daily menu » rate the banner | guess the city | one on oneforums map | privacy policy | DMCA | news magazine

Go Back   SkyscraperCity > Continental Forums > Africa > Southern Africa > South Africa > Economy, Infrastructure and Transportation > Transport and Infrastructure



Reply

 
Thread Tools
Old August 9th, 2011, 06:56 AM   #201
SA BOY
back in the real world
 
SA BOY's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2003
Location: Republic of Waterfall Country Estate
Posts: 9,036
Likes (Received): 55

back and forth, finger pointing and BS from every one. If this is critical to SA's economy whats the problem, ooh wait yes thats it cant get going no one been given their "bonus"yet to make it happen. This is a joke between 2 parastatels and someone higher , like ol JZ should say its a done deal now signing the farking contracts.

The tax payers own both so its peter paying paul
__________________
Build High-The Pixies
SA BOY no está en línea   Reply With Quote

Sponsored Links
 
Old August 9th, 2011, 02:58 PM   #202
romanSA
Registered User
 
Join Date: Apr 2005
Location: Durban
Posts: 7,690
Likes (Received): 212

Actually, that's not totally true. The SA govt is the sole shareholder of Transnet, but not ACSA. Govt only owns 75% of ACSA. The other 25% is made of the private sector (the Public Investment Coroporation owns 20% and G10 Investments, Telle Investments, Pybus Thirty-34, Up-Front Investments 64 and Lexshell 342 Investments Holdings together own just over 4%). Thus, ACSA minority shareholders have a right to expect decent returns from the sale of their asset.
romanSA no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old August 9th, 2011, 03:20 PM   #203
SA BOY
back in the real world
 
SA BOY's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2003
Location: Republic of Waterfall Country Estate
Posts: 9,036
Likes (Received): 55

dude 95% is the same as 100% when it comes to board composition and decition making.
as for 'their assets"well it was given to them by the tax payer and subsidesed for years by the tax payer so the tax payer should get the best deal and that is stop ******* around and get the deal done
__________________
Build High-The Pixies
SA BOY no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old August 9th, 2011, 09:38 PM   #204
romanSA
Registered User
 
Join Date: Apr 2005
Location: Durban
Posts: 7,690
Likes (Received): 212

I want the dugout as soon as possible, and want ACSA to hand it over to Transnet yesterday. However, my point is that ACSA is not 100% owned by the govt, and the rights and interests of its minority shareholders cannot simply be disregarded by the majority shareholder, or a board of directors acting for the interests of the majority shareholder. The past history of the company (was publically owned / pubically funded) is irrelevant in law. Only the here and now matters.

Methinks you should familarise yourself with section 252(1) of the Companies Act of 1973 (relief of oppression clause)...
romanSA no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old August 23rd, 2011, 08:18 AM   #205
romanSA
Registered User
 
Join Date: Apr 2005
Location: Durban
Posts: 7,690
Likes (Received): 212

Durban port land deal expected soon

Agreement between state- owned ports and rail group Transnet and the Airports Company SA (Acsa) for the purchase of land earmarked for a R75bn port in Durban is expected by the end of next month

NICKY SMITH

Published:2011/08/23 07:11:04 AM

AN AGREEMENT between state-owned ports and rail group Transnet and the Airports Company SA (Acsa) for the purchase of land earmarked for a R75bn port in Durban is expected by the end of next month. The proposed port will be on the site of the old Durban airport.

"We think that by the end of next month we will know," Department of Transport director-general George Mahlalela said yesterday, referring to how much Transnet would offer Acsa for the land due to be turned into SA’s newest port.

"The discussions are now about how much of the land do we want and what do we want to do with the rest," said Mr Mahlalela, speaking on behalf of the transport ministry, Acsa’s shareholder ministry.

Progress in the negotiations was being hampered by a difference in price expectations between the two companies, complicated by the Public Finance Management Act, which requires each company to behave in its own best interest.

