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Old December 7th, 2010, 12:11 PM   #21
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Picture by Katong DS at Flickr - De Javasche Bank, now Bank Indonesia at Jalan Braga. Architect: Thomas Karsteen, built: 1931.


Bandoeng / Bandung

Java, Indonesia


It is not known exactly when Bandung city was built. However, contrary to the beliefs of some the city was not originally built by the orders of Daendels, the Dutch East Indies Governor General, but by the orders of 'Bupati' R.A. Wiranatakusumah II. The Dutch colonial powers built wide tree-lined boulevards, villas, gardens, and fountains, earning Bandung the nickname of "Parijs van Java", the Paris of Java, in the early 20th century. Many of these structures survive to today, and can be seen along the road leading to the Dago area north of the city. In the 1930s the Dutch East Indies government planned for Bandung to become the capital of the Dutch East Indies due to its location, however World War II disrupted these plans.


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Picture by Katong DS at Flickr - St.Petruskathedraal.

Ir. Charles Proper Wolff Schoemaker commissioned this cathedral in 1921. Located on Jalan Merdeka no. 14.

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Picture by Katong DS at Flickr - Palace of the Dutch resident (governor).

Gedung Pakuan, built in 1864 and finished in 1866. The architectural style is 'Indische Empire Stijl' (Gaya Empire Hindia). Now West Java Governor residential.

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Picture by bintangputih at Flickr

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Picture by Ikhlasul Amal at Flickr - De Javasche Bank - Bank Indonesia

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Picture by ke laut at Flickr - Groote Postweg - Jalan Asia-Afrika

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Picture by aetna at Flickr - Groote Postweg - Jalan Asia-Afrika

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Picture by dhannykusnadi at Flickr - Savoy Homann Hotel

Sovoy Homann Hotel, has been maintained as the city's landmark hotel. The oldest part of the hotel dates back 1880. In 1938 the Savoy Homann got its new design, the classic Art Deco design. Some of the rooms have been left in original state, and offer the unique experience of staying in exactly the same room that Charlie Chaplin stayed in 1925.


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Picture by dhannykusnadi at Flickr - The Art-Deco-style Preanger Hotel.

The famous Preanger Hotel of Bandung, first built in the 1880s and subsequently redesigned with Art Deco flourishes in the 1920s by the famed architect, Professor Wolfe Shoemaker. The young Sukarno who was his student at the Technische Hogeschool (now Institut Teknologi Bandung), is believed to have assisted Shoemaker in the endeavour. The hotel was renovated again in the 1980s.


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Picture by JUNUS MAUNTI at Flickr

Built in 1895 for a club house for rich people, named the Concordia Society. In 1921, Societeit Concordia Building was rebuilt in a more functional and structural modern architecture (Art Deco) by designer C. P Wolff Schoemaker. It was renovated again in 1940 with new international style architecture with the help of Architect A. F Aalbers.


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Picture by dhannykusnadi at Flickr - Gedung Merdeka

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Picture at Flickr

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Picture by Katong DS at Flickr - Stadhuis - Town Hall


Picture by @Dochan

Gedung Sate

A neo-classical building mixed with native elements that served as a governmental office under Dutch administration and now serves as the governor's office of the West Java province in Indonesia. Located in Bandung, the building was designed by a Dutch architect J. Gerber.


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Picture by Alleat at Flickr

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meneer_nl's photostream on Flickr - [B]Aerial of the large Gedung Saté-complex, with left the old Post Office (Now Post Museum)

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Picture at Flickr

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Picture by Ikhlasul Amal at Flickr - Wisma Sawunggaling, Jalan Sawunggaling

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Picture at Flickr

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Picture at Flickr

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Picture by Ikhlasul Amal at Flickr - Braga street

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Picture by Ikhlasul Amal on Flickr - Fmr. Escompto Maatschappij building


Weblink - Soccer game on the AloenAloen square (1925)


Weblink - Aerial, with the Jaarbeurs/Annual Fair-complex


Atjehstraat - Merdikaweg - Bilitonstraat - Sumatrastraat - Borneostraat - Bangkastraat

