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Old August 23rd, 2009, 04:12 AM   #81
Westsidelife
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Quote:
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Yale and Princeton in NYC? The local residents would be shocked to hear that. Ditto for West Point and Vassar; these are rural communities not associated with NYC proper.
Yale and Princeton are in New Haven and Mercer Counties, respectively. Both are within the NYC CSA boundaries.

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Brown is in Providence; if it counts, then UCSD and UCSB are in LA (and UC Davis is in SF, etc.)
Holy Cross I will give you.
Providence is part of the Boston CSA.

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If I have time I'll look into art and design schools.
Yup, NYC and LA are particularly strong in this area. Boston and SF as well.

For LA:

Art Center College of Design
Otis College of Art and Design
California Institute of the Arts
Colburn School
USC School of Cinematic Arts (probably the best film school in the world)
AFI Conservatory
Southern California Institute of Architecture
Fashion Institute of Design and Merchandising
Woodbury University (top fashion program)

I'm not sure about culinary schools, but the best ones in the LA area are the California School of Culinary Arts and the Kitchen Academy.
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Old August 23rd, 2009, 05:32 AM   #82
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CITY-DATA
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Old August 24th, 2009, 11:19 PM   #83
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Well, so as not to further offend Milquetoast, this is my last comment on statistical measures and city comparisons.

The CSA's are hardly useful for this purpose. Providence and New Haven do not feel themselves part of the Boston and NY areas by any emotional ties. You also end up with absurdities like Yale being much closer to Brown, Harvard and MIT (both geographically and in terms of joint programs) but are thrown in with Princeton which is supposedly their local "NY" academic buddy. It's sort of like using sports allegiances as a meaurement of a metropolitan area. It draws in totally independent small towns and rural areas and ignores reality. It is simple, however.

CSA's are particularly questionable measures since a variety of inputs go into them. Twenty some years ago NY was exapanded to include new counties in NY, Conn, NJ and Pennsylavania (yes, parts of Pennsylavania are now in "NY"). At the same time, the IE was removed from LA metro and SD was removed from LA CSA. The politics of this is murky, at least publicly. However, even the census department is careful to note that these terms are "flexible" and must be adjusted from year to year.

Regardless, I stand with LA 10, Boston 7, NY 4. The rest is poor definitions of metropolitan area.

Finally, I object to SC being called the best film school. UCLA and NYU are in the game. SC may be the best commercial film school; the best at theory or aesthetics, certainly not.
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Old August 25th, 2009, 03:25 AM   #84
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Association ends at the state line- period.
That is my stand and there is no offense.
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Old August 25th, 2009, 04:09 AM   #85
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Association ends at the state line- period.
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Old August 25th, 2009, 06:20 AM   #86
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I don't do Consolidated Metropolitan Areas.
There, you got me being City-Data-ish again!
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Old August 25th, 2009, 07:22 AM   #87
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Wow, not even an honorable mention.

http://www.sceneadvisor.com/travel-n...ive-11524.html

I've been to many of these places mentioned here and can't imagine living in some of them over LA. Where do these people come up with these lists?
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Old August 25th, 2009, 08:16 AM   #88
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This was my reply on that site in the comments section:
.
.
"Los Angeles, not very pedestrian friendly either, Like Washington D.C.! Still, L. A . is a global center.
I noticed that you posted a picture of the interior of Madrid's Barajas International Airport when representing Washington?
Listing "cleanliness" as the only difference between Paris and New York?
Do you even know of what you speak?
You don't..."
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Old August 25th, 2009, 01:24 PM   #89
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Quote:
Originally Posted by milquetoast View Post
This was my reply on that site in the comments section:
.
.
"Los Angeles, not very pedestrian friendly either, Like Washington D.C.! Still, L. A . is a global center.
I noticed that you posted a picture of the interior of Madrid's Barajas International Airport when representing Washington?
Listing "cleanliness" as the only difference between Paris and New York?
Do you even know of what you speak?
You don't..."
A consolation prize perhaps?