Acsa has reportedly been unwilling to accept anything less than R2bn for the land, though it has officially repeatedly declined to comment on its expectations.

Yesterday, Acsa MD Monhla Hlahla said the Public Finance Management Act would dictate the course to be taken by the operator in the talks. While it was understood that, apart from Transnet, there were at least two more bidders interested in the land, Ms Hlahla declined to provide any details.

Mr Mahlalela said the land could be worth anything from R5bn to R15bn, but because of its location the land was needed by the state for critical economic infrastructure.

"Transnet wants it for development, it’s a strategic piece of land, so you can’t hope to get that price. We can’t really be driven by market valuations," Mr Mahlalela said.

Acsa yesterday reported a net loss of R220,5m, its first in its 18-year history. The loss was largely a result of the operator not being granted the tariff increase it needed to offset borrowings used to upgrade and build new airports in time for last year’s Soccer World Cup.

Acsa has spent about R19bn over the past four years on airports, with R6,7bn being ploughed into the new King Shaka International Airport in Durban. Acsa was not a strong proponent of this airport, largely seen as having been built a decade earlier than required to handle projected air traffic volumes.

Last year Acsa applied for a 190% tariff increase covering a five-year tariff cycle. When this was not granted, the operator took the economic regulator to court and has since been granted an increase of 161% for the period in question.

The increase has outraged the International Air Travel Association (Iata) and the Airlines Association of Southern Africa. Tariffs will rise by 70% on October 1. The associations have warned that these increases will damage their industry.

Priscilla Mabelane, Acsa’s departing financial director, said posting a loss in a regulated economic framework "is unheard of". Passenger volumes rose 6% to 17,5-million, due to arrivals for the World Cup. Revenue rose 32% to R4,6bn.


smithn@bdfm.co.za

http://www.businessday.co.za/article...aspx?id=151353
romanSA no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old November 7th, 2011, 03:43 PM   #206
romanSA
Registered User
 
Join Date: Apr 2005
Location: Durban
Posts: 7,690
Likes (Received): 212

Multibillion-rand plan for Durban “old” airport

November 7 2011 at 01:04pm
By Simone Samuels

Transnet’s procurement of Durban’s former airport site as a multibillion-rand dug-out port is close to being a “done deal”, according to National Port Authority officials.

Speaking at a press briefing on local port upgrades on Friday, Hamilton Nxumalo, manager of infrastructure, port planning and development, said the estimated R100 billion project, which has faced delays since an offer was made last year, will be finalised “in weeks”.

Nxumalo could not confirm the exact amount for which the site would be sold, but said Transnet had negotiated a “good price”.

Ricky Bhikraj, port manager, said the developments, both new and those on existing infrastructure, aimed to meet capacity ahead of demand.

Amid the delays, the development came at a opportune time, Bhikraj said, because “if (the National Port Authority) catered capacity too far ahead, we would have been wasteful and if (we had) waited until demand was upon us, we’d have missed the boat.”

Nxumalo said the existing port was close to exceeding capacity because of growing demand and the new port, expected to begin operations between 2016 and 2018, would lighten this load.

Nxumalo acknowledged that several landowners around the Prospecton airport site will need to be relocated, but said this would require careful consideration.

Bhikraj acknowledged that this was not ideal, but added that the new site had to be developed, because failure to embark on such megaprojects would place a “long-term (stranglehold)” on the country’s ability to trade, affecting the economy.

Bhikraj said the development would reap rewards for Durban as a prime port city and for its people in the form of job creation.

During construction, 20 000 direct and 47 000 indirect jobs would be created and once the port was operational 12 000 direct and 16 000 indirect jobs would be available, he said.

Upgrades to the existing port included revamps to the Island View, Bayhead and Maydon Wharf facilities, increasing their current vehicle and vessel capacity, as well as creating space for container and liquid cargo storage.

The cost of these upgrades to Island View, Bayhead Road and Maydon Wharf are estimated at R600 million, R256m and R 1.6bn, respectively.

