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Old October 3rd, 2017, 08:50 PM   #4361
Haljackey
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Cool pics!

For that 401 widening, interesting to see how far away the collectors are from the express. Grass median between the two with the potential of filling it in with an extra lane + concrete median in the future?
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Old October 3rd, 2017, 10:36 PM   #4362
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^ The centre median (the one between the two opposing directions) widens out underneath the McLaughlin Road overpass for a reason that isn't apparent to me. The designers of the highway apparently considered direct ramps from the HOV lanes to McLaughlin Road, but they were ruled out as part of the design. It is obvious that when the bridges were rebuilt for McLaughlin and Mavis 10 or so years ago, a wider 401 cross-section was considered than is currently being built.
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Old October 4th, 2017, 01:13 AM   #4363
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Quote:
Originally Posted by geogregor View Post
Yeah, you can see that junction,leading to A-40 through Trois-Rivieres was designed as exit rather than the main through route.
Just recently (past 5 years or so) the 40 "west" interchange on the 55 was reconfigured to a trumpet design, it used to be a full half-cloverleaf (two loops) in preparation for the 40 to pass over the city. It seems a waste of money at least for the forseeable future (like 40 years...) to build this road though since the city route seems fine. Quebec, especially in this kind of "central" region had very ambitious plans for motorways! The current setup brings the amusing end result of A-10, 20 and 40 having all overlaps on A-55 for a bit...

Meanwhile in Toronto, typical driving abilities on display
http://www.cp24.com/news/eight-peopl...gton-1.3617374

Beige Toyotas are strangely driven so particularly badly... but I'm impressed two people got ejected from the car and flew over the median into the opposite carriageway and so far, are still alive and didn't get run over by the 120 km/h traffic...
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Old October 4th, 2017, 01:11 PM   #4365
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Vancouver BC Freeway Interchange

Just came across this impressive pic of a freeway interchange in metro Vancouver.

Cape Horn Interchange: Trans Canada Freeway, BC Highway Route 7 and Mary Hill Bypass ; Vancouver, BC


[IMG]2014 Ministry of Transportation and Infrastructure’s Deputy Minister’s Consulting Engineers Awards by B.C. Ministry of Transportation and Infrastructure, on Flickr[/IMG]
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Old October 4th, 2017, 01:16 PM   #4366
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Trans Canada Freeway ; Vancouver, BC


[IMG]Vancouver BC by Ian Threlkeld, on Flickr[/IMG]
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Old October 4th, 2017, 04:24 PM   #4367
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sonysnob View Post
^ The centre median (the one between the two opposing directions) widens out underneath the McLaughlin Road overpass for a reason that isn't apparent to me. The designers of the highway apparently considered direct ramps from the HOV lanes to McLaughlin Road, but they were ruled out as part of the design. It is obvious that when the bridges were rebuilt for McLaughlin and Mavis 10 or so years ago, a wider 401 cross-section was considered than is currently being built.
Better to over-design than under-design *cough* *cough* 407 and 427 overpasses.

Maybe the collectors and express are so far apart so it will be easier to build the Credit River bridges perhaps?
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Old October 4th, 2017, 06:03 PM   #4368
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Originally Posted by Kanadzie View Post
nice pictures

Quebecers always seem to take A-20 between Montreal and Quebec instead of the 40. I'm not sure why aside from historical reasons (A-40 was originally tolled) and the hillier terrain, certainly I much prefer its relatively open traffic flow compared to the often congested or slow 20...
It depends where your departure point / destination is in Montreal. For anyone living in Laval or the North Shore, the A-40 is faster, but for anyone on the Island of Montreal or the South Shore, the A-20 is usually faster. It allows you to bypass the busy streches of the Metropolitain (A-40) and Décarie (A-15).
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Old October 4th, 2017, 09:25 PM   #4369
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Haljackey View Post
Better to over-design than under-design *cough* *cough* 407 and 427 overpasses.

Maybe the collectors and express are so far apart so it will be easier to build the Credit River bridges perhaps?
Near the Credit River, the express and collector lanes are a pretty standard distance apart. The space between the concrete of the future collector lanes and the existing highway will pretty much be filled up with (asphalt) paved shoulders and a concrete median barrier.

Only the driving lanes are surfaced in concrete, the shoulders will be asphalt, and they haven't really been started yet.
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Old October 4th, 2017, 09:44 PM   #4370
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nick.english.dept View Post
Just came across this impressive pic of a freeway interchange in metro Vancouver.

