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Old July 9th, 2011, 04:31 PM   #161
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Nagar Ratna Award : Ahmedabad First,Mysore Second and Pune Third
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By DNA Correspondent | Place: Pune | Agency: DNA, PTI

The Pune Municipal Corporation (PMC) on Friday won the third prize of Nagar Ratna Awards for overall performance for best managed urban local bodies.

The award carries a trophy and a cash prize of Rs2 lakh. Mayor, Mohansingh Rajpal; municipal commissioner, Mahesh Pathak; and deputy commissioner, Praveen Ashtikar, received the award from president Pratibha Patil at an event organised in Mumbai on Friday.

The award is instituted by the All India Institute of Local Self Government. The Ahmedabad Municipal Corporation, whose Bus Rapid Transport System (BRTS) has caught the attention of urban planners around the world, was adjudged the ‘overall best performer’ at the Nagar Ratna Awards.

The Ahmedabad civic body received a trophy and a cash prize of Rs5 lakh.

The second best performer was the Mysore City Corporation, which received a trophy and a cash prize of Rs3 lakh.

A selection committee headed by former Supreme Court judge, Arijit Pasayat, evaluated the performance of the cities on nine parameters.

Altogether, 64 cities where the Jawaharlal Nehru National Urban Renewal Mission (JNNURM) is being implemented, were in the reckoning for the Nagar Ratna Awards.
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Yeah Namma Mysore ranked Second,Namma Mysore always stays ahead in national surveys like these
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Old July 9th, 2011, 11:35 PM   #162
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Nagar Ratna Award : Ahmedabad First,Mysore Second and Pune Third


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Yeah Namma Mysore ranked Second,Namma Mysore always stays ahead in national surveys like these
It is easy to maintain cities where very less people live.
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Old July 10th, 2011, 09:13 AM   #163
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Mysore City Corporation gets award for better civic amenities

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It came second among 63 cities covered under JNNURM programme
Mysore City Corporation has been adjudged the second best city municipal corporation among 63 cities covered under the Jawaharlal Nehru National Urban Renewal Mission (JNNURM) and was given the ‘Nagara Ratna' award.

“Ahmedabad and Pune had been adjudged the first and third best city municipal corporations in the country respectively and were presented the Nagara Ratna awards, instituted by the All India Institute of Local Self Government,” MCC Commissioner K.S. Raykar said. President Pratibha Patil presented the award to Mysore Mayor Pushpalatha Chikkanna and Mr. Raykar at a function in Mumbai on Friday. The award carries a cash prize of Rs. 3 lakh.

Factors

Mr. Raykar told The Hindu that the corporation was chosen for the award taking into consideration the status of drinking water supply and the quality of drinking water, sanitation, overall cleanliness, solid waste management, sewage treatment and such other services.

An expert panel constituted by the institute had visited the city four months ago to inspect the services to verify the claims of the corporation, the commissioner said.

Components

Mr. Raykar said the panel studied all the components that had been furnished to the institute for the recognition. “It is a matter of pride to bag the recognition and the award.

We shall look into the areas that need improvement and put the city on top. We shall address the weaknesses so that the city will be seen as a model in almost all areas,” he said.

The commissioner said the corporation would strive for improvement and upgradation. Covered under the JNNURM, Mysore was adjudged the second cleanest city after Chandigarh, last year.

It earned the title of the second cleanest city in the country among 423 cities.

The MCC is making every effort to get the ‘green' tag, as it was classified in the ‘blue' category, ahead of Bangalore that was placed in the black category, sources said.

It is for the first time that prominent Indian cities were rated on their sanitation standards and public health awareness.


An expert panel visited the city to check the civic facilities

President Pratibha Patil presented the award to Mysore Mayor
The Hindu
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Old July 10th, 2011, 07:20 PM   #164
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India unprepared for urban boom

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HUBLI, India — Over the past two decades, this old trading town in southern India has been transformed into a bustling business city as software companies, call centers and factories set up here. Dozens of colleges, air-conditioned shopping malls and international gyms now dot its leafy lanes.

But like many emerging Indian cities, Hubli is ill-equipped to cope with the growth. Piles of garbage lie uncollected on street corners, and vehicles clog the narrow roads. Most residents have access to clean water for just a few hours a week.

More than 600 million Indians will live in cities by 2030, up from 350 million today. About 70 percent of new jobs will be created in cities by 2030, fueling the national economy like never before.