During the upgrades, cargo would be diverted to the Eastern Cape as a temporary measure, and no cargo would be lost to any port outside of South Africa, Bhikraj said. - Daily News


http://www.iol.co.za/news/south-afri...port-1.1173052
romanSA no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old November 17th, 2011, 01:21 PM   #207
dysan1
More development
 
dysan1's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2004
Location: Durban, Singapore
Posts: 17,669
Likes (Received): 345

Old Durban Airport sold

17 November 2011 - 09:21
By Thrishni Subramoney

An agreement has been reached on the sale of the old Durban International airport site to Transnet, although the paperwork has not yet been signed.

Public Enterprises Minister Malusi Gigaba has led a delegation of top executives from state owned companies to KwaZulu-Natal to meet with provincial authorities. He has taken a tour of the Dube Trade Port.

Gigaba says Transnet's plans to develop the site into a dig-out port are part of a greater economic strategy for the country.

The proposed dig-out port is expected to include liquid bulk and container terminals as well as an automotive terminal.

The Minister says Transnet is also planning to expand ports, rail and pipeline infrastructure in KZN. This will see the expansion of the Richard's Bay Coal Terminal, the Port of Durban and upgrades to the Provincial Rail Network.

He says state owned airlines are also considering using King Shaka International as a secondary regional hub after O.R Tambo International, that will connect South Africa to the continent and the rest of the world.

http://www.ecr.co.za/kagiso/content/...n-Airport-sold
__________________
Have your own opinion
dysan1 no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old November 17th, 2011, 01:56 PM   #208
ToxicBunny
BOFH Extraordinaire
 
ToxicBunny's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2007
Location: Durban
Posts: 3,043
Likes (Received): 50

Woooooooohooooo!!!

Finally.... This is going to be awesome when they start.
ToxicBunny no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old November 17th, 2011, 03:31 PM   #209
romanSA
Registered User
 
Join Date: Apr 2005
Location: Durban
Posts: 7,690
Likes (Received): 212

I want to cover my eyes when I think about the EIA process...
romanSA no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old November 17th, 2011, 05:50 PM   #210
ToxicBunny
BOFH Extraordinaire
 
ToxicBunny's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2007
Location: Durban
Posts: 3,043
Likes (Received): 50

Yeah.. and then this group of numbnuts called Groundwork comes along with their own little spin on the whole thing... Don't think I've sworn so much in my car before...

Quote:
It is disappointed that the Public Works Department agreed to sell the old Durban International Airport site for the project which will have negative environmental and social implications.

The group says the sale agreement goes against government's goal to reduce the country's carbon footprint.

Groundwork's Bobby Peek says increased industrial activity by ships and long-haul trucks that will be working in the area will increase air pollution, worsening the situation for a community that is already living with harsh fumes and chemicals from the refineries in the area.

"The major on-the-ground implication of developing a port there, is that it's going have a negative impact on Merebank, Wentworth and Isipingo because of the back port area."

"People are going to loose their homes most probably, people are going to have big trucks through their residential areas."

"And we know that the city has a plan to put a road between the old port and the new port which will go right through Wentworth and Clairwood."

"So this is the beginning of the demise of the residential nature of South Durban."
http://www.ecr.co.za/kagiso/content/...ansnet-s-plans

Can't say I've ever thought of South Durban as anything other than an Industrial area with very low class residential in it.. so not sure how its the "demise" of the residential nature of South Durban.