Cape Horn Interchange: Trans Canada Freeway, BC Highway Route 7 and Mary Hill Bypass ; Vancouver, BC


[IMG]2014 Ministry of Transportation and Infrastructure’s Deputy Minister’s Consulting Engineers Awards by B.C. Ministry of Transportation and Infrastructure, on Flickr[/IMG]
This is just part of this pile of spaghetti - it doesn't show the east half with the Port Mann bridge, Mary Hill Bypass connection, or United Way overpass. For anyone not local, this has actually been built - it's not just a render.
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Old October 4th, 2017, 09:46 PM   #4371
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nick.english.dept View Post
Trans Canada Freeway ; Vancouver, BC


[IMG]Vancouver BC by Ian Threlkeld, on Flickr[/IMG]
Highway 1 westbound, just north of the 1st Ave. interchange. Looking north toward the North Shore mountains - specifically Grouse.
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Old October 4th, 2017, 11:37 PM   #4372
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I like how the main freeways are signed on local roads:

DSC09842
by Geogregor*, on Flickr


IMG_4516
by Geogregor*, on Flickr

A20, east of Quebec City, towards New Brunswick:

DSC09843
by Geogregor*, on Flickr


DSC09844
by Geogregor*, on Flickr


DSC09846
by Geogregor*, on Flickr

Patrzac na zachod:

DSC09848
by Geogregor*, on Flickr

On the A20:

IMG_4518
by Geogregor*, on Flickr


IMG_4519
by Geogregor*, on Flickr
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Old October 5th, 2017, 01:36 AM   #4373
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nick.english.dept View Post
Trans Canada Freeway ; Vancouver, BC


[IMG]Vancouver BC by Ian Threlkeld, on Flickr[/IMG]
I like the way they have marked lane signage here. It is pretty clear which lane leads where.

In Ontario, exit signages can be confusing. Looking at the signage you cannot know whether the rightmost lane will exit directly or a new exit lane will emerge on the right.

I also hate these signages in Ontario. Look so ugly:



The best I have seen were in South Africa. It can't get any more clear and simple than this:

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Old October 5th, 2017, 02:10 AM   #4374
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My first question would be how consistent is that signage in BC? If it's not consistent on every (or most) exits then it's not much better than Ontario. Once you've lived in Ontario for a while it becomes easier to understand the exits, but I can understand why it might be confusing for someone who doesn't live there.

Essentially, if a single lane exits onto the local roads then you will rarely see any signage, especially through rural areas. A new lane forms just for the exit. If multiple lanes exit then you will see something like this:



You may see that symbol on the overhead signs as well. For freeway-freeway interchanges the signage is always present and clear.
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Old October 5th, 2017, 05:20 AM   #4375
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I know about this signage. I meant something else. The same signage is used for 2 different situations:

1. A new lane emerges for exit on the right and the erstwhile rightmost lane splits into two (straight and right exit)

2. No new lane emerges for exit. The rightmost lane exits and the lane second from right splits. This happens when highway loses one lane after an exit. For example, at 400 northbound, the highway loses one lane after Finch exit (6 lanes to 5 lanes). So no new exit lane emerges before Finch exit and the rightmost lane completely exits.

The signage is same for both the situations. In the first situation, if you are driving in the rightmost lane and you intend to continue straight, you don't have to change any lane. Just continue on the left side of the fork. However, in the second situation, you need to move one lane left to avoid exiting. Usually you get to know that when you see thicker lane markings on your left instead of right but it can be difficult to act fast enough with safety.

With the above styles in Vancouver or South Africa you can be sure of the lanes which are heading straight in any situation. You can count your lane's number from the median and know the "future" of your lane. In the Vancouver example here, it is clear that all 3 lanes will continue straight. That means a new exit lane will emerge and you don't have to worry about exiting if you are driving in the rightmost lane.
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Old October 6th, 2017, 12:39 AM   #4376
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I don't like the ZA sign - the route numbers without shield look too similar to the destinations, and the through route indication is confusing with the route indication being to the right as opposed to below or above (e.g. German or indeed Nord American style)

I think the new lane exit doesn't get that random "exit/sortie" rectangle.

Ontario's signs though... they somehow manage to use nonstandard and weird elements (like the exit only signs) and also look frankly cheap and ugly.
Why not copy the American or, if avoiding written words is desired, the Quebec style (which is similar enough to be self-evident to Americans...)
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Old October 6th, 2017, 02:44 AM   #4377
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Quote:
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I don't like the ZA sign - the route numbers without shield look too similar to the destinations, and the through route indication is confusing with the route indication being to the right as opposed to below or above (e.g. German or indeed Nord American style)

I think the new lane exit doesn't get that random "exit/sortie" rectangle.

Ontario's signs though... they somehow manage to use nonstandard and weird elements (like the exit only signs) and also look frankly cheap and ugly.
Why not copy the American or, if avoiding written words is desired, the Quebec style (which is similar enough to be self-evident to Americans...)
Quebec signage doesn't indicate option lanes particularly well, that would be a poor signage style to emulate in my opinion. Ontario has used it's current signage legend since the early 90's. At that time it was pretty progressive for north american standards. While I generally prefer the arrow per lane signage that has recently been rolled out in the US MUTCD, it has it's flaws as well, particularly in showing closely spaced interchanges that both feature options lanes.
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Old October 7th, 2017, 02:59 AM   #4378
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Highway 407 and Highway 418 construction in Ontario, north and east of Oshawa.






Nice photos, I think this part of the extension could be done in 2019.
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Old October 7th, 2017, 03:01 AM   #4379
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So when the concrete lanes are done, are they going to shift the main lanes onto those lanes?
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Old October 7th, 2017, 03:09 AM   #4380
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^ Yes, once the new collector lanes are finished (the concrete lanes) all traffic will be shifted onto them so that the existing lanes can be totally reconstructed to make up the future express lanes.
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