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Old August 21st, 2013, 01:41 AM   #6341
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That seems about right. Best to eat before you enter the station. These new terminals are like airports, with airport food and airport prices.
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Old August 21st, 2013, 01:55 PM   #6342
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Some photos on the construction of the Hefu passenger-dedicated line (PDL) which will run from Hefei to Fuzhou, passing by Wuhu, Huangshan (Yellow Mountains) and Nanping.
Line was supposed to open in 2014, though, I doubt that.

Photos were taken between Wuhu and Nanjing.







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Old August 21st, 2013, 09:44 PM   #6343
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Quote:
Originally Posted by :jax: View Post
Probably more a dependency on the monsoon, though the Himalayan run-off will no doubt be important. The map of Indian potential high-speed lines matches the density map somewhat.



More in the Pan-Asian high-speed thread.
I don't think India is going to be like China having High Speed Rail everywhere replacing old train tracks but everything is possible so will see
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Old August 22nd, 2013, 01:53 AM   #6344
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Quote:
Originally Posted by doc7austin View Post
Some photos on the construction of the Hefu passenger-dedicated line (PDL) which will run from Hefei to Fuzhou, passing by Wuhu, Huangshan (Yellow Mountains) and Nanping.
Line was supposed to open in 2014, though, I doubt that.

Photos were taken between Wuhu and Nanjing.
Hefu PDL will be all connected by the end of August 2014, and trial run starts in December, official opening will be first half of 2015.
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Old August 22nd, 2013, 06:56 AM   #6345
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Great post and pictures doc7austin, truly enjoyed the pictures and the video!
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Old August 22nd, 2013, 05:12 PM   #6346
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I am travelling on the Jinghu High-Speed Railway between Beijing and Nanjing.
About 15 minutes before Shanghai, the Huning Intercity High-Speed Railway is running in parallel to the Jinghu line.





Kunshan South Railway Station is served by both the Jinghu High-Speed Railway and the Huning Intercity High-Speed Railway.

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Old August 22nd, 2013, 05:38 PM   #6347
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Is that a different lunch in first class than others?
How much did you pay for the 绿茶 ?
I can answer, it is kind of 35 RMB.
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Old August 22nd, 2013, 07:55 PM   #6348
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Old August 23rd, 2013, 12:56 AM   #6349
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That's because most people in China live southeast of Xian, and it's been that way for thousands of years. If you go further north or west of Shaanxi you get into the Gobi desert and some very inhospitable places.

Just like when people talk about "North China" they aren't usually talking about Xingjiang. They're talking about Henan, Shanxi, Jilin, places north of the Yangtze in Eastern China. Eastern China or "China Proper" is the part that is really culturally Chinese. (not that the other regions have not been subject to assimilation over the centuries)

"China Proper" is basically China without the northeast, (Jilin, Liaoning, Heilongjiang) the far west, (Xingjiang, Tibet, Gansu, Ningxia, Qinghai) and Mongolia. (possibly Yunnan too) "China Proper" is where most Han Chinese have lived historically and even now.

And yes U.S. has the same trend in regard to geographical nomenclature: when people talk about the "South," they're not really talking about Arizona, New Mexico, or California. They're talking about the Eastern U.S. because that's where most people lived historically and where most people lived when they came up with these naming conventions.
You are ofcourse correct, but nothing is set in stone. So in the case of USA when we see the quite dramatic shift in terms of the center of population moving southwest, the naming conventions should also be suceptible to change.

In regards to China however, I don't see how such a dramatic shift in population centers will ever be possible due to the geography considering the Himalayas, Gobi and the fact that western China is landlocked.

As far as I see it, the center of population is the important factor.
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Old August 23rd, 2013, 05:49 PM   #6350
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some pics by forumer little universe....
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Old August 23rd, 2013, 09:04 PM   #6351
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Quote:
Originally Posted by **pissybits**: That's because most people in China live southeast of Xian, and it's been that way for thousands of years. If you go further north or west of Shaanxi you get into the Gobi desert and some very inhospitable places.
That's just immensely immature and childish, Bannor.
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Old August 25th, 2013, 07:01 AM   #6352
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Residents angry over Beijing rail link
Revised route fails to alleviate fears over project that links the capital with Shenyang, Liaoning
22 August 2013
South China Morning Post

People in Beijing living near the route of a high-speed railway line have rejected a revised construction plan that shortens the route, saying they still don't know enough about how the project will affect their environment.

They want a new survey conducted on the impact of the link, which is part of the 700 kilometre railway under construction between the capital and Shenyang in Liaoning province.

The new plan shortens the link by at least a dozen kilometres and allows it to pass through fewer densely populated residential areas, according to the state-owned company responsible for the design, the Third Railway Survey and Design Institute Group Corporation.

It will end at the Xinhua Railway Station, in a suburban area on the East Fifth Ring Road, instead of the Beijing Railway Station in the city centre.

The company has unveiled six measures aimed at alleviating residents' concerns, including the construction of sound-proof shields around the terminal.

But many are still unhappy with the project. Up to 200 representatives from estates that sit along the planned route staged a protest yesterday outside the Ministry of Environmental Protection.

