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Old October 30th, 2009, 09:42 AM   #21
Pincio
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On the right side of Viale Trastevere, there's the quiet and hidden part of the Rione Trastevere.
Usually out to the tourist route, that prefer the verve and vitality of the other side of quarter.

Santa Cecilia in Trastevere
(Trastevere)

Trastevere is rione XIII of Rome, on the west bank of the Tiber, south of Vatican City. Its name comes from the Latin trans Tiberim, meaning literally "beyond the Tiber". logo is a golden head of a lion on a red background. To the north, Trastevere borders on to the XIV rione, Borgo.

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Entryway to Basilica di Santa Cecilia in Trastevere

In Rome's Regal period (753-509 BC), the area across the Tiber belonged to the hostile Etruscans: the Romans named it Ripa Etrusca (Etruscan bank). Rome conquered it to gain control of and access to the river from both banks, but was not interested in building on that side of the river. In fact, the only connection between Trastevere and the rest of the city was a small wooden bridge called the Pons Sublicius (Latin: "bridge built on piles"). By the time of the Republic in 509, the number of sailors and fishermen making a living from the river had increased, and many had taken up residence in Trastevere. Immigrants from the East also settled there, mainly Jews and Syrians.

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The facade facing the courtyard

The area began to be considered part of the city under Augustus, who divided Rome into 14 regions (regiones in Latin); modern Trastevere was the XIV and was called Trans Tiberim. The area really became part of the city under Aurelian (270–275), who made larger protecting walls to include Trastevere and the Vatican hill. With the wealth of the Imperial Age, several important figures decided to build their villae in Trastevere, including Clodia, (Catullus' "friend") and Julius Caesar (his garden villa, the Horti Caesaris). The regio included two of the most ancient churches in Rome, the Titulus Callixti, later called the Basilica di Santa Maria in Trastevere, and the Titulus Cecilae, Santa Cecilia in Trastevere.

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The Nave

Nowadays, Trastevere maintains its character thanks to its narrow cobbled streets lined by medieval houses. At night, both natives and tourists alike flock to its many pubs and restaurants. However, much of the original character of Trastevere remains. The area is also home to John Cabot University, a private American University, the American Academy in Rome, and the Rome campus of the Thomas More College of Liberal Arts, the Canadian University of Waterloo School of Architecture (between the months of September and December), and the American Pratt Institute School of Architecture therefore serving as home to an international student body. The unique character of this neighborhood has attracted artists, foreign expats, and many famous people.

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The gothic ciborium by Arnolfo di Cambio and the Apse mosaic


The Basilica

Santa Cecilia in Trastevere is a 5th century church of Rome, located in the Trastevere rione and devoted to Saint Cecilia. The first church on this site was founded probably in the 3rd century, by Pope Urban I; it was devoted to the Roman martyr Cecilia, martyred it is said under Marcus Aurelius, by the late fifth century, for in the synod of 499 of Pope Symmachus, the church is indicated with the Titulus Ceciliae. Tradition holds that the church was built over the house of the saint.

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The gothic ciborium by Arnolfo d iCambio and the Apse mosaic

The baptistery associated with this church, together with the remains of a Roman house of the early Empire, was found during some excavations under the Chapel of the Relics. On 22 November 545, Pope Vigilius was celebrating the saint in the church, when the emissary of Empress Theodora, Antemi Scribone, captured him. Pope Paschal I rebuilt the church in 822, and moved here the relics of St Cecilia from the catacombs of St Calixtus. More restorations followed in the 18th century. The Cardinal Priest of the Titulus S. Caeciliae is Carlo Maria Martini. Among the previous titulars are Pope Stephen III, Adam Easton, Thomas Wolsey and Giuseppe Maria Doria Pamphili.

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The byzantine mosaic


Art and architecture

The church has a façade built in 1725 by Ferdinando Fuga, which incloses a courtyard decorated with ancient mosaics, columns and a cantharus (water vessel). Its decoration includes the coat of arms and the dedication to the titular cardinal who paid for the facade, Francesco Cardinal Acquaviva d'Aragona.

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Martyrdom of Saint Cecilia, by Stefano Maderno, one of the most famous examples of Baroque sculpture

Among the artifacts remaining from the 13th century edifice are a mural painting depicting the Final judgment (1289-93) by Pietro Cavallini in the choir of the monks, and the ciborium (1293) in the presbitery by Arnolfo di Cambio. The Gothic ciborium is surrounded by four marble columns white and black, decorated with statuettes of angels, saints, prophets, and evangelists.

