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Old October 18th, 2011, 02:56 PM   #21
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Wonderful.
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Old October 18th, 2011, 09:48 PM   #22
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Surajkund Dam - built in the 8th Century by the Tomar king - Suraj Pal

Pictures copyright varunshiv


The holes have steps going down into the dam


a sluice gate:


The reservoir "kund' (view on google maps)

Last edited by IU; October 21st, 2011 at 03:16 AM.
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Old October 21st, 2011, 03:09 AM   #23
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Chor Minar - 13th century minar in Hauz Khas area. This was built during the Khilji dynasty.

view on google maps

From wiki:
According to local legends, it was a 'tower of beheading', where the severed heads of thieves were displayed on spear through its 225 holes, to act as a deterrent to thieves

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Copyright varunshiv
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Old October 21st, 2011, 08:20 PM   #24
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the last time l visited these sites was in 2007 & l do recall hearing that alot of these structures would be restored and promoted by the tourism board, has there been much progress on these? Especially Lodhi Garden tombs & Nizamuddin Area & Tughlaqabad fort & Purana Qila- any major improvements?
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Old October 22nd, 2011, 12:41 AM   #25
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^ Not that I know of. I did quick comparison on flickr and it looks like none of the places you mentioned have recently had restoration works performed on them.

The ASI is trying to remove the villagers living around the Tughlaqabad fort but that's about it.
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Old October 22nd, 2011, 01:07 AM   #26
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Now that you've mentioned Purana Qila, here are some glimpses. There's a lot more inside the fort that hasn't been shown. I'll cover those in the subsequent posts.

Purana Qila - built in the 1530's by Humayun

view on google maps

Copyright NChoudhary



Bara Darwaza (west gate):


Talaqi Darwaza (north gate):
Copyright varunshiv



Humayun Darwaza:



With the sound and light show that takes place in the evening:

Copyright anubhati_sharma




Copyright sanjay6502


The lake on the west side:
Copyright varunshiv


Copyright mark-vauxhall
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Old October 22nd, 2011, 08:56 PM   #27
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Sher Mandal - built by Sher Shah Suri in the 1540's, this was was his personal observatory. This is also where Humayun slipped and fell to his death.

view on google maps - inside Purana Qila

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Copyright Ramesh Lalwani
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Old October 22nd, 2011, 09:20 PM   #28
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Beautiful pics IU....high quality images...
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Old October 24th, 2011, 08:54 AM   #29
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Quote:
Originally Posted by IndiansUnite View Post
Sher Mandal - built by Sher Shah Suri in the 1540's, this was was his personal observatory. This is also where Humayun slipped and fell to his death.



Copyright Ramesh Lalwani
really nice!
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Old October 24th, 2011, 12:57 PM   #30
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Sahi hai Bhai. kush keeta jey
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Old October 24th, 2011, 11:53 PM   #31
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Cheers everyone

You guys must have heard of Rahim's dohe? He was a composer during Akbar's rule. Here's the guy's tomb, built in the late 1620's. It needs restoration work at the earliest.

Tomb of Abdul Rahim Khan-I-Khana on Mathura Road in Nizamuddin East

view on google maps

Copyright Ramesh_lalwani



Copyright Mayank Austen Soofi



View from the Barapulla elevated road. In the back right is Humayun's tomb.
Copyright mohittzomar
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Old December 19th, 2011, 03:41 PM   #32
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Glorious!

So similair in design to the great Taj Mahal although I guess lots of buildings take their influence.

Purana Qila is a delight too!
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Old December 29th, 2011, 04:31 AM   #33
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Jahaz Mahal and Hauz-i-Shamsi in Mehrauli

view on google maps

from wiki:
Jahaz Mahal was so named, since its reflection (illusion) in the surrounding reservoir looked like a ship floating on a lake. It is inferred to have been built during the Lodi dynasty period (1452–1526) as a pleasure resort or a Sarai or an inn

Copyright VarunShiv







Hauz-i-Shamsi - a 5 acre water storage reservoir or tank built by Iltumish of the Slave Dynasty in 1230 AD, at a location revealed to him in a dream by the Islamic prophet Muhammad

View of the pavilion
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Old December 29th, 2011, 10:34 AM   #34
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Great pics , IU .
I remember reading somewhere that Purana Qila was the site of the legendary Indraprastha . Is that true ?
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Old April 9th, 2012, 11:25 PM   #35
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Ya that's considered to be general location of it.
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Old April 20th, 2012, 11:09 AM   #36
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Cov Boy View Post
Glorious!

So similair in design to the great Taj Mahal although I guess lots of buildings take their influence.
Actually, the tomb of Khan-i-Khannan preceded the Taj Mahal by a few years. It was part of the stylistic development of Mughal architecture leading up to that climax.
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Old April 23rd, 2012, 09:24 AM   #37
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The small tomb of Ataga Khan is one of nicest Mughal mausoleums. Built early in the reign of Akbar (about the same time as the larger tomb of Humayun, with which it has similarities), it stands within the Daragh of Nizamuddin.


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Old April 28th, 2012, 03:18 PM   #38
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http://www.guardian.co.uk/world/2012...homes-heritage

Indian villagers' homes threatened by heritage ruling

Judgment on Tughluqabad's fortress wall likely to force eviction of 60,000 people, amid tensions over monuments
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Jason Burke in Tughluqabad, Delhi

guardian.co.uk, Wednesday 25 April 2012 18.29 BST
Article history



Food being prepared outside the 14th-century fortress wall in Tughluqabad, where people face eviction after a supreme court judgment. Photograph: Alamy


With its snuffling boars, motorbikes, samosa stand and Deepak General Stores, the village resembles thousands of similar communities across India. But look up from the rubbish-strewn, potholed main street and what makes Tughluqabad different from the others is very clear: a 700-year-old, 25-metre-high, 10-metre-thick, four-mile-long wall.

