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Old August 15th, 2009, 11:58 AM   #801
amendercabal2
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Bisaya (Sarawak) Rosary Prayers
This language is also known as Bisayah, Bisaya Bukit, Visayak, Bekiau, and Lorang Bukit.
This language is spoken by 7,000 people in the region southeast of Marudi, 5th Division in
Malaysia. It is also spoken in Brunei and Indonesia.

Amahan namu / Our Father / Pater Noster


Amahan namu nga itotat ca sa langit:
Ipapagdayet an imong ngalan:
Moanhi canamun an imong pagcahadi:
Tumanun an imong buot dinhi sa yuta,
maingun sa langit.
Ihatag mo damun an canun namun sa matagarlao:
Ug pauadun mo cami san mga-sala namu,
maingun ginuara namun,
san mga-nacasala damun:
Ngan diri imo tugotan cami maholog sa manga-panulai:
sa amun manga-caauai.
Apan bauiun mo cami sa manga-maraut ngatanan.


Maghimaya ka Malia / Hail Mary / Ave Maria
Maghimaya ka Malia (Maria) nga napono ka sa
galasiya (grasiya) ang aton Gino Diyosa adda saimo.
Dayago ka sa ku pa sa mangababai ngatanan
ug dayago man ang bunga sa tiyan mosi Hesus.
Santa Malia (Maria),
inahan ka sa Diyosa
magampo ka tango sa anomanga makasasala,
niyan ug sa igkamatai namo.
Amen.
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Old August 15th, 2009, 04:29 PM   #802
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Quote:
Originally Posted by habagatcentral1 View Post

I would rather suggest that be in "Cebuano" rather than "Bisaya" as it may connote "hegemony" of Visayan identity as solely Cebuano. Thanks!
the word "hegemony" is quite a mouthful. perhaps, the person just posted it with an honest mistake. like he/she is not aware.
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Old August 15th, 2009, 08:14 PM   #803
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Quote:
Originally Posted by death327 View Post
Guys, question, which is more close to Malay, Cebuano or Hiligaynon.
Quote:
Originally Posted by habagatcentral1 View Post
Karay-a?
i think you're right, karay-a would be closer to malay. but i'm not that sure. i just presume because it has both cebuano and hiligaynon words. but the waraynon and karay-a dog "ayam" means "chicken" in malay.

Quote:
Originally Posted by amendercabal2 View Post
Bisaya (Sarawak) Rosary Prayers
This language is also known as Bisayah, Bisaya Bukit, Visayak, Bekiau, and Lorang Bukit.
This language is spoken by 7,000 people in the region southeast of Marudi, 5th Division in
Malaysia. It is also spoken in Brunei and Indonesia.

Amahan namu / Our Father / Pater Noster


Amahan namu nga itotat ca sa langit:
Ipapagdayet an imong ngalan:
Moanhi canamun an imong pagcahadi:
Tumanun an imong buot dinhi sa yuta,
maingun sa langit.
Ihatag mo damun an canun namun sa matagarlao:
Ug pauadun mo cami san mga-sala namu,
maingun ginuara namun,
san mga-nacasala damun:
Ngan diri imo tugotan cami maholog sa manga-panulai:
sa amun manga-caauai.
Apan bauiun mo cami sa manga-maraut ngatanan.


Maghimaya ka Malia / Hail Mary / Ave Maria
Maghimaya ka Malia (Maria) nga napono ka sa
galasiya (grasiya) ang aton Gino Diyosa adda saimo.
Dayago ka sa ku pa sa mangababai ngatanan
ug dayago man ang bunga sa tiyan mosi Hesus.
Santa Malia (Maria),
inahan ka sa Diyosa
magampo ka tango sa anomanga makasasala,
niyan ug sa igkamatai namo.
Amen.
it sounds more cebuano to me than hiligaynon and waray.

