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Old March 10th, 2011, 12:00 PM   #41
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What happened to the National Institue of cancer proposed in chennai???
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Old March 11th, 2011, 06:45 AM   #42
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Quote:
Originally Posted by wlbkng View Post
Can anyone decode?
Aorta is the largest artery in the body. It carries oxygenated (good) blood from the heart to the rest of the body.



As you can realize, this is a very important vessel. It leaves the heart in an upward direction and after giving branches for blood supply to head and upper limbs, it takes a U turn and travels downwards from the chest into the abdomen. It ends in the lower part of the abdomen by dividing into two arteries bound for the lower limbs.

In some persons, the wall of aorta can become weak due to infections (syphillis), genetic diseases, connective tissue disorders, external injury etc., Due to the weakening, the aorta may bulge out. This condition is called aneurysm. If the bulge is in the chest, it is called thoracic aneurysm and if it is in the abdomen, it is called abdominal aneurysm.




This is a very dangerous condition because if it bursts, death occurs within minutes. Therefore surgery is done preemptively before anything untoward happens. In this particular patient, there was aneurysms at two different locations. One in the ascending aorta (upward facing part) and one in the descending thoracic aorta (immediately after U turn before it enters the abdomen). Usually such cases are very tricky to operate and surgery is done in two stages. In the first surgery, the aneurysm in the ascending aorta is corrected. Then the patient is allowed to recover for a few months and then again operated to correct for the second aneurysm. This is because, the technique is different for both aneurysms and attempts to combine both have resulted in deaths.

But the MIOT surgeons have used a new technique in which the whole procedure is completed in one operation (hence the name "single stage"). They have combined two well established independent techniques - elephant trunk technique (it has got nothing to do with elephants - its called so because the graft looks like a elephant trunk) and endovascular stent-graft technology in one procedure to achieve this. Since it combines two techniques, it is called hybrid surgery.

I think this explanation will be enough for non medical persons. If any doctors are reading this and if they want more information, they can study this article, this article and this article for the background, indication and procedures.
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Old March 11th, 2011, 10:59 AM   #43
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Old March 11th, 2011, 12:24 PM   #44
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I do not know about Apollo being cheap. Last July I broke my shoulder bone and had to get a metal shaft inserted and the bill I got was a shocking 1.5 lakhs.

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Originally Posted by bonoslack7 View Post
You are joking aren't you? Costs at Apollo are affordable and that is why a lot of people from other states visit them. I particularly like their canteen and tiny bookstall.
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Old March 11th, 2011, 12:59 PM   #45
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Originally Posted by TShyam View Post
Aorta is the largest artery in the body. It carries oxygenated (good) blood from the heart to the rest of the body.



But the MIOT surgeons have used a new technique in which the whole procedure is completed in one operation (hence the name "single stage"). They have combined two well established independent techniques - elephant trunk technique (it has got nothing to do with elephants - its called so because the graft looks like a elephant trunk) and endovascular stent-graft technology in one procedure to achieve this. Since it combines two techniques, it is called hybrid surgery.
Thanks and I appreciate it
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Old March 11th, 2011, 02:15 PM   #46
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தமிழக அரசின், கலைஞர் காப்பீட்டுத் திட்டத்தில் இருந்து, 30 சதவீத தனியார் மருத்துவமனைகள் விலகி உள்ளன. அதனால், நோயாளிகள் சிகிச்சை பெற முடியாமல் மிகுந்த சிரமப்படுவதால், ஆளும் கட்சிக்கு பாதகமாக, காப்பீட்டுத் திட்டம் மாறும் நிலை ஏற்பட்டுள்ளது.