But the government says the country’s infrastructure is unprepared for the massive urban growth. Only 20 percent of India’s urban sewage is treated before disposal, and few cities have sanitary landfills for solid waste. Out of 85 cities with over half a million people, only 20 have local bus service. India needs to invest more than $860 billion in urban infrastructure over the next 20 years, officials say.

“Our cities are bursting at their seams with people, but urban services are lacking. We don’t have enough trained town planners. Our cities are growing without any plan,” said Kamal Nath, the urban development minister in New Delhi.

With more than 900,000 people, Hubli is emerging as an example of the problems and the promise accompanying India’s urban boom as cities of its size look for ways to prepare for new growth.

Two decades ago, Hubli was a cotton and chili trading town, connected to the rest of India only by train. But it began to grow as businesses looked for places to expand beyond expensive and clogged large cities and as the number of college-educated young people began swelling in small towns. Two large, national highways were also constructed through Hubli.

Its small airport, which began functioning in 2006 with propeller planes, is now expanding its runway to make room for wide-bodied Boeing 737s to land. Officials are trying to combat the rising number of private cars and encourage public transport by building dedicated lanes for buses.

But one of Hubli’s most dramatic projects focuses on overhauling the city’s water supply model to keep up with growing aspirations of its residents. With a $39 million grant from the World Bank, the water department began a pioneering experiment in 2008 to deliver water to five neighborhoods 24 hours a day. The project’s success has triggered a clamor for similar programs not only in other neighborhoods, but also other Indian cities.

Until recently, Hubli residents used to skip work and school to line up for water, which was delivered by the city every eight days.

“Sometimes they supplied water in the middle of the night and everybody would run to the taps. Fights would break out. It was like living in a village, not in a city,” said Saleema Sattar, 41, an accountant who lives in a low-income neighborhood.

At first, round-the-clock water was unimaginable for the residents here. They thought the city would quickly run out and feared that their bills would be too high. The city council’s waterworks staff thought that the French company called in to manage the water supply would fire them.

But now, residents pay for their water, and officials say that there is less waste and fewer cases of waterborne diseases.

“This has been a miracle. We can turn the tap on anytime of the day and there is water,” said Girija Manjunath, 31, who lives in a blue-collar area that now receives water. “It has freed me from water worries. My children are cleaner and go to school. Others in the city envy my destiny now.”

The transformation was not easy. Fifty-year-old pipelines, which were cracked and leaking badly, had to be replaced with a new underground water distribution pipes.

“The cracks used to suck external filth and sewage into the water pipes. The old water pipes had been laid very close to underground drainage. This was the cause for constant waterborne diseases in the city,” said M.K. Managond, a senior engineer in Hubli’s water department.

What was worse, Hubli did not have a database on the state of its water pipelines. Officials did not know where they were, where they were leaking or the extent of illegal tapping. When a pipe broke, it took weeks for the city council to find and fix it.

The success of the 24-hour water supply program in Hubli has fueled other aspirations as well — for better public parks, wider roads, traffic management and street lights.

“Our ambitions are growing. It is like a frog coming out of a pond and discovering that the river is bigger,” said Madan Desai, former president of the chamber of commerce in Hubli. “Small towns don’t want to be in stagnant waters anymore.”
http://www.washingtonpost.com/world/...q3H_story.html

Hubli the trend setter for 24*7 Water supply.
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Old July 11th, 2011, 01:55 PM   #165
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Akash!

Why are you spamming all threads with Naraga Ratna award news ?
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Old July 11th, 2011, 06:25 PM   #166
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Akash!

Naraga Ratna award news ?

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Old July 11th, 2011, 06:38 PM   #167
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Akash!

Why are you spamming all threads with Nagara Ratna award news ?
Kushi :P
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Old July 11th, 2011, 07:38 PM   #168
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Yes, it's proved that Nagara Ratna awards improve per capita income and general well-being of all residents of that city. Congratulations, sir
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Old July 11th, 2011, 09:18 PM   #169
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Hello IS, Not sure whether u noticed that Kannan has mentioned 'Naraga' not 'Nagara'
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Old July 12th, 2011, 06:02 AM   #170
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Kolkata beautification work to begin from next month

Press Trust Of India / Kolkata July 11, 2011, 0:04 IST

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In a step towards fulfilment of Chief Minister Mamata Banerjee's poll promise of beautifying the metropolis to match London, the West Bengal government is initiating a project to beautify a stretch along the Hooghly river.

