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Old September 3rd, 2011, 07:17 PM   #1
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Oversea Chinese News

I remember there is a thread like that some where here but I couldn't find it.




City marks anniversary of Chinese Revolution

The 1911 uprising was lead by Dr. Sun Yat-sen, who visited Vancouver on three occasions

By Doug Ward, Vancouver Sun September 3, 2011


Mayor Gregor Robertson and dignitaries from Vancouver's Chinese community and Chinese Freemasons gathered at city hall on Friday.
Photograph by: Jason Payne, PNG, Vancouver Sun



The 100th anniversary of the Chinese Revolution is being celebrated this week in Vancouver - a city with a historical connection to the nationalist uprising in 1911 that led to the founding of modern China.

Dr. Sun Yat-sen, the revolutionary leader considered the "father of the Chinese nation," visited Vancouver three times - in 1897, 1910 and 1911 - seeking political and financial support for armed revolt against the autocratic Qing dynasty.

Sun's insurrectionary message was well-received by the first waves of Chinese immigrants to Vancouver, who mostly came from Guangdong province in southeastern China, which was also the political leader's home region.

The City of Vancouver commemorated the revolution on Friday with a ceremony outside city hall. Mayor Gregor Robertson read a proclamation and the flag of the Chinese Freemasons - the group that gave Sun refuge in Vancouver - was raised. The dissident physician is credited with financing and spearheading the revolution after several previous uprisings failed.

The centennial will also be celebrated on Tuesday with a Chinese music and dance event at the Centre for the Performing Arts in Vancouver.

Sun argued that the conservative and corrupt Qing dynasty (1644-1911) was incapable of transforming China and bringing it into the modern age.

His theme struck a chord among the thousands of Chinese immigrants in B.C. who believed a stronger China could also help their own community struggle against racist anti-Chinese laws in Canada, said University of B.C. historian Henry Yu. But their revolutionary enthusiasm went beyond selfinterest, he added.

"These were people who had travelled and seen other ways of doing things. They'd been exposed to different things and wanted a more egalitarian country back home."

Yu compared the support given Sun by Chinese migrants in B.C. to the backing given by Irish Americans to nationalist movements in Ireland.

The UBC professor said that overseas Chinese, including those in Vancouver, are proud of the link between earlier generations of Chinese migrants to B.C. and Sun's struggle.

Yu recalled that while growing up in Canada, his parents told him that if he was ever bullied by other kids for being Chinese, to remember that his family came from the same county in Guangdong province as the revered Sun. The rebel leader came from Heungsan County, one of eight counties in Guangdong, the home province of almost every Chinese immigrant to North America at that time.

"At the time, it seemed like cold comfort, but I remember thinking that my relatives must have somehow thought it useful advice," said Yu. "It turns out, of course, that they knew something quite interesting about the relationship between the rise of modern China and the role of the overseas Chinese."

Yu said that Chinese communities in Southeast Asia and in North America helped fund the revolt against the Qing dynasty and provided refuge for Sun and other nationalist revolutionaries. Yu said the migrants from Guangdong province living abroad "fuelled a particular anti-Qing ethnic sensibility that created a foundation for nationalism, but also for imagining a better way of being Chinese."

The role that overseas Chinese played during the 1911 Revolution was so significant that Sun himself recognized "Overseas Chinese as the Mother of the Revolution."

Vancouver Coun. George Chow said the pride felt by local Chinese-Canadians in what is known as the Xinhai Revolution "is reflected in the way the community came together in the '70s to build the Chinese gardens in Chinatown that is named after Dr. Sun Yat-sen."

Sun was supported in Vancouver by the Chinese Freemasons, or Chee Kun Tong, a traditional fraternal organization that began in China.

The Freemasons also published the Chinese Times in Vancouver, which whipped up revolutionary sentiment among Chinese people in B.C. The Freemasons mortgaged their buildings to raise funds for Sun's movement, and the nationalist leader lived for a time at the Freemasons building at 5 West Pender in Chinatown.

Sun delivered many lectures to packed houses across the street at the Sing Kew Chinese Theatre in Shanghai Alley. The physician received over $35,000 from the Canadian Chinese community for his revolution.

