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Old November 17th, 2008, 04:19 PM   #141
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I think only Kish Island really has nice beaches for swimming and water sports...

The Caspian shore has extremely dangerous undercurrents, makes it unsuitable for swimming from the beach.

Iran is a place for cultural tourism, which there is nothing wrong with...

As for clubbing, I'm pretty board with going to clubs anyway... Iran has a vibrant rave scene which is much more fun!
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Old November 17th, 2008, 11:14 PM   #142
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to Persa and Alitezar, I understand but look at Americans, they only want to go to Amsterdam because they can smoke pot and for the red district, even though Amsterdam is a beautiful historic city with beautiful gardens etc... But they don't give a crap about those things. not everyone is like you and me. Yes I just loooove to walk in Esfahan streets because I enjoy the historic and beautiful streets and I can relate to the art but not every tourist wants that. I'm not saying we should only care about the ones who are coming to lay naked on the beach and go clubbing. I'm saying we should create a combination of both historic and fun tourism attraction and that's when you make the real money. And when I gave Turkey as an example it's because Turkey has done so. They have combined their historic tourism attraction (mostly not theirs, from the Greeks and Eastern Roman empire) with new modern and fun activities like clubbing, Amazing Restaurants and shopping malls. also foreigners have to have a good image of your country. (the reason I give Turkey as an example is because they are the closest to Iran haha.) Turks are good in something and that's copying other countries. they don't come up with crap but they do a hell of a job stealing others ideas. Turkish cities with tourist attraction look so nice and clean but the ones with no tourism attraction look like shit. it's because Turks are just for show but that's not bad; at least not in tourism business. After spending billions in tourism business and spending millions advertising it there are still Americans who think people ride camels in Turkey!
Its not all about being a historic country or else Egypt and India would be number ones in tourism attraction but they are not. France, Spain and USA are the first three. it's because everyone knows Egypt and India are poor countries that's why they don't want to go there. and what about USA? the oldest building in USA is probably 300 years old but they were ranked number 3 in tourism attraction and most of those tourists go to Florida, Hawaii, Las Vegas and Los Angles. and trust me there are absolutely no Historic sights in those cities.
Again I'm not saying all the tourists want to lay naked on the beach. there are many tourists who come to see the historic sights of a country but real money is in the combination of both.
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Old November 18th, 2008, 08:20 PM   #143
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Quote:
Originally Posted by siyavosh2002 View Post
to Persa and Alitezar, I understand but look at Americans, they only want to go to Amsterdam because they can smoke pot and for the red district, even though Amsterdam is a beautiful historic city with beautiful gardens etc... But they don't give a crap about those things. not everyone is like you and me. Yes I just loooove to walk in Esfahan streets because I enjoy the historic and beautiful streets and I can relate to the art but not every tourist wants that. I'm not saying we should only care about the ones who are coming to lay naked on the beach and go clubbing. I'm saying we should create a combination of both historic and fun tourism attraction and that's when you make the real money. And when I gave Turkey as an example it's because Turkey has done so. They have combined their historic tourism attraction (mostly not theirs, from the Greeks and Eastern Roman empire) with new modern and fun activities like clubbing, Amazing Restaurants and shopping malls. also foreigners have to have a good image of your country. (the reason I give Turkey as an example is because they are the closest to Iran haha.) Turks are good in something and that's copying other countries. they don't come up with crap but they do a hell of a job stealing others ideas. Turkish cities with tourist attraction look so nice and clean but the ones with no tourism attraction look like shit. it's because Turks are just for show but that's not bad; at least not in tourism business. After spending billions in tourism business and spending millions advertising it there are still Americans who think people ride camels in Turkey!
Its not all about being a historic country or else Egypt and India would be number ones in tourism attraction but they are not. France, Spain and USA are the first three. it's because everyone knows Egypt and India are poor countries that's why they don't want to go there. and what about USA? the oldest building in USA is probably 300 years old but they were ranked number 3 in tourism attraction and most of those tourists go to Florida, Hawaii, Las Vegas and Los Angles. and trust me there are absolutely no Historic sights in those cities.
Again I'm not saying all the tourists want to lay naked on the beach. there are many tourists who come to see the historic sights of a country but real money is in the combination of both.
to be honest my friend, i wouldn't like iran to have red district and craps like that, if i were the tourism Man in charge, i would just increase the facilites like

1) Build Plenty 5* Hotels In traditional look (like Shah Abbasi hotel, Tourist love this hotel) but have modern facilities like Wifi, Swimming pool, Jacouzi, Sauna etc....