The first phase of the project, covering a one-km stretch along the river from Babughat to the Millennium Park, would begin from August 2, secretariat sources said.

Banerjee recently gave the clearance after a high-level meeting at the secretariat, attended by Minister of State for Railways Mukul Roy, PWD Minister Subrata Bakshi, Urban Development Minister Firad Hakim, Tourism Minister Rachpal Singh, Mayor Sovan Chatterjee and officials of the Army and the Kolkata Port Trust.

At the meeting, Rail India Technical and Economic Services (RITES), which will implement the project, gave a presentation of the beautification plan prepared by the School of Planning and Architecture, New Delhi.

While the original plan covers a 10 km stretch along the river's Left Bank from Pramamik Ghat at Baranagore in the north to Dahi Ghat in the Garden Reach in the city's southern fringes, it was decided at the meeting that the initial work would be taken up on a one kilometre stretch from Babughat to the Millennium Park, the sources said.

The project, called 'Hooghly River Front Development, Kolkata,' envisages setting up of a cultural node in the northern end and a nature retreat, along with development of the jetties at the Fairlie Ghat, Millennium Ferry Ghat, Babu Ghat and Outram Ghat.

Besides, it also includes setting up a 'Kolkata Square,' an open air theatre and a 'Water Shrine' along the river.

RITES project coordinator DC Mitra said the project plan focuses on increasing the visibility of the Hooghly and restoring the lost heritage around the riverbank.

Citing an example, he said that the famous Eden Gardens off the riverbank has come to mean only the stadium today, with very little public interest in the actual garden with its landmark wooden pagoda at the centre.

"Also, people have heard of the Bandstand, but do not know where it actually is. The project envisages restoring the Eden Gardens and the nearby Bandstand to their full glory," Mitra said.

In the first phase of the project, the Bankim Chatterjee statue roundabout behind Eden would be decongested with the relocation of the inter-state bus stand there and removal of the roadside eateries.

"Once the place is decongested, something called the Kolkata Square will come up there. It will have, as in many foreign countries, a map of the metropolis along with its heritage landmarks would be etched on the road itself for the benefit of outsiders. A pillar would also be installed with the names of the luminaries from the city with their dates of birth," Mitra said. In course of the project, the jetties along the Hooghly would be refurbished to enable upto six yachts of berth on them at any given time, Mitra said.

A 'Gateway of Kolkata' would be set up at the abandoned KoPT cargo sheds near the iconic Howrah bridge.

To bring back the glory of north Kolkata which was the epicentre of what is known as the 'Bengal Renaissance,' a Literary Square would be set up near 'Mayer Ghat' at Bagbazar, associated with the memory of Sri Sarada Devi, wife of the famous saint Sri Ramakrishna.

Besides, heritage projects would also be taken up at Kumartoli, famous for studios of clay sculptors and artists.

Several commercial complexes, including shopping malls and entertainment centres, would also be constructed along the riverfront, Mitra said, adding that the height of the station buildings of the Circular Railway, which runs along the river bank, would be increased to house commercial complexes.

While the state government would be involved only in the infrastructure development for the project, the commercial ventures envisaged in the project would be taken up either through the PPP model or purely on private ownership basis.

According to Mitra, funds of Rs 280 crore would be required for the first phase of the project.

Meanwhile, the Kolkata Municipal Corporation, keen to involve itself with the project, has completed the work of dismantling the commercial hoardings and billboards in the city's heritage BBD Bag area.
BS

Great, if this project succeeds it will compel other cities in India to soon follow the same
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Old July 12th, 2011, 10:11 AM   #171
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Hello IS, Not sure whether u noticed that Kannan has mentioned 'Naraga' not 'Nagara'
I did. I guess it's intentional
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Old July 14th, 2011, 01:48 AM   #172
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Building better cities for tomorrow

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The Indian Institute for Human Settlements plans to transform hordes into urban practitioners. It may save our cities by doing so.

If the renowned—and often reviled—English economist-philosopher Thomas Robert Malthus were to step into any Indian city today, it is quite probable that a faint smile, perhaps even a grin, would manifest itself on his face.