the use of amahan (amay in waraynon), inahan (iroy in waraynon), yuta (tuna in waraynon), namo (namon in waraynon), dayago (daygon in cebuano, dayawon in waraynon) would make it closer to cebuano. i think hiligaynon had only slight variation from the waraynon words. but the use of "ngan" (and) is waray, in cebuano that would be "ug" and "kag" in hiligaynon. "maraut" is also waraynon but cebuano also had "maut" thought they now often use "dautan".
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Old August 16th, 2009, 02:40 AM   #804
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bukid View Post
it sounds more cebuano to me than hiligaynon and waray.

the use of amahan (amay in waraynon), inahan (iroy in waraynon), yuta (tuna in waraynon), namo (namon in waraynon), dayago (daygon in cebuano, dayawon in waraynon) would make it closer to cebuano. i think hiligaynon had only slight variation from the waraynon words. but the use of "ngan" (and) is waray, in cebuano that would be "ug" and "kag" in hiligaynon. "maraut" is also waraynon but cebuano also had "maut" thought they now often use "dautan".
Amay. iloy, duta, namon, dayawon are the Hiligaynon translations of the word. Kag is "and" kalaut in the end.
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Old August 16th, 2009, 02:44 AM   #805
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Quote:
Originally Posted by amendercabal2 View Post
Bisaya (Sarawak) Rosary Prayers
This language is also known as Bisayah, Bisaya Bukit, Visayak, Bekiau, and Lorang Bukit.
This language is spoken by 7,000 people in the region southeast of Marudi, 5th Division in
Malaysia. It is also spoken in Brunei and Indonesia.

Amahan namu / Our Father / Pater Noster


Amahan namu nga itotat ca sa langit:
Ipapagdayet an imong ngalan:
Moanhi canamun an imong pagcahadi:
Tumanun an imong buot dinhi sa yuta,
maingun sa langit.
Ihatag mo damun an canun namun sa matagarlao:
Ug pauadun mo cami san mga-sala namu,
maingun ginuara namun,
san mga-nacasala damun:
Ngan diri imo tugotan cami maholog sa manga-panulai:
sa amun manga-caauai.
Apan bauiun mo cami sa manga-maraut ngatanan.


Maghimaya ka Malia / Hail Mary / Ave Maria
Maghimaya ka Malia (Maria) nga napono ka sa
galasiya (grasiya) ang aton Gino Diyosa adda saimo.
Dayago ka sa ku pa sa mangababai ngatanan
ug dayago man ang bunga sa tiyan mosi Hesus.
Santa Malia (Maria),
inahan ka sa Diyosa
magampo ka tango sa anomanga makasasala,
niyan ug sa igkamatai namo.
Amen.
In Hiligaynon:
Amay Namon
Amay namon, nga yara ka sa mga langit
Pagdayawon ang imo ngalan
Umabot sa amon ang imo ginharian
Matuman ang imo buot
Diri sa duta subong sang sa langit
Hatagan mo kami nian sing kan-on namon
Sa matag-adlaw
Kag ipatawad mo ang mga sala namon
Subong nga ginapatawad namon ang nakasala sa amon
Kag dili mo kami nga ipagpadaug sa mga panulay
Gino-o luwason mo kami sa kalaut
Amen.

Maghimaya ka Maria

Maghimaya ka Maria
Nga napuno ka sang grasya
Ang Dios yara sa imo
Ginadayaw ka labi sa manga babaye nga tanan
Kag ginadayaw man ang bunga sang imo tiyan
nga si Jesus.

Santa Maria,
Iloy sang Dios
Ig-ampo mo kami nga makasasala
Niyan kag sa oras sang amon pagkamatay
Kabay pa!
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Old August 16th, 2009, 06:30 PM   #806
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Quote:
Originally Posted by habagatcentral1 View Post
Karay-a?
Thanks berns! I forgot about karay-a. It is indeed close to Malay compared to the two evolved forms.
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Old August 31st, 2009, 05:35 AM   #807
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The issues on the use of the word ‘Bisaya’

BRIDGING THE GAP
Henry Funtecha, Ph.D.