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The Final judgment (1289-93) by Pietro Cavallini

The apse has remains of 9th century mosaics depicting the Redeemer with Saints Paul, Cecilia, Paschal I, Peter, Valerian, and Agatha. The ceiling of Cappella dei Ponziani was decorated God the Father with evangelists (1470) by Antonio del Massaro (Antonio da Viterbo or il Pastura). The Cappella delle Reliquie was frescoed and provided with an altarpiece by Luigi Vanvitelli.

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The Crypt

The nave is frescoed with the Apotheosis of Santa Cecilia (1727) by Sebastiano Conca. The church contains two altarpieces by Guido Reni: Saints Valerian and Cecilia and a Decapitation of Saint Cecilia (1603). Among the most remarkable works is the graphic altar sculpture of St. Cecilia (1600) by the late-Renaissance sculptor Stefano Maderno. This sculpture reportedly is modelled on the saint's body as seen in 1595, when her tomb was opened. The statue subtly depicts the saint's decapitation.

[IMG]http://i43.************/2roktu1.jpg[/IMG]
The Crypt

In addition, it also it is meant to underscore the supposed incorruptibility of her cadaver (an attribute of some saints), which miraculously still had congealed blood after centuries. This statue could be conceived as proto-Baroque, since it depicts no idealized moment or person, but a theatric scene, a naturalistic representation of a dead or dying saint. It is striking, because it precedes by decades the similar high-Baroque sculptures of Gian Lorenzo Bernini (for example, his Beata Ludovica Albertoni) and Melchiorre Caffà (Santa Rosa de Lima). The crypt is also noteworthy, decorated with cosmatesque style, keeping the relics of St. Cecilia and St. Valerian.

[IMG]http://i34.************/35aky8i.jpg[/IMG]

Last edited by Pincio; October 30th, 2009 at 10:39 AM.
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Old October 30th, 2009, 12:29 PM   #22
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A very unknown ancient church in a beautiful residential quarter.

San Saba
(Rione San Saba)

San Saba is the XXI rione of Rome. It was named after the Basilica of San Saba, which lies there. San Saba is an ancient basilica church in Rome. It lies on the so-called "Piccolo Aventino", which is an area close to the ancient Aurelian Walls next to the Aventine and Caelian Hill.

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San Saba

According to legend, St. Silvia, mother of Pope Gregory I, had an estate at the site. After her death, so legend reads, her estate was transformed into an affiliate monastery of St. Andreas, the monastery which Gregory I founded at the site of today's San Gregorio al Celio. This legend can be traced back to have originated from the 12th century, when in context of Renovatio Romae and Church Reform, the monastery of San Saba was meant to be provided with a long and local tradition.

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View of the Nave and the cosmatesque floor

The historic origin of the religious site goes back to the year 645. In this year, Palestine fugitive monks from the order of Mar Saba (Palestine) who had fled their home country after the Islamic invasion, came to Rome to attend the Lateran council. After the council, these Sabaite monks settled down in an old domus, or noble estate, on the "Piccolo Aventino", which at this time was deserted due to the big decrease in Rome's population numbers. Here, they founded an eremitic cell.

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The Apse

The Sabaites introduced the cult of St. Sabas to Rome. In ancient sources, their monastery however goes by the name cellas novas, "cellanovas" or "cellaenovae", which is in reference to the "cellae" of their mother closter, Mar Saba. The Sabaite monastery propered soon and for long. In the 8th and 9th century, San Saba was one of the most prestigious of Rome and among the leading "Greek" monasteries. Its received rich papal donations.

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The lateral Nave

Since 680, its abbots held important diplomatic roles in the relationships between Rome and Byzantium, and represented the Roman Church and Pope at several church councils in Constantinople. In 768, Antipope Constantine II was held prisoner in this monastery, before being killed by the Lombards. The Benedictine of Monte Cassino received the church after its rebuild in the 10th century. After many years of decay, it was completely renovationed in the 13th century, after the church was granted to the Cluniac monks.

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The medieval frescoes

Before going to the Society of Jesus, the church was granted to the Cistercians in the 15th century. The church, preceded by a small porch from the 13th century, has a nave with two aisles. These end with three apses. The interior is characterized by numerous interventions from different ages. The columns are from ancient buildings, and the floor is an example of Cosmatesque marble art from the beginning of the 13th century.

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The medieval frescoes

The main artpieces are the notable frescoes in a room on the left side of the church, the so-called fourth nave: they portrays the miracles of St. Nicholas. The crypt, built on the house of St. Silvia, holds the relics of St. Sabas. The sacristy houses also a fragment of fresco from the very first church (8th year). The Cardinal Deacon of the Titulus S. Sabae is Jorge Medina Estévez. The titulus was established in 1959.

