daily menu » rate the banner | guess the city | one on oneforums map | privacy policy (aug.2, 2013) | DMCA policy | flipboard magazine

Go Back   SkyscraperCity > Continental Forums > North American Skyscrapers Forum > Metropolis & States > Chicago



Reply

 
Thread Tools
Old December 26th, 2006, 08:18 AM   #41
Chi649
Registered User
 
Chi649's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: Chicagoland
Posts: 1,157
Likes (Received): 7

For people who have Comcast cable, there are a few Chicago programs On Demand (probably only if you live in the Chicago metro area though):

The History Channel's Modern Marvels episode of the Sears Tower. This has some great footage of the construction and historical facts.

Footage from the History Channel's Engineering An Empire Chicago: City of the Future

The History Channel's Tech Effect: Chicago Fire

Go On Demand and go to: Get local, Chicago History
In the Sears Tower episode, it shows people standing on top of one of the antennas during the retrofit for digital broadcasting about 5 years ago!! Also, it shows a newspaper headline from the Chicago Daily News that said:
World's Tallest for Sears!
110-storey unit 'tall as FAA will let us go'. Interesting, I did not know this. Does anyone know if this is true? I found a source that says so: http://www.skyscraper.org/TALLEST_TOWERS/t_sears.htm

Last edited by Chi649; December 26th, 2006 at 08:33 AM.
Chi649 no está en línea   Reply With Quote

Sponsored Links
 
Old December 28th, 2006, 06:32 AM   #42
The Urban Politician
The City
 
Join Date: Jul 2004
Posts: 5,957
Likes (Received): 6

http://www.chicagojournal.com/main.a...25&TM=84053.86
12/27/2006 10:00:00 PM Email this article • Print this article
The party's downtown
‘Looptopia’ will continue neighborhood revival



Over the course of the last few years, as the East Loop has slowly reinvented itself from an aging supply of Class B office space to a prime residential neighborhood on the edge of Millennium Park, much has been said about the possibilities of a 24-7 Loop. For the last two decades or so, as the old moviehouses of the Loop shut down, the central business district has been quiet for the most part after dark, the theater district being the lone exception. But the spectacular success of Millennium Park, combined with the surge in new condo conversions and highrise residential buildings planned in the middle of downtown, have begun to turn the tide, and the Loop is steadily shedding its old "dead after 5 p.m." status.

And that's where Looptopia, an all-night soiree with "music, dance, visual art, light installations, and urban decor and enhancements," comes in. Set to take place next year in mid-May-one of the best times of the year in Chicago-planners hope to emulate similar all-night festivals in London, Paris and Montreal, culminating in a sunrise Millennium Park concert.

It's a great idea, and one that will go a long way in the continued change in the way the Loop is viewed. Fifteen years ago, an all-night Loop festival would have been a tough sell; we're guessing that the inaugural event will be packed.

Right now, the details are sketchy, but Ty Tabing, executive director of the Chicago Loop Alliance, is scheduled to give a talk on the event at the Jan. 4, 2007 confab of Friends of Downtown, scheduled for 12:15 p.m. at the Chicago Cultural Center. Here's hoping that the initial party is a massive hit for a neighborhood that is finally hitting the big time.
__________________
It is humanly impossible to walk through Chicago's core and not consider it one of the world's great cities unless you are inwardly angry at the place for somehow threatening or robbing your hometown of its vitality or integrity.
The Urban Politician no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old December 30th, 2006, 10:54 PM   #43
ChgoLvr83
Registered User
 
Join Date: Aug 2004
Location: Chicago
Posts: 316
Likes (Received): 0

Is anyone having problems accessing SSP? Just trying to figure out if its just me or not.
__________________
Chicago is New York with the heart left in.
ChgoLvr83 no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old December 31st, 2006, 05:30 AM   #44
UrbanSophist
Registered User
 
UrbanSophist's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2005
Location: Chicago, IL
Posts: 2,855
Likes (Received): 43