http://www.sceneadvisor.com/los%20angeles.html
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Old August 25th, 2009, 05:56 PM   #90
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That list is stuffy and predictable. No LA, no Miami, no Guadalajara and Mexico City is so far down on the list....incredible! LA isn't part of that club of cities with "culture", mostly European "old world" culture. This is the land of film, breast implants and taco trucks.......we are as common and lowbrow as they come baby!
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Old August 25th, 2009, 06:43 PM   #91
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That list is stuffy and predictable. No LA, no Miami, no Guadalajara and Mexico City is so far down on the list....incredible! LA isn't part of that club of cities with "culture", mostly European "old world" culture. This is the land of film, breast implants and taco trucks.......we are as common and lowbrow as they come baby!
http://www.sceneadvisor.com/travel-guide

LA is here but the lists don't seem to match the cover story. It is a beta site so are perhaps getting their act together. Recommend checking out some of the other pages on the website. Kinda intersting. New construction, etc.

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Old August 25th, 2009, 11:14 PM   #92
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WSL's list from July 17 seems relatively more objective, but it all depends on what you are trying to measure.

Economic activity can be somewhat measured. Cultural influence is already known by everyone: NY, LA, London, Paris.

Quality of life seems important but is so subjective as to be largely useless. There is a tendency for English speaking cities outside the US to do well since visitors feel comfortable but not totally blown away as they are by the size, diversity and power of American cities. Ditto for Northern European cities, where English is broadly spoken (Copenhagen, Berlin, Amsterdam).
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Old November 10th, 2009, 05:48 AM   #93
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Old November 16th, 2009, 09:45 PM   #94
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http://latimesblogs.latimes.com/lano...d-by-nyu-.html
Quote:
USC again has most foreign students, followed by NYU

For the eighth consecutive year, USC enrolled the highest number of foreign students of any U.S. university last year, a new report shows. USC, which recruits strongly in Asia, hosted 7,482 international students in the 2008-09 school year, according to the study by the Institute of International Education with support from the State Department.

New York University, with 6,761, had the second-largest international contingent and Columbia University, with 6,685, ranked third. UCLA was in eighth place, with 5,590. California had the most foreign students, followed by New York and Texas.

The "Open Doors" survey, released today, showed that the number of international students at about 3,000 U.S. colleges and universities rose 8% last year to a new high of 671,616. Big increases in students from China helped fuel the rise. As in other recent years, India once again sent the most students to the U.S., followed by China, South Korea, Canada and Japan.


But there are indications that the growth might have slowed this fall semester because of economic conditions and concerns about the H1N1 virus. A related but separate survey of 700 schools by the institute and seven other education organizations showed that 45% of those campuses reported an increase in foreign students this fall, compared to 56% last year.
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Old November 17th, 2009, 12:09 AM   #95
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I'll bet at the K-12 level most foreign students are from Mexico and LAUSD is number 1.

I heard some people complaining about how China has great schools if you want to hear about what everyone was doing 10 years ago. That's why so many Chinese come to the US. As far as basics, most of the Asian countries probably blow us away.
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Old December 29th, 2009, 11:17 AM   #96
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Why is it called the World Series
one Chinese student wondered aloud
if all the teams in it are from North America?
.
USC offers AMERICA 101 for FOREIGN STUDENTS
________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
A SPECIAL 12 WEEK CLASS HELPS STUDENTS FROM OVERSEAS
ADJUST TO LIFE AND LINGO IN LOS ANGELES

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The topic was baseball and the class members, foreign graduate students recently arrived in the United States to attend USC, were befuddled.

Not only were they struggling to follow the instructor's litany of batting and pitching rules, they were mystified by the title of the hallowed championship games. Why is it called the World Series, one Chinese student wondered aloud, if all the teams in it are from North America?
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EDWARD ROTH
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Instructor Edward Roth was both taken aback and pleased.
.
The grandiose title might reflect America's arrogance about its national pastime, he acknowledged, but he also praised the question. It reflected the type of cross-cultural debate he encourages in a course aimed at helping these newcomers from overseas adjust to life in Los Angeles.