Also not entirely sure where they come up with the BS about people losing homes.. yes some homes might have to be demolished to make way for the route between the harbours, but the properties will be bought fairly.... not expropriated.
ToxicBunny no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old November 18th, 2011, 04:34 PM   #211
takz
Registered User
 
takz's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2010
Location: durban
Posts: 699
Likes (Received): 33

its not that low lol
takz no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old November 18th, 2011, 08:20 PM   #212
ToxicBunny
BOFH Extraordinaire
 
ToxicBunny's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2007
Location: Durban
Posts: 3,043
Likes (Received): 50

Quote:
Originally Posted by takz View Post
its not that low lol
I know there are "acceptable" areas in it... but South Durban as a general rule has not been a great residential area....
ToxicBunny no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old November 18th, 2011, 08:52 PM   #213
GetDownAdam
Nomadic Student
 
Join Date: Mar 2008
Location: Durban DUR / True Blue GND / Newcastle NCL
Posts: 407
Likes (Received): 0

Most of South Durban will certainly look better flooded with water...
GetDownAdam no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old November 19th, 2011, 12:59 PM   #214
dysan1
More development
 
dysan1's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2004
Location: Durban, Singapore
Posts: 17,669
Likes (Received): 345

the fact is Durban needs this port development. The people living down in the south of Durban have always been surrounded by the industrial development, yet chose to stay there. No one forced them to.
__________________
Have your own opinion
dysan1 no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old November 19th, 2011, 03:36 PM   #215
Project Director
RSA,Vietnam,Q8,DRC,Auz.
 
Project Director's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2009
Posts: 1,988
Likes (Received): 53

Quote:
Originally Posted by ToxicBunny View Post
I know there are "acceptable" areas in it... but South Durban as a general rule has not been a great residential area....


Groundwork haven`t been doing guess work to find out what has been the case for 30 years etc in the south basin. Air pollution also doesnt pick and choose where to float around and affect house holds based on how "great" or not they might seem. Emissions from bunker fuel ships will create more dangers in the south basin than the replacement aircraft industry which had dealt with emission levels over the last 10/15 years.

http://www.groundwork.org.za/Press%2...hDbnHealth.asp



Health Study Proves that Communities in South Durban Face Increased Health Problems Due to Industrial Pollution



The eThekwini Municipality released the findings of the South Durban Health Study today, which confirms an increased rate of respiratory problems and cancer risk in south Durban, South Africa. The study was undertaken after years of civil society mobilising against industrial pollution in the south Durban residential area, which has a legacy of heavy apartheid industrial development on its doorstep [1].

The study had two components to it:

1) Exposure Assessment and Health Risk Assessment and

2) an Epidemiological Study.

The epidemiological study shows strong evidence that school children in the south Durban area (and their families) are more likely to have increased persistent asthma and bronchial hyper reactivity (BHR) compared with the reference (comparison) study groups in North Durban [2].

The exposure assessment and health risk assessment study also found that air quality in south Durban was generally poorer and more heavily polluted than air in the comparison population locality. In addition, air quality in Durban City [Warwick Triangle] was further dangerously elevated due to the existence of Durban’s main public transport node and high traffic volumes within the area.

The researchers also tested whether specific periods with higher air pollution levels in south Durban impacted on health of children with respiratory problems and found that adverse effects on pulmonary function were statistically significantly when associated with increased ambient levels of Nitrogen Dioxides (NO2), Nitrogen Oxide (NO), Particulate Matter of the size 10 ug (PM10) and Sulphur Dioxide (SO2).

The research findings support that the major sources of pollution are arising from the petrochemical and associated industries as well as other significant fossil fuel energy uses, such as motor vehicles.

The research also estimated what the probable lifetime risk of contracting cancer would be following exposure to the accumulative pollutants in south Durban. Using this methodology they estimate this to be 25 in 100 000 people, well above acceptable international guidelines levels. What is of particular concern is that this cancer risk estimate used averaged data which means that this might be not reflect a worst case scenario!

In light of these findings we strongly encourage the eThekwini Municipality to attend to the variety of actions which are recommended by the report in order to ensure the protection of people’s health in south Durban. SDCEA and groundWork believe that the following should be concentrated on:

There is an urgent need to get a more systematic understanding of what cancers affect people living in the south Durban area. A baseline of cancers in the area needs to be understood in order that the eThekwini Municipality can improve its monitoring of governance by comparing present data with long term trends. A cancer registry is one example of this, while a systematic review of health providers servicing south Durban community is another.