தமிழக தேர்தலில், தி.மு.க., கூட்டணி, இலவச திட்டங்களை மையப்படுத்தி, பிரசாரத்தை மேற்கொள்ள திட்டம் வகுத்துள்ளது. ஆளும் கட்சியினரின் பிரசார அஸ்திரங்களில் ஒன்றான, கலைஞர் காப்பீட்டுத் திட்டம், இரண்டு ஆண்டுகளுக்கு முன் துவக்கப்பட்டது. இத்திட்டம் துவக்கப்பட்ட காலத்தில், தமிழகத்தில் உள்ள, 17 மருத்துவக் கல்லூரி மருத்துவமனைகள், மாவட்ட தலைமை மருத்துவமனைகளில் மட்டுமின்றி, முக்கிய நகரங்கள், தாலுகாக்களில் உள்ள தனியார் மருத்துவமனைகளிலும் சிகிச்சையளிக்கப்பட்டது. தனியார் மருத்துவமனைகளும் போட்டி போட்டு, திட்டத்தில் தங்களை இணைத்துக் கொண்டன. 2010 மே மாதம் வரை, தமிழகத்தில் 1,01,150 நோயாளிகளுக்கு, 179 கோடி ரூபாய் சிகிச்சைக்காக செலவிடப்பட்டது.

திட்டத்தைச் செயல்படுத்தும் தனியார் இன்சூரன்ஸ் நிறுவனங்கள், நாளடைவில், பல்வேறு கெடுபிடிகளை அமல்படுத்தின. அதனால், சிகிச்சைக்கு வரும் நோயாளிகளில் பலருக்கு, சிகிச்சைக்கான தொகைகளில், குறிப்பிட்ட சதவீதம் வரை பிடித்தம் செய்யப்பட்டது. அதனால், தனியார் மருத்துவமனைகள், இன்சூரன்ஸ் நிறுவனம் வழங்கிய தொகை போக, மீதி தொகையை, நோயாளிகளிடம் இருந்து வசூலிக்கத் துவங்கின. இது, மருத்துவமனைகளின் நிர்வாகத்துக்கும், நோயாளிகளின் உறவினர்களுக்கும் மோதலை ஏற்படுத்தியது. இதனால் பல மருத்துவமனைகள், காப்பீட்டுத் திட்டத்தில் இருந்து விலகிக் கொண்டன.

2010 ஆகஸ்ட் மாதத்தில், தமிழகம் முழுவதும், 1,152 தனியார் மருத்துவமனைகள் இத்திட்டத்தில் பதிவு செய்து இணைத்திருந்தன. அக்டோபர் மாதத்தில், 125 தனியார் மருத்துவமனைகள் முதல் கட்டமாக, விலகிக் கொண்டன. தற்போது, மாதத்துக்கு சராசரியாக, 25 மருத்துவமனைகள் இத்திட்டத்தில் இருந்து விலகி வருகின்றன. தற்போதைய நிலவரப்படி தமிழகத்தில், 875 தனியார் மருத்துவமனைகளில் மட்டுமே காப்பீட்டுத் திட்டம் நடைமுறையில் உள்ளது. மேலும் பல மருத்துவமனைகள், இத்திட்டத்தில் இருந்து விடுவித்துக் கொள்ள கோரிக்கை விடுத்துள்ளன. இத்திட்டத்தில் இருந்து விலகிய தனியார் மருத்துவமனைகளின் விவரங்களை, அந்தந்த மாவட்ட நிர்வாகத்தின் மூலம், பொதுமக்களுக்கு தெரிவிக்கவில்லை. திட்டத்தில் சிகிச்சை பெற தனியார் மருத்துவமனைகளில் சேரும் நோயாளிகள், சிகிச்சைக்குப் பின், திட்டத்தில் இருந்து, சம்பந்தப்பட்ட மருத்துவமனை விலகியிருப்பதை அறிந்து அதிர்ச்சி அடைகின்றனர்.

திட்டத்தை நம்பி சிகிச்சை பெற்றவர்கள், பின் மருத்துவமனைக்கு பணம் செலுத்த முடியாமல், மிகுந்த சிரமத்தில் தள்ளப்படுகின்றனர். அரசு மருத்துவமனைகளிலும், இத்திட்டத்தில் ஆபரேஷன் மேற்கொள்ளும் டாக்டர்கள் உள்ளிட்ட ஊழியர்களுக்கு சேர வேண்டிய ஊக்கத் தொகையும் நிறுத்தி வைக்கப்பட்டுள்ளது. இது டாக்டர்கள் மத்தியில் கடும் அதிருப்தியை ஏற்படுத்தி உள்ளது. இப்படி அடுக்கடுக்கான பிரச்னைகள் தொடர்வதால், தேர்தல் நேரத்தில் கைகொடுக்கும் என்ற எதிர்பார்ப்பில், தி.மு.க.,வால் துவக்கப்பட்ட இத்திட்டம், ஆளும் கட்சிக்கு எதிராக அமையும் நிலை ஏற்பட்டுள்ளது.

