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Old October 26th, 2010, 03:24 AM   #41
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Oh dear....

More cars?

http://www.stuff.co.nz/the-press/bus...thedral-Square
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Old October 29th, 2010, 06:14 AM   #42
Milan Luka
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I cant get my head around it!

All my favourite restaurants cafes have either closed or relocated.

Winnie Bagoes got smashed up and has now reopened in the Vic and Whale. My Burgers place I know has moved elsewhere but Ive got to idea where.

And Jesus, I think its time the roads in the cbd got a proper fix up. So much subsidence, holes and cracks that where all hastily filled in. Now they just look nasty and third world, we need to get them sorted.
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Old October 30th, 2010, 09:16 AM   #43
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I cant get my head around it!

All my favourite restaurants cafes have either closed or relocated.

Winnie Bagoes got smashed up and has now reopened in the Vic and Whale. My Burgers place I know has moved elsewhere but Ive got to idea where.
And Jesus, I think its time the roads in the cbd got a proper fix up. So much subsidence, holes and cracks that where all hastily filled in. Now they just look nasty and third world, we need to get them sorted.
Burgers n Beers? They're operating out of Melbas nightclub, Cashel/Manchester.
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Old November 3rd, 2010, 02:14 AM   #44
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Thats the one baby! Thanks for the update Cartel. Like I said, Im having trouble getting my head around the changes.
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Old November 3rd, 2010, 12:20 PM   #45
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Arise, Christchurch

The Press

OPINION: Rivalry between Christchurch and Wellington is long- standing, whether it be arguments over the quality of the sportspeople from each centre or over the quality of the cities themselves. So some Christchurch residents might have felt miffed to read that travel guide publisher Lonely Planet had named Wellington as one of the four best cities to travel to in the world.

But a moment of reflection should moderate any civic outrage. Christchurch is arguably New Zealand's most pleasant city in which to live, especially for families. Yet Lonely Planet does have a point when it rates Wellington as a top global tourist destination.

The central quadrants of the capital have more vibrancy than those of Christchurch. Within a relatively short walking distance in Wellington are attractions such as Te Papa, the Westpac "Cake Tin" Stadium and Parliament, as well as the bustling entertainment venues of Courtenay Place and the redeveloped waterfront.

Central Wellington has retained its retail heart far more so than Christchurch, where too many suburban malls were allowed to develop. And Wellington also had the foresight to shift several of Victoria University's faculties right into the central city, with students providing a welcome contrast to the dark-suited bureaucrats of Lambton Quay.

Little wonder that Wellington is a popular destination in its own right for international tourists and domestic visitors, whereas Christchurch is more of a gateway city, providing the chance to pick up a campervan or a flight to Queenstown.

But Wellington's appeal did not develop by accident. It was the result of a sustained emphasis on the part of planners and civic leaders to revitalise what had once been a drab central city.

Now the same challenge faces Christchurch. The central city does have its share of tourist attractions, such as Canterbury Museum, the Arts Centre, the Christchurch Art Gallery and the trams. It also has its Oxford Terrace entertainment venues and attractions like the Ellerslie Flower Show and the International Buskers' Festival.

Yet apart from the annual events and the cultural attractions on the west side of the central city there is not the same energy and excitement that is found across much of inner Wellington. Those Christchurch residents hosting visitors often have to resort to driving their guests outside the central city, to Akaroa or Hanmer Springs.

For many years much has been written and spoken about the need for Christchurch to reinvigorate its central city precincts. This is essential if tourists are to be persuaded to spend more of their time, and their money, in Christchurch before heading elsewhere in the South Island.

It is also crucial to encouraging more residents to come into the inner city for their shopping and entertainment.

The earthquake damage in parts of the central business district must now be a catalyst for vigorous debate on the revitalisation process and this has already begun to occur. There has been discussion over the shape of Cathedral Square, the optimal size of the CBD, the future of heritage buildings and the right mix of retail and residential development.

And if this debate does lead to the creation of a busy and bustling central city, in future it could be Christchurch, rather than Wellington, that wins accolades from Lonely Planet.
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Old November 4th, 2010, 08:45 PM   #46
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More Shops but not in Malls............

Quote:
Originally Posted by Davee View Post
The Press

OPINION: The central quadrants of the capital have more vibrancy than those of Christchurch. Within a relatively short walking distance in Wellington are attractions such as Te Papa, the Westpac "Cake Tin" Stadium and Parliament, as well as the bustling entertainment venues of Courtenay Place and the redeveloped waterfront.

