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Old September 14th, 2007, 02:10 AM   #1
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Knowledge Capital

Been Quite a few Knowledge Capital stories and news articles over the last few weeks. Perhaps we need a thread. (The Tesco one has already been posted, etc, etc)


A BREAST cancer research unit is set to make Manchester one of the top European centres for studies into the disease.

Up to 15 scientists at the £5m unit - announced today by the charity Breakthrough Breast Cancer - will try to find more sophisticated treatments by developing ways of working out which drugs will be most suitable for each patient.

Along with colleagues at two other new centres, in Edinburgh and London, they aim to pinpoint the earliest signs of the disease and ways to prevent it developing.

Every year, 700 people are diagnosed with breast cancer in Greater Manchester and they will benefit from any research trials carried out at the new unit, when it opens next year.

The centre will be based in newly-refurbished laboratories at the Patterson Institute of Cancer Research, next to The Christie, Manchester's specialist cancer hospital.

It will have close links with the newly-opened Nightingale Centre and Genesis Prev- ention Centre, at Wythenshawe.

Anthony Howell, professor of medical oncology at Manchester University, who will be the director of the new unit, said: "It will draw on the enormous strengths in basic and clinical research which exist here and our work will focus on ways to diagnose breast cancer earlier and prevent the disease from occurring.

"Along with our existing research interests in this field, this centre has the potential to make Manchester one of the top breast cancer research clusters in Europe, if not worldwide.

"The aim of our work will be to create new, more sophisticated treatments and more accurately predict which therapies are most likely to succeed for any individual."

Charles Streuli, professor of cell biology at Manchester University, and Nigel Bundred, professor in surgical oncology at the University Hospital of South Manchester and Christie hospitals, will also be directors of the new unit.

Breast cancer is the most common cancer in Britain, yet survival rates are among the lowest in Europe.
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Old October 25th, 2007, 02:18 AM   #2
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Academy plans set to transform education
Published Tuesday 16th October 07 in Education and learning news

Plans to completely transform education and learning in Manchester with the establishment of seven brand new industry-linked Academies are now moving forwards at a fast pace.

Sponsors and the Council are working together to progress the unique proposals that are very different from other Academies being established elsewhere nationally.

Manchester's proposals will see seven brand new Academies open in Manchester by September 2010, each one linked to future growth sectors of the city's economy, and each one linked also to other schools in the city.

It is expected that at least 120,000 new jobs will be created in Manchester over the next ten years and the city's Academy plans will ensure that local pupils are well placed to be able to benefit from this.

The Academies will be fully inclusive and will work collaboratively with all schools across the city to help drive up standards and to ensure that pupils learn directly from industry and education specialists the skills they need in order for them to be able to access further and higher education, and get good jobs in the future.

There will be six Academy specialisms including creative and media; digital communications; health; finance and business; construction and the built environment; and business and enterprise.

Key sponsors of individual Academies are Bovis Lend Lease, Laing O'Rourke, BT, The Co-operative Group, Central Manchester and Manchester Children's University Hospital NHS Trust, Manchester Airport, Willow Park Housing Trust, and Manchester College of Arts and Technology (MANCAT).

Manchester City Council and MANCAT will also be co-sponsors of each of the Academies.

Other organisations offering further support to the Academies include City College, ITV Granada, Microsoft and BBC.

The Council's Academy proposals complement the work already underway through the Government's Building Schools for the Future (BSF) programme to rebuild each high school in the city. Together this represents a £500 million investment in the city's schools.

Councillor Sheila Newman, Executive Member Children's Services, Manchester City Council, said: "There is no doubt that the sponsors' involvement in our Academy plans will be key to radically changing and improving the educational experience of pupils in the city's schools.

"Pupils at all schools will benefit from the proposals as the Academies' business sponsors will work collaboratively, sharing their knowledge, expertise and facilities with schools across the city. "Most importantly however, these plans will improve the life chances and future success of all pupils by ensuring that they leave school with the right skills and qualifications that will give them the best possible chance of accessing further and higher education and good jobs in the future."