Short Translation: Govt's health insurance scheme in limbo as 30% of private hospitals which initially enrolled under the scheme have deregistered themselves citing insufficient compensation from the insurance company. This has lead to discomfort for patients who are surprised to know that they have to pay from their own pockets either because of inadequate compensation from the insurance company or because they weren't aware of the fact that the particular pvt hospital have deregistered themselves. The govt has spent 179 crores on over 1 lac patients till May 2010.
Although I am a proponent of free market, there are three areas where it doesn't apply - education, healthcare and defense. In these areas, the interests of the end user (students, patients and national security) should be the over riding priority among all stake holders. Although private sector and free markets may be allowed to participate, it should be strictly regulated.

Health care ensured by insurance is the costliest form of healthcare. A recent article in the medical journal Lancet assessed and ranked the quality of health care provided and the cost of providing the service in the 7 most advanced countries in the world (US, UK, Australia, NZ, Japan, Germany and France). US was the the country which spent the most per capita on health care ($7700) but was ranked last (7th). Infact no other country spent more than $4300 per capita on health care. NZ which was ranked 3rd spent a measly $2800.

The lower ranking of US was because it was the insurance companies rather than the treating physicians who decides what treatment the patient should get leading to lower quality of health care the end user (patient) receives. This was a damning indication of the way US healthcare with its emphasis on free market and insurance companies works. Whereas all the other countries have a set up similar to ours where the government provides free healthcare (not through insurance). It is alright for private insurance to be available for people who can afford it (afterall not everyone will be willing to go to the government hospital) but it should not be backed by the government for all its citizens. The insurance company just adds a layer of extra expense without adding any value to any of the stakeholders.

My friend who is pursuing Ortho in MMC says that his profs are shifting cases to their hospital to be operated under the insurance scheme. As a result, the number of cases available for PG students have decreased dramatically. Its not even as if the doctors themselves are benefiting. They are now squeezed of their profit by the insurance companies resulting in substandard treatment for patients. Further the company has started demanding cheaper treatment (for eg: they want the doctors to try conservative medical management for urinary stone of larger size where ideally lithotripsy - surgery to remove the stone should be done. This info is given by a friend whose father is an urologist. Whatever I am saying here is true. I am not making any of these things up).

Stakeholder analysis:
As a result of this scheme,
1) The patients are losing because they are receiving substandard, less than ideal treatment.
2) The doctors end up losing because at the end, neither the company nor the patient (who are mostly people who cannot pay) is paying him. These people who are law abiding and soft dont confront anyone and just deregister themselves to avoid any further losses.
3) The medical students have lesser no of cases to study.
4) Not but not the least, the government and the tax payer is losing close to 250 crores per year (the government doctor is anyway going to get his salary - money lost to insurance companies is just extra). This money can be invested in the healthcare system to make it world class and attract even wealthier people to the public healthcare system.
To put it in perspective, AIIMS have an annual budget of 300 crore rupees. By discontinuing the insurance scheme and deploying that money in MMC, the government can turn it into AIIMS standards. So simple but yet needs political will.
5) The only stakeholder who comes out the winner making a mockery of the system is the insurance company who are exploiting everyone to their benefit. They dont add any value whatsoever but make money due to hard labour of the healthcare workers and the misery of the poorer section of the public.

I hope better sense prevails in the government ranks and they cancel this scheme with immediate effect.

I would give a dozen examples of how people getting fooled but then I have to tell about doctors and anyone who knows me will immediately recognize whom I am talking about. All these persons are some of the finest in the art and who have a high standing in the society. They would feel wounded and let down if I explain how they are exploited and fooled by a bunch of financial cronies with no human value enhancement skill but are just a bunch of blood sucking leeches feeding on their toil and effort.
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Peak oil isn't running out of oil. It means that the cost of incremental supply exceeds the price economies can pay without destroying growth. - Chris Skrebrowski
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Old March 11th, 2011, 02:20 PM   #47
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Thanks doc and wlbkng
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Peak oil isn't running out of oil. It means that the cost of incremental supply exceeds the price economies can pay without destroying growth. - Chris Skrebrowski
I'd put my money on solar energy. I hope we don't have to wait till oil and coal run out before we tackle that. - Thomas Edison, in conversation with Henry Ford and Harvey Firestone, March 1931.
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Old March 11th, 2011, 02:31 PM   #48
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Shyam Dhool.

