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Old November 29th, 2011, 12:03 AM   #1
kitayabi
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Sudan says halted South Sudan govt oil exports

Exports halted until a deal on transit fees -minister

* International firms allowed to keep exporting their shares

* Oil is the lifeblood of both countries' economies (Adds analyst comment)

By Alexander Dziadosz and Hereward Holland

KHARTOUM/JUBA, Nov 28 (Reuters) - Sudan said on Monday it had halted landlocked South Sudan's oil exports until the two agree on a transit fee, stepping up a row between the former civil war foes over how to untangle their once-integrated oil industries.

South Sudan seceded on July 9, taking about three-quarters of the formerly united country's roughly 500,000 barrels per day (bpd) of oil production - the lifeblood of both economies.

The new nation still relies on a pipeline running north through Sudan to a Red Sea port to export crude, but the two sides have not agreed how much South Sudan should pay to send its oil through Sudan.

Officials decided to stop the government of South Sudan's oil exports - roughly 200,000 bpd - on Nov. 17, Ali Ahmed Osman, Sudan's acting oil minister, told reporters, adding the pipeline was still running and international firms would not be affected.

"We stopped exportation of the southern oil. We gave them four months free, without any sort of agreement," he said, adding Sudan would not resume the exports until the two sides reached an agreement over the transit fee.

South Sudan has been selling about 200,000 bpd of oil since it declared independence, according to figures provided by the country's petroleum ministry last week.
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Old November 29th, 2011, 12:04 AM   #2
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the government are foolish not to have made this decision sooner, but better later than never.
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Old November 29th, 2011, 01:17 AM   #3
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Wonder why the Sudan government is shooting itself on it's feet - What a golden opportunity, It would be wise if they softened their stance(& I believe they will in due course) as there are very many suitors out there who are just looking to pounce on such opportunities.
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Old November 29th, 2011, 01:49 AM   #4
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Kisumu Ndogo View Post
Wonder why the Sudan government is shooting itself on it's feet - What a golden opportunity, It would be wise if they softened their stance(& I believe they will in due course) as there are very many suitors out there who are just looking to pounce on such opportunities.
South Sudan has not paid a single dollar of transit fees to Sudan and in way of gratitude its been using the revenues it gets from the oil Sudan allows it to transport through its territory to fund conflict in Sudan as well as illegally seizing the assets of Sudanese companies that work in the south.
Sudan will allow the South to export through its territory when its starts paying for the privilege.

What opportunity? South Sudan's oil production is set to plummet by 2016 as oil wells become depleted. A new pipeline if it is agreed today will not be ready until 2015, no company is going to finance a $5 billion pipeline for one years worth of good production and even if they do South Sudan would still be dependant on Sudan up until then. Unless that is the South finds a way of surviving with out 98% of its revenues until a pipeline is built to Lamu(a port that as of yet has not beeen built).
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Old November 29th, 2011, 04:45 AM   #5
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kitayabi View Post
South Sudan has not paid a single dollar of transit fees to Sudan and in way of gratitude its been using the revenues it gets from the oil Sudan allows it to transport through its territory to fund conflict in Sudan as well as illegally seizing the assets of Sudanese companies that work in the south.
Sudan will allow the South to export through its territory when its starts paying for the privilege.

What opportunity? South Sudan's oil production is set to plummet by 2016 as oil wells become depleted. A new pipeline if it is agreed today will not be ready until 2015, no company is going to finance a $5 billion pipeline for one years worth of good production and even if they do South Sudan would still be dependant on Sudan up until then. Unless that is the South finds a way of surviving with out 98% of its revenues until a pipeline is built to Lamu(a port that as of yet has not beeen built).
Unless of cause the Sudan government knows something that many of us do not already, oil resources aside you have to acknowledge that Sudan(South) is now a sovereign state and as such they are entitled to decide their discourse(economic and international relations) in all fairness moving forward.