This view from 1920's gives a good view of the north east district of the center. The KNIL (Dutch Army) War Department building, right from the middle, is the one that catches attention, in the Kalimantan Street. On the left the Palace of the Army commandant (in the Aceh street) and the Molukkenpark (Taman Maluku), and the HBS (now it is SMU 3 Building) on the right of Bilitonstraat (Belitung Street). In the front of the War Department is the Insulindepark (now Taman Lalulintas), surrounded by all kinds of building and houses of KNIL officers. Behind the War Department are buildings of the the Jaarbeurs, first built in 1920. Down left in the picture is the intersection between Aceh Street and Merdeka Street (BIP). At the background, in the left corner is the Department of Government buildings, betterknown as Gedung Sate.


Wiki Commons - Department of War, Insulindepark


Wiki Commons - Technical University College


Wiki Commons - HBS School (High School)


Wiki Commons - Braga street

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*** Link with a list of colonial buildings in Bandung.


www.hetgeheugenvannederland.nl

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Old December 8th, 2010, 08:00 PM   #22
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Great photos!
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Old December 13th, 2010, 02:20 PM   #23
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Informative thread, it is interesting to know that some months ago two Dutch cannons were discovered in Bandar Abbas (Gamron), the capital of Hormozgan province of Iran: http://www.irna.ir/html/1389/13890606/218000.htm

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Old December 16th, 2010, 05:32 PM   #24
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@Cyrus - Thanks for posting In this thread I hope to post about Dutch trading posts in Iran in the future.

---


Wiki Commons - Bronck House


New Amsterdam / New York City

New Netherlands / New York State (USA)

1625-1667



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Link to Flickr - Bronck House, built in 1663: Oldest house in upstate New York

Bronck House, also known as Pieter Bronck House, is a Dutch homestead house in Coxsackie in Greene County, New York that was constructed in 1663 and added to later. It is the oldest structure in upstate New York, and was declared a National Historic Landmark in 1967. A stone house was built first, by Pieter Bronck, a descendent of Jonas Bronck for whom the Bronx was named, who bought the property from native Americans. That was expanded soon after, and, in 1738 a larger brick house that was connected by a doorway was built by his grandson. The house is reputed to be the location where the Coxsackie Declaration of Independence was signed, more than a year before the Continental Congress signing in 1776.


Wiki Commons- Lucas Van Alen house Kinderhook, New York (1737)

Lukas van Alen house. Dating to 1737 - traditional Dutch architecture transplanted into the Hudson River Valley. The House" and its farm are believed to have served as the inspiration for homestead of the Van Tassel family in Washington Irving's short story The Legend of Sleepy Hollow. Irving was a close friend of Kinderhook native (and U.S. President) Martin Van Buren, a neighbor of the "Van Alen House" and a frequent guest in the town. The house is currently operated by the Columbia County Historical Society as a historic house museum showing 18th century Colonial life.


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Picture by brianwbailey222 at Flickr


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Picture by rchrdcnnnghm at Flickr



Wiki Commons - Sleepy Hollow Church interior, New York (1685)


Frederick Philipse I, Lord of Philipse Manor, owned the vast stretch of land spanning from Spuyten Duyvil in the Bronx to the Croton River. After swearing allegiance and later being granted his Manorship from the English, he began construction of the Old Dutch Church of Sleepy Hollow. Although financing this project, work likely progressed slowly and was completed in 1685. The church's walls are about two-feet thick and are composed of local fieldstone. Cast in Holland in 1685, the tiny church bell still hangs in the open-air steeple. Engraved on the bell is a verse from Romans 8:31, “Si Deus Pro Nobis, Quis Contras Nos?” ("If God be for us, who can be against us"), as well as Frederick Philipse’s monogram, “VF.” This monogram also appears on the weathervane above the steeple.