Then Roth reeled off some American sayings that spring from baseball: Step up to the plate. Knock it out of the park. Get your bases covered. Don't drop the ball.

"These are very useful English phrases and we use them quite a bit," he said. The 17 students, mainly master's degree candidates from China, dutifully took notes.

Called "The United States: An American Culture Series," the USC class is an unusual semester-long effort by the university to help its international students learn about the strange food, difficult idioms and bewildering customs that surround them.

To succeed academically, the theory goes, foreign students must also adjust culturally and socially to their new surroundings. So in Roth's class and four similar courses by other teachers, these are some of the topics:
.
What are tailgate parties?
What are baby vegetables?
To whom should you give Christmas gifts?
Is it an insult to call someone a couch potato?
When should you call police in emergencies?
.
By semester's end, Jingjie "Ginger" Li, 22, a Chinese graduate student who is studying public administration, said she felt could interact more easily with Americans. "Everybody from outside the country gets culture shock and needs to get over that," said Li. The USC course, she said, gave her topics for conversations with American classmates and, more important, "taught us to express your own opinion."

After Roth's lecture about sports, Li attended a USC football game and enjoyed it, even though she did not understand much of what happened on the field. "It makes you feel that you are a member of USC, and I was proud of that," she said.

The university has reason to offer the free, non-credit courses in American culture.
.
FOR THE EIGHTH CONSECUTIVE YEAR, USC LAST YEAR ENROLLED
THE LARGEST CONTINGENT OF FOREIGN STUDENTS OF ANY U.S. UNIVERSITY
.
More than 7,500, or about a fifth of its enrollment. Final numbers for the current school year are expected to be even higher, with India the largest exporter of students to USC and the People's Republic of China second and growing fast, officials report.

The university has recruitment offices in Hong Kong, Shanghai, Taipei and Tokyo, as well as in Mexico City, and it holds numerous events for prospective engineering students in India. It also has a network of 19 international alumni clubs, 16 of which are in Asia.

The culture courses began as an experiment last year with one section each semester and were expanded this fall to five sections, each meeting for two hours once a week for 12 weeks. Field trips took students to downtown Los Angeles, the California African American Museum, the Getty Center and, for gourmet tourism, an In-N-Out Burger drive-in. Total enrollment was about 60, mainly Chinese students with a sprinkling from India, Pakistan and Turkey.

Many universities offer one- or two-day orientations for foreign students at the beginning of the school year. But experts say it is rare for schools to provide courses that last beyond the initial culture shock.

"It's a very good thing that USC does this, and I hope many more schools will copy it," said Allan E. Goodman, president of the Institute of International Education, a nonprofit that runs many overseas and exchange programs.

At USC, part of the goal is to ease international students' isolation. Some say they feel trapped by their heavy academic loads, strong accents, shyness and cultural confusion, while an alien universe of parties, study groups and romances swirls about them.

Ironically, it can also be tough for many Chinese and Indian students to break out of their own national circles at USC because those groups are so large and are concentrated in engineering programs.

Broadening their social experience "is a constant struggle," said USC orientation official Chrissy Roth (no relation to Edward Roth), who helped start the classes. "Hopefully, this class contributes to them meeting new people."

Electrical engineering student Fang Li, who adopted the name Jason in honor of NBA star Jason Williams, said he was homesick his first few weeks at USC. He disliked American foods, except for turkey sandwiches and coffee, and lost weight. Now he is feeling better, partly because the American culture class "helped me adjust more quickly," said Li, 23.

Still, he has yet to make strong friendships with Americans, he said. He hopes to widen his circle soon and "become more familiar with the way American people think and the way they live."