2)Build all around the hotel with shops and attractions

3)build up the coasts and Islands, provide competitive deals

There is a hell lot of room for improvement in iran tourism
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Old November 18th, 2008, 08:24 PM   #144
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Quote:
Originally Posted by siyavosh2002 View Post
After spending billions in tourism business and spending millions advertising it there are still Americans who think people ride camels in Turkey!
What have Americans got to do with it? They probably think Turkey is a great big poultry farm. They know little even about the "old countries" in western Europe. They are on the other side of the world. They wouldnt go to Iran in numbers if it was the most liberal, hedonistic and well presented country in the world. Iran has problems attracting tourists from other parts of Iran and Shia pilgrims from Bahrain never mind American holiday makers.
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Old November 19th, 2008, 01:44 AM   #145
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OK guys. Netherlands is an example. I was trying to tell you what Americans think of Netherlands even though its a great country known for other things than red district.

and I gave Americans as an example because they are a rich country and their tourists contribute a lot to the tourism business around the world.
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Old December 2nd, 2008, 07:48 AM   #146
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Kish to host 4th intl. exhibition on hotel management

Kish to host 4th intl. exhibition on hotel management
MEHR NEWS | December 01, 2008

The 4th international exhibition on hotel management and the first catering centers show will kick off in Kish Island on December 15. Some 200 domestic and foreign companies will take part in this four-day event, IRNA reported.

India, Turkey, Thailand, Indonesia, Italy, Denmark, the Czech Republic, Germany, France, Canada, Japan, China, Brazil, Switzerland, Singapore and Austria are among the participant countries.

I hope that some foreign companies will get management contracts in Iran.
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Old December 10th, 2008, 07:56 AM   #147
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Jewish temple on Iran heritage list

Jewish temple on Iran heritage list
PRESS TV | December 09, 2008

Iran registers the Mausoleum of Esther and Mordecai, a holy shrine in Jewish belief, in the western city of Hamadan in its National Heritage List. Given the great historical link between Persian and Jewish people, the two heroes are of great respect among the Jewish people.

A queen of the Persian Empire in the Hebrew Bible, Esther is a heroine of the Biblical Book of Esther which is named after her. The mausoleum, which is visited by Jewish pilgrims from all over the world, is a brick construction that shelters two tombs of Esther and Mordecai. Adorned with some Hebrew inscription, the structure is the resting-place of Esther, the Achaemenian Queen and wife of King Xerxes (ruled Persia from 486 to 465 B.C.) and her uncle, Mardocai.

Esther and Mordecai by Aert de Gelder


The Shrine of Esther and Mordecai in Hamadan, Iran
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Old December 11th, 2008, 04:07 AM   #148
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Culinary Partnership continues between Iran’s Parsian International Hotels Company and Dusit International

Culinary Partnership continues between Iran’s Parsian International Hotels Company and Dusit International
e-Travel BA | December 10, 2008

The exchange program between Dusit International’s Dusit Thani College, Asia’s premier private hospitality college and Parsian International Hotels Company, Iran’s prominent hotel chain has seen a total of ten chef trainees from Iran participating in two days of on the job education to hone their culinary skills and get more exposed and acquainted to the ins and outs of kitchen-related tasks and responsibilities. Following the itinerary of the first batch of trainees, the aspiring chefs stayed and trained at Dusit Thani Pattaya from 27-29 November with the five-star hotel’s own culinary team showing them the techniques of food preparation particularly for buffet and moved on to Dusit Princess Srinakarin Bangkok to observe other buffet lay out style.

