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Old November 17th, 2009, 11:36 PM   #1161
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Rights to vote

November 17, 2009 23:26:00
Michael Tan opinion@inquirer.com.ph
Philippine Daily Inquirer


LAST FRIDAY, I described the long road to suffrage, both globally and locally. In that column, I emphasized how the right to vote had to be fought for, in many different contexts.

In the Philippines, this right to vote had to evolve, from the time of the Katipunan and the First Filipino Republic, aborted by the American occupation when the right was “granted” provided you were male, at least 23, owned property, paid taxes, spoke and wrote English or Spanish and swore allegiance to the United States. I didn’t mention that during the Marcos era, voting was an obligation—you could be prosecuted for not voting. Today, as long as you’re at least 18 and more or less of sound mind, you can vote.

Reflecting on our own situation, I realize that it has become more important to talk about the rights, rather than the right, to vote. I’m referring to the many social, economic and political rights that need to be ensured if the right to vote is to be meaningful.

Last week I mentioned that there has always been ambivalence about suffrage. I mentioned Plato, who did not trust ordinary citizens to decide on who should lead. Winston Churchill, a firm believer in democracy, also observed, “The best argument against democracy is a five-minute conversation with the average voter.”

Certainly, if you look even at so-called developed democracies like the United States, you wonder about the wisdom of suffrage with their share of political dynasties (Bush the Father and Bush the Son being the most recent) and celebrity presidents and governors.

In the Philippines, the upper classes endlessly complain about our elections being marred by guns, goons, gold and glitter, and tend to blame this situation on the poor, who are characterized as timid, corrupt, gullible. But that kind of analysis is not only condescending, it also fails to recognize a social and historical context to our current situation.

The right to vote is shaped by society and culture, with all its baggage from the past. For many years after the United States was founded, slaves and women could not vote. When the Americans took over the Philippines and extended suffrage to its new colony, they were still carrying their elitist (and sexist) notions about voting, as I described at the beginning of this article. By setting all those conditions on voting, the Americans actually strengthened feudalism in the Philippines because it was mainly the cacique, the landlord class, that could vote.

The guns, goons and gold are part of that feudalism. There are still many parts of the country where people have no choice but to vote for the most powerful landlord-turned-warlord in town. To dare to defy that landlord is to court the wrath of that landlord family. Working in development, I have seen entire barangays neglected—no school supplies, no roads, no midwives or medicines for the health center—for three, six or nine years simply because they didn’t vote for the mayor (or the mayor’s relatives) during the last election.

Fortunately, that kind of perverse control is diminishing, albeit all too slowly. We should, however, be concerned about how the feudal imprint takes other forms of distortions in our elections. Foremost, we continue to look at elections not as an occasion to select leaders but to choose patrons. I am using the Spanish form of patron with a stronger emphasis on “patronizing” relationships, i.e., a person who may seem benevolent but actually controls you, and keeps you in a dependency relationship.

It’s a very feudal concept, exactly like the relationship between a tenant and the landlord except that in politics, it has many expanded functions. To be known as a “bata” of the governor, mayor or even barangay captain (notice how a person is reduced to the status of a child) means special access for your needs. Elections then become a way for a potential bata to prove his mettle as, and I apologize to dog-lovers, an obedient lapdog, from running the campaign trail to delivering the votes by hook or by crook.

Fiestas, transactions

It is also this feudal background that transforms our elections into grand fiestas. It is a time for entertainment, courtesy of the politicians. (We forget, of course, that the expenses are actually drawn from taxpayers’ money, or for candidates who haven’t won yet, money that they will eventually collect from us if they win.)

The politicians don’t just bring in celebrities to perform but will themselves go through the song-and-dance routines. The bombastic speeches, the mud-slinging, are all often more for show, generating more heat than light. It reduces elections to personalities, with awards for best performers (or at least with best performing celebrity guests).