Edward Roth, who also heads USC's programs for disabled students and has taught English as a second language, said he empathizes with the foreigners because he was once an exchange student in rural Japan. An athletic man who enunciates with care when speaking to the students, Roth said he wanted them to see his class as a haven.
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"It's very helpful for them to share experiences they are having and to know they are not the only one going through this kind of thing," said Roth. He urged them to join campus clubs and volunteer efforts.

For an American visitor to Roth's class over the semester, there were constant reminders of how much we take for granted in customs, speech and ways of thinking.

In an early class, a campus police officer gave security tips, instructing the newcomers to lock up their bicycles and apartments and telling them how to deal with emergencies. One student announced that he already had lost money to an Internet fraud. "Be very, very careful," Roth said. "Live life and enjoy it but don't put yourself in a dangerous situation."

In a subsequent session, Halloween, Thanksgiving and Christmas rituals were detailed to people who had never gone trick-or-treating, tasted pumpkin pie or been to a church. With the Halloween parade in West Hollywood at hand, talk turned to the large gay community in the area. Some Chinese students expressed surprise at the comparatively open homosexuality in the U.S.; others later attended the parade and said they had fun.

"I think it's great," said Lena Wang, 22, who is working on a master's degree in teaching English. "Nowhere else in the world can you do such crazy things. It can never happen in China." The biggest difference she sees between the two countries is America's individualism, compared to China's emphasis on the communal, she said.

She and most other class members said they were shocked, however, by the heavy drinking and partying among some USC undergraduates.

The class explored mass transit and downtown landmarks, including the Walt Disney Concert Hall. On another day, their visit to the California African American Museum elicited mixed response. Because most did not know the U.S. military had been racially segregated, they were puzzled by a display about the Tuskegee Airmen, the first black pilots in World War II. But they appeared fascinated by an 1857 bill of sale of a slave woman, which triggered discussion about serfdom in China's history.

A final class delved again into idioms, with Roth using anecdotes to illustrate the meanings for "beat around the bush," "grab a bite," "bent out of shape" and others.

For "head honcho," he asked the class to name the person who fills that position in the U.S. The students replied, "Barack Obama" and then one asked Roth to name China's head honcho. The teacher hesitated, then asked for a hint and, given an H, correctly answered: Hu Jintao. The class murmured approval, knowing that many Americans would not have been able to answer.

As the class wrapped up, some students were planning to use winter break to explore Los Angeles and beyond.

Guolin Meng, 23, an electrical engineering student, said he was heading on a U.S.-style road trip to Las Vegas and the Grand Canyon. Meng likes to be called "Fred," short for freedom, he said, and appears to have embraced at least one American ideal.

"With freedom, you can do whatever you want," he said.

.
.
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LOS ANGELES TIMES
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Old January 3rd, 2010, 01:35 PM   #97
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FREIGHT TRAINS MAKE BIG COMEBACK
IN NATION'S TRANSPORTATION NETWORK
.
.
BNSF 7730 leads an eastbound stack train up Cajon Pass on a wet January morning.
.
Warren Buffett's recent purchase of Burlington Northern Santa Fe
shows the renewed importance of railroads in the global supply chain


More than 4,000 miles of train tracks stretch through California, winding up the blustery Cajon Pass and snaking through the desert surrounding Barstow.

Those tracks could be seeing a lot more traffic in the next few years as trains loaded with Chinese-made toys, electronics and clothing roll eastward, connecting West Coast ports with cities across the U.S.

Warren Buffett is a believer. In November, the world's second-richest man paid $34 billion for railroad giant Burlington Northern Santa Fe Corp., despite a deep downturn in the railroad industry. Buffett characterized his investment as an "all-in wager on the economic future of the United States." But it's also a bet on globalization and the renewed importance of rail in the nation's transportation network.

Southern California is a key hub in his new empire. About 40% of all goods that the U.S. receives in containers from overseas enter the country through the seaports of Los Angeles and Long Beach. That freight must then move overland to retailers across the country.