Stretching before him would be an urban chaos, teeming with slums and impregnable traffic. He would pass migrant workers—many of them women who build roads and houses for privileged Indians—splayed out on sidewalks they call home, cooking their evening meal and playing with their undernourished children. He would wrinkle his nose while passing innumerable open and overflowing sewers and gingerly hop around mounds of garbage being scarfed up by placid cows. He would probably still wear that smile.
Malthus, who was a member of the East India Company and influenced British rule in India, would congratulate himself on getting it right hundreds of years ago when he postulated that the human lot is incapable of improving itself, that God invented poverty and starvation so that we could learn lessons about hard toil and virtuous behaviour and that ultimately “sickly seasons, epidemics, pestilence, and plague…” are the only corrective forces we can rely on to bring balance to our cities. Frederich Engels, co-author of the Communist Manifesto, called it "...the crudest, most barbarous theory that ever existed.” Yet, Malthus, despite his cold rationale, may just be right.

Indian cities are a disaster. For instance, while our urban population is rising rapidly by about 30 million people every year, adding to the 350 million already living there, our cities tend to be exclusionary and hostile to the very people that aid their growth—migrants—who often live in abject misery without plumbing or sanitation, and under the many overhangs of flyovers that dot our urban terrain.

The newly minted, Indian Institute of Human Settlements (IIHS)—located in Kengeri on the outskirts of Bangalore—aims to change all of that and by doing so, prove Malthus wrong. As more and more people make that journey from villages to tier-2 towns or major cities, there is an urgent need to train people to manage this humongous social transformation and to fill the human resource and knowledge gap that will arise very soon.

Which is why a group of eminent personalities from the research , professioal and corporate arenas amongst others, put their heads together to try and figure out how to solve India’s intractable urban planning problem and came up with the IIHS.

The board of directors has some serious industry star power and includes Xerxes Desai, Jamshyd Godrej, Cyrus Guzder, Renana Jhabvala, Vijay Kelkar, Keshub Mahindra, Kishore Mariwala, Rahul Mehrotra, Rakesh Mohan, Nasser Munjee, Deepak Parekh, Shirish Patel, Aromar Revi, Deepak Satwalekar and UIDAI chief Nandan Nilekani.

"We conceived IIHS as an inter-disciplinary university born out of the realisation that only inter-disciplinary academics within a university would be able to offer the breadth and depth, and practice urgently required to solve the multi-dimensional urbanisation challenges that confront the country today," said Aromar Revi, director, IIHS.

The scale and ambition of IIHS’s educational mission is breathtaking—to build from ground-up, an establishment that one can refer to in the same breath as the Indian Institute of Sciences or Shantiniketan while educating a staggering 50-100,000 students. This isn’t a place that will churn out urban planners or architects, but instead aims on generating an army of practitioners that has imbibed lessons from these as well as other fields, such as politics, history, law, governance, politics and management. The aim, Revi says, is to learn how to answer questions that ‘why?’ and not just ‘how?’

Training people in this manner may just save the Indian city of tomorrow. Jeb Brugman, author of “Welcome to the Urban Revolution—How Cities are Changing the World,” feels that a revolution is sorely needed in Indian urban planning, which has always glorified alien forms—Le Corbuisier’s Chandigarh, for instance, should have incorporated small Dhaba-like social spaces on its streets—while ingenious indigenous forms, like the ‘Chowk’, are considered out of fashion and ignored. Similarly, instead of embracing Dharavi as a legitimate part of Mumbai’s vibrant economic and cultural life, much like Brazil has done with its favelas, the plan is to raze it to the ground, build a commercial district in its place and shunt its population elsewhere. This is a surefire recipe for social upheaval says Brugman, in his book.

An important mission of the IIHS is to try and attract a large number of students from small towns and villages and not just the urban elite who have a tendency to dominate these kinds of places.

The IIHS will offer "globally-benchmarked bachelors, masters and doctoral degrees in urban practice based on a wide set of disciplines and practice areas central to India's urban transformation.," added Revi. IIHS will offer never-before heard degrees in India, like the BUP (Bachelors in Urban Planning), which will be a four-year course after plus-2. Meanwhile, the MUP or Masters in Urban Planning will be a two-year programme.

The IIHS has also tied-up with several well-known foreign institutions, including the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), University College London (UCL), and The African Centre for Cities (ACC) of the University of Cape Town (UCT), Revi said.

The tentative fee structure for the MUP could be in the range of Rs 3,00,000 and Rs 4,00,000 per annum. The IIHS is planning to offer about 50 per cent of its students scholarships and financial assistance of varying degrees depending on their needs," said Aromar Revi, an alumnus of IIT-Delhi and the law and management schools of Delhi University..