The students were accompanied and supervised by Kamran Pourmoezzi, Food and Beverage Consultant of the Parsian International Hotels Company in Iran. He revealed that the best four of the group will be sent to Le Cordon Bleu Dusit Culinary School for further nine months of training and the others will get advanced skill development at the Dusit Thani College. Le Cordon Bleu Dusit Culinary School is Southeast Asia’s first and finest cooking education and training establishment, also under the wing of Dusit International.

Kamran Pourmoezzi (left) is seen with aspiring Iranian chefs with their trainers from
Dusit Thani, Songglot Bamroongya and Thavat Sanpa-ngern (3rd and 5th left).
Good news! Parsian Hotels is the hotel company that manages the Esteghlal Tehran and Azadi Tehran (amongst others) hotels in Iran.
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Old December 12th, 2008, 08:50 AM   #149
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Iranian pedalling friends raising hope for children

Bangkokpost 12/12/2008


Two adventurous Iranians plan to ride bicycles from Bangkok to the South and on to Malaysia and Singapore to raise awareness about cancer.


Abdollah Mesbah, 55, and Keramat Azizzadeh, 39, arrived in Thailand only five days after Suvarnabhumi airport reopened.


The two Iranians, who can only speak Persian Farsi, made a bad start by taking a wrong turn from the airport and almost went to Pattaya before detouring back to Iran's Cultural Centre in the Ekamai area, where they stayed for almost one week before leaving on their cycling trip to Malaysia and Singapore. From Singapore they will take a ship to India or perhaps China if their three-month-long holiday permits.


The two left Bangkok heading to the South today.


"We want to bring a message of peace and friendship to as many people as possible. We also want to raise some money for children suffering from cancer in our country," said Mr Mesbah, a retired colonel from Tehran, speaking through an interpreter.


"We ride bicycles not only because they are a cheap mode of transportation, but also to bring our message to all commuters that the global environment is getting worse and we should help decrease global warming," added Mr Azizzadeh, who owns a small restaurant in the remote town of Astara near Turkey.


The two financed their cycling trip themselves and say their cause is a noble one. They had some support from Iran's Cultural Heritage, Handcrafts and Tourism Organisation and Iran's Cycling Organisation, as well as from Iranian embassies in the countries they visit.


The two have undertaken cycling trips to promote peace for more than a decade. Last year the pair cycled through Russia and Azerbaijan.


"It is a real eye-opening study tour, and it helps dispel perceptions that Thailand is dangerous, difficult to travel through and full of poverty and corruption. In fact, Thai people are similar to Iranian people - we are hospitable and easy-going.


"The Thais are very friendly to tourists and Thailand is also abundant and prosperous," said Mr Mesbah.





Iranian cyclists Abdollah Mesbah, left, and Keramat Azizzadeh in front of the Iran Cultural Centre in Bangkok before leaving for the South on their journey to raise awareness about cancer.
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Old January 11th, 2009, 02:11 AM   #150
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Iran’s mosaic city

Iran’s mosaic city
The National | January 10, 2009


Why go

A mere hour’s flight south from Tehran, a visit to Esfahan could alone justify a trip to Iran. It is hard to say whether the city’s immense charm lies in its aquamarine-tiled mosques and elegant gardens and palaces; in its location at the foot of the snow-capped Zagros mountains and along the curve of the Zayandeh river with its fairytale arched bridges; in its unique, majestic urban plaza and its evocative bazaar; or, year-round clear blue skies. Winters here are crisp and cool, summers sizzling, and spring balmy.

Undoubtedly the most elegant city in Iran, Esfahan was the Persian capital for a hundred-year period from 1588, when it flourished under the rule of the arts-loving despot Shah Abbas I. Traditionally a crossroads for international trade and diplomacy, the city has never ceased to wow visitors. A famous rhyme – ‘Esfahan nesf-e Jahan’ meaning ‘Esfahan is half the world’ – was even coined in its honour.

However, Esfahan is more than a living, breathing work of art: it is an industrial supremo, a modern, cosmopolitan city, with a population of over 1.5 million. Ethnically diverse – the Christian and Jewish minority live alongside the Muslims in peace – the streets are alive with the irrepressible vitality of its youthful residents. Whether you strike up a conversation with a local, lose yourself in the winding alleys of the old quarter or relax in one of the city’s cosy teahouses, you too will fall under Esfahan’s spell.