When the Spaniards arrived in the Visayas in the 1520s (Magellan expedition) and the 1560s (Legaspi expedition), they widely used the term “Pintados” to refer to the inhabitants. Pintados means the “painted ones” due to the fact that the Bisayans were fond of decorating their bodies with tattoos, both men and women. Not fully understanding what tattoos were, the Spaniards thought the Bisayans indeed painted their bodies with artistic designs. The women had fine and intricate tattoos in their arms and their legs while the men, depending upon their exploits and contributions to the community, had tattoos all over their bodies. In some cases, especially for the brave and courageous ones who had proven their valor in battle, tattoos even covered their faces. The tattoo designs of men were generally of bold geometric patterns or representations of animals. It must be pointed out though that tattooing was not the monopoly of the Bisayans.

Early Spanish writers reported that natives of Albay, Camarines, Catanduanes, and the mountainous sections of northern Luzon also practiced it.

The question now is, at what point of time did the Spaniards begin to refer to the people of the Visayas as “Vizaya” or “Bisaya”? This is still a gray area with regards to the history of the Visayas but, looking at Spanish documents written by the late 1500s and early 1600s, the Spaniards had already shifted to the name “Vizaya” and were already referring to the central islands as “Las Islas de Visayas”. All indications point to the possibility that the name “Bisaya” was already in use prior to the coming of the Spaniards. What probably happened was that the early Spaniards were not yet familiar with the people and the places when they were just new in the country. So, for a while, they used the term “Pintados” but eventually shifted to the word “Vizaya” or “Bisaya” after they had already settled down in the area.

Another important consideration in trying to establish the usage of Bisaya in referring to the people is the fact that the Atis or Negritos of Panay have always been calling the lowlanders as “mga Bisaya”. In addition, there are lots of things in Panay referred to by the people as “bisaya”, like “bisaya nga manok, bisaya nga luy-a, bisaya nga kamatis, bisaya nga ahos, bisaya nga talong, bisaya nga pantat, and many more. The use of the term “Bisaya” is not just confined to local flora and fauna but is also used to refer to traditional processes like “bisaya nga pagpamulong” (use of herbal medicine) and “binisaya nga pamaagi”. Even using Hiligaynon and Kinaray-a in speaking is called “binisaya nga panghambal”. Is it possible also that “Bisaya” means native or local?

The other major issue pertains to the usage of the term “Bisaya” by the Cebuanos. They have expropriated the term as a designation exclusively for the Cebuanos and their language, with the exclusion of the other groups of Bisaya. To the Cebuanos, the other inhabitants of the Visayas are not Bisaya but as Ilonggos in Panay and Negros, Bol-anon in Bohol, and Waray in Samar and Northern Leyte. It is time for scholars and academicians to correct this misconception. The inhabitants of the Visayas are all Bisaya for this has been established as a fact by history.

The Spaniards recognized majority of the inhabitants of the Visayas as one race, except the Atis or Negritos. They generally described the Bisaya as of medium stature, having black hair and dark skin or kayumanggi. Some individual Spanish friars differed from these general characterization and referred to natives in a particular island as being taller, lighter in complexion, brave and more muscular than others, but these were subjective comments which reflected their value judgments and the fact that the Spaniards themselves varied greatly in stature and complexion, as well as physical traits.

The descriptions of the skin pigmentation of the Bisaya by the Spaniards in the 16th century were often contradictory (Scott 1995). The first natives the Spaniards observed were those from Homonhon, Limasawa, and Butuan, and were described by the colonizers as being of medium height and dark-skinned (Ibid).

Fr. Francisco Alcina, on the other hand, said that he did not think that the Bisayans were really that dark, though almost, and that the natives of Leyte and Samar were lighter than those in Davao (Alcina 1668). Alonso Mentrida, however, described the Bisaya “mailum” as a color a bit darker than kayumanggi, though not black like the Ati. From Cebu, Juan de la Isla reported that the natives were darker than the Indios of Mexico (Mentrida 1841).

Of course, it must be borne in mind that, as it is today, the Bisaya and the rest of the Filipinos are not at all of the same shade nor were they all necessarily darker than the Spaniards. In any case, before the development of a colonial mentality, the Bisaya themselves were not impressed by the pale color of the colonizers. In other words, they did not attach a premium on white skin and other features associated with the Caucasian race. The Spaniards were not even perceived as maputi or white, but as “mapuraw”, natural or undyed - meaning, untattooed. And to the Bisaya, because the Spaniards were not into the practice of chewing betel nut, the most distinctive character of these foreigners was their white teeth, a feature shared with animals like dogs, monkeys and pigs.

