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Old August 21st, 2013, 06:10 AM   #5881
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Hiroshima Prefecture proposes reduced scope for San’yō Line, Kure Line grade separation
JR高架化を大幅短縮 府中・海田町に広島県が提案

http://www.chugoku-np.co.jp/News/Sp201308210059.html

In the continuous grade-separation project to elevate 6.3 km of the JR San’yō Line and Kure Line through Fuchū Town (府中町) and Kaita Town (海田町), the Hiroshima Prefectural Government submitted a proposal to both town governments to reduce the scope of the project to only the western 2 km, scrapping elevation plans for the eastern 4.3 km of the project. The downsized project will cost ¥57 billion, saving about 40% on the project costs and easing the burden on a financially-strained Prefectural Government. Kaita Town, which would no longer have any segments grade-separated, has expressed opposition, however.

The project received urban planning approvals in 1999, with the hope of reuniting neighborhoods divided by the JR tracks. The backbreaking cost of ¥96 billion, however, had become an insurmountable obstacle to getting the project built, and the Prefectural Government and Hiroshima City have been re-evaluating the project scope since February of last year. This new proposal represents their first downscaled version of the project, and would elevate 2 km of tracks between Hiroshima City’s Minami Ward and Fuchū Town. The segment east of the border between Fuchū Town and Hiroshima City’s Aki Ward, however, would no longer be grade-separated. The original plan would have eliminated 20 grade crossings, but the downsized plan would only eliminate 14.

For segments where grade-separation is no longer being considered, the revised plan would construct two overpasses over the tracks, as well as one underpass beneath the tracks. One-lane frontage roads would be constructed on both sides of the track for a distance of 2 km.
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Old August 21st, 2013, 06:11 AM   #5882
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Referendum to decide fate of new Takasaki Line station
JR高崎線の新駅問い住民投票へ 埼玉・北本市が条例案

http://www.asahi.com/national/update...308200113.html

Kitamoto City in Saitama Prefecture has decided to submit a motion at the City Council’s September regular session to issue a referendum vote to determine the fate of a new station on the Takasaki Line that the city has been petitioning JR East to establish. Given the high potential cost, the city wants to leave it to residents to determine whether or not to move forward with the project. If the motion is approved, the vote could take place before year’s end.

The site for the proposed station would be between Kitamoto and Okegawa Stations on the Takasaki Line, near ongoing construction for the underground Ken’ō-dō (圏央道) circular expressway. The station was first envisioned 30 years ago by previous city mayors.

As the station would be a “petition station”, the local government would be responsible for bearing the full cost, which a consultant hired by the city in 2006 estimated at approx. ¥6 billion, including costs for the station building and platforms, TVMs and modifications to computer systems, replacement of fare charts at ticketing halls, and other items. Given that the general fund budget for the city is only ¥20 billion, the new station obviously represents a huge investment commitment.

Location of new station, where they are currently constructing the underground Ken’ō-dō Expressway:



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Old August 22nd, 2013, 05:49 AM   #5883
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Nippon Sharyō to bolster overseas railcar production capacity
日本車両、鉄道車両の海外販売を強化 米国内で一貫生産体制

http://www.nikkei.com/article/DGXNZO...20C13A8L91000/

Following completion of a railcar assembly factory last year in the United States, Nippon Sharyō has begun manufacturing car bodies this summer, to be followed by production of specific components next spring, establishing a full production and assembly line for the U.S. market. Faced with declining demand domestically, the railcar manufacturer hopes to increase its revenue in overseas markets to 50% of its total revenues.

The company completed an assembly plant in Rochelle, Illinois in July of last year, allowing them to completely internalize production instead of relying on lease arrangements with local plants. They will invest another ¥5.2 billion to construct a components factory to begin operating next spring. U.S. federal and state governments have Buy America clauses that impose requirements on railcar production, such as requiring over 60% of components to be produced in the U.S. or that cars be assembled in the U.S.

With increased production capacity, Nippon Sharyō will also increase its workforce, increasing from the current 380 employees to 500 employees, in coordination with the start of components manufacturing. A study team will also be established to ensure that the company is successful in future bidding efforts, and will strengthen its existing relationship with Sumitomo Corporation (住友商事)—the two frequently pair up in bid proposals for overseas contracts.