Again , I must warn against attributing all this to gullibility or naivete on the part of our voters (read “the poor”). Precisely because we are so feudal, the poor and the usually powerless have had to learn to navigate around our structures. Elections actually open windows of opportunity for negotiations. A book published several years ago, “De Scribing Elections” (the title is intentional, to highlight the way it de-scribes elections) showed how voters learn to time their demands around elections, to ask for roads, social services (and I’ve found out, even basketball courts).

Unfortunately, much of this negotiation can reinforce the feudal aspect of elections, or what’s sometimes referred to as transactional politics. Worse, it might actually allow the more deceptive politicians to thrive, the ones who know how to time their benevolence around elections, throwing crumbs to the masses but making sure there’s adequate coverage by the press, and putting out announcements and posters with their photographs (get the picture?).

When I talked about Philippine elections last week with the Museum Foundation of the Philippines, I actually ended by saying I was still optimistic. I do worry though that our attempts to reform the system, with its emphasis on educating the poor, actually draws from our feudal mind-set, the idea that we the ilustrado (the enlightened) must convince the poor not to sell their votes or to guard their votes. If we are serious about the right to vote, then we all have to work harder at ensuring that other rights are in place so Filipinos can vote without fear, without having to think of trade-offs and pay-offs.

At the Museum Foundation talk, I went into the need to evolve a system that holds politicians accountable, not for rhetorical promises but for programs and principles, from the day they are sworn into office. As we move into election season, I will write more about how we might build this system.
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Old November 17th, 2009, 11:43 PM   #1162
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Tobacco and the Philippines

ROSES & THORNS By Alejandro R. Roces (The Philippine Star) Updated November 17, 2009 12:00 AM

For better or worse (health wise and economically-speaking somewhat), the Philippines has had a long affair with the tobacco plant. Today, the negative health effects of tobacco and cigarette smoking are well understood; so we hope that the affair is finally coming to an end. Beyond personal health, cigarettes pose a public health and garbage problem. Each day we lose count of how many people we see tossing their cigarettes on the streets and sidewalks: out of car windows, over their shoulder and right in front of other people. People would never indiscriminately litter in their own homes, but almost feel compelled to in public spaces. A health risk is also posed by second hand smoke.

According to the Mayo Clinic’s website (www.mayoclinic.com), “…second hand smoke contain harmful chemicals - and a lot of them. Tobacco smoke contains more than 4,000 chemical compounds, more than 250 of which are toxic. And more than 50 of the chemicals in cigarette smoke are known or suspected to cause cancer. Included in secondhand smoke are: Formaldehyde, Arsenic, Cadmium, Benzene, Polonium.” It is well known, and has been for decades, that secondhand smoke can cause a greater risk of heart disease, cancer and lung disease. According to the United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) secondhand smoke is a Class A carcinogen and causes cancer in humans.

Our historical relationship with tobacco began in the late 1500s; it was one of the first plants exported to our shores by the Spanish empire. The goal was to turn the Philippines into a tobacco producing nation. The tobacco plant had a special affinity for our soil and took root quickly. Among the native population smoking tobacco quickly became a status symbol; in emulation of the Spanish ‘elites’. According to Edilberto J. de Jesus: “the plant enjoyed the prestige of having been imported by the colonial ruling class — it became fashionable among the status-conscious natives ‘to drink, smoke’ according to the custom of the conquerors”. We wonder if this attitude may play into our continuing cigarette consumption?

In the 18th century, the Spanish government imposed a government monopoly on tobacco. This was proposed by Leandro de Viana in 1765 and accomplished in 1780 by Governor-General Jose Basco y Vargas (who was an economically forward thinking governor-general). The result was, instead of being a ‘financial drain’ on the crown, the colony was self-sustaining and even profit-making. S.V. Epistola would write: “The government collected all authorized imposts, taxes and fees. For the first time in a hundred years the government was solvent.” According to Dr. Benito Legarda in his book, After the Galleons there was an unexpected side-effect of the enforcement of tobacco (and other agricultural products) monopoly: “An indirect effect was the beginning of the agricultural specialization, since the tobacco-growing regions could no longer grow their own food but had to import it from elsewhere in the country.” As we just witnessed with the recent calamities, we do need to diversify our food and agricultural production around the country. Our penchant for regional agriculture specialization is a 300-year-old archaic hold-over.