I didnt read it fully but you started it in a very nice way

"Although I am a proponent of free market, there are three areas where it doesn't apply - education, healthcare and defense. In these areas, the interests of the end user (students, patients and national security) should be the over riding priority among all stake holders. Although private sector and free markets may be allowed to participate, it should be strictly regulated"

Once again Dhool.

Now let me read it fully.
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Old March 11th, 2011, 02:35 PM   #49
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Quote:
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Thanks doc and wlbkng
You are welcome....
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Old March 11th, 2011, 11:50 PM   #50
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Quote:
Originally Posted by chennaidesi View Post
Shyam Dhool.

I didnt read it fully but you started it in a very nice way

"Although I am a proponent of free market, there are three areas where it doesn't apply - education, healthcare and defense. In these areas, the interests of the end user (students, patients and national security) should be the over riding priority among all stake holders. Although private sector and free markets may be allowed to participate, it should be strictly regulated"

Once again Dhool.

Now let me read it fully.
Thanks. It logically makes sense if you combine it with Maslow's Heirarchy.



These three (health, education and security) are fundamental and form the basis of human needs (once his immediate survival is taken care of). Thats why it should not be left to the free market as it can be fickle and sometimes these components can be compromised for profits (which comes higher in the pyramid). Always the society should strive to provide a particular level universally before moving higher. That is the basis of social justice and hence societal stability.
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Peak oil isn't running out of oil. It means that the cost of incremental supply exceeds the price economies can pay without destroying growth. - Chris Skrebrowski
I'd put my money on solar energy. I hope we don't have to wait till oil and coal run out before we tackle that. - Thomas Edison, in conversation with Henry Ford and Harvey Firestone, March 1931.
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Old March 12th, 2011, 04:23 AM   #51
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Thanks Shyam. I hope they will not privatize army J/K
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Old March 12th, 2011, 07:56 AM   #52
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TShyam View Post
Although I am a proponent of free market, there are three areas where it doesn't apply - education, healthcare and defense. In these areas, the interests of the end user (students, patients and national security) should be the over riding priority among all stake holders. Although private sector and free markets may be allowed to participate, it should be strictly regulated.

Health care ensured by insurance is the costliest form of healthcare. A recent article in the medical journal Lancet assessed and ranked the quality of health care provided and the cost of providing the service in the 7 most advanced countries in the world (US, UK, Australia, NZ, Japan, Germany and France). US was the the country which spent the most per capita on health care ($7700) but was ranked last (7th). Infact no other country spent more than $4300 per capita on health care. NZ which was ranked 3rd spent a measly $2800.

The lower ranking of US was because it was the insurance companies rather than the treating physicians who decides what treatment the patient should get leading to lower quality of health care the end user (patient) receives. This was a damning indication of the way US healthcare with its emphasis on free market and insurance companies works. Whereas all the other countries have a set up similar to ours where the government provides free healthcare (not through insurance). It is alright for private insurance to be available for people who can afford it (afterall not everyone will be willing to go to the government hospital) but it should not be backed by the government for all its citizens. The insurance company just adds a layer of extra expense without adding any value to any of the stakeholders.

My friend who is pursuing Ortho in MMC says that his profs are shifting cases to their hospital to be operated under the insurance scheme. As a result, the number of cases available for PG students have decreased dramatically. Its not even as if the doctors themselves are benefiting. They are now squeezed of their profit by the insurance companies resulting in substandard treatment for patients. Further the company has started demanding cheaper treatment (for eg: they want the doctors to try conservative medical management for urinary stone of larger size where ideally lithotripsy - surgery to remove the stone should be done. This info is given by a friend whose father is an urologist. Whatever I am saying here is true. I am not making any of these things up).