The Academies will be owned by Academy Trusts which will be charitable companies limited by guarantee. The Board of the Trust will also be the Governing Body of each school and will be responsible for the running of the Academy and its outcomes.

Each Academy will be headed up by a Principal and a national recruitment drive to find the right individuals for the posts is due to begin shortly. It is hoped that appointments to the posts could be made as early as Spring 08 to enable the Principals to be directly involved in the process of establishing each Academy.

Pauline Newman, Director Children's Services, Manchester City Council, said: "The Academies will help shift children's and young people's attitudes and ambitions by offering enriched, challenging and fulfilling learning experiences.

"They will help ensure that young people leave school as emotionally resilient, confident, competent citizens with the skills and qualifications they need to be able to realise their full potential in education, training, and employment."

Five of the planned seven new Academies would replace five existing high schools - Brookway, Parklands, Plant Hill, North Manchester Boys, and North Manchester Girls - which would all close as the new Academies open. There will also be two brand new purpose built Academies, one in east Manchester and one on Queen's Road / Rochdale Road, in Harpurhey.

A period of formal public consultation on the proposed closure of the five high schools begins on 5 November and runs until 21 December.
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Old October 25th, 2007, 10:57 PM   #3
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Renovo makes its mark
Kevin Feddy
15/10/2007


MANCHESTER-based Renovo Group has become the first UK company to win a top European biotech business award.

Renovo, which is developing drugs to prevent wounds from scarring after surgery, scooped what is regarded as the continent's most important and valuable prize for small and medium-sized companies.

More than 500 people from the worlds of science, business and politics saw Renovo collect the 2007 European Biotechnica Award at a ceremony in Hanover, Germany.

The firm beat 27 hopefuls to the accolade, which is worth up to £70,000. Danish companies took second and third prizes. It was the competition's fifth year.

Biotech experts from six countries assessed the marketability, relevance and impact of products to decide the winner.

Prof Peter Stadler, the panel's chairman, said: "Renovo impressed the jury with its high scientific standards, its pioneering products in a very important area of application that has hitherto suffered from low standards of treatment, its strong financial situation and its genuine entrepreneurial spirit."

Expertise

Prof Mark Ferguson, Renovo's co-founder and chief executive, said the honour was further recognition of the strength of Renovo's research and development expertise, its product pipeline and the huge potential market for its drugs, which he believes is worth £2bn a year in the US alone.

Renovo's lead product, Juvista, has been safely administered to more than 1,500 people in several trials, which have yielded `highly positive' results. Another drug, Zesteem, is also undergoing trials.

Prof Ferguson established Renovo with Dr Sharon O'Kane in 2000. The Manchester University spin-out, based on Grafton Street, was floated in 2006.

In June, it struck a deal with drug maker Shire for the rights to Juvista, which could be worth more than £400m to Renovo.

Last year, Renovo was recognised as a worldwide technology pioneer, while Prof Ferguson was named Manchester director of the year.
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Old October 25th, 2007, 10:58 PM   #4
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£2m DNA code quest
deborah haile
12/10/2007

SCIENTISTS in Manchester will be at the forefront of a £2.2m search to pinpoint the gene that causes osteoarthritis.

The crippling condition, with joint pain and reduced mobility, is one of the biggest causes of disability in the elderly, affecting about two million people.

Scientists say the two-year project announced today - involving the DNA screening of thousands osteoarthritis sufferers - could lead to a test to predict those most likely to develop the condition and drugs that could slow the progression. Currently there is no effective drug treatment.

The study will be conducted by a team of genetic experts from across Britain, including Professor Bill Ollier and Dr Gillian Wallis, from Manchester University.

It will involve blood samples from 8,000 people suffering from osteoarthritis of the hip and knee being collected and then sent to the university's centre for integrated genomic medical research. DNA will then be studied to look for common genetic patterns among sufferers.