While currently consolidated subsidiary of JR Central, Nippon Sharyō has extensive experience producing Shinkansen trains, as well as trains for Tōkyō Metro and limited express rolling stock for private railways. They’ve also exported trains to Taiwan, Singapore, and the Philippines. While the company’s revenues can fluctuate depending on when orders are received or completed, overseas contracts currently make up an average of 10% to 20% of their overall revenues, with the U.S. being their primary market. They are still looking to expand their presence in South American and continental Asia, however, producing the stock domestically and exporting it for contracts in countries without “Buy America” clauses or similar requirements.



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Old August 22nd, 2013, 05:50 AM   #5884
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Okinawa to launch bus stop renewal program
バス停が変わる 文字を大きく、系統で色分け

http://ryukyushimpo.jp/news/storyid-...rytopic-4.html

Okinawa Prefecture is considering a major renewal program to revamp fixed-route bus stops starting in FY2014. The program would include installation of benches and eaves to keep out the rain, as well as establishing a new signage standard similar to railway stations on the main islands of Japan, with large fonts for high readability. The Prefectural Government is also considering a consecutive numbering scheme to make the bus system easier to use for foreigners, as well as color-coding routes to improve visibility and consolidating bus schedules for the prefecture’s various bus operators.

The bus stop improvements are being discussed by a special working group featuring representatives from the Prefectural Government and Okinawa bus companies. The group is tasked with improving passenger convenience for the complex bus network serving the urbanized areas in south central Okinawa Island. With about 2,000 bus stops on the main island, the committee will determine the scope of the renewal program after considering other issues such as sidewalk width.

The program will also aim to expand multi-lingual signage to improve convenience for the growing number of foreign tourists in Okinawa. An alphanumeric numbering scheme similar to Tōkyō’s subways would is also under consideration. After confirming and quantifying the benefits of the changes with actual foreign tourists, the Prefectural Government is considering providing funding assistance to bus companies to implement the new signage standards. The Prefectural Government is also hoping to introduce new LCD units inside buses, pre-programmed with information in English, Chinese, and Korean, in FY2014.

For the overlapping bus services on National Route 58 (国道58号), the program would call for color-coding buses into one of three routes: the “Ōjana Line”, for buses forking off starting in Ginowan City’s Ōjana (大謝名) district; the “Isa Line” for buses forking off starting in the Isa (伊佐) district of Ginowan and heading towards the Gushikawa district (具志川) of Uruma City; and the “Chatan Line” (北谷ライン) for routes continuing straight. The color-coding, which could include bus destination signs as well as bus exteriors, is intended to make it easier for passengers to identify routes from a distance.



===

Good news… Hopefully the proposed rail line will also make some headway, as it will make getting around Okinawa so much easier for locals and tourists.
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Old August 22nd, 2013, 05:51 AM   #5885
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New station on Senseki Line in Ishinomaki to open in 2015
石巻・新蛇田に仙石線新駅 15年設置へ 集団移転で人口増

http://www.kahoku.co.jp/news/2013/08/20130821t15016.htm

Miyagi Prefecture’s Ishinomaki City has finalized a plan that proposes establishing a new station on the JR Senseki Line in the city’s Shin-Hebita (新蛇田) district, which is expected to see population growth as a result of a coordinated relocation program in the aftermath of the Great East Japan Earthquake. The city will formally enter into negotiations with JR East to establish the station as a “petition station” (請願駅), aiming to open the new station in 2015 together with the full reopening of the line.

The new station is envisioned for a location between RIkuzen Akai (陸前赤井) and Hebita (蛇田) Stations, on the south side of the 27 ha Shin-Hebita Minami (新蛇田南) neighborhood to be created as part of a land readjustment project. Work on a mass relocation project is also underway on the north side, opposite the Sanriku Expressway (三陸自動車道). The future population of the Shin-Hebita district is expected to reach several thousand, and the city determined that a new station is needed in order to support resident’s quality of life.

As a petition station, the full cost of the new station (estimated at several hundred million yen, including design and construction of the station and necessary modifications to computer systems) will be borne by Ishinomaki City, which has been negotiating with JR in the hopes of inking a deal before year’s end. There had been previous requests from local residents to build a new station between Rikuzen Akai and Hebita, but they had not made any headway until now.



===

Senseki Line clips:

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Old August 22nd, 2013, 05:52 AM   #5886
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Some pictures along the alignment of the proposed Yūrakuchō Line extension (branch) to Sumiyoshi:
http://kenplatz.nikkeibp.co.jp/artic.../628674/?bpnet

First, we start off in Toyosu, where passengers currently transfer to and from the Yurikamome:



The Edagawa (枝川) exit of the No. 9 (Fukagawa (深川)) Route of the Shuto Expressway. Based on maps of the alignment published thus far, one of the two all-new stations on the branch would be located down this road, a bit further down (into the picture). Edagawa is one of the minor man-made islands in Tōkyō Bay, currently without a train station (although Shiomi Station on the JR Keiyō Line is nearby).