Quote:
Originally Posted by Chi649 View Post
In the Sears Tower episode, it shows people standing on top of one of the antennas during the retrofit for digital broadcasting about 5 years ago!! Also, it shows a newspaper headline from the Chicago Daily News that said:
World's Tallest for Sears!
110-storey unit 'tall as FAA will let us go'. Interesting, I did not know this. Does anyone know if this is true? I found a source that says so: http://www.skyscraper.org/TALLEST_TOWERS/t_sears.htm
That was a great documentary. The Sears is so iconic.
UrbanSophist no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old December 31st, 2006, 10:13 AM   #45
Westsidelife
LAL | LAD | LAK
 
Westsidelife's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2005
Location: Los Angeles
Posts: 6,725
Likes (Received): 39

Is Carson Pirie Scott closing its doors?
__________________
"I'm an LA guy, can't help it." -- Tiger Woods
Westsidelife no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old December 31st, 2006, 10:24 AM   #46
ChgoLvr83
Registered User
 
Join Date: Aug 2004
Location: Chicago
Posts: 316
Likes (Received): 0

Yeah. That location I believe. They really havent invested too much in that store. The outside is beautiful but the inside leaves much to be desired. They are, last I heard, opening a new location downtown though which really doesnt make sense to me. State is too good a location and building to ignore.

Someone else can prob elaborate. Im abit intoxicated.

Happy New Years!!!
__________________
Chicago is New York with the heart left in.

Last edited by ChgoLvr83; December 31st, 2006 at 10:29 AM.
ChgoLvr83 no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old December 31st, 2006, 09:02 PM   #47
spyguy
Expert
 
spyguy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2005
Location: Chicago
Posts: 6,942
Likes (Received): 52

^Well they say it costs too much to operate in that store, which might be true. Hopefully it can be a win-win situation: they find a good location and new retailers move into the old store.
spyguy no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old January 1st, 2007, 08:24 AM   #48
Chi649
Registered User
 
Chi649's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: Chicagoland
Posts: 1,157
Likes (Received): 7

Quote:
Originally Posted by UrbanSophist View Post
That was a great documentary. The Sears is so iconic.
I enjoyed every second of it. Definitely a must see for Sears tower fans.
Chi649 no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old January 1st, 2007, 07:15 PM   #49
Mr Downtown
Urbane observer
 
Mr Downtown's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Location: Chicago
Posts: 1,537
Likes (Received): 4

They show part of it now as the film you see when you visit the Skydeck. Inexplicably they show it on a 16:9 video system, so Sears Tower looks short and squat.
Mr Downtown no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old January 2nd, 2007, 11:06 PM   #50
ardecila
Jack-Of-All-Trades
 
ardecila's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2005
Location: New Orleans/Chicago
Posts: 1,391
Likes (Received): 1

Wow - I knew Chicago was breaking onto the global scene, but I had no idea it was also breaking onto the intergalactic scene!

Chicago's a hot city for tourists right now - even ones from the Pleiades Cluster!
http://www.chicagotribune.com/news/l...,6733390.story
ardecila no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old January 3rd, 2007, 06:42 AM   #51
The Urban Politician
The City
 
Join Date: Jul 2004
Posts: 5,957
Likes (Received): 6

http://www.ci.chi.il.us/city/webport...inCategoryOID=
2006 Year in Review
Improving the economy and quality of life in Chicago's neighborhoods was the priority for the Department of Planning and Development in 2006 by creating opportunities for the growth, sustainability and preservation of the diverse communities that make Chicago one of the best places to live, work and raise a family.

"Our efforts focused on helping businesses and developers realize the opportunities that exist within communities which leads to more jobs, retail growth and affordable housing choices," said Lori T. Healey, commissioner of the Department of Planning and Development.

Part of that effort included sponsoring the first-ever Grocery Store Expo, designed to generate interest in Chicago's neighborhoods among major grocery store chains. The day-long expo, which attracted retailers from throughout the country, showcased available business opportunities and city programs.

Our ever expanding downtown continues to thrive and serve as the city's economic engine, but development can be found in every corner of Chicago. From the North Side to the South Side to the West Side and to downtown, the department has retained and recruited thousands of jobs at companies like United Airlines, which is relocating to Wacker Drive from the suburbs, Blommers Chocolate, which updated its plant in the Kinzie Industrial Corridor, Coca-Cola, which is renovating a former Helene Curtis facility in Humboldt Park, Steelhead Corporation, a metals company moving from Bedford Park to the Southwest Side, and MiFab, a plumbing distributor that moved from Canada to the Far South Side.