[IMG]http://i35.************/sevalk.jpg[/IMG]
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Old November 1st, 2009, 01:48 AM   #23
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Lost fountains

For more than two thousand years fountains have provided drinking water and decorated the piazzas of Rome. Here's a list of unknown and hidden ones.


Fontana Torlonia

This fountain was designed by the architect Antonio Sarti and built in 1842. It is situated on the building in front of the entrance to Palazzo Torlonia. It consists of a sarcophagus of the Roman age resting on lion paws with a portrait of the defunct within a medallion in the centre, supported by two tritons. On the sides of the tritons are two Nereids and two tritons and winged geniuses at the far end. Above the sarcophagus a mask pours water that comes out of two taps in the base and flows into a semicircular marble pond with two small columns.The fountain is inserted within an architectural element with side pilasters, surmounted by an arch with the coat of arms of the Torlonia family between two lions rampant. An inscription below the arch commemorates the building of the fountain at the expense of duke Marino Torlonia in an area that belonged to him.

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(1) Fontana Torlonia


Quattro fontane

These quaint old fountains, now fast fading away, were erected during the pontificate of Sixtus V to decorate the famous "Crossing" created by himself and his architect Domenico Fontana when these two began to make over Rome of the Renaissance into modern Rome. The Crossing occurs where the Via Venti Settembre traverses at right angles the Via Sistina. The four fountains are of travertine and represent two rivers and two virtues. They are all by Fontana except that one which is placed across the grille in the wall of the Barberini Gardens. This is the work of Pietro da Cortona. The choice both of the rivers and of the virtues is significant. Pope Sixtus V's early life shows what need he had of fortitude, while fidelity marks his attitude toward his two (and only) friends, Pope Pius V and Domenico Fontana.

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(2) Quattro Fontane


Fontana del Facchino

Il Facchino (The Porter) is one of the talking statues of Rome. Like the other five "talking statues", pasquinades - irreverent satires poking fun at public figures - were posted beside il Facchino in the 14th and 15th centuries. Il Facchino was originally sited on the via del Corso, on the main facade of the Palazzo De Carolis, near the piazza Venezia. In 1874, it was moved to its current position, to the side of the same building, on the via Lata.

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(3) Fontana del Facchino

Unlike the other talking statues, which are all dated to Ancient Rome, Il Facchino is relatively modern. The statue was created in around 1580 for the Jacopo del Conte for the Corporazione degli Acquaroli (although some sources say it was sculpted by Michelangelo). It depicts a man wearing a cap and a sleeved shirt, carrying a barrel - an "acquarolo", who would take water from the Tiber to sell on the streets of Rome during the period before the Roman aqueducts were repaired at the orders of the Popes and the public fountains played again. Somewhat ironically, water spouts from the centre of the barrel, creating a fountain. Its face is badly damaged.

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(4) A little fountain in Aventine Hill


The "Big Mask" in Via Giulia

For the same reasons that affected the two fountains in Piazza Farnese, Jacopo della Porta was unable to carry out the decision taken by the "Congregation for the Fountains" in 1570 to build a fountain in Via Giulia. In fact, although the Aqua Vergine had reached Campo dei Fiori, there was hardly enough water to support a fountain there at ground level and the supply was almost entirely used up by public fountains and private consumers. The idea that water could go beyond Piazza Farnese and as far as Via Giulia was simply not in the cards. It was only many years later, when Paul V brought in the mighty flow of "his" water that a fountain could at last be built on the same spot as the one planned for the Aqua Vergine.

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(5) Fontana del Mascherone

In the quiet and ancient Via Giulia you will find this modest fountain backed up against the wall. The fountain consists of an ancient porphyry trough (taken from the Roman baths) surmounted by a large marble tablet with a kind of scroll on each side, both scrolls topped with balls made of travertine stone. The center of the tablet is occupied entirely by an enormous mask in white marble, which must certainly also date back to the Ancient Romans. With hair parted in the middle and falling below the chin to frame the face and with a fixed, empty look in its eyes, water spurts from the figure's half-open mouth to fall into the shell below. At the very top of the tablet there is a huge fleur de lys, a sure sign that the "Big Mask" was erected under the auspices and at the expense of the Farnese family, most likely at the same time as the construction of the two fountains in the Piazza Farnese just around the corner around 1626.