What to do

First stop has to be Imam Square also known as Naqsh-e Jahan Square, in the centre of town. Begun in 1602 and originally used as a polo ground, it’s one of the world’s largest – beating Russia’s Red Square – and is now a Unesco world heritage site. The grassy fountain-filled courtyard is the perfect spot for people-watching, a picnic or simply soaking up the splendid monuments that surround it, such as the massive Imam Mosque complex.

Adjacent to the Imam Mosque is the more intimate Sheikh Lotfollah Mosque – its intricately tiled dome never fails to mesmerise visitors. Opposite it, is the Ali Qapu Palace, one time roost of the Safavid rulers, and at the far end is the entrance to the Grand Bazaar. It, like the covered arcade that runs around the square, is your best bet for booty: miniature paintings, decorative tiles, enamel vases and plates, jewellery, carpets, clothes and accessories – from colourful scarves, to fake designer handbags, rupushes, a type of long coat, and hijabs – as well as nuts and sweets. The city is famous for gaz, a type of nougat.

Drag yourself away, if you can for another opportunity to savour high Persian culture in the form of Chehel Sotun Palace, with its mirror work, pillared hall and landscaped gardens, now filled with gaggles of friendly students. Conveniently, it’s also in the vicinity of the Museum of Contemporary Art, which exhibits works by both local and international artists.

Don’t forget to check out Jolfa, the Armenian quarter, south of the Zayandeh River. It’s dotted with churches, including Vank Cathedral which is famous for its striking religious tableaux. Whatever you do, be sure to take a sunset stroll along the banks of the river to the striking Khaju bridge, a discreet haunt for courting couples. After dark, visit a Zurkaneh or ‘House of Strength’. Here you’ll witness a centuries-old sporting ritual that fuses wrestling, aerobics, juggling, Sufi-whirling, music and drumming which is both arcane and amazing.


Where to stay

Budget

Many a visitor has accidentally stumbled upon the Isfahan Traditional Hotel whilst traipsing around the bazaar and vowed to stay here. It’s easy to see why: the hotel, the antithesis of a functional guesthouse is made up of two restored houses dating back from the Safavid era. The sixteen rooms with ensuite bathrooms are spacious, characterful, comfortable and surround a pretty courtyard. Expect to pay around US$62 (Dh228) for a double room. Isfahan Traditional Hotel, Baghghalandariha Alley, off Hakim Street (www.isfahanhotel.com; 0098 311 223 6677).

Mid-range

Dibai House Hotel is a gem, tucked away in an alley, next door to a mosque and the city’s oldest minaret. Just a ten minute walk from Imam Square, the 17th-century mansion has been lovingly restored and boasts an ornamental pool house. Of the ten rooms, only two have ensuite bathrooms which makes the twin room rate – around $86 (Dh316) per night – seem a trifle steep, but with a divan-strewn chaikhana or tea room in which to partake of the time-honoured brew and shisha ritual, dining room, two airy courtyards, and kind, helpful staff, you’ll be more than happy to fork out. Dibai House Hotel, 1 Masjid Ali Alley, Harunie(www.dibaihouse.com; 0098 311 220 9787).

Luxury

The five-star Abbasi is one of the most photogenic hotels in Iran – and certainly the flashiest. Housed in a former 17th-century caravanserai, its interiors feature gilt-encrusted ceilings, walls, frescoes and giant crystal chandeliers, so weighty that you wonder how they stay up. If you’re seeking fairytale opulence, this is the place to stay in town. Be sure to ask for a suite overlooking the vast orchard and flower-filled gardens (as some of the doubles can be surprisingly modest.) There’s a decent bookshop, boutique and giftshop in the marble lobby, but best of all is the health club, with pool, gym, sauna and steam room. The hotel is a magnet to the city’s sociable in-crowd, who gravitate towards its restaurants, and the lively chaikhana and outdoor café after dark – so it’s a great place to meet the locals. Expect to pay from around $210 (Dh770) for a suite. Abbasi Hotel, Amadegah Avenue (www.abbasihotel.com; 0098 311 222 6010).