Department efforts have received national recognition including the U.S Environmental Protection Agency Smart Growth award for a transit oriented project with the Bethel Center in West Garfield Park which transformed a former contaminated brownfield into a community anchor.

This year, economic development initiatives created nearly 3,000 jobs and retained 5,800 others throughout the city. One program that directly relates to job creation and retention are Planned Manufacturing Districts (PMD).

Through the use of strict zoning requirements, PMDs provide the means for local industrial, manufacturing and technology-based companies to expand as well as incentives for businesses outside of Chicago to relocate here. Since their inception, PMDs have been responsible for generating more than $1 billion in private and public investment, making Chicago a national model in industrial retention and growth.

Small businesses will get assistance to help them expand through a new City program. The Small Business Development Fund will make $5 million in low interest loans available over the next five years to qualified neighborhood companies for improvements to their operations and increases in their workforce.

Many development efforts have been aided through the Tax Increment Financing program, which has proven to be one of the city's most effective private-public partnership tools. In 2006, the program leveraged more than $960 million in private investment through $210 million in public assistance.

In addition to helping to spur development projects, most of which would not be possible without the use of TIF, the program also funded other initiatives such as TIF Works which has provided training for thousands of Chicagoans seeking industrial jobs.

On the housing front, the city's financial initiatives along with the support of the Department of Housing and the Chicago Housing Authority is helping to advance the Plan for Transformation through the creation of approximately 1,000 affordable housing and CHA replacement units for Chicago families in 2006.

The Department successfully negotiated land sales totaling almost $18 million in 2006 through sealed bids, the Adjacent Neighbors Land Acquisition (ANLAP) program, and other initiatives which have helped us transform blighted and underutilized sites into productive properties.

Preserving Chicago's past is just as important as building its future. The City was recently honored by the National Trust for Historic Preservation for its efforts to preserve and restore Mather Tower, a 41-story skyscraper built in 1928. Utilizing city and other public incentives, the building was completely rehabilitated into first-class office and hotel space.

Earlier this year the city took steps to protect historic water tanks by requiring an automatic review of all proposed demolitions. Constructed of wood and metal, the tanks were a familiar fixture of our skyline. Once numbering in the thousands, less than 200 rooftop and free-standing tanks remain.

Official landmark status was granted this year to one district and fourteen individual buildings, including the Palmer House Hotel, Mundelein College Skyscraper, Roberts Temple and the Carl Sandburg House. These new designations bring the total number of landmark buildings to 237 buildings, and the number of landmark districts to 49 encompassing some 7,600 buildings.

To improve and protect Chicago's valuable natural resources, the Department of Planning and Development, along with the Mayor's Nature and Wildlife Committee and more than 30 conservation organizations, published the first-ever Chicago Nature and Wildlife Plan. The plan identifies 4,800 acres of prairies, savannas, dunes, woodlands and wetlands, and sets forth techniques for keeping these areas habitat friendly.

Chicago remains a recognized leader when it comes to incorporating green technology into urban developments. Currently, more than 250 green roof projects totaling more than 2.8 million square feet have built or are planned on public and private buildings throughout Chicago, more than any other city in the country.
__________________
It is humanly impossible to walk through Chicago's core and not consider it one of the world's great cities unless you are inwardly angry at the place for somehow threatening or robbing your hometown of its vitality or integrity.
The Urban Politician no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old January 3rd, 2007, 06:56 AM   #52
Chi649
Registered User
 
Chi649's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: Chicagoland
Posts: 1,157
Likes (Received): 7

Quote:
Originally Posted by ardecila View Post
Wow - I knew Chicago was breaking onto the global scene, but I had no idea it was also breaking onto the intergalactic scene!

Chicago's a hot city for tourists right now - even ones from the Pleiades Cluster!
http://www.chicagotribune.com/news/l...,6733390.story
I was going to post this yesterday but it was taking like 10 minutes just to load 1 page here. That article seems to be just a summary of the original one which is 2 pages and can be found here:
http://www.chicagotribune.com/classi...7803436.column

This really is an amazing story. Here's a small excerpt:

All the witnesses to the O'Hare event, who included at least several pilots, said they are certain based on the disc's appearance and flight characteristics that it was not an airplane, helicopter, weather balloon or any other craft known to man.