This building is now known as the Old Dutch Church of Sleepy Hollow, a name given by Washington Irving in his "Legend of Sleepy Hollow." Washington Irving himself is buried in the cemetary surrounding the church, now known as the Old Dutch Burying Ground. Seriously. On the north side of the doorway is inserted a stone tablet inscribed as follows: ERECTED AND BUILT BY FREDERICK PHILIPS AND CATHARINE VAN CORTLANDT HIS WIFE, IN 1699.


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Picture by Tommy Bass at Flickr - Philipse Manor Hall, Yonkers, NY (1682)

The southwest corner, the oldest part of the structure, was built around 1682 by Dutch-born carpenter and trader Frederick Philipse, a son-in-law of Stephanus Van Cortlandt, who - by the time of his death - had amassed a 52,000-acre (21,000 ha) estate that encompassed the entire modern city of Yonkers, as well as several other Hudson River towns. During Philipse's life, the building was used primarily as a stopover point on the long journey up and down the river between his home in New Amsterdam and the northern parts of his estate. His grandson, Frederick Philipse II, and his great-grandson, Frederick Philipse III, successively enlarged and enhanced the building, making it the primary family residence. Declared a National Historic Landmark in 1961.


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Link to Flickr - Yates House - fmr. house of the Schuyler family, Schenectady, New York, ca. 1700.



Wiki Commons - De Windt House, Tappan, New York

De Wint House, after the family who owned it during Washington's visits, it is the oldest surviving structure in Rockland County, New York, and an outstanding example of Colonial Dutch architecture in the Hudson Valley. Washington's first stay at the House was from August 8 to 24, 1780, while he was inspecting a redoubt on the Hudson. Major Frederickus Blauvelt, the son-in-law of Johannes and Antje DeWint, who owned the house at the time, invited Washington to stay with the family. Later, when the American Army had moved to Orangeburg, Washington returned on September 28, through October 7, 1780, for the trial and subsequent hanging of the British spy, Major John André.

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Wiki Commons - The Voorlezer House, Staten island NY - The 1st American school building in the United States

The Voorlezer's House is a historic clapboard frame house in Historic Richmond Town in Staten Island, New York. It is the oldest known schoolhouse in America, although it became a private residence for more than a century, and it is now owned and operated by the Staten Island Historical Society. It was built before 1696, and the date of the patent on which it is located is 1680. "Voorlezer" is a Dutch word that can be translated as "Fore-reader". A voorlezer is an assistant to a pastor who, in the absence of a pastor, may hold religious services and read scripture, as well as run a school. Though well-maintained for many years, by 1936 it had fallen into disrepair and was threatened with demolition. It became a National Historic Landmark in 1961 and was added to National Register of Historic Places when that registry was created in 1966.

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Picture by gmpicket at Flickr - Van Cortlandt House Museum - built in 1748

It is now the oldest building in the Bronx.

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Picture by aloorya at Flickr


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Picture by wallyg at Flickr - Hoffman House, Kingston, New York

At 94 North Front Street on the corner of Green Street in Kingston, is a Dutch Colonial style stone house built about 1679 in the northwest corner of the 1568 Stockade area. An excellent example of early American-Dutch rubble construction, the Hoffman House displays several of the "prototypical" characteristics of Dutch Colonial housing.


One of the few buildings in Kingston not burned in 1777 by British troops


Wiki Commons - Residence of Hendrick Van Rensselaer, built in 1704, Rensselaer, New York, USA

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Picture by wati dewidisoni at Flickr

Pieter Claesen Van Norden Wyckoff and his wife, Grietje Cornelis (Van Ness) Wyckoff moved into this Dutch home in 1655 on Canarsie Lane in Flatlands, Brooklyn, NY. They sailed from Amsterdam, Holland on 25Sept. 1636 and reached New Amsterdam, New Netherland (New York) 7 April 1637.