Stakeholder analysis:
As a result of this scheme,
1) The patients are losing because they are receiving substandard, less than ideal treatment.
2) The doctors end up losing because at the end, neither the company nor the patient (who are mostly people who cannot pay) is paying him. These people who are law abiding and soft dont confront anyone and just deregister themselves to avoid any further losses.
3) The medical students have lesser no of cases to study.
4) Not but not the least, the government and the tax payer is losing close to 250 crores per year (the government doctor is anyway going to get his salary - money lost to insurance companies is just extra). This money can be invested in the healthcare system to make it world class and attract even wealthier people to the public healthcare system.
To put it in perspective, AIIMS have an annual budget of 300 crore rupees. By discontinuing the insurance scheme and deploying that money in MMC, the government can turn it into AIIMS standards. So simple but yet needs political will.
5) The only stakeholder who comes out the winner making a mockery of the system is the insurance company who are exploiting everyone to their benefit. They dont add any value whatsoever but make money due to hard labour of the healthcare workers and the misery of the poorer section of the public.

I hope better sense prevails in the government ranks and they cancel this scheme with immediate effect.

I would give a dozen examples of how people getting fooled but then I have to tell about doctors and anyone who knows me will immediately recognize whom I am talking about. All these persons are some of the finest in the art and who have a high standing in the society. They would feel wounded and let down if I explain how they are exploited and fooled by a bunch of financial cronies with no human value enhancement skill but are just a bunch of blood sucking leeches feeding on their toil and effort.
there is a long history to health care & it's high costs. it is expensive because of too much government regulation & not the lack of it - it is no way close to a free market as you think. free market by definition would ensure such services would be delivered much cheaper. there were a few articles on mises that would help you understand history of healthcare & it's costs in usa.

you have specified many examples and i don't understand the point of it. are you saying peope with insurance are better off or not? you started off by saying well off can get insurance and later mentioned that since doctors are getting squeazed of their profits they get sub-standard treatment.

if insurance was not available would patients go for that expensive lithotripsy (whatever that is) or try initially a more conservative medical management? i would think people would try more conservative options first before taking all those expensive tests that may/may not lead to surgeries. it depends on patient to patient and doctor-doctor.

insurance clearly has their values and most of them are not like what you have described them.
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Old March 12th, 2011, 12:39 PM   #53
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there is a long history to health care & it's high costs. it is expensive because of too much government regulation & not the lack of it - it is no way close to a free market as you think. free market by definition would ensure such services would be delivered much cheaper. there were a few articles on mises that would help you understand history of healthcare & it's costs in usa.

you have specified many examples and i don't understand the point of it. are you saying peope with insurance are better off or not? you started off by saying well off can get insurance and later mentioned that since doctors are getting squeazed of their profits they get sub-standard treatment.

if insurance was not available would patients go for that expensive lithotripsy (whatever that is) or try initially a more conservative medical management? i would think people would try more conservative options first before taking all those expensive tests that may/may not lead to surgeries. it depends on patient to patient and doctor-doctor.

insurance clearly has their values and most of them are not like what you have described them.

If govt backed insurance was not available, the patient would have gone to a govt general hospital and the surgery would have been done for free.

Insurance in itself is not bad. People who are not satisfied with govt service would be willing to pay out of pocket and if some of them think they cant gather enough resources at the time of emergency can go for insurance. Insurance is good for them. Govt backed insurance is just forcing another layer of expenditure without adding any value. It is not free market.

Regarding free markets and Austrian, I have to say Austrian is not ideal and it has its flaws. But lets not get into those in this thread. I think you are too much addicted to Peter Schiff. He has a lot of logic no doubt but being a perma bear doesnt give him much credibility. It eventually rains in desert too.
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Old March 13th, 2011, 12:16 PM   #54
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Hospital groups in Chennai are roping in Indian

CHENNAI: During the three decades that Dr Mohammed Rela worked in the UK, he wore British-branded shirts. Today, having moved to India four months ago, he finds them too expensive to buy. But the 52-year-old senior liver transplant surgeon finds everything else affordable here, be it big cars or Internet on the go.

"I love it here. It's the best time to come back home," said Dr Rela, chief transplant surgeon at Global Hospitals. "India is now beginning to take transplant medicine seriously and it's just like it was in the UK when I went there to do my post graduation. It's like someone turned the clock back for me," he says.