I am a skeptic but this type of stuff makes me go Hmmm

Last edited by Chi649; January 3rd, 2007 at 07:02 AM.
Chi649 no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old January 3rd, 2007, 06:50 PM   #53
chicagogeorge
Registered User
 
chicagogeorge's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2004
Location: South suburban Chicago
Posts: 5,307
Likes (Received): 647

Yeah I read the same article. I've always been interested in the "UFO Phenomenon". I just never thought they'd try to land at O'Hare. I guess they didn't know it was the busiest airport in the world, and that they would have to hover for a while until a runway was available LOL!
__________________

for the Pelasgians, too, were a Greek nation originally from the Peloponnesus
The Roman Antiquities of Dionysius of Halicarnassus
http://penelope.uchicago.edu/Thayer/...assus/1B*.html

Macedonia, of course, is a part of Greece". Strabo, VII, Frg. 9
http://penelope.uchicago.edu/Thayer/...ragments*.html

But north of the gulf, the first inhabitants are Greeks called Epirotes....
Procopius
http://books.google.com/books?id=9m6...page&q&f=false
chicagogeorge no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old January 7th, 2007, 06:58 PM   #54
wickedestcity
BANNED
 
wickedestcity's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2004
Location: Chicago
Posts: 1,566
Likes (Received): 2

The ultimate urban planner

January 7, 2007
BY KEVIN NANCE Art & Architecture Critic
Daniel Burnham's 1909 Chicago Plan is a primary text of the city's architectural and urban planning circles, but it's also a little like the Dead Sea Scrolls: a rare and exotic document that most people have heard of, many people know little about and even fewer have actually read.






Enter author Carl Smith, whose The Plan of Chicago: Daniel Burnham and the Remaking of the American City is a concise and reader-friendly introduction to the visionary and ambitious plan that helped shape much of the Windy City as we know it today.

Smith, who holds twin professorships in English and history at Northwestern University, illuminates the unsavory urban conditions that made the plan urgently needed in the early 20th century. Chicago's population had rocketed from about 100 people in 1830 to 2.1 million in 1910, and was beset by noise and air pollution, substandard housing and blocked access to the lakefront.

"The city that had grown so fast was literally choking on its own success," Smith says in an interview. "Traffic was remarkably congested and inefficiently managed. It was the leading railroad city of the world, but there was no rational sense to the passenger stations in the city."


The problems didn't stop there. The downtown was too tightly condensed in the Loop. There was very little park space. The Chicago River took an inconvenient turn to the east, which made northerly movement from parts of the South Side difficult and impeded real estate development.
"I'm very impressed with the book as a very accessible history of the plan and the conditions that led to its origin," says Chicago cultural historian Tim Samuelson. "I've heard readers of the book talk about how happy they are to get some in-depth grasp of why the plan happened."

In particular, Smith examines the motives of the elite Chicagoans who developed the plan, including various members of the Commercial Club, which sponsored and later aggressively marketed the plan. He explains their complicated motives, which included a fear that the burgeoning immigrant populations (and their growing involvement in the increasingly militant labor movement in the city of the Haymarket riots and the Pullman Strike) posed a looming threat -- one that perhaps could be blunted if Chicago were more livable and beautiful.

"They very much believed in environmentalism and its social and political effects," Smith says. "They saw that if you have an unappealing, unattractive and anti-human living environment, you can't expect people to behave well and be happy."

If that sounds like self-interest, it certainly was, Smith says. But it wasn't only that.

"They had something very substantial personally at stake in remaking the city, because it was where their businesses were," he says. "At the same time, this was the place where they had become wealthy and influential, so their motives were a bit more complicated than noblesse oblige. They understood that with power came responsibility."

Smith reserves special admiration for Burnham, the architect and mastermind of the 1893 World's Columbian Exposition in Chicago. He was uniquely qualified for the Chicago Plan assignment, Smith says, not only because of his experience with the World's Fair but also because he'd previously worked on master plans for Washington, D.C., San Francisco, Cleveland and Manila, the Philippines.