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** List of the oldest buildings in New York Link
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Old December 22nd, 2010, 12:43 PM   #25
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Link to Flickr - Hotel Oranje/Hotel Majapahit, built in 1910 by the famous Sarkies Brothers


Soerabaja/Surabaya

Java, Indonesia



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Link to Flickr

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Picture by itboediman's photostream at Flickr - Governor's office/Kantor Gubernur Jawa Timur, Jalan Pahlawan

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jesuskarto - Javasche Bank/Bank Indonesia


www.eastjava.com - Handelsvereeniging Amsterdam, built by Hulswit, Fermont & Ed. Cuypers, 1925


www.eastjava.com


www.eastjava.com - Rode Brug



www.eastjava.com - Internationale Krediet en Handelsvereeniging, built in 1929 by Frans Johan Lowrence.


www.eastjava.com - Internatio-building


www.eastjava.com - Surabaya Municipal Hall, built in 1920.


1898 - during the coronation of Queen Wilhelmina.


Former 'Handelsstraat'.


Aerial Soerabaya - in the middle the Roode Brug over the Kali Mas river.


Former 'Werfstraat'.


Sociëteit Concordia, Soerabaya.


Wiki Commons - Raad van Justitie/Court of Justice (built in 1866 destroyed in WWII)


www.geheugenvannederland.nl
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Old December 22nd, 2010, 12:51 PM   #26
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Feshenating photos!!
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Old December 30th, 2010, 11:04 PM   #27
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Fort Belgica

Banda and Neira islands, Indonesia

Fort Belgica, one of many forts built by the Dutch East India Company, is located in the Banda Islands, Maluku Province, and is one of the largest remaining European forts in Indonesia. Constructed in 1611, the fort was an important defensive structure commanding over the bay of Bandanaira. Its construction gave the Dutch an edge over other colonial powers in the area, and still remains the largest extant structure on the Banda Islands. This site was added to the UNESCO World Heritage Tentative List on in the Cultural category.


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Old January 6th, 2011, 11:39 PM   #28
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Picture by kram cam on Flickr - The Dutch Reformed Church in Galle.


Sri Lanka

Former Ceylon

1602 - 1802



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Link to Flickr - Wolvendaal church Colombo, 1749


Colombo


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Link to Flickr - Former residence Dutch Governor - now Dutch Era museum

The Colombo Dutch Museum is a museum that covers the history of the Dutch colonial rule in Sri Lanka.

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Link to Flickr


Galle



Wiki Commons - Overvieuw of Galle fort - capital of Dutch SriLanka before Colombo was conquered.

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Link to Flickr - Dutch East India Company - Vereenigde Oostindische Compagnie (VOC) - the omnipresent logo of the world's first multinational.

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Link to Flickr - Dutch East India Company warehouses

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Picture by kram cam at Flickr

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Picture by Rhi2010 on Flickr - Typical dutch colonial style house.

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Link to Flickr

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Link to Flickr

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Link to Flickr

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Picture by kram cam at Flickr - Former the Dutch Governor's palace (1684), now the New Oriental Hotel.

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Link to Flickr - These waterways are todays still called 'Dutch canals'. A whole network of waterways was constructed and is still used intensively today.



More on the Dutch canal system on SriLanka in this article.
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Website: www.voc-sri-lanka.nl
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Old January 14th, 2011, 03:29 PM   #29
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Jehangir Sorabjee Photography - Dutch East India Company Tombs - Surat


Surat

Gujarat, India

1617-1795 (178 years)

The structure of the Old English and Old Dutch cemeteries in Surat is dominated by the largest monuments of Europeans we have found all over India. These graves are also some of the oldest tombs which have survived from the earliest times of British and Dutch activities at Surat. The English traders settled in Surat in 1608 followed by the Dutch in 1617. French and also Swedes - even for just a short period - commenced trading-enterprises here. However, it seems that there are no re-mainders of their burial culture left today. Along with the Dutch also Armenian traders left a quite big cemetery in Surat. Both nations share the same burial ground only separated by a wall. There is no typical structure of this burial ground. In contrast to the English cemetery at Surat and most of the other European burial sites in India, this burial ground is dominated by huge pavilions and monuments.