Samples from 6,000 healthy people will also be studied to compare. The study aims to identify genetic changes, known as polymorphisms, which increase the risk of people developing osteoarthritis, where the cartilage at the ends of bones wears away.

Prof Ollier said: "This is a major study to help identify the underlying genetic factors explaining osteoarthritis and Manchester is pleased to be involved in such a significant project."

Experts hope the study, funded by the Arthritis Research Campaign (ARC), will pinpoint up to 20 genes that indicate a risk for the condition.

It was thought osteoarthritis was an inevitable consequence of ageing but experts now believe there is a genetic link.

People with a parent or sibling with osteoarthritis are two to three times more likely to develop osteoarthritis.

Prof Alan Silman, of ARC, said: "With modern technology we have a unique opportunity to unlock the genetic code."
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Old October 25th, 2007, 11:12 PM   #5
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Article in the MEN dated the 22 0f October. Can't find it online.

Manchester scientists are teaming up with top aviation firms to create a world-leading flight research centre. More than 120 staff from across the University will be part of the Aerospace Research Institute. (I'll scan the full article at a later date)

One hundred years ago when the Wright brothers undertook their first historic flight, they could never have envisaged the influence their invention would have upon the development of humankind. In the early days, the main challenges were to ensure flight safety, to enable aircraft to carry more people and to fly faster and further. During the post war period, the cost of air travel became the focus of attention; prices fell and demand grew significantly. The latter half of the Twentieth Century saw exponential growth in air travel driving the development of the Global Economy and the multicultural society.

It is now clear that aviation will play an even more significant role in the future development of society than it has in the past. However, this will be dependent upon its ability to address its environmental impact and engage with the sustainability agenda.

The Centre for Aviation Transport and the Environment is a multi-disciplinary research centre based at the Manchester Metropolitan University. The Centre's mission is to facilitate the integrated social, economic and environmental sustainability of the aviation industry through critical research and analysis, and through knowledge transfer between the academic, industry, regulatory and NGO sectors.


Found more information here. (click on link/PDF brochure/info to the left)

http://www.cate.mmu.ac.uk/index.asp?chg=who
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Old October 29th, 2007, 01:57 PM   #6
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the government is renting at least one 'academy' school in london that has no pupils because they overestimated the demand. the owner of the academy is laughing as they're getting a steady stream of income for i think many years. i wonder if the government was in bed with these companies. the PFI secondary school in question is almost as big as they get.
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Old October 29th, 2007, 02:00 PM   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jrb View Post
MANCHESTER-based Renovo Group has become the first UK company to win a top European biotech business award.
clearly m.e.n. poor grammer or m.e.n. factual error.
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Old November 18th, 2007, 12:15 AM   #8
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Biotech innovation centre opens in Manchester
16/11/2007

Biotech giant Syngenta and the University of Manchester have launched an innovation centre that will bring together chemists, engineers and physicists.

The Syngenta Sensors University Innovation Centre has received half a million pounds of funding from the national technology strategy board to develop next-generation sensor technology for the food supply chain.

One of the first research and development projects involves creating devices based on radio frequency identification that allow retailers to establish more accurate best-before dates on fruit and vegetables.

Dr Bruce Grieve, director of the Manchester-based centre, said: "Our research aims to develop smaller simplified sensors that will operate rather like Oyster cards on the London Underground.

"They will use a battery-free method to store data and then receive pulses of energy from transmitters that will provide just enough power to transmit their data in return."

Syngenta, which employs 21,000 people in more than 90 countries, reported a half-year sales rise of nine per cent to $5.7 billion (£2.8 billion) in July, with new product sales climbing by 15 per cent.
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Old December 12th, 2007, 12:19 AM   #9
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Bioscience firms join Umic
10/12/2007

The University of Manchester Incubator Company (Umic) has welcomed two new bioscience companies to its Grafton Street laboratory and facilities.

Conformetrix is creating the technology required for three-dimensional representation of drug molecules, while Imagen-Biotech is developing screening and assay development services for new pharmaceutical drugs.