"He was an extraordinarily capable, charismatic individual -- really the indispensable figure in the plan," Smith says. "He was experienced, he was well-connected and well-organized, he was articulate. And he had an almost astonishing force of character and belief in Chicago and in himself. He was the man who believed you could literally remake a city of 2 million people, that you could step in amidst all the economic and social forces of the time and change the course of urban history. He both reflected the times and directed them. The Chicago Plan couldn't have been done without him."

Was the plan successful? Smith gives Burnham and his colleagues an A for placing the need for change at the top of the city's agenda. They also receive high marks for their influence on a number of positive developments in the city, including the transformation of Grant Park; the development of Lake Shore Drive, Burnham Harbor and the Museum Campus; the widening, double-decking and extending of Michigan Avenue; and the straightening of the river and the building of the Navy Pier.

On the other hand, Smith says, many of the plan's ideas were recycled from other sources, and some of its most original concepts -- including a new civic center -- flopped. The plan received deserved criticism for its sometimes inhuman scale, its preoccupation with downtown, and its focus on commercial and cultural institutions at the expense of housing.

Still, he says, "It's impossible to imagine Chicago without it."

Kevin Nance is the Sun-Times' art & architecture critic.

http://www.suntimes.com/entertainmen...olit07.article
wickedestcity no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old January 10th, 2007, 05:55 AM   #55
wickedestcity
BANNED
 
wickedestcity's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2004
Location: Chicago
Posts: 1,566
Likes (Received): 2

Quote:
Originally Posted by The Urban Politician View Post
http://www.chicagojournal.com/main.a...25&TM=84053.86
12/27/2006 10:00:00 PM Email this article • Print this article
The party's downtown
‘Looptopia’ will continue neighborhood revival



Over the course of the last few years, as the East Loop has slowly reinvented itself from an aging supply of Class B office space to a prime residential neighborhood on the edge of Millennium Park, much has been said about the possibilities of a 24-7 Loop. For the last two decades or so, as the old moviehouses of the Loop shut down, the central business district has been quiet for the most part after dark, the theater district being the lone exception. But the spectacular success of Millennium Park, combined with the surge in new condo conversions and highrise residential buildings planned in the middle of downtown, have begun to turn the tide, and the Loop is steadily shedding its old "dead after 5 p.m." status.

And that's where Looptopia, an all-night soiree with "music, dance, visual art, light installations, and urban decor and enhancements," comes in. Set to take place next year in mid-May-one of the best times of the year in Chicago-planners hope to emulate similar all-night festivals in London, Paris and Montreal, culminating in a sunrise Millennium Park concert.

It's a great idea, and one that will go a long way in the continued change in the way the Loop is viewed. Fifteen years ago, an all-night Loop festival would have been a tough sell; we're guessing that the inaugural event will be packed.

Right now, the details are sketchy, but Ty Tabing, executive director of the Chicago Loop Alliance, is scheduled to give a talk on the event at the Jan. 4, 2007 confab of Friends of Downtown, scheduled for 12:15 p.m. at the Chicago Cultural Center. Here's hoping that the initial party is a massive hit for a neighborhood that is finally hitting the big time.
All-night party planned for Loop

By Josh Noel
Tribune staff reporter
Published January 9, 2007, 7:43 PM CST


When he attended Montreal's sundown-to-sunrise bash two years ago celebrating that city's downtown art and culture, Ty Tabing's first thought was, "Wow."

The second was, "Chicago needs one of these."

And on May 11, the first Looptopia will be held in the east Loop, modeled on all-night White Night events that have turned the downtown districts in Paris, Rome and Toronto, among others, into de facto art galleries.

The list of offerings between about 8 p.m. May 11 and 6 a.m. May 12 will be long and varied—from loading dock dance performances to a silent dance party of people grooving to their own MP3 players (to comply with a noise ordinance), said Tabing, executive director of the Chicago Loop Alliance.

Also included will be a dodgeball game in a Plexiglas cage, a sleepover at the Harold Washington Library Center, architecture tours from some elevated trains and a sunrise performance from the Joffrey Ballet in Millennium Park. Throughout the night, even in places when no performances are scheduled, the east Loop will be garnished with lighting displays, video projections and banners.