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(6) Fontana del Monte di Pietà

Today, Via Giulia is quiet and rather forgotten, but when Julius II had it opened up at the beginning of the 16th century it was the main street and the most elegant road in the city, remaining that way for many years. It was used for many festivals and ceremonies, so it is only natural that even the motionless and severe-looking mask fountain should have shared in the general hullabaloo. What happened was this: in 1720, on the third day of Pentecost, all the Roman nobles wanted to take the air in Via Giulia to show off their most precious finery and their most expensively furnished carriages in honor of the election of a new Grand Master of Malta. When the time came for Vespers, a copious stream of delicious wine began to flow from the Big Farnese Mask fountain and it did not stop till four in the morning. It was the wish of the authorities to extend the day's rejoicing into the evening, with a pleasing display of fireworks and, before that, to illuminate the street with huge round flat tallow candles.

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(7) Fontana del Dragone

Finally, still on the subject of festivals in Via Giulia, I would like to mention an interesting contest that was held there at the beginning of the 17th century. With the passing years, all trace of it has vanished, but it would be fantastic if it could be revived. One evening, along our street, at the expense of the individuals and with the permission of the authorities, a race took place between naked hunchbacks, whose humps were all so different that it made them a real sight worth seeing; this was a novelty in Via Giulia, so many commoners and nobles gathered to look until the whole area was full, and all the windows in the houses and all the buildings were full of people.

[IMG]http://i33.************/2uoop4m.jpg[/IMG]

Last edited by Pincio; November 1st, 2009 at 10:16 AM.
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Old November 1st, 2009, 10:15 AM   #24
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Old November 1st, 2009, 06:54 PM   #25
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The "Nasoni"

An old proverb says "in Rome you'll never die of thirst". In the whole city there are more than 2500 little fountains of drinking water called "nasoni" (big noses). They are everywhere, but expecially in the historical centre. More, in the historical centre there are about 300 artistic fountains of potable water. More than 250 along streets, alleys and squares, about 50 inside the courtyards of the old buildings. I suggest you not to pay for tons of bottles of water (expecially in summer) since in Rome water is free.

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An old "nasone"


Watermap

Here's a map of the fountains in the historical centre of Rome. Don't forget to carry it with you when you are visiting Rome, expecially in the hot summer!

http://www.watermap.it/

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Old November 2nd, 2009, 12:59 PM   #26
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Old November 2nd, 2009, 01:35 PM   #27
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Antico Caffè Greco
(Via Condotti, Spanish Steps)

The Antico Caffè Greco (sometimes simply referred to as Caffè Greco) is a historic landmark café which opened in 1760 on 86, Via dei Condotti. It is perhaps the best known and oldest caffè in Rome and within Italy only Caffè Florian in Venice (established in 1720) may be older.

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The Antico Caffè Greco

Historic figures including Stendhal, Goethe, Byron, Franz Liszt, Keats, and Felix Mendelssohn have had coffee there. Today it remains a haven for writers, politicians, artists and notable people in Rome.

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The private room

Via Condotti is the official fashion street of Rome. In Roman times it was one of the streets that crossed the ancient Via Flaminia and enabled people who crossed the Tiber to reach the Pincio hill. It begins at the Spanish steps and is named after conduits or channels which carried water to the Baths of Agrippa.

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Via Condotti

The Antico Caffé Greco, perhaps the most famous café in Rome was established at Via dei Condotti 84 in 1760, and attracted figures such as Stendhal, Goethe, Byron, Liszt and Keats to have coffee there. Guglielmo Marconi, inventor of radio, lived at Via dei Condotti 11, until his death in 1937.

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One of the rooms

The Antico Caffè Greco was founded in 1760 by Nicola della Maddalena, a Greek man. The cafè achieved fame later when it began to serve a better coffee, served in small cups.

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One of the rooms

Being near the Spanish steps the street is visited by large numbers of tourists. In 1989, the fashion designer Valentino went to court and attempted to stop McDonald's from opening near the Spanish steps, complaining of "noise and disgusting odours" in the vicinity of Via Condotti. But to the dismay of some Romans, McDonalds did open there.

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The old Cafè

Via Condotti is a center of fashion shopping in Rome, dating back to the atelier of Bulgari which opened in 1905. Now, in addition to Valentino, other designers such as Armani, Hermès, Cartier, Louis Vuitton, Fendi, Gucci, Prada, Chanel, Dolce & Gabbana and Salvatore Ferragamo all have stores on Via Condotti. Others such as Laura Biagiotti have their offices there.