I believe most investors are just waiting for some form of political stability and control by the GOSS, including the setting up of some basic critical infrastructures and laws, many others are also watching Bashir's candor under the new dispensation, but again this will not deter nations like China, Kenya and Uganda from exploring this virgin territory with all the opportunities at hand.
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Old November 29th, 2011, 09:58 AM   #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Kisumu Ndogo View Post
Unless of cause the Sudan government knows something that many of us do not already, oil resources aside you have to acknowledge that Sudan(South) is now a sovereign state and as such they are entitled to decide their discourse(economic and international relations) in all fairness moving forward.
South Sudan is sovereign as are we if they want to use are sovereign territory, they have to pay the price we ask, if they believe its in their interest to build an alternative pipeline we won't stop them.
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Old November 29th, 2011, 10:35 AM   #7
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Looks like we're having another Ethiopia-Eritrea in the making.

Quote:
Originally Posted by kitayabi View Post
South Sudan is sovereign as are we if they want to use are sovereign territory, they have to pay the price we ask, if they believe its in their interest to build an alternative pipeline we won't stop them.
How much is Sudan asking for the transit fees?
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Old November 29th, 2011, 12:55 PM   #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ras Siyan View Post
Looks like we're having another Ethiopia-Eritrea in the making.



How much is Sudan asking for the transit fees?
Sudan has been allowing the South to export for free until an agreement is reached, but the South has refused to pay anything saying it is owed arrears from the oil sharing period.
so if the south has made it clear that they won't pay why would Sudan bother to export their fuel for them
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Old November 29th, 2011, 02:28 PM   #9
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South Sudan's oil minister said would pay a "transit fee which would not be more than $0.75 per barrel."

The South's arrogance is laughable, South Sudan is refusing to offer more than $0.75 a barrel when oil prices are $110. We can make do with out that $0.75 but can South Sudan make do with out 98% of its entire revenues lets see who cracks first.
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Old November 29th, 2011, 04:34 PM   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ras Siyan View Post
Looks like we're having another Ethiopia-Eritrea in the making.



How much is Sudan asking for the transit fees?
They're demanding $32/barrel.....Good luck to them.
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Old November 29th, 2011, 04:40 PM   #11
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kitayabi View Post
South Sudan's oil minister said would pay a "transit fee which would not be more than $0.75 per barrel."

The South's arrogance is laughable, South Sudan is refusing to offer more than $0.75 a barrel when oil prices are $110. We can make do with out that $0.75 but can South Sudan make do with out 98% of its entire revenues lets see who cracks first.
I doubt you would have resorted to intimidation tactics if oil money wasn't that important to you.....Just saying.
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Old November 29th, 2011, 05:14 PM   #12
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Originally Posted by chiefayic2 View Post
I doubt you would have resorted to intimidation tactics if oil money wasn't that important to you.....Just saying.

if the prospect of the South's economy collapsing due to the loss of 98% of its revenues intimidates you then it should, but Sudan isn't going to export the South's oil for it for comical amounts. If the South wants to use our sovereign infrastructure it has to pay an amount we deem acceptable.

Last edited by kitayabi; November 29th, 2011 at 05:23 PM.
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Old November 29th, 2011, 05:25 PM   #13
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kitayabi View Post
not saying it isn't but saying if $0.75 is what is on offer, we can do with out it and you can find another way of getting your oil to the market.
Dude, I wouldn't be whacking my tail yet, if I was you. Not that long ago, oil shipment was detained only to be released a short while afterward......without the so call "demands" being met, I must add.
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Old November 29th, 2011, 07:11 PM   #14
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Originally Posted by chiefayic2 View Post
Dude, I wouldn't be whacking my tail yet, if I was you. Not that long ago, oil shipment was detained only to be released a short while afterward......without the so call "demands" being met, I must add.
I agree with you Sudan has been far too lenient, the South was allowed to export for free while negotiations continued, therefore it was in the South's interest to not come to an agreement. Now the south won't be able to use our facilities until they meet their obligations.
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Old November 30th, 2011, 04:02 AM   #15
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South Sudan should pay a fee, after all they are utilizing Sudan's ports. However, that fee shouldn't be anything outrageous or pitiful such as $0.75/barrel. Both countries need to act in a respectable, professional manner to get the matter resolved so that in the medium-term relations can be good until South Sudan can export its oil & other resources through Kenyan ports.
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Old November 30th, 2011, 04:34 PM   #16
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Say what? I thought so....
Quote:
Sudan Says It Hasn’t Stopped South Sudan’s Oil Exports

Sudan’s government said it hasn’t blocked South Sudan’s oil exports, contradicting a statement by its oil minister two days ago that shipments have been halted.