Sun wasn't involved in the Oct. 10, 1911, military uprising that eventually toppled imperial rule. But his pivotal leadership role in the anti-monarchy movement was recognized a few months later when he was elected president of the Chinese republic.

For Yu, the centennial of the uprising is a reminder that Vancouver's Chinese community wasn't at "the margins of the 1911 Revolution and the new China, but at its centre."

dward@vancouversun.com



Read more: http://www.vancouversun.com/life/Cit...#ixzz1WuWg7SVn
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Old September 3rd, 2011, 11:07 PM   #2
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Originally Posted by Yellow Fever View Post
I remember there is a thread like that some where here but I couldn't find it.]
Here


http://www.skyscrapercity.com/showthread.php?t=747598
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Old September 4th, 2011, 02:39 AM   #3
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Thanks!

For some reasons girls are always on the top of everything!
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Old September 4th, 2011, 03:16 AM   #4
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LOLOL
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Old September 4th, 2011, 04:36 AM   #5
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forget to post this this morning. He and my great grand parents were from the same hometown.




http://www.vancouversun.com/years+la...013/story.html
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Old September 4th, 2011, 05:02 AM   #6
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Wow he might be related to you.
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Old September 4th, 2011, 05:28 AM   #7
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If you look carefully, don't you think we are kinda look alike? We have the same noses and moustaches!
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Old September 4th, 2011, 05:49 AM   #8
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It really does, but he doesn't have a zappa. -.-

When you mean by hometown, you same "city" or same town/village, cuz if its latter, then you might be related to him somehow. Town and Village folks tend to marry each other rather outsiders.

Topic: Oversea Chinese should be proud that current China is making processes but at the same time, they should support for more reforms in the government.
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Old September 4th, 2011, 06:01 AM   #9
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They were from the small region called Chung San and they spoke the same chungsanese dialect.
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Old September 15th, 2011, 06:32 AM   #10
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Yuen inspires a nation to play hockey

Young player has following in Hong Kong, China

By Jim Jamieson, The Province September 14, 2011



The Vancouver born and raised defenceman had obviously distinguished himself as a special hockey player just being drafted 119th overall.

But for anyone of Chinese ethnicity it's just a little more special.

Yuen, 18, is the first Chinese blueliner to be drafted into the league and, according to the NHL, would, if he gets to the big league, become one of the rare few to make it all the way to the top. Larry Kwong, a resident of Vernon, was the first Chinese Canadian to play in the NHL, when he got into one game for the New York Rangers in the 1947-48 season.

"There really hasn't been any full Chinese-Canadians playing at such a high level and I hope I can be a role model and inspire other kids to pursue hockey," the 5-foot-11, 196-pound Yuen said Tuesday, before his Jets prospects team took on Edmonton.

Yuen sees a day when more players of Chinese descent are playing in the NHL.

"There's language barrier for sure," he said. "There isn't much hockey in China, although it's starting to develop there. When people immigrate over here, they don't know what hockey is. It's hard to get immersed in it because it's all in English. But right now I think it's really starting to grow.

"You see the Canucks have a huge Asian fan base and lots of Asians are starting to play hockey."

If anyone has a chance to achieve his hockey goal - and be an excellent role model - it's Yuen. He graduated with honours from Vancouver private school St. George's and is a classically trained pianist, earning a diploma from the prestigious London College of Music at 13.

Clearly, attention to detail and focus are not issues with Yuen.

"You want your kids to pick up something and want to do well," said Zach's father, Charles, who's here for the prospects tournament.

"We never pushed hockey on Zach - he played soccer and lacrosse, too - but he always loved hockey."

Charles emigrated from Hong Kong at 13 with his family in 1978. There, he met his wife, Mary, who was born in Vancouver after her parents came from Hong Kong in the late 1950s.

Charles, who's done some colour commentary in Cantonese for the 2010 Olympic hockey tournament and the Vancouver Whitecaps for Omni TV, said hockey was unknown in Asia, but that's all changed now with digital media almost everywhere.

"Now there are about 400 playing hockey in Hong Kong," said Charles. "In Hong Kong and China a lot of people follow him. This is the best league in the world so a lot of people are really excited about it."