Nandan Nilekani, and his wife Rohini Nilekani have donated Rs 50 crore to the IIHS. Nilekanis when making this donation recently said: “The donation was made as the IIHS is at the convergence of both our interests in education, urbanisation and sustainability.” On the gift by the Nilekanis, Revi said :"This is in keeping with their vision of building quality transformative institutions for India and a reinforcement of their past philanthropic commitments. Nandan Nilekani has been deeply involved with the IIHS from its conceptualization".

The IIHS said the donation marked “a major step” in its endeavour to mobilise Rs 300 crore to fund five interdisciplinary schools, build one of South Asia's largest reference and digital libraries and establish other facilities on its campus near Kengeri. The IIHS is also raising Rs 100 crore for chair professorships at the university.

Revi was confident that students passing out of this institute will have job opportunities since the "most serious constraint facing Indian cities today is not capital but the availability of suitably educated professionals, entrepreneurs and change makers who can act in the common good".

“We see career opportunities across the public and private sectors as well as civil society and universities and knowledge enterprises” says Xerxes Desai, founder head of Titan Industries. “We have started a dialogue with with future employers including developers, financial sector, NGOs and the government and the private sector to develop a market for these graduates,” adds Desai.

With IIHS’s new flock of well-trained cadres, India has a chance to dream about an inclusive, well-planned and sustainable urban future while staving off the kind of social calamities and criminality that inevitably accompany inequitable, non-inclusive high growth trajectories.

Somewhere up there, Malthus is frowning.
http://www.business-standard.com/tak...morrow/442650/
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Old July 14th, 2011, 09:52 AM   #173
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President urges 25 years futuristic approach for urban planning

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Mumbai, July 8 (IANS) President Pratibha Patil Friday said that urban planning should not be limited to catering to the needs of current inhabitants but look at developing cities and townships keeping in mind a minimum time-frame of 25 years.

She urged the need to develop effective public transportation systems to solve the problems of congestion and vehicular pollution and asked planners to adopt environmentally-friendly options like bio-gas, solar and wind energy in their designs.

Speaking at a function wherre she presented the prestigious Nagar Ratna Awards to several municipal bodies here, the President said that works like roads, drainage constructions or repairs should be undertaken in a co-ordinated manner by adopting an integrated development framework for an area.

"The construction of green buildings, designed for energy conservation and water harvesting, should be encouraged as also making earthquake resistant buildings," she said.

Patil called upon the local self-government bodies to ensure that building plans and standards are strictly adhered to.

Expressing concern over the growing number of slum-dwellers in the country, the president said that the population of people living in urban slums has grown from 26 million in 1981 to 62 million in 2001.

"Being at the lower rung of the ladder, they constitute the vulnerable section that is likely to suffer from hunger, malnutrition and disease," Patil observed,

The Ahmedabad, Mysore and Pune municipal corporations bagged the coveted Nagar Ratna Awards, for being judged the civic bodies in the country.

The award, instituted by the All India Institute of Local Self-Government, Mumbai, carries a rolling trophy and cash awards of Rs.5 lakhs, Rs.3 lakhs and Rs.2 lakhs respectively for the top three winners.

Besides, Nashik, Kalyan-Dombivali, Faridabad, Rajkot, Surat, Vadodara, Bangalore, Visakhapatnam and Agartala municipal corporations also received prizes in different categories like public health, cleanliness, provision of basic amenities, use of IT in governance, transparency and accountability.

The president expressed happiness that mayors of six of the 12 award-winning municipal corporation were women.

The awards were decided by a committee, headed by retired Supreme Court judge Arijit Pasayat, which evaluated the performance of various civic bodies covered under the Jawaharlal Nehru National Urban Renewal Mission.
Mangalorean

Does JNNURM stipulate how much of amount alloted should be spent on improving Public Transportation?


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Old July 15th, 2011, 09:01 PM   #174
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Fresh thrust to urbanization

Trend may redefine the political economy of the country, forcing a shift in public policy focus towards urban India

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India’s Census 2011 shows that one in every three Indians now lives in an urban habitat and that the move towards towns and cities has happened mostly in south India, contiguously from Maharashtra to Tamil Nadu.