“The government of Sudan has not and will not stop or impede the flow and export of oil of the Republic of South Sudan through its territory and facilities,” Sabir al-Hassan, a spokesman for Sudan’s delegation at talks with South Sudanese officials in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia, told reporters today.

Sudanese Oil Minister Ali Ahmed Osman on Nov. 28 announced a blockade on South Sudan’s oil exports that pass through its pipelines and said it would be lifted only when the two countries agreed on payments for the shipments. They failed to reach a deal in African Union-backed talks this week, al-Hassan said, and negotiations will resume next month.

While South Sudan took control of about three-quarters of the former unified Sudan’s output of 490,000 barrels a day when it seceded on July 9, it relies on the north for access to an export terminal on the Red Sea.

Sudan rejected an offer by South Sudan of $5.4 billion compensation package for the loss of its oil fields, the south’s chief negotiator, Pagan Amum, told reporters in Addis Ababa. Sudanese authorities responded to the offer with “hostility and threats,” he said.
Pipeline Fees

“South Sudan insist they have the right to continue exporting oil through our facilities without paying charges,” al-Hassan said. “If we do not find an agreement on fees and charges, we are under obligation to take our dues.”

He also criticized Sudan Sudan’s seizure on Nov. 8 of stakes held by Sudan’s state oil company, Sudapet, in joint operations in the south with companies such as China National Petroleum Corp., Malaysia’s Petroliam Nasional Bhd. and India’s Oil & Natural Gas Corp. (ONGC)

“Their assets that were more than $2 billion dollars were confiscated by a presidential decree issued by the president of the Republic of South Sudan,” al-Hassan said.

Amum said that Sudan has kept revenue owed to the south for oil exports from May to July. Since a 2005 peace agreement that ended a two-decade civil war until South Sudan’s independence, the north and south split earnings from crude pumped in southern fields.

“The claim that they need us to pay them processing and transportation fees is not true because we are paying those to the companies,” Amum said. “We are paying the Chinese. What the north is talking about is extortion.”

China yesterday urged the two sides to reach agreement in negotiations.

“Maintaining normal production of oil is important to both South Sudan and Sudan,” Chinese Foreign Ministry spokesman Hong Lei told reporters in Beijing. “We hope North and South Sudan can stay rational, show restraint, and resolve relevant problems through neighborly pragmatism and friendly talks.”

To contact the reporter on this story: William Davison in Addis Ababa at wdavison3@bloomberg.net
Bloomberg
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Old December 1st, 2011, 11:12 AM   #17
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lol.. How about that.
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Old December 1st, 2011, 03:05 PM   #18
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well..this article Explain what happen..

ADDIS ABABA (Reuters) - Sudanese official denied on Wednesday that Sudan had halted oil exports from southern Sudan because of a dispute over transit fees, but said that the country seized shipments of crude compensation payments for claims that South Sudan by the debtor.

The minister said the oil in southern Sudan - the return from Addis Ababa where the talks broke down on the resolution of overlap between the two countries' oil industries - the shipment of at least one million-barrel oil from his country was still "stuck" in the port of Port Sudan on Wednesday.

The oil is very vital to the economy, but the two sides have yet to agree on the fees paid by the Republic of South Sudan for the carriage of oil, which issued from the port on the Red Sea via a pipeline within the territory of Sudan.
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Old December 1st, 2011, 03:08 PM   #19
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So Sudan takes his money...
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Old December 1st, 2011, 06:45 PM   #20
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Takes? More like steal...
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