Zach was thrilled to hear his celebrity is raising hockey's profile in China.

"I just heard it through my dad," said Zach, a mobile two-way D-man who's played two seasons with the WHL's Tri-City Americans. "Apparently, there's some discussion on the blogs in China. That's pretty neat that they are following it so closely."

From an early age, Charles took Zach and older daughter Montana to public skating. Both kids also took figure skating along with piano lessons.

Zach was on skates at 20 months, playing hockey at four - the age he started piano - and by age nine had left Vancouver Minor for the North Shore Winter Club program.

So does piano still fit in Zach's busy life? Apparently, he's instructing two youngsters in Kennewick, Wash., where he plays junior. But there's more to it than that.

"With piano, you've got to be really disciplined, sitting there for two hours practising," he said. "I think that's recently translated in general into my life, through to hockey. It's really helped my game out. Even with puck handling.

"In piano, it's all in the fingers and the wrists, so no doubt it helped me there."



Read more: http://www.theprovince.com/sports/Yu...#ixzz1XzZpEOUV
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Old September 17th, 2011, 01:25 AM   #11
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Yellow Fever View Post
If you look carefully, don't you think we are kinda look alike? We have the same noses and moustaches!
Well, if you are related then you have a relative with a top private school named after him in Panama. Seems to be made up of mostly non-Chinese Panamanians. Panamas Chinese population is close to 10%. Some say up to 1/3 of the entire population might have some Chinese.

Its called "El Centro Cultural Chino Panameño - Instituto Sun-Yatsen".

"Chinese Panamanian Cultural Center - Institute Sun-Yatsen".



This will take you to the schools site. http://www.ccchp-isys.edu.pa/
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Old September 17th, 2011, 04:37 AM   #12
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cool! I don't think we are closely related, but we could come from the same ancestors hundred years ago!
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Old October 15th, 2011, 07:23 AM   #13
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China comes to Richmond


By Douglas Todd, Vancouver Sun
October 14, 2011 8:05 PM



Chinese signs dominate the Richmond Night market. There is no law in Richmond requiring English to be given equal status, or that English signs be displayed at all.





Jeremy Lau sometimes wishes familial duty didn’t compel him to live in central Richmond.

“I’d like a more typical North American city and lifestyle, with not so many Chinese people,” said Lau, who came to Canada from Hong Kong in 1993. “When you immigrate to a new country, you don’t want to experience just what you’re used to. You want a new adventure.”

So why does Lau, who works in the high-tech industry, remain in the heart of the largest, highly concentrated, ethnic Chinese enclave in Canada?

To support his parents-in-law, who live with Lau and his wife. They don’t speak English or own a car. Like many recent and elderly immigrants, Lau’s in-laws feel more comfortable in Chinese surroundings.

It’s arguable that no major city in Canada has changed more rapidly because of Asian immigration than Richmond — an island of farmland, subdivisions, Asian malls, apartment towers and English-language signs promoting eateries such as “Shanghai Wonderful Restaurant.”

More than 60 per cent of Richmond’s mostly well-off 200,000 residents are immigrants, among the highest rate of any major city in Canada.

When he was interviewed, Lau was having his hair cut in a salon across the street from Richmond City Hall, which is located on No. 3 Road just west of what could be the most densely ethnic Chinese neighbourhood in North America.

This commercial section of Richmond includes part of the region known as “The Golden Village,” an array of glittering high-end Chinese-themed malls and hotels, including the Aberdeen Centre, President’s Plaza, Parker Place and Yaohan complex.

According to the Canadian census, an astonishing 80 per cent of the residents in the rectangle of highrises, low-rises and retail outlets east of No. 3 Road, between Landsdowne and Blundell, are ethnic Chinese.No neighbourhood in Metro Vancouver appears as dominated by one ethnic group as this urban Chinese enclave east of No. 3 Road. The only region of Metro that is almost as concentrated along ethnic lines is the west Newton area of north Surrey.

But this buzzing census-tract neighbourhood, where four out of five residents are ethnic Chinese (mostly from China) does not stand alone in Richmond, a relatively affluent suburb that is home to Vancouver International Airport and its scores of daily flights to and from Asia.