The announcement comes as Manchesterbiomedical giant Renovo takes on a further 25,000 sq ft at Umic's core technology facility.

Dr Linda Magee, head of Bionow at the Northwest Development Agency's biotechnology cluster programme, said: "I believe that Umic's cohort of flourishing biotechs together with a pipeline of next-generation companies is even better than envisaged seven years ago by the NWDA.

"The Manchester bio-incubator has proved to be a real hub of activity and it's great to see two more exciting companies join."

Hi-tech firm Greenlight Computers is also taking on extra space at the north campus incubator, while business solutions company Winning Pitch has expanded its operations at One Central Park.
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Old January 17th, 2008, 05:07 PM   #10
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Nano-tech firm reaches global deal


Nanoco Technologies Ltd., a nano-materials company based in Manchester, has reached an agreement in which Sigma-Aldrich in the US will distribute its luminescent quantum dot nanocrystals globally.

Potential value of the agreement was not disclosed. Nanotechnology involves working on an atomic or molecular level.

Nanoco, a University of Manchester spinout, is a nanotechnology company that holds patents related to industrial-scale production of Quantum Dots. Quantum Dots are fluorescent semiconductor nanocrystals that can be used in a range of applications from biological imaging to next generation solar cells and displays.

Under the terms of the agreement, Sigma-Aldrich will distribute research quantities (less than 1 g) of seven core-shell semiconductor quantum dots through the Aldrich Materials Science initiative of its Research Specialties business. The nanocrystals will be marketed and distributed under the brand name Lumidots.
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Old January 20th, 2008, 12:11 PM   #11
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DxS seeks to build on Young BioTechnologist of the Year award

From http://www.investinmanchester.com/newsevents-n2089

DxS seeks to build on Young BioTechnologist of the Year award

17/01/2008


DxS, one of the northwest's internationally-recognised biotechnology firms, has a lot to celebrate in 2008. Based at the University of Manchester Incubator Company facilities DxS has not only grown its staff by 28% inside a year and expanded its laboratory facilities, the company received a prestigious award at the recent BioNow 2007 awards evening.

Dr Nicola Thelwell and her product development team were recognised in BioNow's Young BioTechnologist of the Year award sponsored by Novartis.

Dr Thelwell's team developed a diagnostic to help identify DNA changes – mutations - in the K-RAS gene. This gene is found in a range of cancers and the presence of these mutations is linked to a patients' response to some cancer treatments.

Nicky is keen that her entire team share the award's glory! Commenting on the award Nicky said: "I am delighted to have had the opportunity to work on such an interesting and scientifically challenging product that will provide a valuable health benefit to many cancer patients.

"I want to thank the DxS product development team that I work with, they have done a fantastic job and worked really hard over the last 12 months, their efforts are hugely appreciated and its great to have this recognised by the industry."

DxS's technology is superior in the field of cancer. DxS kits are highly selective and sensitive, able to detect significant mutations that are often missed by sequencing methods.

No wonder then that Amgen Inc., a leading global biotechnology company chose DxS's K-RAS kit to identify which colorectal cancer patients will respond to Amgen's Vectibix cancer therapy.

During 2007 the company has also welcomed nine new members of staff during 2007, and expanded its laboratory facility by 33%, with plans underway for further expansion and a recruitment drive in the New Year.

Beverly Taylor, Head of Primary Production at award sponsors Novartis Vaccines, Liverpool, said that as a major biotechnology manufacturer Novartis had been proud to play a part in recognising the achievements of emerging talent within the region's scientific community.

"Dr Thelwell was a worthy winner," Beverley commented. "She has led the development of products that are not only the best in class from a technical perspective but also meet the regulatory and clinical requirements needed to allow the introduction of personalised medicine in cancer."

Martino Picardo, general manager of the University of Manchester Incubator Company (UMIC), added: "We have been proud to watch DxS grow and take its place amongst the northwest's 'bio stars'.