Where to eat

Breakfast

Traditionally Iranians breakfast on flatbread (freshly baked and hot from the oven) chai, butter, cheese (like feta), a variety of jams, honey and eggs. People usually eat the first meal of the day at home, and Esfahanis are no exception. The vast majority of visitors will do the equivalent, tucking into a buffet in whatever hotel or guesthouse they’re staying at.

For a repast worthy of a Safavid royal, try the Chehel-sotoon Restaurant on the second floor of the Abbasi Hotel. Here you can breakfast to your heart’s content on the usual suspects: flatbread, toast, croissants, brioche, eggs (every which way), bacon, sausages, beans; but also, specialities such as asheh, or ash soup, made from lentils and noodles, and fereni, a yoghurt-like dessert made with rice flour, milk, sugar and rose water. As an added bonus, it’s all laid out in a grand, high-ceilinged hall, with tall windows, which overlooks the gardens. Chehel-sotoon Restaurant, Abbasi Hotel Amadegah Avenue (www.abbasihotel.com; 0098 311 222 6010).

If you’re south of the river, in the Armenian quarter, and can’t stomach a full breakfast, but require liquid refreshment head to the Shant Coffee shop, around the corner from Vank Cathedral, where the espresso and cappuccino come highly recommended. Shant, Vank Church Alley East Nazar Street (0098 311 628 7525).

Lunch

The Safreh Khaneh Naqsh-e-Jahan, a traditional restaurant close to the Sheikh Lotfollah Mosque, off Imam Square, is lively, fun and popular with locals. Through a courtyard, and up a flight of stairs (look for the neon sign), you’ll find a rooftop eyrie decorated with colourful tiles, stained-glass windows and divans. Try the dizi, a tasty stew of lamb, chickpeas and flatbread cooked and served in a stone jar or khoresht-e bademjan (aubergine stew). Safreh Khaneh Naqsh-e Jahan, off Imam Square (0098 311 222 3291).

When you’ve finished eating, you may want to head over to the Azadeghan tea house nearby. Decked out like an Aladdin’s cave, it’s popular with students and Bazaris – stallholders – alike, who flock here for the chai (served in small glasses and sucked through a cube of sugar), saffron-flavoured rock candy, pastries and a flavoured-tobacco shisha pipe. Azadegan, off Haj Mirza, off Mir-emad St. near Imam Square (0098 311 221 1225).

Dinner

Esfahan is known for its beryani, a dish of ground lamb, fried and then topped with spices. Try it, and the traditional Persian favourite, fesenjan, a rich, fragrant stew made from pomegranates, walnuts and chicken, at Shahrzad restaurant. Smart and elegant, with attentive staff, it’s just down the road from the Abbasi Hotel. Shahrzad Restaurant, Abbas Abad Road (0098 311 220 4490).

Bastani in Imam Square boasts fewer frills but its khoresht beh or quince stew, made with chunks of lamb, the fruit and yellow split peas, makes a pleasant change from the ubiquitous chelo-kebab – rice with meat or chicken kebabs – a culinary offering that you can’t easily escape from in Iran. Bastani, southeast corner of Imam Square (0098 311 222 0374).

For a more informal meal, head to Abdoul Vahab, towards the Zayandeh River for roast chicken and vegetables – you can either eat it on the premises or order it to go, and enjoy a picnic in the park on the riverbank. Abdoul Vahab, 270 Chaharbagh Street, (0098 311 222 1975).


How to get there

A return flight to Tehran including tax costs from: $368 (Dh1,350), flying from Abu Dhabi on Etihad Airways (www.etihad.com); $517 (Dh1,900), flying from Dubai on Emirates (www.emirates.com); and, $180 (Dh660) flying from Sharjah on Air Arabia (www.airarabia.com). Iran Air flies direct from Dubai to Esfahan twice a week for $310 (Dh1,140) return (www.iranair.com).


Recommended reading

Lipstick Jihad by Iranian-American journalist Azadeh Moaveni is a compelling tale about life in post-Revolutionary Iran. Christiane Bird’s Neither East nor West debunks popular misconceptions of Iran. For a classic Iran primer, there is arguably no equal to Robert Byron’s Road to Oxiana – the author’s passion for Islamic architecture alone merits a read.