Tomb - Architecture and Form:
Again, destructions caused by climate and also by alterations of the mausoleums are responsible for the loss of most of the inscriptions. Only six inscriptions remain. Three of them are situated in the tomb of "Baron Adriaan van Reede". This monument is the largest of all monuments we have found in India. (below left) This baroque monument only shows few connections to the Arabian art. The building consists of a double copula with an upper and lower gallery. The galleries and copula are supported by decorated columns. However, there is no clear style to identify. The plinth of the columns resemble Doric style, even if the torus in the middle of the columns is not typical for this style. We likewise find adoptions of a classical tholos with columns, stairs and the cella in the interior. The decoration with wood carvings, frescoes and escutcheons which were originally inside and outside the monument, support the impression that this pavilion was built in remembrance of an important, higher ranking person, don't exist anymore. Bellasis mentions that later about 6000 Rupees were spent by the Dutch VOC for repairing works. The whole arrangement emphasizes the social status of the Baron in this particular case.



Link British Library

Photograph of the tomb of the Dutch Governor Baron Adriaan van Reede at Surat in Gujarat from the 'Album of architectural and topographical views, mostly in South Asia' taken by an unknown photographer in 1895. Surat was an important Mughal trading port. The English, Dutch, Portuguese and French were permitted to trade here in the seventeenth century. Adriaan van Reede tot Drakenstein (1636-1691) wrote a work on plant species called the "Hortus Malabaricus" which was published in 12 volumes in Amsterdam from 1686-1703. Van Reede, who was the son of a Dutch forester, enlisted the help of the local community of tree-tappers and ayurvedic medical practioners who had specific knowledge of plant species. This view of his tomb in the Dutch Cemetery shows an double cupola with open arcades. On ground level, the arcade is supported by columns.



www.discoversurat.com - The tomb of Governor Baron Adriaan van Reede at Surat in Gujarat

See this link for more info on this subject
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Old January 22nd, 2011, 01:25 PM   #30
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Link to Flickr - Office of the Dutch East-Indies Railway Co./ Lawang Sewu


Semarang

Java, Indonesia


Even though in the Dutch East Indies Batavia was the political center of government and Surabaya became the center of commerce, the third largest city in Java was Semarang. As off during the time of the Dutch East India Co., Semarang had always been an important center of government for North Java, employing many Indo-European officials, until GG Daendels (1808–1811) simplified burocracy by eliminating this extra layer of officialdom. The historic presence of a large Indo (Eurasian) community in the area of Semarang is also reflected by the fact a creole mix language called Javindo existed there.

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Picture by miraikawati on Flickr


Blogspot - Willemskerk/Gereja Bleduk, Semarang

The Protestant Church in Semarang was built by the Dutch community in 1753. In 1894, the Church underwent extensive renovation, under the guidance of W. Westmaas and H.P.A de Wilde.

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Picture by mpaku2's at Flickr - The old post office

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Picture by mpaku2's at Flickr

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Picture by mpaku2's at Flickr

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Picture by mpaku2's at Flickr - Office of the NILLMIJ - Nederlandsch-Indische Levensverzekering- en Lijfrente-Maatschappij.

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Picture by mpaku2's at Flickr

This magnificent building, designed by Dutch architects Prof. Jacob F. Klinkhamer and B.J Queendag in art-deco style, used to be the office of Nederlandsch Indische Spoorweg Maatschappij (NIS), which was built in 1903 and completed in 1907. Today, the name of the building is 'Lawang Sewu', meaning 'the building with a thousand doors'. Because of it's size the building has many rooms and each room has about 4-8 doors, then if calculated is about 1000 doors. There are wo main building massed. The building on the west-side has the shape of an 'L'. It said that its floors made from marble from Italy, its iron spiral-staircase was made without any weld. In the main stair, there are a beautiful big mosaic and huge glass windows.

See this link to the Dutch National Architecture Institute for more info on this building.