Fort Worth-based BNSF has invested hundreds of millions of dollars in recent years to beef up its Southern California operations to grab a bigger share of that business.

"Within our 28-state network, California is incredibly important to us," BNSF Chief Executive Matthew K. Rose said. "A lot of trade comes through there, a lot gets consumed in California, and a lot gets handled and repackaged there."

China's rise has given a new push to U.S. railroads, which have chugged their way back into the nation's transportation future after losing ground for decades to the trucking industry.

The sheer volume of inbound cargo from Asia to North America -- more than 40 million container loads last year -- has made it cost-prohibitive to haul all those goods over congested U.S. highways.

Rail companies have strengthened their networks and upgraded their equipment to handle the ubiquitous metal shipping containers to provide a nearly seamless transition from cargo ship to freight train to truck or any combination in between. This so-called intermodal traffic has been the fastest-growing segment of the industry for about a decade.

In 2008, international and domestic intermodal cargo accounted for nearly a third of BNSF's revenue, a figure that's expected to grow when the U.S. economy gets back on track.

Although factory jobs have been lost to Asia, international trade is now a pillar of the Southern California economy, accounting for more than 300,000 jobs. Chains such as Wal-Mart Stores Inc. and Costco Wholesale Corp. depend on the nation's trains running on time.

"There wouldn't be big-box retail and globalization if you had to truck in all those containers -- it wouldn't be worth the cost," said Anthony Hatch, a rail consultant in New York.

Over the last 20 years, ton-miles of freight hauled by the nation's biggest railroads doubled, from 876,984 ton-miles in 1985 to 1,770,545 in 2007, according to the most recent government figures. Paul Bingham, managing director of world trade and transportation markets at research firm IHS Global Insight Inc., projects that number will grow 14% within a decade.

Environmental concerns are also helping to fuel rail's comeback. Railroads can move a ton of freight an average of 457 miles on a gallon of fuel, according to the Assn. of American Railroads.

Freight rail's resurgence has been stunning for even some of its most die-hard devotees. Pittsburgh rail entrepreneur Henry Posner III recalls the mid-1970s, when railroads were tumbling into bankruptcy after losing market share to big rigs and air freight. He credits deregulation in the 1980s, and the brutal downsizing and cost-cutting that followed, for the industry's survival.

Posner's company, Railroad Development Corp., owns a piece of what was once the famed Chicago, Rock Island and Pacific Railroad, as well as some lines in Latin America.

"Growing up, I was told that the age of the train was just around the corner, and in fact I have lived to see it," Posner said.

He said Buffett's big bet on rail was a "reflection of the position of the rail industry as an important part of our national transportation infrastructure."

One of the linchpins of this global supply chain can be found in the industrial cities of Vernon and Commerce, home to BNSF's Hobart rail yard. The massive facility, on 245 acres near the 710 Freeway, is one of the biggest operations of its kind in the world. Workers toil 24 hours a day, seven days a week, offloading shipping containers ferried by big rigs arriving straight from the ports. They pluck the uniform boxes from the backs of the 18-wheelers and stack them neatly on lines of train cars, some stretching two miles.

Other containers are offloaded directly from cargo ships to trains inside the ports.
.
On a recent morning at the Port of Los Angeles, BNSF conductor Dennis Marquez and engineer Armando Nevarez prepared to leave for Clovis, N.M., hauling 282 double-stacked shipping containers filled with assorted freight. This run required four locomotives, hitched one behind the other, to haul 6,000 tons of freight up mountain passes.

Walking through the bright-orange railway vehicles, the engineers inspected fuel levels, checked the air brakes and stored food in an onboard refrigerator. Outside, the horn of another train blew nearby.

Upon arriving in New Mexico, the cars of shipping containers would be attached to other locomotives headed for destinations across the country.