At right is one of the exits from Tōyōchō Station on the Tōzai Line. The extension would likely be located underneath the road on the left, Prefectural Route 465 (Yotsume-dōri 四ッ目通り).



Further north along Prefectural Route 465, near Sengoku in Kōtō Ward, the proposed area for the second all-new station on the extension.



Further north, the Sumiyoshi 2-chōme (住吉2丁目) intersection. There are existing exits for Sumiyoshi Station on the Hanzōmon Line and Toei Shinjuku Line at this intersection.



Hanzōmon Line platforms at Sumiyoshi Station. The platforms are on separate levels, with one side of each platform currently fenced off. Currently, the second pair of tracks is used to store trains.

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Old August 22nd, 2013, 06:34 AM   #5887
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Construction progress on the Tōhoku Through Line (2013.08). Not much longer to go.



The busy morning rush hour at Ueno Station, Yamanote Line and Keihin–Tōhoku Line platforms (2013.07.30). This is the most overcrowded segment of rail in Japan and the primary impetus behind the Tōhoku Through Line, as the Utsunomiya Line (8-9 tph), Takasaki Line (9-10 tph), and Jōban Rapid Line (17 tph), virtually all of them 15-car formations, dump all of their passengers at this station, where many transfer to the Yamanote Line and Keihin–Tōhoku Line to continue further south.

Part 1 (8:00 am~), focusing on the Keihin–Tōhoku Line:



Part 2 (8:20 am~), focusing on the Yamanote Line:



Train action at Kanda (latter half of 08:00 hour to first half of 9:00 hour). Unfortunately, you won’t get a very good view of the Tōhoku Through Line trains, since they’re just too high up, elevated an additional level above the other lines.

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Old August 22nd, 2013, 06:16 PM   #5888
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Originally Posted by quashlo View Post
Construction progress on the Tōhoku Through Line (2013.08). Not much longer to go.

The busy morning rush hour at Ueno Station, Yamanote Line and Keihin–Tōhoku Line platforms (2013.07.30). This is the most overcrowded segment of rail in Japan and the primary impetus behind the Tōhoku Through Line, as the Utsunomiya Line (8-9 tph), Takasaki Line (9-10 tph), and Jōban Rapid Line (17 tph), virtually all of them 15-car formations, dump all of their passengers at this station, where many transfer to the Yamanote Line and Keihin–Tōhoku Line to continue further south.
Has the schedule or even rough service plan been released yet for the Tohoku Jukan Line? (I may have missed it.)

Will some trains be likely to continue to turn at Ueno? Of the trains that do proceed onto the Tohoku Jukan line, will any of them turn at Tokyo and/or Shinagawa? Or will they all proceed onto the Tokaido Main Line?

Last edited by orulz; August 22nd, 2013 at 06:22 PM.
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Old August 23rd, 2013, 06:53 AM   #5889
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No, the schedule probably won't be released for a while, although it's been a hot topic of debate on 2ch for the longest time.

Current layout at Ueno:



The Tōhoku Through Line (yellow with dotted will be removed, red is the new track being constructed).



There are plenty of operational issues with putting Jōban Line trains on the new line, not the least of them being the track conflicts with the Utsunomiya Line and Takasaki Line trains. Then there’s the issues with the Jōban Line rolling stock... The Tōkaidō Line stock all feature the two double-decker green cars in every train, but the inner-suburban trains (近距離電車) on the Jōban Line, operated with E231 series, don’t have them. The longer-distance suburban trains (中距離電車), operated with E531 series, do have them, but these are special dual-voltage trains designed to cope with the change from DC to AC east of Toride, so if you operate them too far onto the Tōhoku Through Line or Tōkaidō Line during the peak hours, you may end up increasing your fleet demand and needing to manufacture a new train or two just to maintain the existing service levels on the Jōban Line east of Toride. In comparison, the Utsunomiya Line and Takasaki Line are far more natural for interlining, as the rolling stock is already uniform and you already have plenty of through-services via the Shōnan–Shinjuku Line.