Central Wellington has retained its retail heart far more so than Christchurch, where too many suburban malls were allowed to develop. Little wonder that Wellington is a popular destination in its own right for international tourists and domestic visitors, whereas Christchurch is more of a gateway city, providing the chance to pick up a campervan or a flight to Queenstown.

But Wellington's appeal did not develop by accident. It was the result of a sustained emphasis on the part of planners and civic leaders to revitalise what had once been a drab central city.

Now the same challenge faces Christchurch. The central city does have its share of tourist attractions, such as Canterbury Museum, the Arts Centre, the Christchurch Art Gallery and the trams. It also has its Oxford Terrace entertainment venues and attractions like the Ellerslie Flower Show and the International Buskers' Festival.

Yet apart from the annual events and the cultural attractions on the west side of the central city there is not the same energy and excitement that is found across much of inner Wellington. Those Christchurch residents hosting visitors often have to resort to driving their guests outside the central city, to Akaroa or Hanmer Springs.

For many years much has been written and spoken about the need for Christchurch to reinvigorate its central city precincts. This is essential if tourists are to be persuaded to spend more of their time, and their money, in Christchurch before heading elsewhere in the South Island.

It is also crucial to encouraging more residents to come into the inner city for their shopping and entertainment.

The earthquake damage in parts of the central business district must now be a catalyst for vigorous debate on the revitalisation process and this has already begun to occur. There has been discussion over the shape of Cathedral Square, the optimal size of the CBD, the future of heritage buildings and the right mix of retail and residential development..
Davee, reading the above reminded me of my home town , Liverpool.
Back in 2000 the city was faced with similar problems , change quake damage for vacant sites and worn out buildings. A private developer was appointed to work in partnership with the city, after public consultations the city went for banning a large Mall type development whilst retaining the street pattern.

Over 42 acres of the centre was rebuilt and now houses 160 shops,dept stores, over 20 bars and restaurants, 3 hotels, park and bus station & parking for 3,000 cars........




When this £1billion was fully opened, it moved the city from 15th. to 5th in the shopping league table with over 25M visitors per annum.

Christchurch must do something similar, it has to retain the existing street layout, provide plenty of car parking and ban all new mall developments, whilst providing more shops and an improved public realm. The Quake ,tragic as it was, does give the city a golden opportunity to rebuild an exciting and dynamic CBD
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Old December 18th, 2010, 08:26 PM   #47
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Time to 'green the rubble' in a battered city

The Press

A post-earthquake initiative to "green the rubble" will be launched in Christchurch tomorrow.

The Greening the Rubble project aims to revitalise the sites of demolished buildings. Temporary landscapes, including seating and native plants, will fill spaces as landowners prepare to redevelop their sites.

The project is part of Make- SHIFT, which finds temporary uses for empty sites across Christchurch. Rhys Taylor, of organiser Living Streets Aotearoa, said the group wanted to put "fun and entertainment and visual pleasure back into a rather battered central city".

"The aim is that these should be spaces people can use, rather than being fenced out," he said.

It was a team effort, with everyone from professional landscape designers to students involved.

Volunteers had enough energy and funding to run up to four sites and landowners could offer short or long-term access to their vacant sites.

The launch will be held on the former site of Asko Design and Carl Watkins Hairdressing in Victoria Street between 11am and 2pm tomorrow.
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Old December 21st, 2010, 02:32 AM   #48
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I have heard its very difficult to demolish the NZ express co BLDG it is taking a lot longer than planned. So it was built very well and not so likely to fall down by itself after all!
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Old December 21st, 2010, 08:03 AM   #49
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hmmmm - funny that.... i thought the engineers and the owner were all in absolute agreement that it could all just tumble at any time and had to be removed pronto..
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Old December 21st, 2010, 03:15 PM   #50
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hmmmm - funny that.... i thought the engineers and the owner were all in absolute agreement that it could all just tumble at any time and had to be removed pronto..
Better safe than sorry I suppose ...
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Old December 21st, 2010, 03:19 PM   #51
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I see from the news the building have been on fire!
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Old December 21st, 2010, 10:09 PM   #52
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I have heard its very difficult to demolish the NZ express co BLDG it is taking a lot longer than planned. So it was built very well and not so likely to fall down by itself after all!
God I hope not. So sad if that's the case.

Also i must say, so surprised this is taking so long. Really feel sorry for the business owners around there. This part of town is going to take so long to recover.
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Old December 22nd, 2010, 05:30 AM   #53
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They are now saying the earthquake is the 3rd most expensive quake in the world an is more costly than the San Francisco one!
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Old January 1st, 2011, 11:00 PM   #54
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Planner's vision for inner city

The Press

Like any true-born Glaswegian, James Lunday doesn't mince words when it comes to Christchurch's future.

