postcount=3151
http://www.skyscrapercity.com/showpo...postcount=3153
Pape's Building, Pink Lane - Was the 'Sun Temperance Hotel' in 1926
http://www.skyscrapercity.com/showpo...postcount=1933
Nursery Cottage, Scotswood road (1870s/1890s) - Said to be the 'First Temperance Hotel in Newcastle'
http://www.skyscrapercity.com/showpo...&postcount=714
Commercial Temperance Hotel, Royal Arcade (circa 1850)
http://www.skyscrapercity.com/showpo...postcount=3907
Queens Temperance Hotel, Westmorland Road, Nr Discovery Museum/Newcastle College (the building with the 'Tyne Bridge' painted on the gable-end)
http://www.skyscrapercity.com/showpo...4&postcount=27
http://www.skyscrapercity.com/showpo...postcount=2189
http://www.skyscrapercity.com/showpo...1&postcount=95
http://www.skyscrapercity.com/showpo...6&postcount=96
Temperance Hotels in Newcastle in 1850 - List in 'Wards 1850 Directory'
http://www.skyscrapercity.com/showpo...postcount=3907
Temperance Bars in the South Shields Area - Various locations pictured in the early 1900s
http://www.skyscrapercity.com/showpo...&postcount=477
History of the 'Temperance Movement' - Hotels, Bars and Societies, etc
http://www.skyscrapercity.com/showpo...postcount=3908
.
Newcastle Historian no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old May 27th, 2013, 10:52 AM   #479
Steve Ellwood
Moderator
 
Steve Ellwood's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Location: Newcastle Upon Tyne/Whitley Bay
Posts: 14,809
Likes (Received): 912

World War 1 Memorial - John Readhead & Sons, South Shields

I wonder how many folk travelling into South Shields notice this World War 1 Memorial that is located on the outside wall of the McNulty Shipyard (ex John Readhead & Sons)

The memorial is to those employees of John Readhead & Sons who lost their lives during the First World War.

The North East War Memorials web site gives this information @ http://www.newmp.org.uk/detail.php?contentId=9647

Evidently the plaque has had several sites, originally being within the Redheads Head Office.

The plaque, which had lain around the yard for many years, was re-erected in November 1999 in its present position by worker Ronnie Sharp and Tony Lobb at a special service.

Gold and enamel medallions were presented by Readheads to their men who fought in WWI.
John G Atkinson was one of those men. He was in the RNVR but fought on land at the Somme where he was badly injured. He was unable to resume work in the yard because of his injuries.


Of course the McNulty Yard has recently been purchased by the Port of Tyne Authority and hopefully the future of the plaque will be guaranteed.




Images hosted on http://ellwood.fototime.com/South%20...ds%20Memorials
__________________
Regards

Steve Ellwood
www.steve-ellwood.org.uk
Steve Ellwood está en línea ahora   Reply With Quote
Old May 27th, 2013, 03:34 PM   #480
Aylett 67
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jul 2012
Posts: 2,208
Likes (Received): 88

Nice one, Steve, also the town lost 3000 merchant seamen in the Second World War.
Aylett 67 no está en línea   Reply With Quote


Reply

Tags
1 of 2 historic threads, historic newcastle, historic north east eng, history, newcastle, newcastle photos, north east england

Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off



All times are GMT +2. The time now is 01:20 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
Feedback Buttons provided by Advanced Post Thanks / Like v3.2.5 (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2014 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.

vBulletin Optimisation provided by vB Optimise (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2014 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.

SkyscraperCity ☆ In Urbanity We trust ☆ about us | privacy policy | DMCA policy

Hosted by Blacksun, dedicated to this site too!
Forum server management by DaiTengu