There is concern that ambient concentrations of metals such as cadmium, chrome and manganese, which are found in the area, present a further risk. The eThekwini Municipality needs to undertake urgent action to find these emission sources in order to better regulate and stop these emissions.

Considering the reality that “relatively modest” increases in concentration of NO2, NO, PM10 and SO2 adversely affects pulmonary function of people living in this areas, the present standards proposed by the Department of Environmental Affairs and Tourism [3] need to be made more stringent in south Durban because of the evidence presented.

There is clear evidence that air pollution that affects the community exists in south Durban. What is critical now is for government to review all permits of the industries in the area which emit these identified problematic chemicals in order to start a process of reducing the sources of these chemicals, and that this is undertaken in conjunction with increased enforcement and monitoring.


Desmond D’Sa, the Chairperson of SDCEA states: “The results support community concerns that have been expressed over the last 30 years that an air pollution problem exists in the south Durban area and that it affects the health of local residents. This is a victory for community campaigning for environmental justice in the south Durban area and the eThekwini Municipality must be commended for taking such a bold step for supporting and undertaking this research. We now have proof validating community struggles.”

Rico Euripidou, resident environmental epidemiologist at groundWork states: “We expected the findings of this study would show increased levels of respiratory illness in people living in south Durban as a result of the industrial pollution in the area. This evidence provides government with a unique opportunity to act to protect the citizens of south Durban.”


End:

For more information call:
Desmond D’Sa – SDCEA: 083 982 6939
Rico Euripidou – groundWork: 083 519 3008
Bobby Peek – groundWork: 082 464 1383
Footnotes:
[1] The health study was proposed by government in November 2000, after air samples taken by groundWork and SDCEA on 20 May 2000 indicated elevated levels of industrial pollutants such as methylene chloride, carbon disulphide, 2-butanone, benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene and x-ylenes. Subsequent media investigations indicated leukaemia levels in the area being 24 times the national average, and the Settlers School Study undertaken by Michigan University indicated respiratory problems in the learners at Settlers School as being at 52% of the population.

[2] The reference group with the same social economic standings as the south Durban community were drawn from Newlands East, Newlands West and KwaMashu. These communities do not have the extensive industrial pollution that is found in south Durban.

[3] See http://www.info.gov.za/gazette/notices/2006/28899a.pdf
__________________
Always assume your being Mis-led.
Project Director no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old December 7th, 2011, 03:31 PM   #216
Project Director
RSA,Vietnam,Q8,DRC,Auz.
 
Project Director's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2009
Posts: 1,988
Likes (Received): 53

Bunker tax on shipping gets the nod

Bunker tax on shipping gets the nod


Durban - With only three days left to set a strategy against global warming for the coming years, negotiators on Wednesday proposed an even lower temperature rise and gave a nod to a bunker tax on shipping.

"Significant progress has been made," said the ad-hoc working group on long-term co-operative action.

The text emerged a day after the launch of high-level talks involving heads of state and government and ministers. Negotiators have been meeting since November 28 to wrestle over the way forward.

More than 190 countries and 15 000 official delegates and observers are meeting in Durban under the looming cloud of the expiration of the world's only infrastructure to combat climate change. The Kyoto Protocol expires in December 2012.

The proposed text calls for the world's average temperature increase over pre-industrial times to be limited "to well below 1.5 degrees Centigrade" - a drastic decrease over the 2°C agreed upon in the past two climate summits.

Lowered expectations

That would mean even greater reductions in carbon emissions that are blamed for global warming. But even the current legally-binding and voluntary reduction pledges won't hit the 2°-mark. Rather, the UN Environmental Programme said on Tuesday, the world is on course for a 4° rise over the coming century.