There are two more large, high-density ethnic Chinese enclaves to the east and west of this No. 3 Road neighbourhood. These are residential zones where more than two-thirds of inhabitants are Chinese.

One is a subdivision of large, mostly new pastel mini-mansions fronted by gated driveways between No. 2 Road and Gilbert, bordered by Granville and Blundell. The other is a more modest neighbourhood west of Garden City Road and south of Westminster Highway.

Indeed, in a wide four-kilometre radius of Richmond City Hall, the proportion of residents who are ethnic Chinese averages about 50 per cent.

For his part, Lau says his in-laws feel more comfortable in such a familiar Chinese environment. “They’re restricted in where they live. They don’t communicate that well. When people ask them questions in English, they don’t understand,” said Lau, 47.

It’s a similar case for many ethnic Chinese immigrants from Hong Kong, Taiwan and China who struggle with English. Their expressed sense of comfort and security in this ethnic enclave seems to bear out University of Victoria scholar Zheng Wu’s thesis that new immigrants to Canada feel “protected” in enclaves.

But he also found people in ethnic enclaves feel less sense of belonging to their new country. Wu’s position dovetails with that of famed Harvard sociologist Robert Putnam, whose extensive U.S. studies found enclaves often contribute to distrust among residents.

Jessica Kuo, a 31-year-old dentist in central Richmond, shares Lau’s desire that the city somehow find a more multicultural mix. But she still likes it.

“It’s very comfortable, very safe and affordable,” said Kuo, who emigrated from Taiwan to Canada when she was a youngster. She appreciates the clean air of Richmond, especially compared with polluted Taiwan.

And Chinese supermarkets, shops and restaurants are inexpensive in Richmond, Kuo said, because “the competition is fierce.” She also thinks the high proportion of Mandarin speakers may help her young child learn the language, in addition to English.

Kuo and Lau both commented on how immigrants to Richmond from China in the past decade are not particularly outgoing or friendly. Lau said many Chinese immigrants “tend to not want to expose too much of themselves.”

And Kuo said it took a long time for her to get used to how wary immigrants from China are often as polite as those who grow up in Metro Vancouver. “It’s just a different style of communication.”

Despite the social shyness and even distrust that Lau and Kuo experience from many new immigrants to Richmond, both said there is a great deal in the community to make an ethnic Chinese person feel they’re back in their homeland.

There are scores of Chinese-language restaurants, supermarkets, shops, acupuncture centres, real estate offices, giant Buddhist temples, martial arts outlets and Chinese malls and hotels. The roaring outdoor Summer Market on the Fraser River — which explodes each season with exciting Asian music, food and shopping — has become a vibrant symbol of the city’s Chinese-oriented culture.Laurence Tom, who was born in B.C. and lives in south Delta, sometimes drives to Richmond to shop. But even though his father was from China, Tom said he usually feels “like a fish out of water” among all the Chinese people in Richmond.

There’s too much “hustle and bustle,” Tom said. And since most recent Chinese immigrants speak Mandarin, he can’t communicate with them. He knows only a Cantonese dialect, so he generally stays away.

However, K.S. Cho, the owner of Tae Kwon Do College, across the street from city hall, is committed to working with the population. He moved to Richmond almost a decade ago to try to instil deeper Asian values and philosophy in the city’s mostly Chinese residents.

Even though Cho says he’s making slow headway in converting Richmond residents to martial arts philosophy, he offers 25 tae kwan do classes a week, mostly to Chinese youngsters.

The signs in the tae kwon do master’s storefront on No. 3 Road promise students that they will learn self-protection, release their inner “energy,” “over-rule fear” and develop a “powerful confident mind.”

Instead of worrying about “winning and losing” in the martial arts or life itself, Cho says he’s on a mission to instil more “divine” and “humane” values among his tae kwon do students in Richmond and beyond.Even with its large proportion of ethnic Chinese, Richmond is by no means alone in being a stronghold. Throughout Metro Vancouver, one out of five residents have Chinese origins.