Each year approximately 90,000 people die from smoking related illness: this is more than deaths from natural calamities and conflicts. Surveys in terms of tobacco use among youth in the Philippines indicate that smoking is on the rise. The government has passed the Tobacco Control Act in 2003, but more needs to be done.

What we recommend are developing targeted publicity and anti-smoking campaigns focusing on the youth. The goal should be to educate people on the dangers of smoking. In the Philippines, we have not seen such a high-profile campaign mounted. The rising number of youths smoking demonstrates that the health risks of smoking are not being effectively taught. Youth-oriented campaigns have proven effective in other countries and should be emulated here. The benefits of reducing smoking in the Philippines will be found in public health, garbage and even beautifying our cities and streets.
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Old November 26th, 2009, 01:36 AM   #1163
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Philippine House Passes Bill Making Arnis The National Sport

Kris Alingod - AHN Contributor

Manila, Philippines (AHN) - The Philippine House of Representatives has approved a bill declaring the martial art of arnis, a form of stick fighting, the national sport. The measure has moved to the Senate where it is expected to pass.

H. B. 6516 would add to the four official national symbols, none of which, contrary to popular belief, include a national sport or national hero. Sipa, a traditional sport similar to sepak takraw that involves kicking a rattan football, has been called the official sport of the nation despite no law declaring it so.

Apart from the national anthem, flag, official seal, coat-of-arms, and motto prescribed by the Flag and Heraldic Code of the Philippines, the nation only has four other official symbols: the sampaguita as the national flower, the nara as the national tree, the Philippine Eagle as the national bird and the Philippine Pearl as the national gem.

And while Jose Rizal is listed in a number of reference materials and even taught in some schools as the national hero, there is in fact no law or proclamation declaring anyone as such, according to the National Commission for Culture and the Arts.

The legislation declaring arnis the national sport would bring recognition to an increasingly popular pastime that was also used by Filipinos to fight invaders during the pre-Spanish period. If enacted, the measure would be promulgated by inscribing the symbol of arnis into the seal of the Philippine Sports Commission.

"There has long been a collective sentiment to put Arnis in its rightful historical place in the country," Rep. Pryde Henry Teves, a co-author of the bill, said in a statement.
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Old November 26th, 2009, 04:08 AM   #1164
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^^i think its a good proposal..Arnis is the only internationally recognized sports which is in genuine to the Philippines. Sipa is akin to Sepak Takraw, and probably just a copycat of the sports played by Indonesians and Malays.
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Old November 28th, 2009, 06:57 AM   #1165
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Beauty, depending on where you live

I still find it very sad that the first Filipino words I learned were “malaking ilong.” I kept hearing those words repeatedly as I walked around Manila’s giant shopping malls in my very first days of living in the country. When I asked what they meant, a friend told me the sad truth in full agony and embarrassment: big nose.

I have never been under the illusion that I had the world’s most conservative and miniscule nose, but until that point in my life it was never a public exclamation or excitement. What caused me to emerge in a real-life Cyrano de Bergerac role was the fact that Filipinos, no offence, do not tend to have proper noses – proper as defined in this part of the world.

The positive side of it was that I could have made it to a basketball team in the country, as my height, which was normal for us, was rather exceptional there. In fact, twice, random pregnant women pinched my back site on the streets, due to the belief that if they did so their children would also be tall like me. I always laughed thinking, “They did not see the malaking ilong as they approached me from my back, that would be my revenge!”

These funny exchanges signal a much more complex issue of how our perceptions of beauty are shaped by our cultural and geographical location, if not orientation.

I always found it amusing to see the excessive money spent and great lengths gone by some Asian women to lighten the color of their skin, and at the same time to see my British friends go great lengths with fake tanning and torturously long sun bathing to darken their skin color, just a bit for a day or two.