"DxS joined UMIC as a bio start-up in 2000, with just its two founder scientists. In 2008 DxS is not only a highly successful company – but it has helped to put personalised medicine and Manchester's BioIncubator firmly on the global biotech map!

"What is really exceptional about DxS is that it provides such a great example to the region's bio-community – an example of young entrepreneurs being supported and nurtured alongside commercial development and success."
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Old January 21st, 2008, 05:10 PM   #12
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Renovo eyes multi-billion US market for scar drug
Biotech company founder compares potential of Juvista to Botox
By Claire Shoesmith


Mark Ferguson, chief executive of Manchester-based wound care specialist Renovo, has likened the revenue potential of the group's flagship product Juvista to Botox.

At comparable pricing levels Juvista has the potential to generate peak sales in the US alone of about $4bn, he said. Specialist life science analysts Nomura Code meanwhile are forecasting annual global sales of $1.2bn.

“The nearest comparable is Botox because this is a market where almost certainly a big segment will be self paid by the patient,” he said.

Addressing the JP Morgan Healthcare conference in the US earlier this month, Ferguson said he was not claiming the drug would definitely generate this amount of money, but simply wanted to reiterate its potential importance in the wound care market.

“This is a virgin market with no drugs,” he told delegates. “Even with conservative pricing estimation and conservative penetration this is a multibillion-dollar opportunity.”

Samir Devani, an analyst at Nomura Code, was also upbeat, saying that in terms of commercialisation potential, Juvista is one of the most exciting developments in European biotech activity at the moment. “There is nothing out there that prevents scarring,” he said. “This is a very, very big project.”

Others however aren't so sure. Paul Cuddon, an analyst at KBC Peel Hunt, said that while the science behind Juvista is excellent, the extent of the commercial potential is uncertain.

Successful



Renovo, a spinout from Manchester University that listed on the London's main market in 2006 and has since seen its shares rise 41 per cent, is seeking to make its mark in the wound care market with the development of a series of drugs that reduce scarring. According to Ferguson, a former scientist at the university, about 42 million people in the US go to hospital for a cut and in about 40 per cent of these cases, the use of Juvista, Renovo's flagship product, is likely to be appropriate.

So far, trials have shown Juvista to be successful in about 70 per cent of cases and half of those success stories experience a permanent reduction in scarring. “Renovo believes this drug works,” said Ferguson. “This is a permanent reduction in scarring you get just from one injection of Juvista.”

Ferguson meanwhile is banking on the versatility of the drug making it a success as it can be used in anything from trauma and burns cases through to cosmetic surgery. However, he said that while the skin market itself is huge, the area of nerve repair has greater potential because although it is smaller, it is able to command premium prices.

Last month Renovo reported a full-year loss of £23.2m, more than double that recorded in the prior year, but made its first revenue after signing an $825m agreement with drug giant Shire Pharmaceuticals for the rights to Juvista in the US. The shares also fell that day after Renovo said its mole removal phase II trial had failed.

Ferguson dismissed this, saying the problems stemmed from issues with the way different types of skin heals, rather than problems with the drug. This year the shares are up 8 per cent.
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Old January 21st, 2008, 06:12 PM   #13
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Jane Davies:
Think locally, act globally

I believe that the main competition for UK-based science parks will come, not from a neighbouring science park, but from one on the other side of the world. Leaders must therefore create effective international networks to enable them to attract and retain companies at an international level.

Over the past few years we have focused on positioning Manchester Science Park as an internationally accessible location, concentrating on building relationships with businesses, universities, government and other science parks around the globe. In just a few years this has resulted in numerous companies locating their European or UK headquarters in Manchester, including the Research Triangle Institute from North Carolina, Oxyrane from South Africa and IGM Resins from the Netherlands.