Mainland China is now B.C.’s top immigrant source country, and the vast majority of the province’s newcomers settle in Metro Vancouver. Chinese immigrants are cited for raising real estate prices in many urban neighbourhoods, including Richmond.

In addition to Richmond, online maps created by The Vancouver Sun, based on Census data, show that Chinese people from China, Hong Kong and Taiwan have formed many more enclaves in Metro Vancouver.

For example, ethnic Chinese make up roughly 40 per cent of the population of most of southeast Vancouver. Ethnic Chinese are also focused in south Vancouver around Granville and 49th, in central Burnaby around Kensington and Halifax streets and in pockets of northern Coquitlam.

That said, Richmond remains the most striking bastion of Chinese culture — a place where scores of Chinese-language signs on restaurants and shops are often bigger than the same outlet’s English-language sign.

Many of those large Chinese signs are on No. 3 Road, directly across the street from Richmond’s stylish city hall, with its airy, contemporary West Coast-style, architecture.

The lack of prominent English-language signs on the shops next to city hall represents the kind of symbolic issue that might set off cultural-protection alarms in a more nationalistic place, like Quebec.

In La Belle Province, language laws dictate that all commercial and social outlets must display their names more prominently in French than in English. Battles have raged in that province over English-language signs being oversized by a few centimetres.

But there is no similar sign law in Richmond, nothing insisting English remain in the city’s visual forefront. Or that English be displayed at all.

Since there has been resistance to protecting the English language in Richmond, commercial outlets in the city can post signs with only Chinese characters, if they so desire.

Richmond communications officer Ted Townsend said the city’s “intercultural advisory committee” a few years ago put the issue of language on signs on their proposed 10-year work program.

“I believe their position was that there should be a requirement for English on all signs,” Townsend said. “It caused a bit of furore at the time and was generally seen as overkill. It hasn’t come back as an issue and I think the committee may have decided to leave it alone.”



Read more: http://www.vancouversun.com/news/Map...#ixzz1ap6wnR5T
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Old January 10th, 2012, 05:32 AM   #14
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New federal immigration rules exploited by Chinese fraudsters: documents



Federal anti-fraud unit finds 22 per cent of Chinese applicants misrepresented credentials



By Peter O'Neil, Vancouver Sun January 9, 2012 8:01 PM


OTTAWA — New federal immigration rules passed in 2008 to make the system more streamlined and "responsive" to Canadian economic needs were exploited by Chinese fraudsters, according to newly released internal documents.


The Conservative government quickly confirmed that the documents, obtained by immigration lawyer Richard Kurland, reflect an ongoing problem that needs to be tackled.


An official acknowledged concerns with bogus applications, particularly those relating to the arranged offer of employment (AEO) program.


"We are aware of this issue and are concerned," said Candice Malcolm, spokeswoman for Immigration Minister Jason Kenney.


"That is why we are currently reviewing options to strengthen the AEO process to prevent this fraud from taking place in the future."


She added that the Harper government has "done more than any government in Canadian history to crack down on all types of immigration fraud and strengthen the integrity of Canadian citizenship."


The documents underline a problem that is of particular concern to B.C., since close to a third of permanent residents allowed into Canada are from China.


Kurland said the documents show that understaffed Canadian missions in certain countries aren't able to contain the pressure from applicants who misrepresent themselves.


"It's China, it's Pakistan, it's Africa, and it's because some countries of the world do not have western democratic institutions issuing reliable paperwork. It's that simple," said Kurland, who obtained the documents through the Access to Information Act.


Canadian officials have "opened their eyes and they see the problem. The question is, what are they going to do about it, if anything?".....

Read more: http://www.vancouversun.com/business...#ixzz1j1iCJEOI
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Old January 10th, 2012, 07:08 AM   #15
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I read the top article.. there it mention Chinese Freemason. Never heard Chinese Freemason. The Freemason and Illuminati are western secret society who govern the western countries.