One local resident, who used the name Mo Mo, said the representatives hoped to pressure authorities into holding a new survey, conducted by a third party, on how the residents felt about the project. Results of such surveys are incorporated into reports a project's environmental impact and can affect whether authorities approve it.

"The design company has falsified documents in order to push along environmental impact studies in the past," he said. "We feel we can no longer trust whatever plan or promise we're offered without an independent and transparent survey."

The project has failed to pass the environmental impact assessment three times since March 2009, largely due to residents' opposition.

Home owners have become increasingly vocal in recent years about safeguarding their property amid deepening distrust of authorities.

The ministry and the design company have yet to respond to the residents' calls.

The mainland-based China Times newspaper quoted an official from the design company as saying it had never encountered so many difficulties with an environmental impact evaluation. He conceded the construction plan might have to be revised again due to the public disapproval.

The Beijing-Shenyang High-Speed Railway is part of the backbone Beijing-Shenyang-Harbin Railway. It is expected to be finished next year and will cut travelling time between Shenyang and Beijing in half, to about 2 ½ hours.

According to the current blueprint, the railway tracks will run as close as 32 metres to some villages and housing estates near the terminal. This is at odds with government guidelines that rail lines be at least 200 metres away from homes.

Wang Mengshu, a railway specialist at the Chinese Academy of Engineering, said tunnels could offset some of the problems associated with building railways in densely populated areas, but the cost could be high.

Mo Mo said the revised link would no longer pass through his neighbourhood but he would continue his fight for an independent survey.

He said previous surveys the design company conducted were not reliable. He said pollsters were not honest about the purpose of the survey, and told residents it only related to the installation of sound-proof shields.

Liu Shuzhen, an activist living near the planned terminal, said residents deserved a better deal. A train already passed her estate once every two hours along lower-speed lines, she said. When the high-speed service began, six trains an hour would pass through her area, she said.

Liu said residents had complained for years to the authorities about existing train services, which ran on heavily worn tracks, making them noisy. "We just don't want it to happen again. When problems pop up from the high-speed rail services in the years ahead, we will have no one to turn to for help."
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Old August 25th, 2013, 09:16 AM   #6353
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Quote:
Originally Posted by hkskyline View Post
The new plan shortens the link by at least a dozen kilometres and allows it to pass through fewer densely populated residential areas, according to the state-owned company responsible for the design, the Third Railway Survey and Design Institute Group Corporation.

It will end at the Xinhua Railway Station, in a suburban area on the East Fifth Ring Road, instead of the Beijing Railway Station in the city centre.
Then how many more kilometres will the passengers need to walk to Beijing city centre?
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Old August 25th, 2013, 09:42 AM   #6354
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It should be the Xinghuo Station on east Beijing. Metro Line 3 will connect this station. But even this plan is not final due to residents protest. The construction of Beijing-Shenyang HSR may be further delayed.

Location of Xinghuo Station of Beijing
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Old August 25th, 2013, 03:12 PM   #6355
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I find protest against rail link for environmental concern is a joke. I would be happy to have a high speed rail station close to my home.

Also, lovely pictures Highcliff, thanks for sharing them.
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Old August 25th, 2013, 03:29 PM   #6356
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I find protest against rail link for environmental concern is a joke. I would be happy to have a high speed rail station close to my home.
You'd find it much less of a joke if someone were to build a line (not a station) on a high viaduct just 100 m from your apartment.

Seriously looks like the easy and fast era of infrastructure building in China is about to be over. Overall probably a good thing and a sign of more advanced society.
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Old August 25th, 2013, 05:09 PM   #6357
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Shenzhen North



























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Old August 25th, 2013, 06:29 PM   #6358
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Sunfuns View Post
You'd find it much less of a joke if someone were to build a line (not a station) on a high viaduct just 100 m from your apartment.

Seriously looks like the easy and fast era of infrastructure building in China is about to be over. Overall probably a good thing and a sign of more advanced society.
No problem, bring it. It will be less noisy than the cars passing on the road in front of the house. This is a joke. There is no similar coverage for other, hmmm I don't know, 100 rail lines under construction. There is smt else behind this.

Edit: By the way I find your can to define a society advance or backwards rather pretentious.

Last edited by foxmulder; August 25th, 2013 at 06:51 PM.
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Old August 25th, 2013, 06:31 PM   #6359
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The idea of those gates to the platforms never ceases to grate with me.

No one else in the world with an HSR system feels they need to have ticket checks at the platform entrance, like they have at airport boarding gates. It would be so many times easier on the crowds and general passenger experience if they simply checked all tickets before one is allowed into the waiting hall.
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Old August 25th, 2013, 06:43 PM   #6360
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Originally Posted by Sopomon View Post
The idea of those gates to the platforms never ceases to grate with me.

No one else in the world with an HSR system feels they need to have ticket checks at the platform entrance, like they have at airport boarding gates. It would be so many times easier on the crowds and general passenger experience if they simply checked all tickets before one is allowed into the waiting hall.
They need to prevent passengers who don't belong to a particular train from boarding. Given how full these trains out of SZ North have become, it's a wise move rather than have seat fights on board.
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