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Picture by i_am_amity at Flickr - Window in the Grande hall of the office of the Dutch East-Indies Railway Co./ Lawang Sewu


Picture by @Bozhart


Picture by @Bozhart


Picture by @Bozhart


Picture by @Bozhart


seputarsemarang.com - Semarang Tawang Railway Station

The present Semarang Tawang Station started to operate on 1 June 1914. The station was built by NIS (Nederlandsch-Indische Spoorwegmaatschappij) railway company to replace Samarang Station in Tambaksari. Samarang Station has been operational since 1867. The architect of Semarang Tawang Station is Sloth-Blauwboer. The huge and robust pillars and walls reflect the splendor of the station building. Despite its artistic and splendid styles, according to the original goal of the building construction (as stated by Director of NIS in Den Haag, the Netherlands), the building was emphasized on the functionality. At the same time, on 6 August 1914, the SCS (Semarang-Cheribon Stoomtram Maatschappij) railway company launched Semarang Poncol station designed by architect Henry Maclaine – Pont.

See here for more info on the railway station.

..........Or here


Tawang Railway Station in 1920 - Originally posted by @DOCHAN


Parade-square in 1920 - Originally posted by @DOCHAN




Wiki Commons - Gouvernementskantoor or Groote Huis


Wiki Commons - Office of the Koninklijke Paketvaart Maatschappij


Wiki Commons - Office building


Wiki Commons


The Roman Catholic convent in 1910 - Originally posted by @DOCHAN


Picture by @Bozhart


** See: here for more pictures on colonial architecture in Semarang
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Old January 24th, 2011, 09:07 PM   #31
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Hi Nemo,

You know what kind of modifications were made by you in Galle fort?

Awesome pictures.
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Old January 25th, 2011, 12:26 AM   #32
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Hi Costa,

The Portuguese first built a relatively small fort in Galle (certainly in comparison with impressive forts like Bom Jesus in Mombasa). The Dutch later extended the fort, constructed high ramparts with bastions. Governor Petrus Vuyst was responsible for the large scale works. But all over the city ou can still see Portuguese influences in the architecture style the Dutch used - a tropical Portuguese/Dutch hybrid.

I really enjoy the Portuguese architecture thread - impressive! The pictures of Salvador de Bahia were great!
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Old January 25th, 2011, 12:36 AM   #33
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Guys, it's a bit off-topic, but I hope you could help me: what was the Dutch population in the colonial Indonesia?
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Old January 25th, 2011, 03:38 AM   #34
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Did some googleing, but can't find much information.

After independence about 300,000 people were repatriated to the Netherlands, although most were Indo-Europeans.

Wiki mentions that there were about 1,500 Dutch civil servants and 16,000 Dutch soldiers in Indonesia in 1900, and there were 13,000 Dutch children enrolled in school.

In 1941 the KNIL (Dutch East-Indies army) consisted of about 45,000 Dutch soldiers, although this includes Indo-Europeans and other Europeans.

According to the Dutch wiki on the Japanse camps, there were about 100,000 'white' (European) civilians in Indonesia during the occupation. I don't know how many people had fled Indonesia by that time.

So I doubt the Dutch population of Indonesia ever exceded 150,000 people. The total population in 1940 was ~70 million.
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Old January 25th, 2011, 08:59 PM   #35
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Thanks, Crownsteler!

I have an 1950's English edition of the Encyclopædia Britannica and they claim the number of white people in Indonesia was high as 300,000 White people by 1940. However, they don't provide further details, that's why I'm asking you guys for more information.

I found the number quiet high, which at least for me, changes the image of the Europeans colonists in Asia. I tended to assume it was only a smaller elite of well-paid mandarins and wealth tradesmen. However, the 300,000 figure suggests a much more complex society, with probably a sizeable middle-class and even work-class or small farmers.

Anyway, I'd like to have more information about the "Dutch way of life" in Dutch East Indies, specially from the 1930's and 1940's, but also about the whole 300 years of colonization.
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Old January 26th, 2011, 03:28 AM   #36
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Well, the 300,000 figure might actually be correct. I found a document from the Dutch Royal Academy of Sciences about the demographics of Indo Europeans, but it also mentions the Dutch population in Indonesia.