Similarly, I get puzzled by seeing increasing obsession in the West with size zero, if not the closest to that “ideal,” and at the same time listening to the comments of my African and Polynesian male friends on how thin Western women won’t make it as suitable brides in their countries, and how my Middle Eastern and Latino friends love their curves.

What can be seen as most mundane in one country, e.g. blond hair in Scandinavia, can be seen as an extremely attractive feature somewhere else, e.g. a blond Scandinavian woman in Turkey.

Obviously, these are tongue-in-cheek over-generalizations. Yet, they draw our attention to something much deeper than what meets the eye. It seems, that just like we travel between different time zones, there are invisible lines that separate different perceptions of beauty and attractiveness across the world.

This challenges the conventional wisdom that beauty is a subjective judgment of the individual and that it is in the eye of the individual beholder. Somehow, collectives produce and then internalize descriptions of a “desirable woman.” Thus, the beholder is looking at its object through the limited angle and lenses provided by his or her culture, not simply out of personal taste. So, we learn “beauty,” just as we learn what is a “good life.”

The realization that beauty, and thus personal conformity pressures we face, has strong social conditioning can be liberating. The first thing that comes to my mind is the fun strategy of moving to another “beauty zone” if the one you are in is stressing you, just like people move to warmer climates.

If you feel your nose is too big and people laugh at you in East Asia, move to Central Asia and the Middle East. If you feel your looks are just plain and common, move to the far end of the world, where your hair color or skin complexion is rare. If you feel a bit too conscious about the extra pounds you have put on as the years go by and if the Western culture is causing you to have nightmares, pack your bags to Africa, the Middle East and Latin America. You won’t regret it.

The second thing is of course an assuring realization that most people are lead to feel horrible about themselves by the aggressive assertions of their cultures. It is indeed heartbreaking to see eating disorders haunting 14-year-old girls who think that they are “too fat,” and it is similarly heartbreaking to see an olive-skinned Asian trying to look “white” as a statement of social status.

This does not need to be! All across centuries and across different cultures we have been shaped to confirm into shapes and behaviors that were presented to us as what it means to be beautiful and worthy. Yet, long gone are the days since Chinese women had to wear iron shoes to keep their feet small, or British women had to cover their faces with that ghostly white powder.

Being exposed to another culture and its perception of beauty helps us to see the bizarreness of what we are exposed to as the “plain truth” in our own home culture; hopefully, leading to a much more mature and confident self-actualization, if not the first flight to a different beauty zone.
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Old November 28th, 2009, 07:13 AM   #1166
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when it comes to a character sensitive ako dyan...madaling masaktan pero mabagal magalit:)
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Old December 10th, 2009, 07:09 AM   #1167
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Christmas isn’t Christmas without the Nativity Scene

By CYRIL DE LEON
December 8, 2009, 4:47pm


The Philippine parol may well be the most “iconic” symbol of Christmas for Filipinos but the “Belen” (crèche or Nativity Scene) probably runs a close second. This is understandable of course, considering the Roman Catholic Faith of most Filipinos. The Spanish equivalent of Bethlehem, the Belen remains a potent tool for teaching the Catholic faith.

It is often mentioned that the Nativity Scene was first re-created by St. Francis of Asisi way back in 1223 though it had one major difference. Instead of the static tableau of sculptures and figurines, the crèche of St. Francis was re-created with live humans standing-in for St. Joseph, the Blessed Virgin Mary and the Holy Infant. It was said that live animals were also used in the setting which no doubt added an element of fun to an austere scene.

For sure, there was an element of novelty to this first Belen. After all, any scene with docile farm animals will surely bring out the inquisitiveness of children and adults—we are all usiseros, after all. Nonetheless, it was clearly apparent that St. Francis’ intention was more than just re-creating the birth of Jesus in the manger, but rather his desire to focus the attention of the laity on the true meaning of Christmas. Then as now, the desire for gift-giving and merry-making has blurred somewhat the celebration of this Christian holiday and the Belen, as “simple” as it was, proved to be a an effective means of reminding holiday revelers of what Christmas is all about.