And woah look at Richmond become more chinese or asians! Wonder how many percent of Richmond population are asians?
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Old January 11th, 2012, 09:52 AM   #16
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According to Wikipedia, Richmond's population as of January 2011 was 196,858. It is the fourth largest city in British Columbia, after Vancouver (642,843), Surrey (462,345) and Burnaby (227,389).
Richmond has an immigrant population of 60%, the highest in Canada. More than half of its population is of Asian descent, many of whom immigrated in the early 1990s, mostly from Hong Kong, Taiwan, and Mainland China. Other Asian Canadians in Richmond include Indo-Canadians, Filipino Canadians and Japanese Canadians.
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Old January 14th, 2012, 06:26 PM   #17
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連任成功 綠營承認失敗 馬英九狂勝
[2012-01-14]Share



本報記者報道

國民黨總統候選人馬英九14日在大選中,以超過78萬票差距,贏得連任。馬英九當地時間周六夜間發表勝選演說,表示今次也是人民的勝利,民眾選擇了和平及反貪腐。但就提醒民眾,要像上屆他大選勝利後所說的,「大家商興一晚就好了」。他並承諾會為打造可持續的未來,以及和平和諧環境,實現台灣夢,繼續努力。
三位候選人蔡英文、馬英九和宋楚瑜,當天上午到所屬選區投票,一派輕鬆。當局動員逾6萬警員,確保選舉順利舉行。而蔡英文在14日深夜已承認敗選,並辭去黨主席職位,同時祝賀馬英九當選。
台灣大選投票於14日下午4時結束,進行點票。藍綠雙方局勢漸趨明朗,目前點算超過1,000萬票,馬吳配已經超過600萬票,總統馬英九得票穩定領先民進黨主席蔡英文,國民黨名譽主席吳伯雄宣布國民黨勝選,強調是大家團結的結果。
吳伯雄宣布小馬勝選
國民黨榮譽主席連戰,感謝台灣民眾再一次將台灣的領導權,交給國民黨,未來四年會以更謙虛、更積極及更認真態度衝刺,完成對民眾的承諾。
爭取連任的馬英九總統,原定晚上7時抵達國民黨總部,提前在下午5時前抵。晚上會舉行「開票晚會」,站台發表講話。
馬英九夫人周美青面帶笑容現身馬吳競選總部,同馬英九一共觀看開票情況。國民黨榮譽主席連戰、吳伯雄、副總統蕭萬長、北市長郝龍斌、新北市長朱立倫到競選總部,在場支持者歡欣鼓舞,一起在總部同歡。
台灣海基會董事長江炳坤在「開票晚會」致辭說,馬英九勝利在望,他引述馬英九說,連任後會繼續推動兩岸關係,維護兩岸和平。
根據台灣傳媒顯示,目前已點算的超過1,100萬票,馬英九得票接近五成二,蔡英文得票超過四成五,馬英九領先約5.8個百分點,超過78萬票,宋楚瑜贏得約2.8%的票數。
立委選舉方面,國民黨在49席領先,民進黨則領先26席,親民黨一席。
對小英選情差感意外
總統票數方面,點票開始時,雙英互有領先;開票一個小時後,馬英九已經拋離蔡英文,親民黨統候選人宋楚瑜,排在第三名。親綠的台灣傳媒也承認,國民黨馬英九領先,超出英嘉配將近70萬票。
謝長廷在親綠的三立電視台節目說,他感到很意外。謝長廷認為,澎湖是台灣大選的指標,馬英九應該可以贏蔡英文70萬票。
綠委蔡煌瑯在看到蔡英文選情那麼差,感到很意外,他不敢相信馬英九執政滿意度那麼差,竟然贏那麼多。
不過,台灣傳媒稱,雙英在該贏的地方沒有大贏,該輸的地方沒有大輸,選情超想象。傳媒稱,雖然蔡英文在雲嘉南持續領先,但是領先不夠補足在北台灣的損失。
台灣中央選舉委員會公告,總統副總統選舉的選舉人數為1808萬6,455人,相較人數增加76萬4,833人。2012年總統大選及立委選舉,僑胞申請返台投票為4,672人,創歷次總統大選新低,統計1996年首次總統直選,有7,356名僑胞申請返台投票,2000年大選時有8,636人,2004年1萬1,364人,2008年總統大選則是9,132人。
周美青攜兩女投票
馬英九當天表示,天氣非常好,希望大家都踴躍前往投票。馬英九沒有回答記者有關兩岸政策的提問,表示會在開票後再作答覆。
馬英九特意身穿一身深藍色西裝,在接受媒體訪問時候聲音略帶沙啞,他說,13日晚休息的很好,夫人周美青的身體也好。
馬家分三批前往投票,除了馬英九之外,周美青稍後會帶兩個女兒前往投票,馬英九的母親則是由馬英九的姊姊們陪往投票。
蔡英文14日上午前往永和投下一票。她表示心情很好,對選情有信心。蔡英文表示,對於當上第一位女總統已經有了心理準備。至於選後第一件要做的是,蔡英文表示,要和媽媽吃個飯。
親民黨總統候選人宋楚瑜當天上午前往投票,希望民眾冷靜平和的投下一票,他對選舉結果有信心,競選期間,他傾聽了許多聲音,尤其是在花蓮,更是讓他感觸良多。
最高檢要求全體檢、警、調機關加強查察,全力防止金錢、暴力介入選舉,並要求各地檢署檢察官進駐警分局坐鎮。