The architect, planner and urban designer knows this city well after working closely with the city's former mayor, Garry Moore, on several major projects, including Beckenham and Hornby housing schemes.

He launched his own company, Common Ground, here in 1992 to head the creation of Pegasus Bay in North Canterbury. Since this foundation project, Common Ground Studio ("urban design and master planning specialists") and its founder have continued to work in a variety of international urban design, planning and community development projects.

Lunday retains strong emotional and professional ties with Christchurch - and he's concerned about its future.

"When I look at Christchurch today, it's not a decaying city - it's a city which has never been built to its full potential. It was still- born. There are magnificent buildings at its core but when you look at the four avenues the standard declines. It hasn't gone from industrial to post-industrial. It's gone to warehouse. Low value, low cost warehouses.

"The September 4 earthquake gave an opportunity to debate what Christchurch will be like in the future; how will people make a living and live here; how the city will make its place in the world to become a great city?" he tells you with the certainty of a man for whom the world is his drawing board.

"Or is it comfortable to simply remain as it is? A big country town. That has a certain charm but you don't want to simply replicate other cities' mistakes. Christchurch needs to do things its own way but what I haven't seen is the opportunity for really constructive public debate about what Christchurch and Canterbury wants. That's possibly because it's still in the rebuilding mode but the situation existed before the earthquake and nothing was done about that.

"Timid? I prefer the word complacent," says Lunday.

He has returned to a Christchurch that's battered and scarred not merely by natural disaster but by an economic recession which never quite disappeared.

He has also stepped unswervingly into the contentious debate about the future of the central city and its role as an urban economic engine room.

At the core of his argument is a simple equation: Urban design exists for people rather than the other way around.

"The September 4 earthquake was obviously a fundamental event - a watershed, a turning point - for Christchurch. That's a cliche only if it's used as such. The danger now is that it all slips back into 'business as usual' mode where things are simply patched up and life - and attitudes - continue unchanged.

"Glasgow in the 1960s still contained vacant sites from the 1943 bombing. The same thing could happen in Christchurch, except that the spaces will be filled with cars."

Seen through Lunday's eyes, Christchurch now has an opportunity to become a city state, maximising the huge resources of the Canterbury Plains, the intellectual grunt which comes from two universities, and the ability to add value to products.

But that requires a major shift in how Cantabrians see themselves.

"Glasgow's transformation started with a simple vision, rather than a detailed plan, which envisaged a series of precincts, 20 activity zones along the River Clyde. Glaswegians . . . were encouraged to celebrate what it meant to be a Glaswegian and what and how they could contribute to the world.

"If you want to transform Christchurch, you must firstly transform its citizens. You do that by celebrating its culture, not knocking it. Building on its arts and culture is the easiest - and cheapest - thing to do."

The central authorities must play a central role in developing this brave new future.

"We have a capital crisis in New Zealand. Developers can't get capital. The city council has a huge equity base and the ability to raise capital. It needs to get mechanisms to involve the private sector. Marry that with the stability of its economic base through the growth of a joint venture. You've already done this successfully through the Christchurch City Holdings but there's now an opportunity to do it on a larger scale. Why not raise capital through your own citizens through some form of city bonds, a city development bank? Without this tool you won't see development."

Lunday says the central city poses major issues.

"I'm not too worried about shopping malls. CBDs can compete with these. The ability to put commercial activities into industrial areas is more damaging, especially when quasi shopping malls cannibalise larger department stores.

"It needs to return to the time when the CBD was a place to be seen, to come for the best shopping and where you come for culture. Let's face it, there's no culture in big box developments or the suburbs. There are already snippets in the lanes which have developed here."

The Lunday solution?

Shrink the CBD into a smaller entity and start to create an inner city. Reduce the ability of the car to move quickly and easily through the inner city. Create a tight commercial core surrounded by a liveable, high density residential area.