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The private room

More pictures of the Caffè Greco, here:
http://www.anticocaffegreco.eu/2008/01.html

[IMG]http://i33.************/j8fpl0.jpg[/IMG]

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Old November 3rd, 2009, 09:00 AM   #28
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Palazzo Spada is just next to the famous Palazzo Farnese.

Palazzo Spada
(Piazza Capo di Ferro)

The Palazzo Spada is a palace in Rome that houses a grand art collection, the Galleria Spada. The collection was originally assembled by Cardinal Bernardino Spada in the 17th century and added to by his grandnephew Cardinal Fabrizio Spada (1643-1717), and by Virginio Spada (1596-1662).

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The façade inside the courtyard

The palace is located in the rione Regola, at Piazza Capo di Ferro, 13, with a garden facing the Tiber, very close to the Palazzo Farnese. It was originally built in 1540 for Cardinal Girolamo Capodiferro. Bartolomeo Baronino, of Casale Monferrato, was the architect, while Giulio Mazzoni and a team provided lavish stuccowork inside and out.

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The main façade (detail)

The palazzo was purchased by Cardinal Spada in 1632. He commissioned Francesco Borromini to modify it for him, and it was Borromini who created the masterpiece of trompe-l'oeil false perspective in the arcaded courtyard, in which diminishing rows of columns and a rising floor create the optical illusion of a gallery 37 meters long (it is 8 meters) with a lifesize sculpture in daylight beyond: the sculpture is 60 cm high. Borromini was aided in his perspective trick by a mathematician.

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The Borromini Gallery

The Mannerist stucco sculptural decor of the palazzo's front and its courtyard façades feature sculptures crowded into niches and fruit and flower swags, grotesches and vignettes of symbolic devices (impresi) in bas-relief among the small framed windows of a mezzanine, the richest cinquecento façades in Rome.

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The Borromini Gallery

The colossal sculpture of Pompey the Great, erroneously believed to be the very one at whose feet Julius Caesar fell, was discovered under the party wall of two Roman houses in 1552: it was to be decapitated to satisfy the claims of both parties, which appalled Cardinal Capodiferro so, that he interceded on the sculpture's behalf with Pope Julius III, who purchased it and then gave it to the Cardinal.

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The fountain

Cardinal Spada's collection, which includes four galleries of 16th and 17th-century paintings by Andrea del Sarto, Guido Reni, Titian, Jan Brueghel the Elder, Guercino, Rubens, Dürer, Caravaggio, Domenichino, the Carracci, Salvator Rosa, Parmigianino, Francesco Solimena, Michelangelo Cerquozzi, Pietro Testa, Giambattista Gaulli, and Orazio and Artemisia Gentileschi, has the additional interest of being hung in the 17th-century manner, frame-to-frame, with smaller pictures "skied" above larger ones.

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Guido Reni: Portrait of Cardinal Berardino Spada

Palazzo Spada was purchased by the Italian State in 1927 and today houses the Italian Council of State, which meets in its richly frescoed and stuccoed rooms. The Galleria Spada is open to the public.

Gallery hours

Opening time
- Tuesday to Sunday, from 8.30 a.m. to 7.30 p.m.

Closed
- Monday
- December 25th, January 1st
Ticket office close 30 minutes before Gallery’s closing

[IMG]http://i33.************/2ujjajl.jpg[/IMG]
Orazio Gentileschi: David contemplating

Tickets
Spada Gallery is located within the Palace head office of the State Council. Entrance and ticket office are on the ground floor.
Ticket is inclusive of the visit to the picture gallery and Borromini’s perspective.

Full price € 5,00
Reduced € 2,50

- EU citizens between 18 and 25 years old - EU full-time public school teachers
All the reductions are only for European Union with providing document
Free admission
- EU citizens under 18 and over 65 years old
- EU students and teachers of Arts, History of Arts or Architecture courses
- ICOM members
- EU schools with teachers by reservation

[IMG]http://i37.************/b6st9k.jpg[/IMG]
Artemisia Gentileschi: Saint Cecilia

Museum shop
Situated on the ground floor, carries several guide books, art books, catalogues, postcards, posters and items inspired by and dedicated to the masterpieces of the Gallery.
Shop hours are the same as those of the ticket office.
Tel. +39 06 6832409

Official Guide. English ed. | Art tastings. Mythological, symbolic, spiritual and metaphysical wine. English, German ed.

[IMG]http://i35.************/2igf2o2.jpg[/IMG]
Tiziano: Potrait of a Violinist

Spada Gallery
Piazza Capo di Ferro, 13
00186 ROMA
Tel. +39 06 6874893

Information and tickets booking
tel. +39 06 6832409

Groups booking
fax +39 06 32651329

Guided tours
fax +39 06 8555952

[IMG]http://i36.************/vdz8si.jpg[/IMG]
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Old November 6th, 2009, 04:49 AM   #29
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Rome can make anyone go speechless .
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Old November 6th, 2009, 11:11 AM   #30
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When in Rome, always look up.