Ten years ago, the journey out of Los Angeles would have taken hours, the trains forced to navigate dozens of crossings over congested city streets. No longer, thanks to the Alameda Corridor, a 20-mile freight rail expressway leading out of the ports.

Completed in 2002, the $3.4-billion public-private partnership includes a 10-mile dedicated underground tunnel that allows BNSF and its West Coast rival, Union Pacific, to avoid L.A. traffic and speed their cargo to the rest of the nation.

Activity has slowed with the global downturn. U.S. freight rail traffic in 2009 was down about 16% from 2008. Traffic in the Alameda Corridor was down 20% in the first 11 months of 2009 compared with the same period in 2008. Some of that business might not return even when imports rebound.

That's because seaports in Mexico and Canada are becoming less expensive than Los Angeles and Long Beach, analysts said. A project to deepen the Panama Canal, expected to be completed in 2014, could make it more economical for massive ships from Asia to head directly to ports on the East Coast.

Other factors could hurt too. A bill pending in Congress seeks to partially re-regulate railroads. California's tough environmental restrictions could add to operating costs. And if the U.S. weans itself off coal for electricity production, railroads would lose a big chunk of their revenue because they haul much of that fuel to the nation's power plants.

Still, West Coast railroads aren't yet ready to surrender the advantage they've gained as globalization has brought more trade through their ports. They're making big capital investments to make trains even faster and more environmentally friendly.

BNSF is double-tracking its entire transcontinental line and in November 2008 finished laying a third track over the Cajon Pass. It has also been straightening curves and polishing the steel track to lower resistance and save fuel, said Bingham, the research analyst. It worked with the government to develop a hydrogen fuel cell locomotive, which it brought to Los Angeles, and is lobbying to create a rail yard closer to the ports to handle increased container traffic.

Whether in Los Angeles or Omaha, analysts agree that the increased dependence on rail makes Buffett's bet on BNSF a smart one. Railroads may be down in this recession, but this time they won't be left for dead, as long as the U.S. economy one day recovers too.

"We're very bullish on most of the railroads," said Jeffrey Kaufman, managing director of the brokerage firm Sterne, Agee & Leach. "These are good franchises. They're going to be around for a long time."

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Old February 22nd, 2010, 03:34 AM   #98
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PORTS OF L.A./LONG BEACH LOADING UP ON JOBS
.
.
RETAIL ORDERS INCREASE THE NUMBER OF DOCKWORKERS 34.5%
DURING FIRST THREE WEEKS OF FEBRUARY
.
The ports of Los Angeles and Long Beach are bringing in a surprising new commodity: jobs.

The first post-recession surge in employment at the nation's busiest seaport complex began this month and appears to be gathering momentum. There has been as much as a threefold increase in the number of longshoremen finding work on the docks in the first three weeks of February compared with the same period last year, a review of daily employment dispatches shows.

Through the first three weeks there was an average of 2,679 longshore jobs a day during the usual three work shifts at the two ports, according to the summaries. That's an increase of 34.5% over the 1,992 jobs that were available on average a year earlier.

The increase in dock work this month indicated that retailers were ordering goods again, even if it was just to refill depleted warehouses, said John Husing, an economist who tracks trade-related employment in the Inland Empire.

"Companies are restocking their inventories," Husing said, "and the weak dollar is helping our exports."

A strong recovery in international trade is vital to the regional economy, experts say. About 116,000 Southern Californians work in jobs related to goods movement. An additional 185,000 are employed in warehousing and wholesale distribution of various imports and exports, said Jack Kyser, an economist with the Los Angeles County Economic Development Corp. Longshore jobs are among the highest paying blue-collar jobs in the nation, with wages of $22 to $35 an hour.

But the depth of the recession has tempered the enthusiasm of many involved in cargo movement. Most of the skepticism can be laid to one of the worst crashes in employment in the waterfront's history.

George Lujan, for instance, said he needed to see sustained employment improvement before he would believe that a strong recovery had arrived. Lujan is president of Local 13, in Long Beach, of the International Longshore and Warehouse Union, the union that represents all West Coast dockworkers.