Another key part of the document is how to fund the ambitious $100bn Green Climate Fund that was charted in Cancún in 2010. Negotiators adopted a proposal from Oxfam and other environmental groups to pursue a bunker tax on international shipping that would produce about $10bn a year for the fund.

But environmental groups are worried that the US has refused to even commit to backing the bunker tax, let alone discuss any other specifics about where the money will come from for the fund. US climate envoy Todd Stern insists that finalisation of details about governance and operation of the fund must come first.

UN Secretary General Ban Ki-moon on Tuesday lowered expectations for the outcome of Durban talks, saying the world's financial crisis is a large hurdle for climate change efforts.

Ben Grossman-Cohen, a spokesperson for the Oxfam group, greeted the inclusion of the bunker tax in the document.

"It is significant that it made it through to this text, which is now under consideration by top ministers," he said.


- SAPA


so all that bunker fuel pollution is just going to continue add nausiem......not easy fine tuning ship engines
__________________
Always assume your being Mis-led.
Project Director no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old December 14th, 2011, 07:49 PM   #217
romanSA
Registered User
 
Join Date: Apr 2005
Location: Durban
Posts: 7,690
Likes (Received): 212

TPT ready to compete to operate terminals at Durban ‘dig-out port’
By: Terence Creamer

13th December 2011

State-owned Transnet Port Terminals (TPT) is planning to bid, possibly with partners, for the right to operate any possible new terminal capacity that could arise should South Africa proceed with the development of the so-called ‘dig-out port’ at the old Durban International Airport site, in KwaZulu-Natal.

The bigger Transnet group is in the process of securing the land from the Airport Company of South Africa and it has indicated previously that the development, which would be a Transnet National Ports Authority (TNPA) project, could involve an initial investment of some R50-billion.

TPT CEO Karl Socikwa told business people in Johannesburg on Tuesday that its volume projections indicated that additional container terminal capacity could be required by as early as 2019, notwithstanding current initiatives to bolster the capacity of the Durban Container Terminal.

TPT would have to compete for the right to operate on the site in line with South Africa’s ports legislation. But Socikwa insisted that it would not have an unfair advantage over its competitors simply as a result of the fact that both TPT and TNPA, the port landlord, resided within the same corporate entity.

That said, TPT would “fight” for the opportunity to participate in what could become a future key “gateway” harbour.

Similarly, the unit, which had 16 terminals and assets of R13.5-billion, was hoping to position itself as a favoured African trans-shipment port system.

To achieve this, attention was being given to improving efficiencies at the existing terminals, as well as to building capacity at the Port of Ngqura, in the Eastern Cape, which was currently the group’s main trans-shipment hub.

Socikwa said the uptake at Ngqura had been “beyond our wildest expectations”, and two additional ship-to-shore cranes would be added by January, raising the harbour’s total crane complement to eight.

In the year-to-date, total container volumes across all of TPT’s facilities had risen to 2.2-million twenty-foot equivalent units (TEUs), from 2.16-million TEUs in the corresponding period last year.

Edited by: Creamer Media Reporter


http://www.engineeringnews.co.za/art...ort-2011-12-13
romanSA no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old January 23rd, 2012, 11:18 AM   #218
dysan1
More development
 
dysan1's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2004
Location: Durban, Singapore
Posts: 17,669
Likes (Received): 345

R100bn Transet project moves forward
January 23 2012 at 10:05am
By Leanne Jansen

INLSA


Air Force Base Durban, home to 15 Squadron since the early 1980s, is to move to King Shaka International Airport to make way for Transnet’s R100 billion dig-out container terminal.

The move from the Prospecton site, which is estimated to cost “a minimum of R800 million”, has been confirmed by the Department of Defence.

But while questions about the time frame of the move and who will foot the bill remain unanswered, DA MP David Maynier has expressed concern that should the department itself fund the move, it could prove detrimental to an already strained SA Air Force budget.

“The air force is not able to optimally operate the Gripen or Hawk fighter aircraft because of underfunding,” he said.


