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View Poll Results: Should the US build or improve it's HSR network?
Yes 249 89.57%
No 29 10.43%
Voters: 278. You may not vote on this poll

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Old February 17th, 2017, 05:47 AM   #6721
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Vancouver to Portland HSR Feasibility Study Funds Allocated

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Vancouver to Portland HSR Feasibility Study Funds Allocated :$1 million USD in funds have been allocated in the Washington State budget by State Governor Jay Inslee in order to commission a proper feasibility study for a High Speed Rail project that would link Vancouver in Canada to Portland in Oregon via Seattle, Washington.

The study is aimed at identifying the costs and benefits of ultra-high speed ground transportation, according to the 2017-2019 Transportation Appropriations Bill. It would determine potential alignments, ridership numbers and costs, as well as environmental implications and technological options.

A full report is expected to be submitted by 15 December 2017.

Stations are being considered for: Vancouver (British Columbia, Canada), Bellingham, Everett, Seattle, SeaTac, Tacoma, Olympia, Vancouver (Washington) and Portland.
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Old February 17th, 2017, 01:04 PM   #6722
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Cascades

Siemens Charger on test in Pacific Northwest



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A Siemens SC-44 Charger locomotive has arrived in the US state of Washington for certification testing on Amtrak’s Cascades Corridor, which links Eugene with Portland, Seattle and Vancouver.

Illinois Department of Transportation awarded Siemens a $US 228m contract in 2014 to supply 32 of the 200km/h diesel-electric locomotives for use on Amtrak services in the states of Illinois, California, Michigan, Missouri and Washington. Washington State Department of Transportation (WSDOT) has ordered eight locomotives as part of its $US 800m federally-funded Cascades High-Speed Rail Program.
Talgo Cascades trainsets (T-200 y T 8) are suitable for 200 km/h but are now limited to 120 per infrastructure.


Talgo 200


T 8
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Old February 17th, 2017, 01:54 PM   #6723
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Originally Posted by prageethSL View Post
Obama wanted to be the high-speed rail president. It might be Trump instead.
It is nice to hear that the President is opened to provide the funds for some new HSRs! Especially because during the previous administration, red governors were the ones who stopped the preparations for HSRs, e.g. in Florida, as I remember correctly.
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Old February 17th, 2017, 05:57 PM   #6724
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What he SAYS and what he DOES are two very different things.
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Old February 18th, 2017, 07:25 AM   #6725
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Speaking of Trump and CAHSR

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U.S. Department of Transportation puts off OK of key $647-million grant related to California's bullet train
Feb 17, 2017 1pm
By Ralph Vartabedian


The U.S. Department of Transportation has deferred a decision on a $647-million grant that would help Caltrain electrify a section of track between San Jose and San Francisco, a project crucial to California’s struggling high-speed rail project.

The decision not to approve the grant by a key Friday deadline may be an early sign of the Trump administration's view of the bullet train project. The line is already under construction and will need significant federal funding moving forward.

...

Caltrain requested the federal money as part of a $2-billion project to replace diesel locomotives with electric trains. The electrification is important to the high-speed rail project because its trains would eventually use the same tracks and electrical system.
http://www.latimes.com/local/califor...217-story.html

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Old February 18th, 2017, 02:09 PM   #6726
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 00Zy99 View Post
What he SAYS and what he DOES are two very different things.
Often, even what he says and what he says are two different things.

@Anday It says in that link that they're looking at trains operating above 400km/h. They must know how impractical an operating speed that is, even if it makes the appealing-sounding hour-ride from Portland to Vancouver possible.
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Old February 18th, 2017, 11:06 PM   #6727
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Quote:
Originally Posted by aquaticko View Post
Often, even what he says and what he says are two different things.

@Anday It says in that link that they're looking at trains operating above 400km/h. They must know how impractical an operating speed that is, even if it makes the appealing-sounding hour-ride from Portland to Vancouver possible.
At this point aren't only Maglevs capable of such operating speeds?
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Old February 21st, 2017, 08:00 AM   #6728
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Siemens Charger on test in Pacific Northwest


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Old February 22nd, 2017, 07:45 PM   #6729
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Nice looking trainset. Is there a plan to purchase them? What advantage do they have over the Talgos?
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Old February 22nd, 2017, 08:25 PM   #6730
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UNITED STATES | High Speed Rail

Those are Talgos just older models. And the fins were added to reduce the drag from the EDM F59 PHI locomotives as they are almost twice as tall as the Talgo coaches.
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Old February 22nd, 2017, 08:59 PM   #6731
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Tower Dude View Post
Those are Talgos just older models. And the fins were added to reduce the drag from the EDM F59 PHI locomotives as they are almost twice as tall as the Talgo coaches.
I was talking about the Siemens Chargers... they're not older Talgos, are they?
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Old February 22nd, 2017, 09:13 PM   #6732
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No they are not but the Siemens Charger is just the Locomotive the trainset attached to it is a Talgo VI series.
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Old February 22nd, 2017, 09:14 PM   #6733
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The Charger is just the diesel at the front. You can tell, because it has a different paint scheme. The rest of the train is the Talgo.