Tour delle Madonnelle
(Little Madonnas)

The ancient Romans venerated the Lares, tutelary spirits of the house, in the form of small statues (of men and women), put in high places. These spirits protected also the roads and their statues were placed at road intersections. This practice is at the root of the very large number of sacred images which populated (and to some extent still populate) the streets of Rome.

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(1) Madonnella con Bambino (Via del Pellegrino)

In 1853 a researcher, Alessandro Rufini, listed 2739 sacred images, the majority of which portrayed a Madonna (hence they are called Madonnelle = Little Madonnas). Some of these images became associated with miraculous events and were moved inside a church (for example Madonna dell'Archetto).

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(2) The most beautiful one (Piazza di Tor Sanguigna, next to Piazza Navona)

This thread shows a number of sacred images and has a list of links to pages of this website where other sacred images are shown. Be aware that in Rome there are many more Madonnelle to see. The majority of the images were positioned on the line marking the separation between the ground floor and the first floor. An alternative placement was between two windows of the first floor.

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(3) The most famous one (Piazza dell'Orologio)

The height protected the image from damage caused by the carriages and was consistent with the positioning of images inside churches or chapels. In many cases the images were placed at the corner of a building. Because very often an oil-lamp shed some light on the Madonnelle, they constituted for centuries the only public lighting available in Rome.

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(5) Madonna (Piazza della Rotonda, Pantheon Square)

The Madonnelle were a form of popular devotion. In general the rich did not feel these images would add to the beauty and importance of their palaces and only a limited number of palaces show a sacred image. A miraculous event or just a happy event often led the inhabitants of a street or of a building to commemorate it by placing a little Madonna at the corner of the street.

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(6) Madonnella (Via di Monserrato)

In the XVIIth century the development of stucco techniques made affordable to these people the framing of the image in a little stucco relief. Angels holding the image became a common subject of these reliefs or statues. Angels were a typical Baroque theme, but they were popular among the lower classes well into the XIXth century.

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(7) Madonna and Angels (Somewhere near Trevi Fountain)

A little baldaquin, sometimes made with metal, gave the image some protection against rain. The more sophisticated stucco reliefs were painted in line with the Baroque tendency to mix painting with sculpture (and architecture). A certain number of images were made of rather large paintings, a memory perhaps of the Renaissance habit of painting the façades of the palaces. In these cases the subject of the image was more complex and the painting was most likely the initiative of a brotherhood, if not of the pope.

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(4) Madonnella (Rione Sant'Angelo)

In some cases the stucco reliefs are so large and ornate that the sacred images are somewhat suffocated. Besides many painted images are almost unreadable. In general we know very little about who designed and executed these reliefs. The large majority of the Madonnelle have a Baroque appearance, even though they were designed in the XIXth or even in the XXth century. In the late XIXth century, however a certain number of Madonnelle were designed having in mind Renaissance patterns.

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(8) Madonna and Angels (Trevi Fountain Square)

More info here:

http://www.romeartlover.it/Madonne.html

Here's a list of the most famous Madonnelle in the historical centre of Rome.

http://www.romaspqr.it/roma/Madonnel...le_di_roma.htm

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Last edited by Pincio; May 13th, 2010 at 08:21 AM.
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Old November 10th, 2009, 09:06 AM   #31
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If you are looking for a beautiful park with a nice terrace over the city, this one is probably one of the most beautiful ones.

Pincio
(Pincian Hill)

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Pincio seen from Piazza del Popolo

The Pincian Hill (Italian: Pincio) is a hill in the northeast quadrant of the historical center of Rome. The hill lies to the north of the Quirinal, overlooking the Campus Martius. It was outside the original boundaries of the ancient city of Rome, and was not one of the Seven hills of Rome, but it lies within the wall built by Roman Emperor Aurelian between 270 and 273.

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The clock

Several important families in Ancient Rome had villas and gardens (horti) on the south-facing slopes in the late Roman Republic, including the Horti Lucullani (created by Lucullus), the Horti Sallustiani (created by the historian Sallust), the Horti Pompeiani, and the Horti Aciliorum.

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The fountain

The hill came to be known in Roman times as Collis Hortulorum (the "Hill of Gardens"). Its current name comes from the Pincii, one of the families that occupied it in the 4th century AD.