The base is next to the old airport site, which the state-owned freight logistics and transport entity is keen to snap up. According to the national Department of Public Works, Transnet had expressed its intention to buy the land the base occupies, although “to date no formal offer or terms and conditions have been determined”, department spokesman Thami Mchunu said.

Although Transnet and Airports Company SA are yet to conclude negotiations on the price tag which the former will shell out for the old airport site, the relocation of Durban’s air force is a clear signal that port development plans are surging ahead.

The Department of Defence has until now remained tight-lipped, saying only that a move is “possible”. But it finally released the information after being confronted with its 2010/11 annual report.

The document states that a decision to move Air Force Base Durban to King Shaka airport has been reached, but has not been implemented yet because of the financial implications.

“The total cost for the relocation is estimated at R800m,” the report says.

Department spokesman Siphiwe Dlamini has confirmed the contents of the document, saying that “intense discussions” between stakeholders, including Transnet and the Department of Public Works, are under way.

The operational and domestic areas of the base occupy 27.8ha at present, but the department would not reveal the staff complement.

Dlamini said the nature of the infrastructure and the equipment that would need to be moved and built at the new site complicated the task.

“When King Shaka was built, it was not built with security or military considerations in mind,” he said. “Construction will have to start from scratch, so this could be considered phase two of building for the airport… Office space, workshops, hangars and a range of things which come with a base would need to be built. The cost could be higher; R800m is the minimum.”

King Shaka airport spokesman Colin Naidoo said that while he was aware of the air force plans, no formal discussions had been entered into.


Development

The Mercury understands that La Mercy may also be the new home of the SAPS air wing situated adjacent to the old airport site, but SAPS spokesman Vish Naidoo has said the unit was staying put until told otherwise.

The chairman of the KwaZulu-Natal Growth Coaliton, Moses Tembe, said he could not think of any implications the relocation would have for business, but said it could only be positive as it made way for the port’s development.

“Our understanding is that in the first quarter of this year, a deal will be consummated.”

Transport Minister S’bu Ndebele said that since Acsa had paid more than R6 billion to shift its operations from the old airport in the south of Durban to La Mercy, part of its return should be the resale of the old site.

“They should get at least R2bn out of the resale,” he said. It has been reported that Transnet has set aside R1.5bn for the deal.

The first phase of the port’s construction, expected to start in 2015, is set to cost R50bn. - The Mercury
__________________
Have your own opinion
dysan1 no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old March 13th, 2012, 01:33 PM   #219
dysan1
More development
 
dysan1's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2004
Location: Durban, Singapore
Posts: 17,669
Likes (Received): 345

KwaZulu-Natal to punt new port to Japanese firms
SBU MJIKELISO
Published: 2012/03/13 08:44:35 AM


KwaZulu-Natal Premier Zweli Mkhize intends to use his pending visit to Japan to encourage automotive components companies to manufacture their products at a port and petrochemicals hub to be built at the old Durban airport.

Mr Mkhize announced in his state of the province address last month the provincial government would go ahead with plans to dig out a port at the old airport to expand the Durban port’s capacity. The new section will allow for the expansion of existing facilities such as oil refineries, and is expected to attract more than R100bn in investment over the next 20 years. An automotive supplier park and car terminal will also be included in the project.

The province announced a number of infrastructure projects following President Jacob Zuma ’s multibillion-rand infrastructure programme, including R5bn to develop the KwaMashu-Umlazi north-south rail corridor and a business express service between Pietermaritzburg and Durban. Mr Mkhize said the infrastructure would lead to greater social and economic development and job prospects for the province.

At a meeting with CEOs of Japanese automotive components companies yesterday, he said a manufacturing hub would be built at the new port, the focus of which would be sending products to other parts of the country and parts of Africa. "The country is embarking on an infrastructure revolution," Mr Mkhize said.

"We are holding discussions with these (Japanese) investors around the manufacturing hub, because it is going to be the centre of major investment in the province in the future. We are going to be building a new dig-out port — that will probably take up to 20 years to mature into full operation."