No doubt, the first re-created Nativity Scene proved to be quite a success and not surprisingly, captured the world’s fancy. Nativity Scenes, this time carved in wood or fashioned from painted terra cott, flourished in countries with a Christian background. However, secular themes eventually seeped into the simple set-up of the Belen with human characters providing humor and social commentary added from time to time. Examples of this would be the santons of France which showed everyday characters like fishmongers and vegetable vendors mingling about the Nativity Scene; or the stock Spanish characters that literally showed toilet humor.

Anyway, no one knows the exact date when the first Belen in the country was first put up. For sure though, the Spanish friars were already cognizant of the Belen’s potency as a means of instruction vis-à-vis the Catholic faith. It also helped that the country has a tradition of woodcarving and an unusual affinity and love for representations of the Holy Infant as exemplified by our devotion to the Sto. Niño.

Although intact representations of the Belens dating from the Spanish-era are very rare, enough examples showed that Filipinos spared no expense as Belen owners asked the best wood and ivory carvers to create images that are now considered works of art.

One can even assume that perhaps, given the distance of the Philippine colony then to the Western world, unusual leniency were given to the creators of these early Belens in terms of materials use.

Such a case can be made if we consider the religious artworks they made then which they covered with viriñas or semi-spherical glass covers. These artworks made use of a number of local raw materials ranging from the exotic to the conventional. They were also refreshingly tolerant when it came to the interpretations or poses assumed by the figurines.

However, it was probably during the American period when the Belen gained even more popularity and currency. Mass communication, mass production and an introduction to technological innovation made the Belen popular with paper cut-outs and pop-up Belens available for display in even the humblest homes. Incidentally, this type of Belen still survives to this day—proof of how prevalent the custom of displaying a Belen in every home has become.

The custom of commissioning expensive recreations of the Belen also survived with corporate buildings often vying with one another in displaying sometimes life-size images of the Nativity. Often exhibited along with extravagant lighting and even a profusion of parols, these corporate examples of the humble Belen have become attractions in their own right.

Nonetheless, among all these corporate-sponsored Belens, only one probably dominates Philippine pop culture the most—the COD Belen, or more appropriately the defunct-COD Department Store Christmas Display. Not because it was the most spectacular, but because during its heyday, it managed to combine the essence of tradition and innovation and infused it with secular themes that to this day resonates with the Filipino public.

Indeed, this Belen has left such an indelible mark on the Filipino psyche that even if it was dismantled and re-assembled in another mall, Filipinos still call it by its original name. It also proved to be very influential as towns and cities all over the country had clones of it made.

To be fair the newer animated displays are more technologically up-to-date with animatronic technology years ahead of the original COD Belen.

Nonetheless, the latter remains unique and heartwarmingly-Pinoy as evident in its surprisingly effective combination at one time, of a barrio fiesta theme with the Nativity as its centerpiece. Certainly, one only wonders what the Three Kings might have thought of the Pinoy kid, clumsily climbing the bamboo pole in a game of palo sebo.

At present, one can safely say that although not apparent, the Filipino version of the Belen is perhaps even healthier or more popular than our love for the parol. This is because we have been actually exporting it abroad for some time now, in forms other than the traditional life-like interpretations of it. Examples of this include the dreamy and romantic Belens made of hand-made paper and even modernistic Belens in wood or resin that are then covered with a resin veneer and/or acid-treated capiz shell covering.

Certainly, when the Filipino Belen finds itself halfway around the globe underneath a Christmas Tree in the United States, we have already concluded the cycle that brought this Christmas symbol to our tropical shores in the first place.
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Old December 12th, 2009, 02:11 PM   #1168
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"The Philippine House of Representatives has approved a bill declaring the martial art of arnis, a form of stick fighting, the national sport. The measure has moved to the Senate where it is expected to pass."

This is useless endeavour if it's not taught in our school. Very few people knows arnis. I am glad chess is now being included in the school activities. And hope arnis too. These would be good combination, brain and physique.
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Old December 12th, 2009, 02:17 PM   #1169
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"Cebu is the oldest Philippine city."