American Talgo sets do not have any dedicated power equipment. They just use whatever advanced passenger diesel happens to be handy.

The Charger is basically higher-performing and lower-emitting than the preceeding F40PH and the F59PHI. Both of those engines were used on the Talgo, but also on other trains as well.

Likewise, the Charger can be used on other types of rolling stock-AAF bought Chargers (with a different nose design) for running the Brightliner service in Florida. That's all there is to it.
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Old February 23rd, 2017, 08:32 AM   #6734
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 00Zy99 View Post
The Charger is just the diesel at the front. You can tell, because it has a different paint scheme. The rest of the train is the Talgo.

American Talgo sets do not have any dedicated power equipment. They just use whatever advanced passenger diesel happens to be handy.

The Charger is basically higher-performing and lower-emitting than the preceeding F40PH and the F59PHI. Both of those engines were used on the Talgo, but also on other trains as well.
Thanks that clears up some things. I always thought that the Talgos referred to the locomotives not the carriages. Good to know!
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Old February 23rd, 2017, 03:20 PM   #6735
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Texas lawmakers move to stymie high-speed rail project

http://www.chron.com/news/transporta...s-10948520.php

By Dug Begley, Houston Chronicle Updated 5:05 pm, Tuesday, February 21, 2017

Nearly a dozen Republican state lawmakers, mostly from rural and suburban districts, filed a flurry of bills Tuesday aiming to “derail” plans for a privately-funded high-speed rail line in Texas.

The 18 bills, nine each in the Texas Senate and Texas House, aim to limit Texas Central Partners’ ability to develop a Houston-to-Dallas line supported by both metro areas, but strongly opposed by many rural landowners and elected officials.

The bills complicate the private company’s right to acquire property via eminent domain, strengthen landowner protections, compel state agencies to assess the feasibility of the planned rail line and prohibit the state from ever maintaining or operating a high-speed rail line.

"I still have doubts about whether a high-speed rail project makes sense for Texas" said Senator Brandon Creighton, R-Conroe. “Taxpayers should not be expected to pay the bill if the project fails.”

Company officials, in a statement, defended the project, noting Texas needs new mobility options.

"Contrary to the national focus on infrastructure projects that stand to create tens of thousands of jobs and benefit millions of people, it is ironic that the proposed legislation calls for more government regulation in trying to block a free market led project that will create jobs and generate economic development," said Holly Reed, managing director of external affairs for Texas Central.

Since the legislative session began, state lawmakers have said they planned to use Austin to constrain development of the high-speed rail project, notably its rights to survey and acquire rural land. Critics of the company have said it has used heavy-handed tactics to force landowners into sales agreements.

Earlier this month, Texas Central announced about 30 percent of the parcels needed for the 240-mile project are covered under sale option agreements, meaning landowners have agreed to sell the land once the project has the necessary environmental clearances and is ready for construction.

The company, which is said its still finalizing its private funding, will use Japanese bullet train technology to travel between the two metro areas. The trip, company officials said would cost around the same as airline travel, estimated to take 90 minutes. In addition to Houston and Dallas, the company plans a stop near College Station.

Along the route, residents and elected leaders who feel the project doesn’t benefit them and ruins the rural character of their communities have banded together to oppose it. State lawmakers, among them Sens. Charles Schwertner, R-Georgetown, and Lois Kolkhorst, R-Brenham, and State Reps. Cecil Bell, R-Magnolia and Byron Cook, R-Corsicana, have repeatedly questioned the need for the project.

"Transportation is a critical issue for our state, which requires thoughtful and pragmatic solutions for today and the future," said State Rep. John Wray, R-Waxahachie. "Texas Central has failed to demonstrate a viable or comprehensive plan addressing the real mobility needs of our state, and the legislation filed today seeks to address the legitimate issues posed by this project."

One of the major issues dividing Texas Central and opponents is the company's right to acquire property via eminent domain. The company claims it has rights as a railroad to use eminent domain, though some landowners have challenged that.