Esfahan, Iran
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Old March 14th, 2009, 11:07 AM   #151
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German tour operator highlights strong demand for trips to Iran


13 March 2009
Berlin: There is a strong demand for German tourists to visit Iran, according to a German tour operator. Talking to IRNA in Berlin on the sidelines of the 43rd ITB Berlin Tourism Fair on Friday, the director of the Orient Express Travel Agency, Hartmut Niemann said, "There is a much stronger demand for Germans to travel to Iran than last year."

"We hope this trend will continue this fall," he added.

Other German tour operators had also reported a major increase in the number of tourists visiting Iran last year, according to press reports.

The Munich-based Studiosus Reisen Travel Agency which is the largest tour operator of culture and nature special interest group tours in Germany, said Iran had become one of the top destinations for German tourists in the Middle East in 2008.

Studiosus which is in charge of the travel arrangements of 101,800 tourists every year, reported earlier a stunning 91 percent surge in the number of tourists traveling to Iran.

Meanwhile, Niemann said Iranian tourism was less affected by the global financial and economic crisis since it was not a destination for mass tourism like Turkey or Dubai.

"One could say Iran may actually benefit from the economic crisis in the long-run," the travel expert said.

He pointed to major progress in Iran's tourist sector since 2001.

Niemann urged Iran's tourist industry to boost advertising abroad and to open tourism bureaus in major German cities.

He welcomed Iran's move to issue 14-day visas at airports, border crossings and sea ports.

The travel agent hailed also Iran's decision to remove the need for foreign tourists to pay with US dollars for their hotel rooms which had been viewed as discriminatory by many tourists.

© IRNA 2009

http://www.zawya.com/Story.cfm/sidZA...ps%20to%20Iran
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Old March 15th, 2009, 10:29 PM   #152
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Very cool. Thank you
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Old April 27th, 2009, 07:11 PM   #153
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Isfahan hosts 5th int'l hotel exhibit

Isfahan hosts 5th int'l hotel exhibit - Press TV
Mon, 27 Apr 2009 07:18:48 GMT


A hotel suite in Isfahan, architecture and interior in the style of the Qajar period

Isfahan is to host the 5th International Tourism and Hotel Management Exhibition in a bid to promote the travel industry in Iran.

The international event is expected to play a key role in pinpointing areas available for investment in Iran's hotel industry.

Local and foreign companies will be presenting their goods and services at the exhibition, seizing the opportunity to market their products.

The gala, which is planned to be held in over 150 pavilions, is scheduled to run from May 14 to 17.

The organizers arranged the international event to be held in Isfahan, the jewel that reflects the many facets of Iran's history. The destination offers the chance to introduce the tourism potential of the city.

Iran's 20-Year Vision document has projected investments to the tune of more than $32 billion in the country's tourism sector. Iran's Cultural Heritage, Handicraft and Tourism Organization (ICHTO) wants to encourage the private sector to provide $25 billion of the total, with the balance coming from the public budget.
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Old April 27th, 2009, 09:19 PM   #154
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So is it already set to take place in Isfahan or they are just bidding to see if they get it or not?
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Old April 27th, 2009, 09:31 PM   #155
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The language and tone of the news article suggests it already is
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Old April 27th, 2009, 09:43 PM   #156
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aw ok. Thank you
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Old April 27th, 2009, 10:03 PM   #157
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Special Vehicles to Transport Passengers in Terminals
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------


A number of passenger vehicles have been considered to transport passengers in different terminals.

SAMA reported that priority will be given to the aged, war disabled and other disabled people.
This will save a lot of time and help people who have difficulty walking for any reason.
The measure is even more remarkable in terminals where there is a great distance between parking lots and offices of passenger buses.
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Old April 27th, 2009, 10:04 PM   #158
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this would be nice to transport older people in iran!
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Old April 27th, 2009, 11:30 PM   #159
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Wow! Ghalibaf is gone literally nuts about development (in a good way)
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Old April 29th, 2009, 08:10 AM   #160
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Did you know that Ghalibaf is a pilot? That's why i always wanted him to become Iran's president someday.
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