According to the latest census, 31.2% of the total population lives in urban centres compared with 27.8% in 2001 and 25.5% in 1991. Of the 1.21 billion population, 833 million live in rural India while the remaining 377 million reside in urban India.

The number of towns in the country rose 53.74% to 7,935 in the last decade. The census defines all places with a municipality, corporation, cantonment board or notified town area committee as a town.

The trend, if sustained, say some experts, will redefine the political economy of the country, forcing a shift in public policy focus towards urban India. Further, the fact that urbanization has gained momentum in the South also opens up new opportunities for the consumer economy.

The biggest trend towards urbanization is in southern India, where all states except Andhra Pradesh have more than 35% of the population in urban centres. While by the earlier census in 2001 more than 35% were already living in urban areas in Tamil Nadu, the latest census has added Karnataka and Kerala to the list, while more than 30% of the population lives in urban areas in Andhra Pradesh.

The southern states also saw the fastest economic growth in the last decade, drawing in associated migration from other states. In 2007-08, the economies of Kerala, Karnataka and Andhra Pradesh grew at 10.42%, 12.92% and 10.62%, respectively.

Among other states, Haryana, Punjab, Uttarakhand, West Bengal and Manipur have seen faster urbanization than the rest of the country. Gujarat and Maharashtra already had more than 35% living in urban centres by 2001.

In terms of urban population, the top three states are Maharashtra with 50.8 million, Uttar Pradesh with 44.4 million and Tamil Nadu with 34.9 million.

Saloni Nangia, senior vice-president (retail) at Technopak Advisors Pvt. Ltd, said the North and West account for approximately 70% of organized retail. “Both of these are about the same size. The South accounts for about 22% and is a large market attracting a lot of big-box retailers and new investments. The East is the smallest market.” Hyderabad, Bangalore and Chennai are young, exciting markets comparable with any city in the West or the North, she said.

The new data shows the sex ratio—the number of females per 1,000 males—improved faster in urban India to 926, from 900 in the earlier census. In rural India, it increased marginally to 947 from 946. The child sex ratio—the number of girls in the 0-6 age group per 1,000 boys in that age group—declined faster in rural India than urban India. While the child sex ratio has been declining since the 1971 census, during the latest census the ratio declined to 902 from 906 in the earlier census in urban India, while the decline was sharper at 919 from 934 in the earlier census for rural India.

The literacy rate—the number of literate persons among every 100—grew faster in urban areas at 84.98% versus 68.91% in rural India. The total literacy rate in the latest Census stood at 74.04%, against 64.83% in 2001.

The faster rate of urbanization in the decade ending 2011 may unleash new challenges for planners as well as policymakers.

N. Bhaskara Rao, chairman of Centre for Media Studies, a New Delhi-based think tank, said the focus of public policy will shift. “The growth in the urban population is mostly because of the increase in slumdwellers. Governments will have to spend more in the urban areas than they do now. The policy has to be reoriented,” he said.

The delimitation exercise that redrew the boundaries of both the assembly and Lok Sabha constituencies in 2008 also recognized the demographic shift. Based on the 2001 census, the exercise resulted in a rise in constituencies in the cities, adding a greater urban flavour to Indian politics. The number of urban Lok Sabha seats increased from around 70 to at least 100.

However, B.D. Ghosh, a senior fellow at Kolkata’s Institute of Social Sciences, said it is unlikely that there could be a shift in policies at least in the northern states. “Although the urban population is growing, in politics the rural side weighs heavier. So it is difficult to expect a change in the current rhetoric on farmers, agriculture and rural sectors in the near future. The rural orientation will continue,” he said.

“However, things may change from state to state. New initiatives will be focusing on urban population in the southern states, especially in Tamil Nadu,” Ghosh added.

The census data showed for the first time since Independence that the absolute increase in population in India in Census 2011 compared with Census 2001 is more in urban areas (91 million) than in rural areas (90.4 million). Uttar Pradesh has the largest rural population of 155.11 million; Maharashtra has the highest urban population of 50.8 million.

Kavas Kapadia, head of the department of urban planning, School of Planning and Architecture, said people move from villages to urban areas because of the infrastructure. “Even though there is a legal provision in urban master plans for street vendors, migratory population and the like, it is rarely implemented, and that strains urban infrastructure. People get used to a lower quality of life due to an inadequacy of resources,” he added.
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Surat has been selected by MHUPA to study the case of its street vendors and chalk out a plan to improve their living standards and evolve a national policy.