Courts, thus far, have issued mixed rulings. In a handful of cases, either courts have not approved the company's requests or Texas Central has pulled the claims. In a Harris County case last month, in which the landowner did not appear in court, Texas Central was granted a default summary judgement allowing it to survey property and declaring it a railroad.

Lawmakers, many who contend Texas Central does not have eminent domain authority, have said many of their concerns focus on landowner rights.

"Texans have always had a deep respect for the land and for the law," Kolkhorst said. "That's why the Legislature must tread lightly when property rights are at risk."
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Old February 23rd, 2017, 05:16 PM   #6736
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This is what the real problem in the US is. Not immigration. Not Muslims. Not bathrooms. People like that.

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"Texans have always had a deep respect for the land and for the law," Kolkhorst said. "That's why the Legislature must tread lightly when property rights are at risk."
Yeah right except for when it's about polluting rivers and fields for the sake of scraping up a few more barrels of oil
If it wasn't so incredibly stupid that would be the funniest thing I've read all day.
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Old February 23rd, 2017, 06:09 PM   #6737
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Of course they would oppose it it does nothing to help them directly albeit greater productivity and a larger tax base in the urban areas would subsidize these districts.
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Old February 23rd, 2017, 09:45 PM   #6738
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But greater funding through increased taxation of other districts is a direct benefit. It's only because rural idiots think they're the exemplar of the mythological Independent American who doesn't need anyone that they're opposed to the project. Just like how most rural electorates don't understand that their lifestyle is subsidized by metropolitan areas.

It's the same kind of logic southern New Hampshire is dealing with. A northward extension of the Lowell commuter line from Lowell through the more urbanized Merrimack Valley region is being threatened by state legislators from rural districts, whose businesses only exist because there are enough people living in Nashua, Manchester, and Concord to sell to and pay taxes.

Short O/T rant, but it's just exhausting to see this same, flawed logic happen all over this country.
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Old February 23rd, 2017, 11:48 PM   #6739
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And someone here wrote that HSR in Texas would be easier because no public money is involved. That's just laughable... They are going to kill it even more thoroughly there.
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Old February 24th, 2017, 07:03 AM   #6740
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Support Grows for a Seattle to Vancouver Bullet Train

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People have been talking about building a Pacific Northwest high-speed rail line for a long time. The George H.W. Bush’s 1991 transportation act authorized a high-speed rail corridor from Eugene, Oregon, to Vancouver, British Columbia. Paul Schell, Seattle’s mayor from 1998-2002, was a big proponent of a Portland to Vancouver line. According to transit advocate Shefali Ranganathan, Transportation Choices Coalition Choices executive director, there was a brief push to use American Recovery and Reinvestment Act funds to invest in real high-speed rail.

The idea is once again in the headlines. With a coalition of tech millionaires and billionaires, politicians and investment groups behind the renewed push, it seems plausible high-speed rail could finally move from fantasy to reality in the Northwest. The idea is at least real enough that Washington Governor Jay Inslee put $1 million in his proposed budget to fund a feasibility study.

Connecting commerce is, of course, the driving force behind this latest push. Last September, a group of Northwest tech industry leaders, including Bill Gates and Microsoft CEO Satya Nadella, as well as elected officials and other business people held a conference in Vancouver to discuss how better to connect Seattle and Vancouver as their populations and economies boom. A high-speed rail corridor that would cut travel time between the cities down to just one hour was a centerpiece of the conference.

Currently there are only a few options for traveling the 140 miles between Seattle and Vancouver and none of them are ideal. Driving can take as little as two and a half hours, but it’s rare that I-5 doesn’t have traffic jams these days (and getting rarer as the regional population continues to grow). The Amtrak train takes four hours, only runs a few times a day and often gets delayed by freight train traffic. Bolt and Greyhound Buses are cheap and do more runs a day than Amtrak, but also take four hours and get stuck in that same terrible I-5 traffic.

A one hour trip on high-speed rail would be a game changer.

Engineering consultants WSP/Parsons Brinckerhoff presented a high-level report on the feasibility of the rail project. Trains in Europe and Asia can travel up to 250 mph. At those speeds, a train could get between Seattle and Vancouver in an hour including interim stops in Everett and Bellingham. But getting those speeds would require building new rail infrastructure from scratch.

If successful, the report predicts the line would be extended to Portland and Eugene, Oregon, and eventually all the way to California’s high-speed rail line. A two-track rail corridor could support six to eight trains per hour, meaning someone could catch a train every 10 to 15 minutes.

“It’s being proposed as a tech industry talent draw, but I think it could be much more than that,” says Ranganathan. “If it’s an hour to Vancouver, I’ll tell you people will get out of their cars. The number one reason people make a switch to transit is convenience and reliability.”

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