Source: The News Today
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Old September 2nd, 2009, 09:27 PM   #808
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Quote:
Originally Posted by habagatcentral1 View Post

The issues on the use of the word ‘Bisaya’

BRIDGING THE GAP
Henry Funtecha, Ph.D.

The other major issue pertains to the usage of the term “Bisaya” by the Cebuanos. They have expropriated the term as a designation exclusively for the Cebuanos and their language, with the exclusion of the other groups of Bisaya. To the Cebuanos, the other inhabitants of the Visayas are not Bisaya but as Ilonggos in Panay and Negros, Bol-anon in Bohol, and Waray in Samar and Northern Leyte. It is time for scholars and academicians to correct this misconception. The inhabitants of the Visayas are all Bisaya for this has been established as a fact by history.

Source: The News Today
granting that there is a misconception here, i doubt if the misconception is hegemonic in nature. my impression is that other visayan groups do not feel that tribal subjugation. that's just my observation anyway.
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Old September 27th, 2009, 06:51 PM   #809
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Kinaray-a

Guys btw, people who speak Kinaray-a is called Karay-a. Kinaray-a is the name of the language. Also, Kinaray-a serves as the buffer between Western Philippine languages (and also Tagalog languages, as evidence of the mixture of Kinaray-a like grammar and vocabulary of Southern Tagalog such as Marinduque) and Visayan languages (Hiligaynon-Ilonggo and Bisaya-Sugbuhanon is more closely related as seen in their grammar).

Kinaray-a is closely related to Akeanon, Cuyonen, Romblomanon (Looknon), Palawanon languages.

Also just some trivia, Antique Province's orignal name is "Hamtik" spelled only in the French form but mispronounced as "Ahn-tee-keh" which should actually be "Ahn-tihk" in French. Same is true with Marinduque from "Malindig" and Cavite from "Kawit."
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Old January 3rd, 2010, 10:14 AM   #810
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BUMP!

Hey guys. I'm here to ask if there are any Wikipedians here, because I'll be working on a major policy shift for the Philippine-language Wikipedias. Please tell me who you are, and we'll see each other in the Wikipedians thread in Samahan. Thanks!

(The Hiligaynon and Kinaray-a Wikipedias can certainly use contributors as well! )
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Old March 2nd, 2010, 04:59 AM   #811
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Hello everyone!!! Daw wala na gid tawo di aw??? Tgacapiz ko kag gusto ko magentra man sa inyo thread..
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Old March 10th, 2010, 08:10 PM   #812
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Quote:
Originally Posted by amendercabal2 View Post
Bisaya (Sarawak) Rosary Prayers
This language is also known as Bisayah, Bisaya Bukit, Visayak, Bekiau, and Lorang Bukit.
This language is spoken by 7,000 people in the region southeast of Marudi, 5th Division in
Malaysia. It is also spoken in Brunei and Indonesia.

Amahan namu / Our Father / Pater Noster


Amahan namu nga itotat ca sa langit:
Ipapagdayet an imong ngalan:
Moanhi canamun an imong pagcahadi:
Tumanun an imong buot dinhi sa yuta,
maingun sa langit.
Ihatag mo damun an canun namun sa matagarlao:
Ug pauadun mo cami san mga-sala namu,
maingun ginuara namun,
san mga-nacasala damun:
Ngan diri imo tugotan cami maholog sa manga-panulai:
sa amun manga-caauai.
Apan bauiun mo cami sa manga-maraut ngatanan.


Maghimaya ka Malia / Hail Mary / Ave Maria
Maghimaya ka Malia (Maria) nga napono ka sa
galasiya (grasiya) ang aton Gino Diyosa adda saimo.
Dayago ka sa ku pa sa mangababai ngatanan
ug dayago man ang bunga sa tiyan mosi Hesus.
Santa Malia (Maria),
inahan ka sa Diyosa
magampo ka tango sa anomanga makasasala,
niyan ug sa igkamatai namo.
Amen.