"I'd plan for a city of one million and consider where people would live and work and enjoy the city. Create a major marketing campaign. Create more cultural centres to promote the arts. Get the national ballet, national orchestra to Christchurch. This can be a festival city. All it needs is a belief in yourself."
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Old January 2nd, 2011, 09:47 AM   #55
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Thanks Davee that is exactly the article I was alluding to earlier. Christchurch does need to be planning for a city of 1 million, many politicians are simply missing the boat on this. That is a great article and has a lot of what Bob has been alluding to in it as well. On the forum Betterpublictransport.co.nz there is a lot of information about how commuter rail could be set up. Amazingly it was once a major part of Canterbury's infrastructure and was reasonably viable in a time when the population was only a fraction of what it is now. The figures project an urban population of 700,000 in the next thirty years, albeit these are conservative figures as well. I also heard that Bob was interested in extending the tram to the university, haven't seen the article, it sounds interesting.
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Old January 10th, 2011, 10:30 PM   #56
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The Press - Grand homestead back in business



More than 200 walls had to be repainted and replastered, 11 chimneys repaired and 15 fireplaces restored, but the 115-year-old Otahuna Lodge reopened yesterday.

The heritage building near Tai Tapu was closed for more than four months after damage caused by the September 4 earthquake. More than 40 tradesmen, engineers and architects have worked on the building to repair roofs, complete seismic strengthening and recreate Otahuna's 11 chimneys. Insurance covered the repair costs.

Managing director Hall Cannon said the goal was to recreate the original architecture of the building.

He said February could be a record month for bookings.
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Old January 10th, 2011, 11:14 PM   #57
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I would say Christchurch would be more like 550,000 in 2040 if the current growth rate of just 1% is maintained, it will take a lot longer than 30 years to reach 700,000.
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Old February 1st, 2011, 05:57 PM   #58
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Beaven's bold view for city

OPINION: Christchurch architect PETER BEAVEN makes a call for action on the city centre.

The troubles of Christchurch's central city were real before the earthquakes. Now the central city is so stressed that the situation calls for immediate and much wider community, professional and city council combined leadership and action.

The issues are much too big for any one group to manage.

We desperately need now an overall comprehensive view of the central city shared by everyone, certainly not another or new City Plan.

This comprehensive view, in my opinion, must grapple with the real problems of declining economic strength, and the need for many more people to live in the central city and fill the open spaces.

Thankfully, we still have enough heritage quality, good streetscape and splendid open spaces to make the central city a rich, varied and culturally diverse precinct. With so many damaged buildings, this is under real threat.

If we had a comprehensive plan to build a vibrant, diverse and cultured inner city, we would all find the enthusiasm to rebuild the city.

This new city centre would be completely different to the often boring, very repetitious suburban malls. This is what we need - a City Centre in complete contrast to Suburbia.

The immediate objectives of the comprehensive plan:

(1) Many more people in the city centre.

(2) To provide the widest range of services to this new population.

(3) More small, modest rent spaces for small businesses.

(4) City aesthetics: (a) Heritage to take in streetscape, and (b) a new building design guide.

(5) To eliminate one-way streets.

(6) To alter the City Plan which currently allows maximum development everywhere in the city centre. Land, of course, stays empty waiting for that to happen. Land values stay much too high, and prevent more diverse development.

It is council policy that more people live in the inner city. Real estate agents who work in the inner city say there are a great number of people, particularly young couples with diverse skills, many retired people, and some short-term young families who really want to live in the city centre.

The simplest way to achieve more people in the inner city is to occupy empty old buildings and replace open car parks with apartments.

These apartments should really be mixed use spaces capable of adaption to housing, working at home, or small offices.

They don't need to be more than three storeys with big roof lofts - this suits the Christchurch skyline. They can be in self- contained blocks either facing existing streets or onto new mews, and little squares.

We know that the overall cost of a dwelling unit in existing city centres is much less than new housing in outer suburbia, and that more people in the streets make safer inner cities. These are just two of the numerous advantages of higher density.

South City and Moorhouse Ave have perfectly adequate supermarkets. What is needed is help for small scattered outlets, boutiques, opportunities for independent businesses with modest incomes. Timaru has such a rule for its Stafford St, and it works.

The new apartment blocks would be multi-use, so small businesses, community services and non-government organisations can occupy them.

It is obvious that modern architecture simply cannot create the visual delight of Victorian streets. This is, of course, one of the delights of older inner cities, and absolutely impossible with the repetitious modern suburban malls.

We need to look at heritage not just as separate listed buildings but as heritage streetscape. Surely our best Victorian heritage from now on must be absolutely sacrosanct; we have so little left. All really successful heritage cities have streetscape design guides. One would be really helpful.

The next and last issue which we have all talked about for years is the madness of allowing one- way traffic raceways through the inner city. Ours is a radial city; the quickest way across it is through the centre, and this is what everyone does.

All traditional cities limit the use of cars in their heritage central areas. They know from long experience that pedestrians add much more richness and economic vitality than cars. Now is the perfect time to seize the opportunity, and make the one- way streets two-way, and limit inner city traffic with a 30km speed limit. The shuttle bus is a success. We need more shuttle buses complementing the tram routes.