Like Dr Rela, several other Indian doctors settled abroad are now relocating to Chennai as they can pursue successful careers here. In the last five years, several new hospital groups like Global Hospitals and Fortis come to the city. Older ones, like Apollo Hospitals and MIOT, are expanding. And they are roping in talent from abroad. Since 2009, at least 20% of the doctors appointed in Apollo Hospitals, 40% in Global Hospitals and more than 20% in MIOT have been doctors who had settled down in the US and UK.

Hospital managements and doctors say it's usually a win-win situation. The doctors return home to earn a handsome salary that gives them a good lifestyle. And the corporate hospitals expand into super-specialities and adopt more efficient systems.

"We are always in need of trained specialists. Last year, we recruited experts in paediatric behavioural sciences, paediatric intensive therapy and transplant surgeries. We don't have such specialists here," says Dr Bhama, medical superintendent of Apollo Hospitals.

One of them was Dr Rajkumar Palaniappan, a surgical gasteroentrologist working in the UK. The doctor, who relocated last October, does keyhole surgeries for weight reduction.

Dr A Olithselvan, who was working at Leeds University, also joined Global Hospitals last year. "I knew I had better opportunities in Chennai because there are not many hepatologists here. I will have the opportunity to train youngsters," he said.

At his hepatology department, Dr Olithselvan has put certain system into place. In his unit, nurses gently remind doctors to scrub their hands after seeing every patient to prevent infections.

Hospital managements also find these specialists impressive. "Most hospitals have the latest equipment and technology. These doctors will help give better care," says MIOT hospital chairman Dr P V A Mohandoss.

The salary in India is not on par with what the doctors get in US or UK. But, in India, they get to see more patients and make more money. The cost of living in India is also cheaper. "My annual tax in the UK was 62%. Here, it's not even 30%," says urologist Dr Krishsai, who returned from UK last year.

In the US, doctors pay up to 45% as tax. Housing and education of children is expensive. "You also don't have to iron your shirts, clean your cars or make your own your bookshelves," says Dr NS Balaji, surgeon at Global Hospitals, who moved back to Chennai from UK recently.

Dr P Prabu, hematologist, who worked in the UK, decided to join Apollo Hospitals in Chennai last year. "I would probably have not come back 10 years ago. But India's healthcare system is now more efficient."

The grass on this side is not all that green. Traffic jams, lack of civic infrastructure and high pollution levels do frustrate foreign-returned doctors. "We also spend longer hours in the hospital, which means lesser time with family," says urologist Dr Krish Sai.

However, India is seen as the one of the fastest growing economies. "You don't need to wait for several days to get a telephone line, or stand in long queues to pay electricity bills," says Global Hospital chairman Dr K Ravindranath. "It's now time to have the reverse brain drain."

TOI
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Old March 13th, 2011, 06:48 PM   #55
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Heart surgery by Robo



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Nice to see some of the latest medical technologies being used in Chennai hospitals.
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Old March 13th, 2011, 07:09 PM   #56
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Originally Posted by dis.agree View Post
there is a long history to health care & it's high costs. it is expensive because of too much government regulation & not the lack of it - it is no way close to a free market as you think. free market by definition would ensure such services would be delivered much cheaper. there were a few articles on mises that would help you understand history of healthcare & it's costs in usa.

you have specified many examples and i don't understand the point of it. are you saying peope with insurance are better off or not? you started off by saying well off can get insurance and later mentioned that since doctors are getting squeazed of their profits they get sub-standard treatment.

if insurance was not available would patients go for that expensive lithotripsy (whatever that is) or try initially a more conservative medical management? i would think people would try more conservative options first before taking all those expensive tests that may/may not lead to surgeries. it depends on patient to patient and doctor-doctor.

insurance clearly has their values and most of them are not like what you have described them.
Insurance by itself is not bad. I don't think that shyam is saying that it's bad. What's bad is when they start dictating terms and decide on low-cost options for patients which may not be the best option.

Coming to insurance in US, have you heard of Obama care and what he is trying to do?
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Old March 16th, 2011, 09:53 AM   #57
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Stem cell therapy helps man regain vision

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CHENNAI: In what was termed a first of its kind in India, doctors used stem cell therapy to restore the vision of an NRI whose condition was claimed to be irreversible by American doctors, here on Tuesday.