The term city should further be defined. If it's an organized township then somewhere out there in the southwest of the Philippines may have that attribute much, much earlier.
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Old December 16th, 2009, 08:57 AM   #1170
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‘New Philippines’ in Cuba



MANILA, Philippines — Cuba and the Philippines share more than a common colonial past: The third largest province in Cuba, Pinar Del Rio was formerly called Nueva Filipinas (New Philippines) in the mid-18th century.

The area evidently became known as Nueva Filipinas as a result of the influx of Asians—Chinese, Japanese, Filipinos and other Asians—who came to work in the region's extensive tobacco fields, according to the Philippine embassy in Havana.

Philippine Ambassador to Cuba MacArthur Corsino led the Philippine delegation that visited the province on December 11 to 12 to strengthen the historical and cultural ties between the two countries. The delegation, which included Mrs. Bernadette C. Corsino, Vice Consul Jason J. Anasarias, and Mrs. Asteria D. Aguilloso, was welcomed by acting president Jesus Rafael Fernandez Echevarri of the Provincial Asssembly of Popular Power of Pinar del Rio province. City historian Juan Carlos Rodriguez Alfonso and provincial firector for international relations Juan Palados Menendez also led lectures on the province.

From the lectures, it was learned that Filipino and other Asian workers reached Cuba sailing in the Manila-Acapulco galleons that crossed the Pacific Ocean regularly from the late 16th century until 1815.

Manila was the jump-off point for all Spanish trade coming from East Asia, while Havana was the take-off point for Spanish trading ships sailing from Latin America to Spain.

Most of the Asians who landed in Cuba went on to work in Nueva Filipinas. They were generally called “Chinos Manila," as Manila was very famous among the Cuban population at that time.

Later in the 19th century, Nueva Filipinas was gradually supplanted with its present name, after a new capital of the same name overshadowed the former Nueva Filipinas capital of Guane.

The delegation was also given a tour of the Pinar del Rio provincial museum, the city museum of natural history, the Trinidad cigar factory, and the city cathedral. The Filipinos also visited the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (Unesco) bio-heritage site of Vinales, where the town historian Ricardo Alvarez Perez acted as their guide.
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Old December 18th, 2009, 02:32 AM   #1171
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Animo View Post
Kris Alingod - AHN Contributor

Manila, Philippines (AHN) - The Philippine House of Representatives has approved a bill declaring the martial art of arnis, a form of stick fighting, the national sport. The measure has moved to the Senate where it is expected to pass.

H. B. 6516 would add to the four official national symbols, none of which, contrary to popular belief, include a national sport or national hero. Sipa, a traditional sport similar to sepak takraw that involves kicking a rattan football, has been called the official sport of the nation despite no law declaring it so.

Apart from the national anthem, flag, official seal, coat-of-arms, and motto prescribed by the Flag and Heraldic Code of the Philippines, the nation only has four other official symbols: the sampaguita as the national flower, the nara as the national tree, the Philippine Eagle as the national bird and the Philippine Pearl as the national gem.

And while Jose Rizal is listed in a number of reference materials and even taught in some schools as the national hero, there is in fact no law or proclamation declaring anyone as such, according to the National Commission for Culture and the Arts.

The legislation declaring arnis the national sport would bring recognition to an increasingly popular pastime that was also used by Filipinos to fight invaders during the pre-Spanish period. If enacted, the measure would be promulgated by inscribing the symbol of arnis into the seal of the Philippine Sports Commission.

"There has long been a collective sentiment to put Arnis in its rightful historical place in the country," Rep. Pryde Henry Teves, a co-author of the bill, said in a statement.
ay naku dapat madaliin to at sana dati pa ito ginawa no..para naman ma include na ito as official sport sa SEA Games para naman meron tayong sport contribution para sa meet na yun.. kasi halos lahat ng member countries sa SEA Games ay may kanya kanyang sport dun so ang arnis e wala pa..

one morething.. na excite ako nung nakita ko ang arnis sa MI:3 ni tom cruise..
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Old December 18th, 2009, 02:53 AM   #1172
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^^ Arnis was also used by Matt Damon in the movie "Bourne Ultimatum," the third installment to the Jason Bourne series.
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Old December 18th, 2009, 09:48 AM   #1173
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really? never got the chance to watch the 3rd installment.. makabili nga ng dvd..
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Old December 20th, 2009, 11:56 AM   #1174
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MANILA, Philippines — Cuba and the Philippines share more than a common colonial past: The third largest province in Cuba, Pinar Del Rio was formerly called Nueva Filipinas (New Philippines) in the mid-18th century.