With the creation of the Manchester International Innovation Centre (MIIC) we now offer first class accommodation for overseas companies, which are visiting the UK to assess the viability of setting up or expanding their business in this country. If they decide to go ahead, they can stay in the MIIC for another 12 months at a reasonable rent whilst we help them to build their own networks, secure customers and revenue and, finally, move to a permanent location. Working in partnership with MIDAS's International Links programme, we are playing our part in attracting inward investment by providing a 'soft landing' for overseas companies that decide to locate in Manchester.

I do believe that if all science park leaders in the UK take a global approach and really make a concerted effort to break out of a local mindset we could substantially increase UK competitiveness and harness worldwide business opportunities. In the last twelve months, 16 overseas companies have used the MIIC and 13 have stayed to do business in Manchester. We have welcomed delegations from 21 countries including Taiwan and India, so the interest is out there and we now just have to convert this into investment.

Having recently taken over the chairmanship of the UK Science Park Association (UKSPA), a movement with over 65 science park members, I know that many of the more mature parks are starting to embrace world-wide opportunities. But, with a combined strength of 3,400 tenant companies and employing some 75,000 people in the UK alone, a collective approach by science parks could make a significant impact on the economy of the UK.

Last year we hosted an "Intellectual Party" to mark the retirement of MSP's outgoing chairman John Allen. Representatives from innovation centres, science parks and universities around the globe, joined John in an attempt to identify the attributes that mature science parks will need for their future success.

The main findings highlighted that tomorrow's successful science parks will not be stand-alone ventures. They will be intimately connected to, and involved with, the implementation of national and regional innovation policies. Through professional management, increased networking, achieving greater mass and helping to attract investment into their SMEs, they will become an essential part of a more innovative Europe and leaders in the development of their local knowledge economy.

Science parks will also continue to engage with their local communities, stimulating economic, social and educational improvement, inputting into regional economic development plans and in many instances helping to shape the city's image and brand. As they thrive, science parks will become less reliant on public sector finance and become more closely linked with successful companies and research institutions. A mature science park will typically have great networks and alliances within the park itself, with its associated university, the regional business community, consultants, advisors and large commercial and financial institutions and alumni, and will become more sophisticated in its measurement of the effectiveness of these networks.

In the future science parks must act as a gateway and not a destination for successful companies and a pre-occupation with property and location will be replaced by a stronger focus on process.

This is increasingly important to regional and national competitiveness, especially whilst the UK and EU still have the advantage over economies such as China and India in their relative closeness to, and understanding of, complex high-value markets.

Jane Davies was appointed chief executive of Manchester Science Park in October 2000. Davies is also President of the European Division of the International Association of Science Parks (IASP) which represents 207 member parks and associates across Europe.
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Old January 23rd, 2008, 08:18 PM   #14
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The University of Manchester is leading a £2m project into the sustainability of nuclear power. The university has received funding from the Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC) and the Economic and Social Research Council (ESRC) for the project, which will seek to develop a methodology and decision-support system for assessing the sustainability of nuclear power. It will take into account both energy supply and demand. The project, which will last for three years, is being led by Professor Adisa Azapagic in the School of Chemical Engineering and Analytical Science.
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Old January 23rd, 2008, 08:19 PM   #15
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DsX, a biotechnology business based at the University of Manchester Incubator Company, has won a top accolade for its development work on a DNA-based product that will help assess patients' response to some cancer treatments. The company, which was founded back in 2007 and currently employs about 24 people, was named as BioNow's Young BioTechnologist of the Year. The award is sponsored by drug giant Novartis.
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Old January 29th, 2008, 04:28 PM   #16
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University in China tie-up

29/ 1/2008

NORTH west avaiation experts are helping China to control the environmental impact of its huge economic boom.

A Manchester Metropolitan University delegation has been in Beijing to sign an agreement with the Chinese authorities to transfer knowledge and to share research and training in the areas of aircraft noise and airport design.

The Chinese Civil Aviation Authority signed the agreement jointly with MMU's Centre For Air Transport And The Environment (CATE) and with ARUP, a civil engineering firm.