This could easily pass as Hiligaynon or Karay-a!
Believe me...
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Old April 6th, 2010, 07:14 PM   #813
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A brave and beautiful Filipino feminist novel


FRENCH feminist critic Helen Cixous, in her essay “The Laugh of the Medusa," bravely stipulates that “the woman writer should write her self" if she wants to “reclaim her voice" and “reclaim her body that was confiscated by patriarchal society." This confiscation leads to women being subordinate to men that they cannot even enjoy their own bodies, literally and figuratively.

If only Cixous could read a novel in Filipino (Visayan-laced Filipino, to be specific), she might enjoy intellectual ecstasy in reading the latest book of Genevieve L. Asenjo, a novel called Lumbay ng Dila (Loneliness of the Tongue).

Set in the bucolic province of Antique and chaotic Taft Avenue in Manila, this is the story of a young literature teacher in a university, Sadyah Lopez. She is looking for herself in the city and also looking for her long-lost mother, Teresa, a former commander of the New People’s Army in Panay who is now an NGO worker.

Sadyah’s name is from the Kinaray-a word “sadya" which means “happy." Kinaray-a is the language in Antique and is the dominant language in Panay, being the mother language of the more well-known Hiligaynon (often mistakenly called “Ilonggo" which actually refers to a person from Iloilo province) spoken in the cities of Iloilo, Roxas in Capiz, and Bacolod in Negros Occidental.

Asenjo incorporated Kinaray-a and Hiligaynon words in the writing of her novel, a practice introduced by Palanca Hall of Famer Leoncio P. Deriada in Iloilo which he describes as “Visayan-laced Filipino." For what is Filipino, the national language, but the happy mixing of all existing Philippine languages and colonial languages? Filipino is still in its process of development, and what Asenjo has done is to quicken the process of language formation, or “language engineering" as Deriada would put it.

Sadyah probably did not have a happy childhood. She was left by her parents in the care of her aunt, as her father and mother used to be active NPA leaders. Her father was killed in an ambush along with Sadyah’s baby brother Dakila. She only found out about her dead brother towards the end of the novel, when she and her mother were talking in Sadyah’s condominium unit near Taft Avenue. Thanks to the Internet they finally met —one hot mama and one hot daughter. As an adult, Sadyah is enjoying her career and her life, a woman at home in her body who is not afraid to love. She is the epitome of a liberated woman.

Those who love reading chick lit with lots of sex will not be disappointed with this novel. But definitely, Lumbay ng Dila is not just chick lit if what we mean by it is a lifestyle novel about a young woman with a career whose main problem is about not having a man. Of course there are many things about urban lifestyles in this novel, where the main character is a young woman who has a string of lovers—from a Tsinoy law student who is always ready with a condom, a jobless man with a box of carpentry tools, a Muslim guy who has a Quiapo connection, and an Indian man she met on the Internet. Even then, Lumbay ng Dila is definitely not pornographic material, if what we mean by pornography is something that would stimulate only our libido and nothing else. Mind you, page four and many other pages of this novel are not for the prude and the weak-hearted.

In contrast to the usual chick lit, however, while reading the novel I could not help but compare Sadyah Lopez to Leah Bustamante of Lualhati Bautista’s Bata, Bata Paano Ka Ginawa (How Were You Created, Child). Both women are in charge of their own body and mind.

In the discourse of the region and the nation, Sadyah Lopez is more nationally encompassing than Leah Bustamante for she is from Panay, specifically Antique, a poor province but not wanting in heroes in real life like Evelio Javier. I’m not faulting Leah Bustamante (as well as Bautista) for having their roots in imperial Manila. What I’m saying is that Asenjo is definitely writing in the tradition of feminist writing in Filipino and being a woman writer from the vernacular realm of the Philippine nation she pushed, and is continuing to push, to the frontier of an imagined Filipino community where women are free, where gender does not prohibit anyone from doing any small but vital role in nation building.