For sure, some will continue to terminate at Ueno, as you simply wouldn't be able to carry the peak hour traffic from all three lines (well over 30 tph) on a single double-track line, especially given the passenger flows at stations. For sure, some trains will also terminate at Shinagawa, as they've been doing lots of minor trackwork there, including installing new crossovers, track realignment, platform improvements, etc. expressly for the project. Not sure how much further they would go, though.

Definitely makes the mind wander, though... The connection means you could also potentially have some of the limited expresses and other special services that currently terminate at Ueno terminate at Tōkyō or even Shinagawa instead (Hitachi, Cassiopeia, etc.).
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Old August 23rd, 2013, 06:54 AM   #5890
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Hiroshima City unveils layout alternatives for Hiroshima Station South Exit improvements
駅前大橋線レイアウト公表

http://www.chugoku-np.co.jp/News/Tn201308230024.html

On the evening of 2013.08.21, Hiroshima City held an outreach session with residents to present two layout alternatives for the South Exit station plaza at JR Hiroshima Station. One alternative is based on the Ekimae Ōhashi Line (駅前大橋線), the proposed realignment of the Hiroshima Electric Railway (Hiroden) Main Line to reduce travel times between the station and central Hiroshima. Almost all of the 40 residents who participated, however, expressed concern about the elimination of three stops—Enkōbashichō 猿猴橋町, Matobachō 的場町, and Danbara Itchōme 段原一丁目—as part of the realignment. A total of 3,900 passengers use these three stations daily.

The new alignment would save approximately four minutes on trips to and from Kamiyachō / Hatchōbori and JR Hiroshima Station when compared against the current route, which detours to the east. Instead, trains would travel along the main street leading south of the station and rise on an elevated structure to tie into the second floor of the station. The bus terminal bays, currently scattered at the South Exit station plaza and surrounding streets, would be consolidated on the west side, with pick-up and drop-off zones for private autos and taxis going on the east side.

A separate layout alternative for the station plaza assumes the current Hiroden alignment remains, proposing to widen the tram platforms to optimize passenger flows. With limited space at the plaza, however, there would be no consolidation of bus stops. The station plaza improvements would cost ¥13.5 billion with the Hiroden realignment and ¥8 billion without the realignment.



===

5× scenes on the Hiroden system between Takanobashi (鷹野橋) and Hon-dōri (本通り):



Rest:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UkrcVoUQViM
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=74OlRBPellE
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MRoiuApwmjg
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Old August 23rd, 2013, 06:56 AM   #5891
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Sendai IC card to launch on subway starting next fiscal year
仙台で「IC乗車券」名称募集-来年度、地下鉄南北線から導入予定

http://sendai.keizai.biz/headline/1484/

Starting 2013.08.22, a joint authority formed of representatives from the Sendai City Transportation Bureau (仙台市交通局), private bus operator Miyagi Kōtsū (宮城交通), and the Sendai Urban Planning Bureau (仙台市都市整備局) began accepting names for Sendai’s new contactless IC farecard to debut on the Namboku Line subway in FY2014, followed by the Tōzai Line subway and city buses in FY2015.

The name must be easy to remember and easy to pronounce, and must not infringe on third-party copyrights or trademarks. The deadline is 2013.09.17.

===

Didn’t realize they were so far along… The article doesn’t mention anything about interoperability, but hopefully the card will, at the very least, be interoperable with Suica within the Sendai area.



They are also accepting nominations for the names on the stations. Deadline is 2013.08.31:

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Old August 23rd, 2013, 06:57 AM   #5892
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Railbus in final testing stages before revenue service
JR北海道、DMVの試験再開 27日から、営業運転へ最終段階

http://www.hokkaido-np.co.jp/news/donai/486965.html

The Dual-Mode Vehicle (DMV) being developed by JR Hokkaidō, capable of running on both rails and rubber tires, will restart running tests on 2013.08.27. The technology is in its final stages before revenue service, with the railway confirming that a specially developed train control and protection system, engineered specifically for the DMV, operates according to spec.

The DMV has been in on-and-off testing on the Yūbari branch of the JR Sekishō Line since FY2009, logging a cumulative distance traveled of 9,668 km this spring. This is the first time in three years that the vehicle will be testing during the summer season. The tests will take place on the Yūbari – Numanosawa section of the Yūbari branch, and will last from 2013.08.27 through to 2013.10.31. Tests will be conducted during the wee hours of the morning on Tuesdays, Wednesdays, and Thursdays every week to confirm that the train control and protection systems installed on the car body operate properly. On Mondays and Fridays, the DMV will be tested on public roads and expressways, deadheading back to the railway’s Naebo Works in Sapporo for inspection and maintenance over the weekend.