Looptopia will be capped by music, yoga and a free breakfast buffet at Millennium Park.

Just don't call it a street fair.

"It's absolutely not a street fair," Tabing said. "It's an artistic and cultural celebration of downtown."

Also among the offerings will be "Opera Idol," based on the television show "American Idol," and a cabaret show in an alley. The Art Institute of Chicago will have exhibits open into the early morning hours, and several retailers will offer extended shopping hours. State Street will host a procession of performers for much of the night.

About two-thirds of the potential $1 million cost has been raised, Tabing said. A majority has been privately financed, though the state Bureau of Tourism has pledged about $100,000, he said.

Most events will be free. Organizers hope to attract 100,000 people and for the event to become an annual springtime event that ushers in warmer weather.

"People are jonesing to get outside in May," Tabing said. "Hopefully this will kick off the warm weather season."

Looptopia, he said, is a tribute to the Loop becoming less of a place to simply go to work and increasingly residential and rife with cultural attractions, like Millennium Park.

The Chicago Loop Alliance, formed in 2005 after the merger of the Greater State Street Council and Central Michigan Avenue Association, had been looking to showcase downtown, and found the perfect avenue after hearing of White Night events in other cities. A "white night" occurs at high latitudes when the sun never sets in a 24-hour period.

Tabing traveled to the closest, in Montreal, with friends in 2005 to investigate. He was impressed at what a showcase the downtown had become.

"I took one look and said, 'Boy this would be a hell of an undertaking, but it's an opportunity to show what the Loop has become,'" he said. "The Loop is really a destination, and it hasn't always been a destination."

Last year, with two board members, he also visited the Paris version, called Nuit Blanche. Unlike Montreal, where the event was held in single-digit temperatures, Paris allowed for a more leisurely outdoor pace that he hopes to replicate in Chicago.

Looptopia has the city's full support but it costs the city nothing, said Jim Law, executive director of the Mayor's Office of Special Events.

"It will bring activity and economic development and show the Loop as the 24/7 community it is," he said.

Programming will extend from Wacker Drive to the north to Congress Parkway to the south and from Dearborn Street to the west to Lake Michigan to the east.

At a kickoff party Tuesday morning, Tabing said organizers have confirmed that the average high on May 11 is 68 degrees. What he didn't point out is that the average low is in the upper 40s.

The Chicago Tribune is among the sponsors. More information is available at the Loop Alliance Web site.

jbnoel@tribune.com

http://www.chicagotribune.com/news/c...ck=1&cset=true

Last edited by wickedestcity; January 10th, 2007 at 06:07 AM.
wickedestcity no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old January 10th, 2007, 06:07 AM   #56
wickedestcity
BANNED
 
wickedestcity's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2004
Location: Chicago
Posts: 1,566
Likes (Received): 2

Man gives blood 2 save his girlfriend.They break up & he wants it all back. She hands him a Tampon & says I'll pay u Monthly Bitch!. HA
wickedestcity no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old January 10th, 2007, 06:34 AM   #57
Chi649
Registered User
 
Chi649's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: Chicagoland
Posts: 1,157
Likes (Received): 7

good one

Due to the warm weather, I would assume that our construction pace has been a bit faster, but this is only an assumption. Has anyone heard reports or does anyone know or think this will have a moderate impact on building progress?
Chi649 no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old January 15th, 2007, 12:02 AM   #58
Chi649
Registered User
 
Chi649's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: Chicagoland
Posts: 1,157
Likes (Received): 7

This is awesome, 1000 Megapixel picture of Chicago:
http://www.docbert.org/ChicagoByNight/
Chi649 no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old January 15th, 2007, 08:56 PM   #59
wickedestcity
BANNED
 
wickedestcity's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2004
Location: Chicago
Posts: 1,566
Likes (Received): 2

Editorial: Embracing the Windy City
From the Journal Sentinel
Posted: Jan. 14, 2007
It's not one market - yet - but Milwaukee and Chicago are growing closer by the day, and leaders in southeastern Wisconsin would do well to make the most of it.

Milwaukee & Chicago

Buy a link hereThat includes shoring up the region's transportation network and taking other steps to encourage cooperation.