It seems to agree that there were about 300,000 Dutchmen in Indonesia in 1940. It estimates that there were 305,000 Europeans in Indonesia in 1942, and 283,000 in 1946. Furthermore it mentions that about 300,000 people migrated to Indonesia from the Netherlands between 1900 and 1940.

2 other nuggets mentioned are;
The total Dutch population was ~91,000 in 1900.
There were 2000 Dutchmen in Indonesia in 1820.

The average jearly earnings in 1930 were about 60 guilders for a native, and 2700 of a Dutchmen (according to 1 source, the average yearly earnings in the Netherlands were 2000 guilders). Appearently only 2000 Indians earned more than 2000 guilders per year (Life magazine
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Old January 26th, 2011, 04:24 PM   #37
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I checked Dutch websites - a bit easier to find info on that subject I think.

In 1942:

- 80.000 Dutchmen (migrated from Holland - mostly people in the service of the government).
- 200.000 Dutchmen born in the Dutch East Indies.

So more or less then 300.000 Europeans (with non-Dutch European strangers counted in)


The population consisted of three layers:
* The Europeans (Indo-Europeans)

* Inlandse bevolking or 'local Dutch East Idian population' - 1940: 68 million.

* Vreemdelingen or 'strangers' :
* Chinese - 1940: 1.250.000
* Arab - 1940: 50.000
* Malay- 1940: 20.000
* British
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Old January 26th, 2011, 06:36 PM   #38
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Yes, it's a lot of people. Those East Indies-born Dutch were probably very adapted to the country, like the British in India. It's so weird to think it's been only 60 years since the end of the Dutch rule and those lifestyle actually kept going several places throughout the next decades. It's a shame the Dutch language didn't take roots in Indonesia.

Well, I found those interesting videos on Youtube:

Colonial Dutch-Indies (1938-39 in colour) [Part 1 of 4]


Colonial Dutch-Indies (1938-39 in colour) [Part 2 of 4]


Colonial Dutch-Indies (1938-39 in colour) [Part 3 of 4]


Colonial Dutch-Indies (1938-39 in colour) [Part 4 of 4]



One scene is particulary unconfortable, but I suppose that's the way the things were back then.
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Old February 1st, 2011, 02:24 AM   #39
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@Yuri
Thanks for these video's, they are really nice. And as for the uncomfortable moments....I guess all of history is full of these uncomfortable moments - we can only hope that we learn from it.


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www.anping.tncg.gov.tw


Fort Zeelandia

Formosa/Taiwan

1624-1662


Fort Zeelandia (Chinese: 熱蘭遮城) was a large fortress built over ten years from 1624–1634 by the Dutch Verenigde Oostindische Compagnie, in the town of Anping (Tainan) on the island of Formosa, present day Taiwan, during their 38-year rule over the western part of it. Although the site has been previously named Orange City (奧倫治城), Anping City (安平城), and Tayoan City (台灣城), the current name of the site in Chinese is Fort Anping (安平古堡). The Dutch chose a sandy peninsula off the coast of Tainan as the site of the fortress since this would allow the fortress direct access to the sea and with it, supplies and reinforcements from Batavia in event of a siege. Unfortunately, the site chosen lacked adequate supplies of fresh water, which had to be shipped in from the mainland.

The bricks used for the construction of the fortress were brought over from Java, and the mortar used consisted of a mixture of sugar, sand, ground seashells and glutinous rice. The fort was designed to be surrounded by three concentric layers of walls and the four corners of the fort were built into protruding bastions for better defence. On 30 April 1661, General Zheng Cheng-gong ("Koxinga") of Ming China (1368-1644) laid siege to the fortress (defended by 2,000 Dutch soldiers) with 400 warships and 25,000 men. After a nine-month siege with the loss of 1,600 Dutch lives, the Dutch surrendered the Fortress on 1 February 1662, when it became clear that no reinforcements were forthcoming from Batavia ( present day Jakarta, Java, Indonesia ) and when the defenders ran short of fresh water.