Perhaps to call a “Filipino feminist novel" brave and beautiful is redundant, for it is imperative for a Filipino feminist novel to be brave and beautiful. Lualhati Bautista has already cleared the way for other feminist writers. But I think being redundant in this aspect is forgivable. I am just happy that young novelists like Genevieve Asenjo are treading this path, Lualhati Bautista’s brave and beautiful way.

I teach writing and communication in the national language in a women’s college, and I always tell my students to read Bautista’s Bata, Bata Paano Ka Ginawa to see how a woman can empower herself and become a very useful citizen. Now I will also tell them to read Asenjo’s Lumbay ng Dila to complete their education as Filipino women who are ready to liberate themselves and their country.

-----------

Genevieve L. Asenjo hails from the town of Dao in Antique. She has MFA in Creative Writing and Ph.D. in Literature degrees from De La Salle University Manila. She has won Palanca awards for her short stories in Hiligaynon. Her other books are Pula ang Kulay ng Text Message, a poetry collection in Filipino and Kinaray-a, and Komposo ni Dandansoy, a collection of Hiligaynon short stories with Filipino translation.

Lumbay ng Dila is published by C&E Publishing for De La Salle University-Manila. It is available in all major bookstores.

source
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Old October 25th, 2010, 08:49 PM   #814
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Quote:
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siki is also used in some towns of Iloilo like Pototan/Miag-ao

In Capiz they also "lapuk" for mud.

For karay-a Cats are called "kuti" or "iring"

TODAY: in karay-a is also "tulad" (lossely used as "now" as well) or "kadya"
TOMORROW: is "rum-an"

ngaa man diri sa passi iba ang term ya..like:

CAT: miyaw(pareho sang ila sound meow)

TODAY: dukaron/dukar-on

TOMORROW: is harum-an

hehehe.
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Old January 29th, 2011, 04:57 PM   #815
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Good evening to all!!!!

sa tanan mga Ilonggo,

Kamusta na kamo tanan da???
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Old January 29th, 2011, 05:05 PM   #816
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Amay Namon

mao ni ang correct gid na lyrics sang Ama'y Namon

Amay Namon
Na yara ka sa mga langit
Dayawon ang imo ngalan
Umabot sa amon ang imon ginhari-an
Matuman ang buot mo sa duta siling sang sa langit
Hatagan mo kami niyan
Sing kan-on namon sa matag adlaw
Kag patawaron mo sa mga sala namon
Siling nga gina patawad namon
Ang mga nakasala sa amon
Kag dili mo kami ipadaug sa dautan
hinunu-a luwason mo kami sa Kalaut....
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Old February 19th, 2011, 10:17 AM   #817
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JosefinoRicaforte View Post
Hello everyone!!! Daw wala na gid tawo di aw??? Tgacapiz ko kag gusto ko magentra man sa inyo thread..
join our main thread http://www.skyscrapercity.com/showthread.php?t=1308559 thanks
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Old June 14th, 2011, 09:05 PM   #818
alheaine
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Bukas Na Lang Kita Mamahalin by Lani Misalucha

Kay hirap palang umibig sa 'di tamang panahon
[Kabudlay gali magpalangga sa indi intsakto nga tiyempo..]
Kung bakit ngayon ko lang natagpuan ang isang katulad mo
[Kung insa nga dukaron ko lang nakita ya isa ka pareho mo..]

Sana noon pa kita nakilala
[Daad kato pa kita nakilala..]
Sana noon pa lang na ang puso ay malaya pang magmahal
[Daad kato pa lang nga ya tagipusuon pwede pa ka higugma..]

Bukas nalang kita mamahalin
[Harum'an ta lang ikaw palanggaon..]
Sabay sa paglaya ng ating mga puso
[Dungan sa paghilway ka atun tagipusuon..]
Bukas na lang kita mamahalin
[Harum'an ta lang ikaw palanggaon..]

Kay hirap pa lang umibig sa di tamang panahon
[Kabudlay gali magpalangga sa indi intsakto nga tiyempo..]
Kung bakit ngayon ko lang natagpuan ang isang katulad mo
[Kung insa nga dukaron ko lang nakita ya isa ka pareho mo..]