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The park of Casina Valadier

The Pincio as we see it today was laid out in 1809-14 by Giuseppe Valadier; the French Academy at Rome had moved into the Villa Medici in 1802. The orchards of the Pincio were laid out with wide gravelled allées (viali) that are struck through dense boschi to unite some pre-existing features: one viale extends a garden axis of the Villa Medici to the obelisk placed at the center of radiating viali.

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The park of Casina Valadier

The obelisk was erected in September 1822 to provide an eye-catcher in the vistas; it is a Roman obelisk, not an Egyptian one, erected under the Emperor Hadrian in the early second century, as part of a memorial to his beloved Antinous outside the Porta Maggiore.

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Casina ValadieR

The Piazza Napoleone — in fact Napoleon's grand urbanistic example was set from a distance, as he never visited Rome — is a grand open space that looks out over Piazza del Popolo, also laid out by Valadier, and provides views to the west, and of the skyline of Rome beyond.

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Piazza del Popolo seen from Pincio

Valadier linked the two spaces with formal staircases broken by generous landings, (illustration) and a switchback carriageway. In the gardens of the Pincio, it was Giuseppe Mazzini's urging that lined the viali with busts of notable Italians.

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The skyline from Pincio

Though the Villa Ludovisi was built over at the turn of the twentieth century, several villas and their gardens still occupy the hill, including the Borghese gardens, linked to the Pincio by a pedestrian bridge that crosses the via del Muro Torto in the narrow cleft below; the Muro Torto is the winding stretch of the Aurelian Wall, pierced by the Porta Pinciana.

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Old November 13th, 2009, 05:57 PM   #32
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Near the Colosseum there's one of the most interesting medieval churches of Rome, even if not so known.

Basilica di San Clemente
(Via San Giovanni in Laterano)

The Basilica of Saint Clement (Basilica di San Clemente) is a Roman Catholic minor basilica dedicated to Pope Clement I. Archaeologically speaking it is a three-tiered complex of buildings on the site, the lowermost notable as being an archaeological record of a first century insula belonging to T. Flavius Clemens, with remains under it of foundations from the republican era; superposed on it is a second century Roman pagan temple dedicated to Mithras. On the foundations of the 4th century Christian church is the current one built just before the year 1100 during the height of the Middle Ages. This ancient church was transformed over the centuries from a private home that was the site of clandestine Christian worship in the first century to a grand public basilica by the sixth century, reflecting the emerging Catholic Church's growing legitimacy and power.

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The facade inside the courtyard

Roman buildings

The house was originally owned by Roman consul and martyr Titus Flavius Clemens, who was one of the first among the Roman senatorial class to convert to Christianity. He allowed his house to be used as a secret gathering place for fellow Christians, the religion being outlawed at the time. There is evidence of pagan worship on the site. In the second century members of a Mithraic cult built a small temple dedicated to Mithras in an insula, or apartment complex, on the site. This low vaulted space, encrusted with pumice that renders it cavelike, was used for initiation rituals, lasted until about the third century. A centrally placed white marble altar is carved in low relief on all four faces, with Mithras killing the bull, torchbearers and a serpent.

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Interior

The first basilica

Excavations by Fr. Joseph Mullooly in the 1860s revealed the forgotten earlier basilica that underlies the medieval one. St. Jerome writing in 392 attests to a church dedicated to St. Clement. After Christianity became the state religion of Rome in the 390s, the small church underwent expansion, acquiring the adjoining insula and other nearby buildings; Architects began work on the complex of rooms and courtyards, building a central nave over the early church site, and an apse over the former Mithraeum. The new church was dedicated to Pope Clement I, a 1st century AD Christian convert and considered by patrologists and ecclesiastical historians to be identical with Titus Flavius Clemens. Restorations were undertaken in the ninth century and ca 1080-99.

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The Nave

Apart from those in Santa Maria Antiqua, the largest collection of Early Medieval wall paintings are to be found in the lower basilica of San Clemente. Among these, there is one of the earliest examples of the passage from Latin to vernacular Italian: a fresco of around 1100 A.D. depicts the pagan Sisinnius and his servants, who think they have captured St. Clement, but are dragging a column instead; Sisinnius encourages the servants in Italian ("Fili de le pute, traite! Gosmari, Albertel, traite! Falite dereto colo palo, Carvoncelle!), while the saint speaks in Latin ("Duritiam cordis vestris, saxa trahere meruistis"). Over the next several centuries, San Clemente became a beacon for church artists and sculptors, benefitting from Imperial largesse. The early basilica was the site of councils presided over by Pope Zosimus (417) and Symmachus (499). The last major event that took place in the lower basilica was the election in 1099 of Cardinal Rainerius of St Clemente as Pope Paschal II.