The area stretching from Milwaukee's northern suburbs through Chicago is an emerging mega-city, the home to more than 11 million people, 36 Fortune 500 companies and 10 major universities or colleges. This is no small matter. Heft and scale are powerful attractions to both business and talent in the global economy. A combined Chicago and Milwaukee ranks among the nation's leaders in key job markets, including legal services, computer systems design, accounting and professional and technical services.

William Testa, the respected economist at the Federal Reserve Bank of Chicago, noted in his blog recently that "an absence of organized efforts" at promoting increased business up and down the corridor is puzzling.

"Perhaps a little détente along the Illinois-Wisconsin border might be advantageous to all," he wrote.

In fact, it's happening.

As the Journal Sentinel's Tom Daykin noted recently, Chicago-area residents are moving to Wisconsin, especially to Kenosha County, where the population is expected to grow almost another 5% by 2011 and median income is expected to rise nearly 11%.

At the same time, Chicago-area businesses are expanding northward, including hospital equipment maker Hospira Inc. and, we hope, pharmaceutical giant Abbott Labs, which has purchased land near Pleasant Prairie for expansion.

There is the increased traffic coming from Illinois to Mitchell International Airport, already the third Chicago airport for many folks in northern Illinois trying to avoid lines and delays at O'Hare and Midway. Commuting between the two cities is still small but growing rapidly. Ridership on the Hiawatha, the Amtrak service between the two cities hit an all-time record at midyear. Other signs: Marquette University gets a significant influx of students from northern Illinois, and Children's Hospital of Wisconsin gets a significant number of patients from south of the state line.

Wisconsin is a partner in Chicago's bid to host the 2016 summer Olympics, something that likely would drive further development up and down the I-94 corridor.

The question becomes: How can leaders on both sides of that divide best take advantage?

First, change the mind-set. Root for the Packers? A no-brainer. Hate the Bears. A given. But beyond that, it's time to embrace the market heft of Chicagoland, especially when selling Milwaukee to the world. For all its charm, Milwaukee isn't a household name in every corner of the nation, let alone overseas.

There are tangible necessities, too, especially a renewed push for the Kenosha-Racine-Milwaukee commuter rail line.

No single project is more important to development along the Milwaukee-to-Chicago rail corridor. The line, which would run through lakefront communities on existing freight lines, would allow passengers to connect to Chicago's Metra service in Kenosha. It would cost

$200 million to build and

$11 million to operate annually. It's clear KRM is a good investment that would not only move workers along the corridor but lead to expansive development near the stations. It would also make the region more attractive for two-income power couples whose choice of workplace would multiply exponentially. The commuter rail line is a must-have for the Milwaukee area.

Chicago and Milwaukee should find other ways to work cooperatively - perhaps by seeking joint federal funding for transportation projects or on preservation and sustainable use of Great Lakes water.

Clearly, the top priority needs to be on learning to play together in southeastern Wisconsin. But taking advantage of the size and scale of Chicago should be on any list of to-do items.

As Paul O'Connor, executive director of the group World Business Chicago, put it:

"There no question about it: Milwaukee and Chicago are just a picket fence from being together."
wickedestcity no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old January 16th, 2007, 02:58 AM   #60
The Urban Politician
The City
 
Join Date: Jul 2004
Posts: 5,957
Likes (Received): 6

Thanks for posting that, Wicked.

I cut and pasted this same article (credit given, of course) for our friends in the Milwaukee Development Thread
__________________
It is humanly impossible to walk through Chicago's core and not consider it one of the world's great cities unless you are inwardly angry at the place for somehow threatening or robbing your hometown of its vitality or integrity.
The Urban Politician no está en línea   Reply With Quote


Reply

Tags
chi town, chicago, random posts

Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off



All times are GMT +2. The time now is 01:27 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
Feedback Buttons provided by Advanced Post Thanks / Like v3.2.5 (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2014 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.

vBulletin Optimisation provided by vB Optimise (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2014 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.

SkyscraperCity ☆ In Urbanity We trust ☆ about us | privacy policy | DMCA policy

Hosted by Blacksun, dedicated to this site too!
Forum server management by DaiTengu