Under the Koxinga-Dutch Treaty (1662) signed on 1 February 1662 between Koxinga and Frederick Coyett, the Dutch governor, the Dutch surrendered the Fortress and left all the goods and property of the VOC behind at Fort Zeelandia. In return, all officials, soldiers and civilians were free to leave with their personal belongings and supplies. On 9 February 1662, Frederick Coyett handed over the keys to the fort and led the remaining Dutch forces and civilians back to Batavia by sea, ending 38 years of Dutch colonial rule on Taiwan.
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National Anping Harbor Historical Park is one of Taiwan's Focus Development Projects. Apart from exploring the tourism potential of the harbor, the importance of the project remains in the review of the historical meaning of Fort Zeelandia (AnPing Fort). Fort Zeelandia is the most significant historical monument of Taiwan in the Great Age of Explorations during the 17th Century.

However, after 300 years, only 3 walls remain of the once magnificent Fort Zeelandia. The southern wall of Fort Zeelandia is the biggest of the remains with a length of 65.8 metres. 2 other shorter sections hide deep in people’s houses. Although from the end of Ching Dynasty to Japanese occupation Fort Zeelandia's appearance has changed greatly, many people still believe that the original building foundation is still buried underneath the ground.

Therefore, ways on how to unearth the building structures is a task many archaeologists are confronting. Around the world many nations are beginning to study their own archaeological remains. These studies not only enhance the tourism industry, but also provide a sense of national and historical pride for the nation. Moreover it also contributes to accumulations of knowledge for generations to come. The Tainan City Government's aim is to present more clearly Fort Zeelandia to the world as one of Taiwan's few world-class historic sites and add values to the National An Ping Harbor Historical Park. In doing so the Government is enlisting the help of Cheng Kung National University Engineering Research Centre by using non-intrusive radar which explores the remains of Fort Zeelandia without damaging the site. This exploration has heralded some success as the analysis shows that 70% of the original structure of the Fort Zeelandia historic site is still intact.

Underneath the walls of Fort Zeelandia, at about 3.5 to 4 meters of depth, in an area of 20 meters long, for every 6 meters there is a hole of 1 meter in diameter. Are these holes the entrances to the legendary Dutch tunnels? These finds further add to the mystery and archaeological values of Fort Zeelandia, and they have motivated the Tainan City Government to excavate the remains of the Castle wall, in hope to find out the way of the dwellers’ life of Fort Zeelandia during the Dutch Era. In a very near future the City Government will be able to present a more complete face of the Fort Zeelandia to the world.



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Old February 8th, 2011, 10:39 PM   #40
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Villa Isola

Bandung - Java, Indonesia


Villa Isola (now Bumi Siliwangi) is an art-deco building in the northern part of Bandung, the capital of West Java province of Indonesia. Overlooking the valley with the view of the city, Villa Isola was built in 1932 by the Dutch architect Wolff Schoemaker for the Dutch media tycoon Dominique William Berretty, the founder of the Aneta press-agency in the Dutch East Indies. The original purpose of the building was for Berretty's private house, but then it was transformed into a hotel after his death and now it serves as the headmastership office of the University of Education Indonesia.

Villa Isola was constructed within six months (October 1932 — March 1933), which was quite fast at that time. The foundation was built of steel and concrete was used to fill the skeleton and the floors between iron bars. The Villa Isola complex consists of the building itself and two large gardens and it covered an area of about 120,000 square metres (1,300,000 sq ft).

The design of the Villa Isola by architect Wolff Schoemaker, was influenced by indigenous Javanese philosophy. The orientation of the building is according to the north—south axis, where the building faces Mount Tangkuban Perahu to the north and the city of Bandung to the south. Schoemaker was a firm follower of the art-deco style, which he mixed with local ornaments. Many circular shapes decorated the whole complex, the design of which reminds people of the shape of Candi in the east of Java. Circle is the main theme of the complex, both inside and outside the villa, including the gardens.




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See this Link for more info.
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