Economic powerhouse China has well-advanced plans to build 48 airports by 2011, bringing the total there to 200.

Callum Thomas, (pictured) MMU professor of sustainable aviation, said: "This is a strategic partnership with China to encourage and promote sustainable development and is in line with the discussions between Gordon Brown and the Chinese premier Chinese premier Wen Jiabao on issues relating to climate change.

"The growth of air transport has significant implications for the environment and these impacts have the potential to constrain growth in this vital industry if not properly managed."
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Old January 29th, 2008, 09:21 PM   #17
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Manchester University News.

http://www.manchester.ac.uk/aboutus/news/
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Old February 6th, 2008, 11:49 PM   #18
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Render below article.

£35 million new Christie centre – giving hospital largest patients trials unit in world
Artists impression of new trials unit - Click image for larger view The Christie Hospital has announced major new plans for a £35 million patient treatment centre – providing the famous cancer hospital with the biggest early trials unit in the world and an expanded world class chemotherapy centre.

Construction work will start at the hospital's main site in Withington later this year and will be finished by 2010.

The Christie already runs one of the largest clinical trials units in Europe, but this new development will double the number of early trials undertaken – bringing huge benefits to local patients. The research undertaken will lead to more effective treatment and more lives saved.

Clinical trials are research studies to find better ways to prevent, diagnose or treat cancer. They aim to find out if a new treatment is safe, has side-effects, and works better than established treatments. Around 2,400 Christie patients a year will be amongst the first in the world to benefit from the latest treatments.

The centre will also include a large laboratory for biomarker research. Biomarkers are beginning to play a critical role in drug development and can predict how patients will respond to a drug.

Professor Malcolm Ranson, head of the clinical trials unit at the Christie Hospital said: "This unit is tremendously exciting and hugely significant for cancer patients in the North West and for the Christie Hospital. It will make us a global leader in cancer research. Most importantly it will bring substantial benefit to local people because they will be among the first in the world to access the latest and most innovative treatments for cancer as they become available, giving them the best possible chance of survival."

The new centre will also be home to an expanded first-class chemotherapy facility which will allow the Christie to build on the major changes that are taking place in the way chemotherapy treatments are given. Advancing technology means more chemotherapy treatments are being developed and more treatments are being given as patients survive for longer.

Used alongside radiotherapy and surgery, chemotherapy is the use of drugs to destroy cancer cells. In the new centre, treatments will be increased from 30,000 to 36,000 per year. As the largest single site cancer centre in Europe, the Christie currently registers around 12,500 new patients and treats around 40,00 every year and this is increasing year on year. Christie doctors are also giving more chemotherapy to patients in other hospitals across the area as well as on the main hospital site.

The new building will include around 70 beds, 60 specialist treatment chairs where patients are given chemotherapy, 10 consulting suites, a phlebotomy room for blood tests, a pharmacy and two laboratories.

The announcement comes just weeks after the Christie confirmed plans to open two £17 million Christie radiotherapy centres in Salford and Oldham, providing Christie quality radiotherapy care much closer to patients' homes.

Caroline Shaw, Chief Executive of the Christie Hospital said: "We are delighted to move forward our plans for a new treatment centre on our main site, as well as our new radiotherapy centres in Salford and Oldham. We are going through one of the most significant times in the proud history of the Christie Hospital as we work to bring more world class cancer facilities to local people. Both these developments will strengthen our position as one of Europe's leading cancer centres and provide huge benefits to our patients. We will be able to save more lives affected by cancer than ever before."

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Old February 12th, 2008, 11:58 PM   #19
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Internet service provider UKFast has been short-listed in the Best Hosting Provider category at the ISPA awards. The Manchester-based firm, which recently doubled turnover to £4.2m, has won the award for the past three years. “We are delighted to be in the final for this category,” said managing director Lawrence Jones.
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Old February 13th, 2008, 12:16 AM   #20
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Am not sure yet but I might be going in one of their data centres tomorrow, through my mate since we have nothing else to do.
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