The Japanese foreign ministry has invited Mr Mkhize for a four-day visit to discuss ways of increasing Japan’s direct investment in SA. No signed trade agreements are expected to arise from the trip, however, and no South African private company will accompany the provincial government delegation.

Most of the automotive investment lobbying on the trip will be geared towards boosting the capacity of the Toyota plant in Durban, which employs more than 6500 people. Mr Mkhize said he believed Toyota would produce more if the manufacturing of components was brought closer to the plant.

Toyota SA senior vice-president Nigel Ward said the plant hoped to improve on the 50000 vehicles it produced each year, towards a capacity of 220000 by 2020.

"We are currently the primary users of the (Durban) port, not just for the exportation and importation of parts but also for vehicles. The whole development that the premier spoke about has a huge synergy to our thinking. We want (the port) close, flexible and for it to support our future requirements," he said.


mjikelisos@bdfm.co.za

http://www.businessday.co.za/article...aspx?id=167285
__________________
Have your own opinion
dysan1 no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old April 10th, 2012, 03:48 PM   #220
dysan1
More development
 
dysan1's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2004
Location: Durban, Singapore
Posts: 17,669
Likes (Received): 345

BIG step closer to this happening... SALE OF THE LAND!

Transnet mulls Durban dig-out port partnerships, confirms R1.8bn land deal

By: Terence Creamer
10th April 2012

Freight logistics group Transnet has concluded a R1.8-billion property deal with fellow State-owned company (SoC) Airports Company South Africa for the acquisition of the former Durban International Airport (DIA) site, which Transnet aims to develop into a new port over the coming years.

Transnet CE Brian Molefe reported on Tuesday that the much-anticipated transaction had been concluded ahead of the two SoCs’ financial year-ends of March 31, 2012. However, the deal still required sanction by the competition authorities.

Transnet National Ports Authority (TNPA) had indicated previously that it planned to pursue a so-called ‘dig-out port’ at the DIA site and the project was likely to involve an initial investment of some R50-billion.

Molefe confirmed in an interview with Engineering News Online that TNPA would proceed with the development in collaboration with the private sector under its so-called private sector participation (PSP) scheme.

Therefore, only a small portion of the R47-billion capital budget that had been set aside for TNPA under the group’s larger R300-billion, seven-year investment programme would be directed towards the project and the environmental studies that would be required to proceed with the development.

Nevertheless, the project could move ahead as a PSP during the seven-year period, running from the group’s 2012/13 financial year through to 2018/19.

In fact, Engineering News Online established separately that Transnet, which had more or less excluded major PSPs from its Market Demand Strategy, was working on a new version of its PSP in a bid to facilitate complementary private-sector infrastructure investments of as much as R150-billion.

“The biggest PSP that will ever happen in this country is going to be on the DIA site . . . which we hope to dig out and develop into a port,” Molefe said in an interview.

“The money for the development of that port is not in the R300-billion,” he added.

A process was being designed for a build-operate-and-transfer-type development of the port and associated terminals and the details should emerge either during the course of the current financial year or during 2013/14.

“Quite a lot of work needs to go into this . . . but definitely during the next financial we expect this project to go out on tender.”

The project would take 10 to 15 years to develop, but Molefe expects the first shovel in the ground within “five to six years time”.

http://www.engineeringnews.co.za/art...eal-2012-04-10
__________________
Have your own opinion
dysan1 no está en línea   Reply With Quote


Reply

Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off



All times are GMT +2. The time now is 12:47 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
Feedback Buttons provided by Advanced Post Thanks / Like v3.2.5 (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2014 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.

vBulletin Optimisation provided by vB Optimise (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2014 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.

SkyscraperCity ☆ In Urbanity We trust ☆ about us | privacy policy | DMCA policy

Hosted by Blacksun, dedicated to this site too!
Forum server management by DaiTengu