All these issues have been discussed in one form or another for years. Much is already perfectly well known. The city council has thankfully set the scene for wider debate with the new special committees.

I believe that the three groups which, in all heritage cities, have an equal voice must come together with one voice:

(1) Community groups of all kinds.

(2) All professionals concerned with the built environment.

(3) The city council.

If this could happen a successful heritage city full of people and economic life would be inevitable.

The best first move would be for all the interested parties to nominate representatives to meet and find common paths. We don't need any new City Plan. Instead we must build on the excellence we were given.

- The Press
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Old February 8th, 2011, 03:15 PM   #59
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New park takes shape in city centre

NICOLE MATHEWSON - The Press

A giant brick art mural was unveiled in Christchurch this morning as part of a post-earthquake "greening the rubble'' project.

The 25 square metre mural was revealed today on the former premises of Asko Design and Carl Watkins (Mod's) Hairdressing, left vacant after the September 4 earthquake.

The Crusaders rugby team lent a hand to turn the site into a temporary public park as part of the 'Greening the Rubble' initiative, while the brick art was installed to help raise funds for the Child Cancer Foundation (CCF).

Austral Bricks national manager Cindy Driscoll said it was the first time a brick art mural has been constructed outside of Australia.

''It's a massive undertaking for us to do it. There's lots of work involved.''

Three weeks were spent on getting the design just right, while four bricklayers spent four days on putting the pieces together, she said.

Christchurch mayor Bob Parker called the work a ''wall of hope'' for Canterbury.

CCF funding and development manager Clare Wilkinson said the foundation needed to raise '' after earthquake damage required them to move out of their family building.

''Everybody who's involved is just doing an amazing thing for us. It's just fantastic.''

The family place is a ''safe haven'' for child cancer patients and their families as they go through treatment.

The home has relocated to temporary premises while the fate of the building is determined, Wilkinson said.
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Old February 8th, 2011, 03:19 PM   #60
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Huge jobs spinoff from quake

BEN HEATHER

A Canterbury Development Corporation study predicts jobs created by the residential rebuild will exceed the region's workforce by about 13,000 jobs.

That figure would peak at about 14,500 next year before dropping to about 13,000 in 2013, and continuing to fall as recovery work dwindled.

The study assumes there will be a three-year recovery period. However, the positive impact would drop by thousands of jobs if rebuilding was slower.

Corporation workforce strategy manager Simon Worthington said the earthquake recovery could easily absorb the 5500 Cantabrians on the unemployment benefit.

"There won't be unemployment when this work comes online," he said. "If you're unemployed, you'll need a pretty bloody good reason."

Most new jobs would be in construction but would include anything from accountants to shop assistants as spending flowed into the rest of the economy, he said.

Some specialised jobs would require recruitment outside Canterbury, but many local people could be trained to fill the gaps, he said.

However, in some roles, such as painting and carpentry, there was likely to be a skills shortage, which could slow the recovery.

Worthington said the employment surge should begin in the next two months and building contractors needed to be ready to increase capacity.

UBS senior economist Robin Clements said the figures were credible and would represent a 3.8 per cent increase in the regional job market.

It remained to be seen how many jobs could be provided locally and how many would go to skilled workers from outside Canterbury.

It could also be difficult to fill some skilled roles, particularly with the lure of flood recovery work in Australia, he said.

"If we need 13,000 and we can only get 6000, then we are going to have some bottlenecks."

Christchurch Mayor Bob Parker said the job influx was a great opportunity to improve the city's skills base. Talks had begun with Christchurch tertiary education providers regarding courses teaching construction skills.

Canterbury Employers' Chamber of Commerce chief executive Peter Townsend said the job surge would shift the regional economy.

The boom had the ability to soak up unemployment but would also pull people out of some industries, such as retail, into construction. "I think there is a lot of capacity in our local economy to resource those jobs."

The recovery would not lead to zero unemployment, but could push it as low as 3 per cent, he said.

Mainzeal construction manager Graeme Earl agreed there would be an increase in employment, but said it would be difficult to sustain. "The biggest issue is making sure it doesn't drop down to unsustainable levels again," he said.

Despite predictions of job growth, the most recent employment figures show increasing unemployment in Christchurch. In the last quarter of 2010, unemployment rose 1.6 percentage points to an unadjusted 6.7 per cent, from 5.1 per cent in the previous quarter.

Worthington said those figures did not reflect feedback he had from employers.

- The Press
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