A handful of tourists may drive down through the snarling traffic to reach the village, sited within a complex of forts, tombs and defences built in the 14th century, but otherwise the rich heritage brings little benefit. Indeed it could bring about the village's destruction. A supreme court judgment last year now means the 60,000 inhabitants are likely to be evicted and their homes demolished as illegal "encroachments" on an archaeological site.

Though a last-ditch legal fight is under way, people such as Shakunthala, a 60-year-old grandmother who was born in Tughluqabad, are worried. "I've lived here all my life. We are poor people. We have nothing. Where will we go? What will we do?" she said.

Resistance in the village is led by Ramvir Singh Bidhuri, a local politician. Claiming descent from the soldiers and craftsmen who founded the village after building the walls and forts, Bidhuri invoked the "valiant history" of the community, which he said fought British colonial overlords during the 1857 Indian rebellion.

"The records show that the people of Tughluqabad fought bravely in the first independence war. Now they want to throw us out of the homes we have inhabited for so long," he said.

Such conflicts are increasingly common in India. With legislation recently passed, a growing public awareness of the value of India's architectural heritage and a new political will to boost the lucrative tourist trade, officials from the Archaeological Survey of India (ASI), the government body responsible for maintaining 3,660 of the country's historical sites, have been charged with clearing them of illegal settlements.

The Times of India newspaper recently spoke of a "man v monuments conflict" on a national scale.

"Our job is to conserve and protect the monuments and encroachment is a problem," said Dr Gautam Sengupta, the ASI director general. "We try to do things amicably but there is little we can do without support from law enforcement agencies." Sometimes the ASI fulfils its mandate without conflict. Many temples are run in tandem with local trusts or administrative bodies. But hundreds of sites have suffered from the pressure generated across India by land scarcity and a rapidly increasing population and are now home to large numbers of people or used as shops, storehouses or even schools. ASI officials speak of their legal duty to ensure a clear belt of land of up to 300 metres around every site.

PBS Sengar, the ASI's director of monuments, said if "encroachments" were not cleared, "ultimately the sanctity of the monument is lost, repairs are not possible, the original historical setting is spoiled and a lot of damage is there".

So in the famous desert fortified town of Jaisalmer, a regular stop on the tourist trail of Rajasthan, local families are now facing legal action to force them to dismantle all or part of their homes. At the other end of Rajasthan, in Deeg, the ASI is trying to clear hundreds of people from homes and shops built around the 18th-century fort.

Even globally recognised sites are not immune. A group of temples at the Khajuraho complex, famous for their erotic sculptures, has disappeared behind hotels, shops and residential houses. Last month a court ordered authorities to clear unauthorised meditation centres, guesthouses and shops from Hampi, the 2,000-year-old temple complex in the southern state of Karnataka, which is one of 28 Unesco world heritage sites in the country.

Though the Taj Mahal in Agra has been carefully protected in recent years, many other sites in the city have disappeared under makeshift homes, bazaars and even rubbish heaps. These too will have to go, the ASI says.

Some, however, are pioneering a different approach. In Nizamuddin Basti, a poor Muslim neighbourhood in Delhi, specialists from the Agha Khan Development Network, an international private philanthropic NGO, have developed a "holistic" strategy that combines development and conservation.

Ratish Nanda, who oversees the restoration of the vast 16th-century tomb of the Mughal emperor Humayun, as well as dozens of other medieval shrines, said the goodwill of local people was essential. "Local people need to benefit from conservation. The community need to see buildings as assets, not burdens," he said. In Nizamuddin, where 40,000 people exist in narrow lanes and tenements, school reading programmes, clinics and training schemes have been set up alongside the conservation projects. One aim, Nanda said, was to create "an example of what can be done" to inspire authorities in India to change their approach.

But though ASI officials say they respect the Nizamuddin project, it is unlikely such strategies will be seen elsewhere soon. Government in India is infamous for its lack of transparency or engagement with local communities.

In Tughluqabad, few have had any contact with officials. "The worst thing is you never know what is happening," said Ram Bhatti, 73. "Is it going to be the whole village? Or just some of us? And where would they send us? We are always the last to know."
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Old June 18th, 2012, 06:41 AM   #39
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Khooni Darwaza - built during Sher Shah Suri's reign, this was earlier called Kabuli Darwaza.

view on google maps

from wiki:
Quote:
The Khooni Darwaza (Bloody Gate) earned its name after the three princes of the Mughal dynasty - Bahadur Shah Zafar's sons Mirza Mughal and Khizr Sultan and grandson Mirza Abu Bakr, were shot by William Hodson on September 22, 1857 during the Indian Rebellion of 1857 (also known as the First War of Indian Independence). After having secured the surrender of the Emperor, Hodson the next day asked for an unconditional surrender from the three princes at Humayun's Tomb. They had gathered an army of thousands of rebels and refused. Hodson, armed with one hundred horsemen ordered the band to disarm which they did. Thus he got an unconditional surrender of the three princess. On their way to the Red Fort, Hodson ordered the three to get down at the spot, stripped them naked and shot them dead at point blank range. The bodies were then taken away and put up for public display in front of a Kotwali.
Copyright Jose Manuel


Copyright Parth Joshi


Copyright Mayank Austen Soofi
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Old June 23rd, 2012, 12:11 AM   #40
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off to the next page ====>

(since this one has become pretty image heavy)
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