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The mosaics

The second basilica

The current basilica was rebuilt in one campaign by Cardinal Anastasius, ca 1099-ca. 1120, after the original church was burned to the ground during the Norman sack of the city under Robert Guiscard in 1084. [6] Today, it is one of the most richly adorned churches in Rome. Its original entrance (a side entrance is ordinarily used today) is through an axial peristyle (B on plan) surrounded by arcades, which now serves as a cloister, with conventual buildings surrounding it. At the rear is Fontana's chaste facade, supported on antique columns, and his little campanile (illustration). The basilica church behind it is in three naves divided by arcades on ancient marble or granite columns, with Cosmatesque inlaid paving. The 12th-century schola cantorum (E on plan) incorporates marble elements from the original basilica. Behind it, in the presbytery is a ciborium (H on plan) raised on four gray-violet columns over the shrine of Clement in the crypt below. The episcopal seat stands in the apse, which is covered with mosaics on the theme of the Triumph of the Cross that are a high point of Roman 12th century mosaics.

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Cappella di Santa Caterina (Masolino da Panicale)

Irish Dominicans have been the caretakers of San Clemente since 1667, when England outlawed the Irish Catholic Church and expelled the entire clergy. Pope Urban VIII gave them refuge at San Clemente, where they have remained, running a residence for priests studying and teaching in Rome. The Dominicans themselves conducted the excavations in the 1950s in collaboration with Italian archaeology students. On one wall in the courtyard there is a plaque affixed by Pope Clement XI, who praises San Clemente, declaring, "This ancient church has withstood the ravages of the centuries." Clement undertook restorations to the venerable structure, which he found dilapidated. He selected Carlo Stefano Fontana, nephew of Carlo Fontana as architect, who erected a new facade, completed in 1719. The carved and gilded coffered ceilings of nave and aisles, fitted with paintings, date from this time, as do the stucco decor, Ionic capitals and frescos.

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The mithraeum

In one lateral chapel there is a shrine with the tomb of Saint Cyril of the Saints Cyril and Methodius who created the Glagolitic alphabet and Christianized the Slavs. Pope John Paul II used to pray there sometimes for Poland and the Slavic countries. The chapel also holds a Madonna by Giovanni Battista Salvi da Sassoferrato. Current Cardinal Priest of the Titulus S. Clementi is Adrianus Johannes Simonis, archbishop emeritus of Utrecht in the Netherlands. Pope Paschal II (1076-1099) was one of the previous holders of the titulus.

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Last edited by Pincio; November 13th, 2009 at 06:05 PM.
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Old May 13th, 2010, 08:21 AM   #33
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Hi I'm back
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Old May 13th, 2010, 01:59 PM   #34
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Anglican churches


St. Pail within the Walls
(Via Nazionale)

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St Paul's Within the Walls American Episcopal Church of Rome, built in 1873, was the first non-Roman Catholic church to be built inside the walls of Rome. It now houses a multi-ethnic, multi-cultural congregation and is the home of the Joel Nafuma Refugee Center.

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St Paul's is unique in that, other than its work of mission & ministry, it also has to oversee the upkeep of some remarkable pieces of art. The mosaics by Burne-Jones and Breck, the stained glass windows are just the beginning.

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The first Rector of St. Paul's, Robert Jenkins Nevin, was an art dealer and on his death bequeathed to the parish an assortment of pieces of fine art and sculpture. Some of these pieces are now available for public viewing.

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All Saints
(Via del Babuino)

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All Saints' Church (Ognissanti) is an active English-speaking congregation representing the Anglican Communion in Rome, Italy. The church building is a very fine red-brick construction in a neo-gothic style, situated in the Via del Babuino, about 100 meters from the Spanish Steps. It is regularly used for concerts, as well as for the church services.

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All Saints Church is the only Anglican and Victorian Gothic Church in Rome. It is found in Via del Babuino. The architet was George Street who also designed the High Court in London. The Church has excellent acustic qualities. You will see that this in achieved by the fact the church has a wooden roof and a mixed marbel and oak floor. Intenely the structure is of several different tipes of fine marbel and red bricks whoch were madelocally to George Street’s owndesign.

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This is why Filarmonica d’Opera di Roma has chosen to use this place for these concerts, offering the public high quality performances, fine period costumes. The singers of the Filarmonica d'Opera di Roma combine to produce in high quality performance an inforgetable experience.

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