Article posted Click here For TOI article : Click here
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Old July 16th, 2011, 06:05 AM   #175
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Does JNNURM stipulate how much of amount alloted should be spent on improving Public Transportation?
Krishnamoorthy as such there is no limit and it varies from city to city,but it is based on the needs of a city.Few cities got BRTS sanctioned which is a costly project.While,Mysore and Bangalore both got green signal for the construction of IMTCs which no other JNNURM city got I guess(plz correct me).

Basically the transport dept of a city must forward the DPR to JNNURM (NIUA) and get clearance.The DPR may include projects worth many crores but how many projects get clearance is what matters in the end.
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Old July 16th, 2011, 08:44 PM   #176
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Post Urbanization in India

Cross-posting from TN thread. Courtesy: chennaidesi

The difference is obvious between small and big states. In small states, it is often a city-state model and naturally more people will live in urban areas. So, the real deal is with the big states which have diverse demographics and huge land area to identify the differences.

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TN top urbanized state of India


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Old July 17th, 2011, 06:52 AM   #177
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City's public transport projects get a push

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PUNE: In a major push to the city's transport projects, including the proposed metro rail, the Parliamentary Consultative Committee (PCC) on urban development has emphasised on better transport for non-metropolitan cities, with the help of the Central government.

The Pune Municipal Corporation (PMC) has decided to seek Central funds for implementation of the ambitious metro railway project under the Jawaharlal Nehru National Urban Renewal Mission (JNNURM) phase II. The Central government has started the process to implement phase II of the JNNURM.

The public transport initiatives by non-metropolitan cities, including Pune, came up for discussions in the PCC meeting held in New Delhi this week, in presence of Union minister for urban development Kamal Nath. Pune is the first non-metropolis in India to submit a proposal for a metro railway. The meeting concluded that the Central government will now focus on developing transport systems in other cities than the metros. Kamal Nath told the committee that urban transport is a priority and all steps would be taken to ensure that a robust transport system is developed in metros as well as smaller cities.

Various means of urban transportation, such as the metro, Bus Rapid Transit System (BRTS), buses under JNNURM and Regional Rapid Transit System (RRTS) were deliberated upon at the meeting.

"In June 2010, the PMC general body had approved the proposal to build a 14.925-km corridor of the Pune metro railway from Vanaz (Paud Road) to Ramwadi (Ahmednagar Road). The metro project is with the state government for approval and the PMC has sought suggestions on 'strategic' issues from the Delhi Metro Rail Corporation for speedy implementation of the project. Pune would be the first beneficiary of the Central government's new approach towards transport facilities," said a senior state government officer.

Some of the members in the PCC expressed concern about not having adequate transport infrastructure in smaller towns. It was also brought to the attention of the committee that in some towns, old railway lines could be used to develop local transport.

The minister said the government is committed to developing the Regional Rapid Transit System (RRTS) which will be a rail-based sub-urban transport system. MP Vilas Muttemwar and Danjay Dina Patil represented Maharashtra in the meeting.
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So phase two JNNURM for sure?
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Old July 18th, 2011, 06:40 PM   #178
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I did. I guess it's intentional
Yes. It is.

Akash,

In Tamil, Naragam means Hell. Is it same in Kannada or Hindi?
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Old July 19th, 2011, 07:47 AM   #179
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Bengal wants more A-grade cities

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KOLKATA: West Bengal has remained a one-city state for long. Apart from Kolkata, not a single place from the state ever gets a mention on the national stage. But people from Bengal now wants the set-up to change and has voted for a more dynamic state with more first grade cities.

Responding to the Focus Bengal debate on whether the new government should lay emphasis only on Kolkata or make efforts to upgrade potential towns in north and south Bengal, people have voted overwhelmingly in favour of the latter.

Most of the other states in India have more than a couple of large cities. For example, while Maharashtra has Mumbai, Pune and Nasik, Andhra Pradesh has Hyderabad, Vijaywada and Vizag and Karnataka has Bangalore, Mysore and Mangalore. West Bengal, on the other hand, harps only on the culture and heritage of Kolkata. Though Durgapur-Asansol in south Bengal and Siliguri-New Jalpaiguri in north Bengal have the potential to turn into A grade cities from their present state of towns, there has been no concerted effort from the government.

Three out of four respondents on the issue wanted equal emphasis on B-grade towns and Kolkata. They opined that while Kolkata should not fall behind cities like Delhi or Mumbai, towns of West Bengal should also be developed to compete with other cities in the country.