Because of its lightweight design, the DMV is not compatible with rail-based train protection systems using track circuits and current transmitted through the rails. As a result, the railway the DMV transmits its location to the train control center via a dedicated mobile phone line, with the specially designed system controlling the operation of grade crossings and other track features. The system is capable of operating trains at 10-minute headways during the morning rush hour.

===

DMV on display at a railfan event (2013.07.15):

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Old August 23rd, 2013, 06:58 AM   #5893
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Inbound track for Keisei Oshiage Line to be elevated on 2013.08.24
京成押上線:24日から高架線化 押上−八広駅間の上り線 /東京

http://mainichi.jp/area/tokyo/news/2...40228000c.html

The inbound track of the Keisei Oshiage Line will soon be switched out to 1.5 km of newly elevated track as part of the continuous grade-separation of 2.3 km of the line in Tōkyō’s Sumida Ward between Oshiage Station and Yahiro Station. Inbound trains will begin using the elevated track starting on 2013.08.24. The switchout is expected to reduce grade crossing closure times at six crossings including Loop Road No. 4 (Meiji-dōri 明治通り) and the Keisei Hikifune No. 1 crossing by about 40%.

The Tōkyō Metropolitan Government and Sumida Ward have been carrying out the grade-separation project since FY2000, and have recently completed the new elevated inbound track. Switchout work will begin after the last inbound train on 2013.08.23 at 00:15 on 2013.08.24 and be completed before the start of service at 05:00. The inbound platform will switch to a new platform located at the third level of the station. Completion of the grade-separation project, including elevation of the outbound track, is scheduled for FY2016.

===


Recent view from an outbound train between Oshiage and Yahiro, showing the mostly complete inbound trackj:



The other half of the Oshiage Line from Yotsugi to Aoto is also scheduled to begin grade-separation work soon, with Katsushika Ward in the final stages of land acquisition. This is the current scene at Tateishi Station, one of many grade crossings that will be eliminated:

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Old August 23rd, 2013, 09:44 AM   #5894
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Quote:
For sure, some will continue to terminate at Ueno, as you simply wouldn't be able to carry the peak hour traffic from all three lines
Arguably, the need is less for through trains off the Joban Line, due to the run-through arrangement for local services with the Tokyo Metro Chiyoda Line.

Quote:
The connection means you could also potentially have some of the limited expresses and other special services that currently terminate at Ueno terminate at Tōkyō or even Shinagawa instead (Hitachi, Cassiopeia, etc.).
In JNR days, before the building of the Tohoku and Joetsu Shinkansen platform at Tokyo Station, there was an additional platform for Tokaido Line services, which provided the capacity for a few services such as the Hitachi and Nikko to terminate there.
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Old August 23rd, 2013, 04:56 PM   #5895
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Quote:
Originally Posted by quashlo View Post
Inbound track for Keisei Oshiage Line to be elevated on 2013.08.24
京成押上線:24日から高架線化 押上−八広駅間の上り線 /東京

http://mainichi.jp/area/tokyo/news/2...40228000c.html
Looks like Keisei is getting pretty close to having everything inbound from Aoto grade separated. Glancing at aerials, on the Keisei Main Line it seems there is one grade crossing just west of Senju Ohashi station, and five in the immediate vicinity of Ohanajaya station.

The project underway will complete the Oshiage line between Oshiage and Yotsugi. The Yotsugi-Aoto gap is still there, but as you mention most of the land is already acquired and cleared so construction can't be too far off.

Heading outbound from there, Keisei Takasago station looks like a giant mess - one that will need to be cleaned up someday, but I have no idea how they would do that. I wonder why they grade separated the Kanamachi line there rather than a line that actually matters... like the Hokuso line or the Keisei Main Line. The recently completed elevation of the Kanamachi line now seems like it would stand in the way of elevating the whole station complex.
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Old August 24th, 2013, 01:07 AM   #5896
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A couple of comments:

1. I wonder has JR Hokkaido thought about using this railbus on the Esashi Line between Kikonai and Esashi? Or is it that JR Hokkaido will just rip up the line altogether?

2. It will be VERY interesting to see what trains will use the new Tohoku Through Line. My guess is that it will be trains coming down the Takasaki and Utsunomiya Lines only, and they will initially terminate a Shinagawa Station and eventually terminate at Yokohama Station. Trains from the Jōban Line will continue to terminate at Ueno Station.