Sana noon pa kita nakilala
[Daad kato pa kita nakilala..]
Sana noon pa lang na ang puso ay malaya pang magmahal
[Daad kato pa lang nga ya tagipusuon pwede pa ka higugma..]

Bukas nalang kita mamahalin
[Harum'an ta lang ikaw palanggaon..]
Sabay sa paglaya ng ating mga puso
[Dungan sa paghilway ka atun tagipusuon..]

Bukas na lang kita
[Harum'an ta lang ikaw..]
Bukas na lang kita
[Harum'an ta lang ikaw..]
Bukas na lang kita
[Harum'an ta lang ikaw..]
Mamahalin...
[Palanggaon..]

i translated to kinaray'a of central iloilo (passi kinaray'a)..i don't know kung en tsakto man..toink.
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Old August 22nd, 2011, 06:19 AM   #819
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Hiligaynon now has book on its usage


By: Jaime S. Cabag, Jr.


THE Sumakwelan Iloilo, Inc., an organization of writers and poets in the Hiligaynon language, has written a book on the Hiligaynon language and its proper usage. The book is now available in the market.

Sumakwelan Iloilo president, retired Judge Nilo Par. Pamonag said on behalf of the organization that the book entitled “Pulong Hiligaynon Para sa Tanan” (Hiligaynon Language for All) is the first book of its kind to be written about the local language used by the people of Western Visayas and some parts of southern Philippines.

Pamonag said the book is in response to the need of the times and in fulfilment of their responsibility to promote, preserve, protect, and popularize Hiligaynon through its proper usage.

The writing of the pioneering book was undertaken by an ad hoc committee from the organization and its consultants of veteran Hiligaynon writers.

The book has two parts: Part I – Fundamental Principles of Hiligaynon and the Affixes; Part II – Hiligaynon Rules of Spelling, Correct Usage, and other salient aspects of the language.

The local language is now also used by the Philippine Information Agency (PIA) in Western Visayas for its Hiligaynon News, which has been institutionalized under the present stint of PIA Director General Jose A. Fabia, along with other major languages in the country as part of promoting a facet of regional cultural heritage and giving PIA news a wider audience reach.

Sumakwelan Iloilo was first organized in 1948 and was known by the name “Mga Gakud ni Sumakwel” (Knights of Sumakwel) then. It is named after Datu Sumakwel, one of the ten Bornean datus who settled in the island of Panay through the historic barter of Panay in the early 13th century.


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Old November 11th, 2011, 10:34 PM   #820
METROPOLITAN_ILOILO
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Haldir07 View Post
Hiligaynon now has book on its usage


By: Jaime S. Cabag, Jr.


THE Sumakwelan Iloilo, Inc., an organization of writers and poets in the Hiligaynon language, has written a book on the Hiligaynon language and its proper usage. The book is now available in the market.

Sumakwelan Iloilo president, retired Judge Nilo Par. Pamonag said on behalf of the organization that the book entitled “Pulong Hiligaynon Para sa Tanan” (Hiligaynon Language for All) is the first book of its kind to be written about the local language used by the people of Western Visayas and some parts of southern Philippines.

Pamonag said the book is in response to the need of the times and in fulfilment of their responsibility to promote, preserve, protect, and popularize Hiligaynon through its proper usage.

The writing of the pioneering book was undertaken by an ad hoc committee from the organization and its consultants of veteran Hiligaynon writers.

The book has two parts: Part I – Fundamental Principles of Hiligaynon and the Affixes; Part II – Hiligaynon Rules of Spelling, Correct Usage, and other salient aspects of the language.

The local language is now also used by the Philippine Information Agency (PIA) in Western Visayas for its Hiligaynon News, which has been institutionalized under the present stint of PIA Director General Jose A. Fabia, along with other major languages in the country as part of promoting a facet of regional cultural heritage and giving PIA news a wider audience reach.

Sumakwelan Iloilo was first organized in 1948 and was known by the name “Mga Gakud ni Sumakwel” (Knights of Sumakwel) then. It is named after Datu Sumakwel, one of the ten Bornean datus who settled in the island of Panay through the historic barter of Panay in the early 13th century.


DailyGuardian

Finally, this is a welcome development!
We need more of these.
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