http://news.singtao.ca/vancouver/201...5d3647492.html
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Old January 22nd, 2012, 02:38 AM   #18
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Will China's rise shape Malaysian Chinese community?

By Jennifer Pak
BBC News, Penang

In Malaysia's northern state of Penang, a distinct shift is being felt in the immigrant Chinese community, as it rides the wave of China's economic rise.

The Leong San Tong Khoo Kongsi, one of the richest clan associations, used to send money back to their ancestral home in Fujian province, China.

But that is changing as places like Sin Aun, a fishing village that the clan members' families hail from, are now bustling and have no need for money sent from overseas.

"In the past, overseas Chinese were seen as more wealthy but now the Chinese from China are even richer than us," says the clan association's Khoo Boo Hong.

Indeed, Chinese money is becoming more visible in Penang. A bridge that is currently under construction is being partly financed by a cheap loan from the Chinese government. The 4.5bn Malaysian ringgit (US$1.4bn) project is set to be the longest bridge in South East Asia, stretching 24km (15 miles).

In 2010, Malaysia was one of China's biggest trading partners from South East Asia. Two-way trade hit 147bn Malaysian ringgit (US$46.3bn) last year, with a push to more than double that amount by 2015.

'Special relationship'
Much of the trade has been established by the Chinese Malaysian community, says Oh Ei Sun, the former political secretary on Chinese affairs to Prime Minister Najib Razak.

Malaysia was the first South East Asian country to form diplomatic ties with China in 1974.

As a result the two countries have a special relationship, and the Chinese in Malaysia have tried to exploit this kinship by developing business ties with China, says Mr Oh.

The Chinese began arriving on Malaysian shores in the early 15th Century. Today, they make up 24% of a population of 28 million, and have always been more prosperous than other ethnic communities. According to a 2011 Forbes magazine list, eight out of the top 10 richest Malaysians are ethnic Chinese.

This wealth imbalance has fuelled long-standing resentment among the Malay majority. It erupted into deadly race riots in 1969 - violence that two years later led the government to implement an affirmative action plan called the New Economic Policy.

This gave ethnic Malays and indigenous groups privileges over the Chinese and Indians, such as cheaper housing, priority in university scholarships and civil service jobs. The policy officially ended in 1990 but it has been succeeded by similar plans.

"The quota system is still in place on so many levels," says Teo Nie Ching, a lawmaker from the opposition Democratic Action Party. This limits job prospects for Malaysian Chinese in certain businesses, including listed companies, she says.

"After so many generations [the Chinese] still feel that we are second class citizens," Ms Teo says.

Analysts say this sense of alienation has made many Malaysian Chinese look for opportunities elsewhere, including China.

Speaking the language
As the Chinese economy opens up, Malaysian Chinese act as a bridge because many are educated in the United States or Britain but they can also understand the Chinese language and culture, says Lim Cheah Chooi.

His engineering firm, Unimech Group Berhad, has production factories in China, but he employs Malaysian or Singaporean Chinese at the middle management level.

This is something you see even among local Chinese companies who export to the West, says Mr Lim.