Last edited by sacto7654; August 25th, 2013 at 04:24 AM. Reason: correct spelling
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Old August 24th, 2013, 06:55 PM   #5897
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The Japanese Wiki lists some of the railways and local governments that are interested in the DMV technology, but oddly enough, there's nothing listed for Hokkaidō. Now that you mention, I don't recall anything that mentions where exactly in Hokkaidō they want to operate the technology, although I would assume the Esashi Line would be a very good candidate.

As for the Tōhoku Through Line, I almost think JR East is obligated to operate at least a handful of through-services with the Jōban Line. They've been selling the project as benefitting all three lines, and I expect that the backlash from passengers in Ibaraki and northern Chiba if they eventually only interlined the Takasaki Line and Utsunomiya Line would be fierce. Besides, through-services in Tōkyō have been trending towards more and more complexity (e.g., Shōnan‒Shinjuku Line, Hanzōmon Line, and Fukutoshin Line), so I don't expect this to be any different.

Perhaps it'll be 6 / 6 / 4 or something during the peak (Takasaki Line / Utsunomiya Line / Jōban Line).
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Old August 24th, 2013, 07:10 PM   #5898
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Quote:
Originally Posted by orulz View Post
Heading outbound from there, Keisei Takasago station looks like a giant mess - one that will need to be cleaned up someday, but I have no idea how they would do that. I wonder why they grade separated the Kanamachi line there rather than a line that actually matters... like the Hokuso line or the Keisei Main Line. The recently completed elevation of the Kanamachi line now seems like it would stand in the way of elevating the whole station complex.
The elevation of the entire station is still the ultimate goal, at least for Katsushika Ward: http://www.city.katsushika.lg.jp/30/134/002574.html

The elevation of the Kanamachi Line was a stop-gap measure to deal with the increased train traffic through the station from the opening of the Narita Sky Access. The thinking was probably along the lines of "something needs to give", else the main crossing just east of the station would never open during the rush, plus they probably didn't have enough track / platform capacity at the station to handle everything plus the Sky Access. So the Kanamachi Line was the obvious choice.

If you look at the Kanamachi Line platforms, they are built with the bare minimum, so I think we can safely conclude that future plans (however long they may take to reach fruition) will still fully grade-separate the passenger tracks. Not sure about the leads to and from the railyard... We may end up with a solution like at Moto-Sumiyoshi on the Tōkyū network.
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Old August 25th, 2013, 04:31 AM   #5899
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Quote:
Originally Posted by quashlo View Post
As for the Tōhoku Through Line, I almost think JR East is obligated to operate at least a handful of through-services with the Jōban Line. They've been selling the project as benefiting all three lines, and I expect that the backlash from passengers in Ibaraki and northern Chiba if they eventually only interlined the Takasaki Line and Utsunomiya Line would be fierce. Besides, through-services in Tōkyō have been trending towards more and more complexity (e.g., Shōnan‒Shinjuku Line, Hanzōmon Line, and Fukutoshin Line), so I don't expect this to be any different.

Perhaps it'll be 6 / 6 / 4 or something during the peak (Takasaki Line / Utsunomiya Line / Jōban Line).
I think due to capacity constraints on the Tokaidō Main Line between Tokyo and Yokohama Stations, JR East may limit operations on the new Tōhoku Through Line to trains from Takasaki and Utsunomiya until line improvements are made that will allow more trains from north of Tokyo Station all the way to Yokohama Station. Once that happens, expect all trains from the Takasaki, Tōhoku and Jōban Lines to terminate at Yokohama Station.
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Old August 25th, 2013, 03:36 PM   #5900
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Quote:
until line improvements are made that will allow more trains from north of Tokyo Station all the way to Yokohama Station
What line improvements? There is no room.

Quote:
Once that happens, expect all trains from the Takasaki, Tōhoku and Jōban Lines to terminate at Yokohama Station.
Ah, no. Do you really think JR-E will terminate their services at Yokohama, then run deadhead/non-revenue all the way to Kozu or Odawara, where the trains can reverse? (the trains can't reverse at Yokohama, the facilities/capacity doesn't exist). Trains will run as revenue services as far as Odawara/Atami, just like current Shonan Shinjuku/regular Tokaido Line trains do. If there are no pathings available at certain times south of Tokyo, services will terminate at Shinagawa.

Last edited by k.k.jetcar; August 25th, 2013 at 03:47 PM.
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