The area evidently became known as Nueva Filipinas as a result of the influx of Asians—Chinese, Japanese, Filipinos and other Asians—who came to work in the region's extensive tobacco fields, according to the Philippine embassy in Havana.

Philippine Ambassador to Cuba MacArthur Corsino led the Philippine delegation that visited the province on December 11 to 12 to strengthen the historical and cultural ties between the two countries. The delegation, which included Mrs. Bernadette C. Corsino, Vice Consul Jason J. Anasarias, and Mrs. Asteria D. Aguilloso, was welcomed by acting president Jesus Rafael Fernandez Echevarri of the Provincial Asssembly of Popular Power of Pinar del Rio province. City historian Juan Carlos Rodriguez Alfonso and provincial firector for international relations Juan Palados Menendez also led lectures on the province.

From the lectures, it was learned that Filipino and other Asian workers reached Cuba sailing in the Manila-Acapulco galleons that crossed the Pacific Ocean regularly from the late 16th century until 1815.

Manila was the jump-off point for all Spanish trade coming from East Asia, while Havana was the take-off point for Spanish trading ships sailing from Latin America to Spain.

Most of the Asians who landed in Cuba went on to work in Nueva Filipinas. They were generally called “Chinos Manila," as Manila was very famous among the Cuban population at that time.

Later in the 19th century, Nueva Filipinas was gradually supplanted with its present name, after a new capital of the same name overshadowed the former Nueva Filipinas capital of Guane.

The delegation was also given a tour of the Pinar del Rio provincial museum, the city museum of natural history, the Trinidad cigar factory, and the city cathedral. The Filipinos also visited the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (Unesco) bio-heritage site of Vinales, where the town historian Ricardo Alvarez Perez acted as their guide.
^^very informative...
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Old December 21st, 2009, 05:56 PM   #1175
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I like the quiz...got 77 out of a 100.
i like the quiz too but i only got 40 out of 100. :)
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Old December 22nd, 2009, 08:36 AM   #1176
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^^what quiz ba yan?
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Old December 22nd, 2009, 11:59 AM   #1177
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^^ :)

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Wala lang. Gusto ko lang subukan ang talino ninyo.

Paki-laro ang quiz na ito: http://www.sporcle.com/games/yeontura/20philippines
Ganito yon: N cities/municipalities ang kailangan ninyong i-identify. Pagkatapos po noon, paki-discuss yung quiz natin dito sa thread na ito. Walang spoilers. Deal? Kung hindi, paki-lock na lang.
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Old December 23rd, 2009, 01:24 PM   #1178
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^^ :)
its a no brainer quiz. walang ka relevance or significance ang game na ito except that its a guessing game. its not even worth a social studies question. ask your teachers, professors or the prc boards whats the rationale behind this idiotic game. the inventor of this coocoo game needs to take a class in tests and measurements sa college of education.

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Old December 23rd, 2009, 05:57 PM   #1179
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Originally Posted by MatudNilaBaby View Post
its a no brainer quiz. walang ka relevance or significance ang game na ito except that its a guessing game. its not even worth a social studies question. ask your teachers, professors or the prc boards whats the rationale behind this idiotic game. the inventor of this coocoo game needs to take a class in tests and measurements sa college of education.
:D kalingawan ra mana uy. lingaw lingaw ra mana. just take it as a guessing game. dont take the data too seriously. :)
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Old December 23rd, 2009, 06:15 PM   #1180
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^^ :)
^^i took the quiz....a stupid quiz...:lol::lol::lol:
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