"How many people can say they speak Mandarin, multiple Chinese dialects, Malay and English? Most Malaysian Chinese can," he says.

This advantage is maintained because of Malaysia's multilingual education system. Ethnic Chinese and Indians can choose to study at the primary level in their mother tongue.

With the rise of China, more and more people, including non-Chinese, want to learn Mandarin, says Yong Yeow Khoon, CEO of the Chinese-language newspaper Guang Ming Daily in Penang, who is also a board member at an independent Chinese school.

The number of non-Chinese in Chinese vernacular schools is estimated to have grown to over 60,000 over the last three decades.

Even the Malay prime minister has sent his son to learn Mandarin at the Beijing Foreign Studies University.

Optimists point to this as a sign of increasing acceptance of Chinese culture by the Malay community. But some say this is wishful thinking.

Attitude change?
Although the government has been pushing for national unity through the 1Malaysia slogan, analysts interviewed by the BBC do not believe that there is a fundamental change in attitude towards the Malaysian Chinese.

Economist Cheong Kee Cheok, who used to work for the World Bank, says some Malays do not distinguish between the Chinese from China and the ones from Malaysia.

"Malaysia in some ways is hostage to its own politics," says Mr Cheong.

He also says that Malaysia needs to be more aggressive in accessing the Chinese market. It may have had a head start in China, but "unfortunately...never used this advantage".

He believes much more can be done to facilitate relations between the two countries. At the moment most businesses who get into China are through the individual efforts of Malaysian Chinese businessmen, he says.

He says Malaysian leaders are not serious about China's rise.

The latest visit from Chinese premier Wen Jiabao in April could lend credence to this theory.

Malaysian blogs were filled with complaints about the grammatical mistakes on the welcome banner put up for Mr Wen in Chinese, suspected to be roughly translated from Malay.

Interpretations vary but the Chinese banner read: "Official welcoming ceremony, with him together his Excellency Wen Jiabao official interview Malaysia."

Many comments on Lowyat.net forum said that was shameful, given that ethnic Chinese people form the second-largest population in this multi-racial country.

"What do you expect? No Chinese working in government," wrote automan5891.

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-asia-16284388
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Old February 21st, 2012, 03:42 AM   #19
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Obituary: Businessman Alex Louie helped win the vote for Chinese-Canadians



y MIA STAINSBY, Vancouver Sun February 20, 2012 5:30 PM




Alex Louie, a Vancouver businessman and a veteran who made a difference in this city and country, died Saturday of heart failure. He was 86.

Louie might be best known to Vancouverites as one of the trio of brothers who ran the Marco Polo Supper Club from the 1960s to the early 1980s. The Marco Polo, the first Chinese smorgasbord restaurant and night club in Vancouver’s Chinatown, featured big acts for the time, including Mitzi Gaynor, The Fifth Dimension, Linda Ronstadt, Bill Haley and the Comets and comedian Pat Paulsen.

He and brothers Victor and Henry were also pioneers of the Asian food import business with Le Kiu Asian Foods. Louie was a grandson of H.Y. (Hok Yat) Louie, whose descendants have grown what began as a general store in Chinatown, into the H.Y. Louie Co., the second largest B.C. company which includes London Drugs and the IGA food chain.

Louie was most proud of the role he played in helping to win the franchise for Chinese-Canadians. During the Second World War, he was trained as a Morse code operator to serve on Force 136, an elite British operation that assisted resistance movements in enemy-occupied territories in Southeast Asia. Chinese-Canadians soldiers were recruited to blend into the population for covert operations behind enemy lines. Previously, Chinese-Canadians had been prevented from serving in the Canadian military.

Louie enlisted and trained, knowing he had an 80-per-cent chance of not returning home, but the war ended before he was dispatched behind enemy lines. Force 136 was portrayed in the 1957 movie, Bridge Over the River Kwai. The Chinese-Canadian soldiers’ wartime contribution resulted in them receiving the right to vote in 1949.......


Read more: http://www.vancouversun.com/Obituary...#ixzz1myqSxUEt
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Old February 22nd, 2012, 12:15 AM   #20
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So London Drugs and IGA Food is owned by Canadian Borned Chinese? I just know that.
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