"It's picked up. It's a positive sign, but we have no knowledge of what the future holds," Lujan said.

Jim McKenna, president of the Pacific Maritime Assn., which represents ocean shipping lines and terminal operators in their labor negotiations with the ILWU, said that some customers were shipping ahead of schedule "before rate increases take effect. For the calendar year, I think a 3% to 7% gain is possible."

Others loosened the reins on their enthusiasm.

"It's wonderful news," Kyser said. "International trade is the industry that will lead the economic recovery."

But the ports still have a long way to go before they begin to rival the number of jobs available during the economic boom years that ran from 2004 through most of 2008.

In February 2006, an average of 3,773 jobs a day were filled by longshoremen, and that number increased to nearly 4,000 jobs a day in February 2007. During those two years, the ports sometimes employed more than 5,200 dockworkers a day. During the depth of the recession last year, that number dropped to as low as 1,000 jobs a day.


ron.white@latimes.com
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LOS ANGELES TIMES
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Old April 12th, 2010, 02:34 AM   #99
milquetoast
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"UNTIL NOW, NEW YORK HAS BEEN
THE BIGGEST PRIZE IN THE AMERICAN CHURCH ..
BUT NOW IT'S L A .. BY FAR"
VATICAN PICKS A LATINO TO LEAD THE LOS ANGELES ARCHDIOCESE
.
Archbishop Jose Gomez of San Antonio will take over from Cardinal Roger Mahony.
The selection of the Mexican American
reflects a change in the U.S. church from Eurocentric to Latino-dominated.

The Vatican's choice of a Mexican-born archbishop, Jose Gomez of San Antonio, as the next prelate of Los Angeles reflects the formal acknowledgment of a remarkable, decades-long shift in the center of gravity of the U.S. Roman Catholic Church - from Northeast to Southwest, from Eurocentric to Latino-dominated.
.
.
The 58-year-old Gomez has the potential to reshape the Archdiocese of Los Angeles over most of the next two decades, assuming he can successfully steer it past the shoals of a lingering sexual abuse crisis. In him, Pope Benedict XVI clearly saw a leader for a new kind of American church, one that is in sync with changing demographics but also adheres to Benedict's traditional notions about Catholic theology.

This is an epic moment in the life of the church in the United States," Cardinal Roger Mahony said Tuesday as he introduced his successor during a news conference at the Cathedral of Our Lady of the Angels, itself a symbol of L.A.'s position as the new capital of U.S. Catholicism.

Gomez, who stood near Mahony, nodding and smiling slightly as he was introduced, struck a humble tone in his own remarks to reporters. "I know that God will give me the grace to serve this local church well, as Cardinal Mahony has done for so many fruitful years," he said.

The archbishop, who has led the San Antonio Archdiocese since 2005, was named by the Vatican on Tuesday as co-adjutor of the Los Angeles Archdiocese and will assume that role May 26. The term means he will be Mahony's successor-in-training until the cardinal retires early next year, as expected, at age 75.

At that point, Gomez will become archbishop of what is by far the largest Catholic community in the United States, spread over Los Angeles, Ventura and Santa Barbara counties and containing more than 5 million members, 70% of them Latino.

Given the stature of Los Angeles in the worldwide church, he will almost certainly be elevated to cardinal at some point after Mahony's retirement.

"Until now, New York has been the biggest prize in the American church," said Rocco Palmo, a Philadelphia-based blogger who closely follows Catholic affairs. "But now it's L.A . . . by far."
Gomez, Palmo said, will be able to speak to Latinos "in a way that no other American prelate in the top ranks has ever been able to. . . . The makeup of the leadership in the church has been forever changed overnight."
.
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MITCHELL LANDSBERG
LOS ANGELES TIMES
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Old April 12th, 2010, 10:36 AM   #100
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200 deaf boys.
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