Shailesh (name changed), a 22-year-old US-based medical sciences student experienced a sudden loss of vision after accidentally consuming methanol.

Himanshu Bansal, a stem cell therapist from the Institute of Spinal Injury and Stem Cell Research, who treated him said, “After diagnosis and treatments, the doctors who were consulted in the US called his case irreversible and despite intensive treatment with high dose steroids, his condition continued to deteriorate, possibly due to cell death.”

For humans, methanol is said to be highly toxic. If ingested, as little as 10 ml can damage the optic nerve, thereby causing permanent blindness while 30 ml could be potentially fatal.

“During the procedure, doctors aspirated about 120 ml of autologus bone marrow from the lilac crest and concentrated it to 20 ml, processed it, and injected it into Shailesh’s optic nerve,” said Bansal. “A week after the procedure, Shailesh was able to read and differentiate colours,” he added. The procedure was carried out at Laksha Hospital, Mylapore.

“Once I return to the US, I will revisit my doctors and show them how Indian doctors have succeeded in treating me while they claimed my condition was irreversible,” said Shailesh. “We are plan to publish the achievement in a medical journal,” added Bansal.
http://expressbuzz.com/cities/chenna...on/256854.html
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Old March 24th, 2011, 08:50 PM   #58
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Single portal kidney removal surgery performed by city docto

For the first time in South India, a team of doctors at the super speciality Global Hospitals and Health City has performed an unique single portal kidney removal surgery -- Nephrectomy -- on a Nigerian patient.

The procedure is a novel technique to remove a diseased kidney, using a keyhole method. This provides significant benefits to the patient. Laparo Endoscopic Single Site Nephrectomy (LESS) is a new technique used to remove kidneys.

Dr Krish Sairam, Consultant Urological Surgeon, Department of Urology Global Hospitals, who performed the surgery told reporters here today that the 35-year-old Nigerian was suffering from recurrent left flank pain and fever.

His CT Scan and Renogram revealed a chronic 'PUJ' obstruction or a block in one of the tubes that carries urine from kidney to the bladder. '' When his case was presented to Dr. Krish Sairam, he decided to remove the kidney by using the path breaking 'LESS' procedure, compared to conventional open surgery or the regular Laparoscopic Surgery.

The advantages of this single hole minimal access surgery is less pain and lowering the risk of post-operative complications. The patient is mobile soon after surgery. It also provides better cosmetic results than regular laparoscopic surgery since it is done through the patient’s navel. There would only be a small or near invisible scar. Dr Sairam said it was a technically challenging surgery, performed probably for the first time in south India.

SRC: http://news.chennaionline.com/newsit...TEGORYNAME=CHN
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Old March 27th, 2011, 05:12 AM   #59
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Old March 28th, 2011, 03:33 AM   #60
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New research centre tests herbal effect against Parkinson's

http://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/c...ow/7789724.cms

CHENNAI: The newly-inaugurated National Centre for Neurotoxicity Research to Assist Drug Development is studying the potential of herbal medicines in treating Parkinson's disease.

"Traditional medicines offer solutions for treatment of Parkinson's. We are seeing if the individual ingredients in these herbal preparations will aid the treatment of this condition," principal investigator of the project SL Maheswari said. The centre is collecting serum samples of patients with Alzheimer's and Parkinson's from the Government Medical College and patient samples from Nimhans to study the causes of the symptoms.

The study is part of a larger research work to observe the influence of heavy metals in the progress of neuro-degenerative diseases like Alzheimer's and Parkinson's. "Alzheimer's, which used to be prevalent in the West, is now being seen in India. We have so far not identified any causative agents. We are studying the heavy metal influence in Alzheimer's to see if they are involved in the disease's progress. In Parkinson's too the involvement of metals is being explored," said co-principal investigator of the neurotoxicity project, and professor and head of the department of pharmacology and environmental toxicology, University of Madras.

Though traditional medicines are gaining popularity, India lags behind in exports because of the lack of regulations in the field. Experts have called for the need to back Indian products with rigorous scientific studies to establish their quality, safety, efficacy and standards. The National Centre on Neurotoxicity Research to Assist Drug Development at the University of Madras, a brainchild of professor Maheswari, is a step in this direction.

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