The rest wanted development of infrastructure in B-category towns like Asansol-Durgapur and Siliguri to take priority over Kolkata so that enough resources is committed to make the transition effective and visible.

Sankar Maulik of Kolkata offered a compelling argument on why the state should have more A1 cities. According to him, unless other towns are developed, the pressure on Kolkata would persist, stunting its growth as well. "The current level of infrastructure in other towns is appallingand needs immediate attention," he argued.

Maulik is spot on. Both hospitals and colleges in Kolkata are in dire straits since patients and students continue to pour into the city from the towns in the state in absence of proper infrastructure in the districts.

Saikat Sengupta of Haldia pointed out that industrial and business towns like Haldia and Siliguri do not have proper connectivity with Kolkata like Durgapur and Kalyani do. "Though Haldia is a major industrial hub, it is less developed than Durgapur, Asansol and Burdwan. The basic problem lies with connectivity amongst these industrial areas and their connection with Kolkata. Despite being an industrial center and a port town, Haldia's connection to Kolkata and the rest of Bengal is extremely poor," he said.

Sengupta, once again, is spot on. The National Highway connecting Haldia and Kolkata is under construction for over a decade. Surprisingly, doubling the 60 km two-lane highway into a six lane one has literally taken ages.

Bidhan Mandal of Bhopal had a word of caution. "In the quest to develop more cities, Kolkata's development should not be ignored," he said.
TOI

Quote:
Originally Posted by kannan infratech View Post
Yes. It is.

Akash,

In Tamil, Naragam means Hell. Is it same in Kannada or Hindi?
Naraka is a sanskit word. In kannada it is Naraka only. In hindi it is Narak. And in Tamil ga substitution to ka is common and then an m or an n is added at the end.
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Old July 19th, 2011, 07:52 AM   #180
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States to discuss Land Titling Bill

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Sanjay Jog / Mumbai July 14, 2011, 0:52 IST

The Centre plans to table the Land Titling Bill in the ensuing monsoon session of Parliament to bring in transparency and efficiency, especially in the urban land management system.

The Bill aims to provide clear titles to properties through a robust recording system which would reduce litigation and prevent encroachment. The legislation, currently circulated among states for suggestions, proposes to amend the Indian Stamp Act of 1889, the Registration Act of 1908, the Land Acquisition Act of 1894 and the Limitation Act of 1963.

A system of recording titles of properties would be set up that would have the benefit of enabling a framework for protecting property titles from fraud. The provisions of the Bill would come up for a comprehensive debate at a two-day meeting of inspectors general of registration and secretaries of the respective state departments in Lucknow, starting tomorrow.

“Any robust city development is possible if there is safety in recognising the legal and transferable rights on a property. This involves two things — the creation of a system of recording property rights in urban areas and to enable easy trading in the rights through an effective registration system. Though there is a system for recording rural land titles through khasra and khatauni and girdawari, there is no such system prevalent in the urban areas,” A Maharashtra government official, who did not want to be identified, told Business Standard.

He informed the registration of properties under the Registration Act was not be mandatory and it only provides proof of presumed ownership but was not a conclusive proof of title.

In the absence of any system, there have been instances of duplicate claims to property through forced wills, duplicate power of attorneys and false registration claiming ownership.

“Transactions in land will become simpler, quicker, accurate and secure. This will also improve the urban planning considerably as reliable data will be available. Credit crunch in property growth will be tackled due to the better value of the collateral offered on account of a better titling system,” the official said.

The Bill also aims to form a titling authority which would play a key role in establishing a system of registering titles of immovable properties. It would be mandatory for all documents relating to the registration of memorandum recording creation of mortgage by deposit to title deeds, memorandum recording family settlement involving immovable properties, notices under section 52 of the Transfer of Property Act, 1882.

The government would also set up a title registration office and the authority would prepare a record of all immovable properties in the notified area. The titling registration officer, district land titling tribunal and state land titling appellate tribunal would be empowered to enquire the processes of preparation and updation of register of titles.

They would have similar powers as vested in a civil court under the Code of Civil Procedure, 1908, when hearing an objection or dispute.

Moreover, the Title registration Officer may inspect or summon the production of any of the documents or records or registers in respect of immovable property within the notified area, during the process of holding an enquiry before ordering an entry in the register of titles.
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