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Old November 27th, 2010, 06:49 AM   #81
saiholmes
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Originally Posted by REUTERS

World's First Hybrid Tug Beats Standard Vessel in Emissions Study
By Leslie Guevarra at Greener World Media
REUTERS
Thu, Nov 25 2010

The world's first hybrid electric tugboat, Foss Maritime's Carolyn Dorothy which plies Southern California's San Pedro Bay, emits 73 percent less soot, 51 percent fewer nitrogen oxides and 27 percent less carbon dioxide than a standard tug of comparable size, according to a study by the University of California, Riverside.

Researchers from UC Riverside's College of Engineering Center for Environmental Research and Technology charted the performance of the Carolyn Dorothy against that of the tugboat Alta June for the study released this week.

Both vessels are Foss "dolphin class" tugs and were tested in the ports of Los Angeles and Long Beach, where the Carolyn Dorothy operates. The Alta June runs on four diesel engines; the Carolyn Dorothy, on four diesel engines and 126 batteries. All the engines meet EPA emissions standards for Tier 2 certification.

Researchers found that the Carolyn Dorothy's diesel electric drive train, rather than the vessel's batteries, was chiefly responsible for producing the emissions benefits. The researchers recommended that future studies include more running time without batteries to test the initial finding.

The team also said the tug's plug-in capabilities should be tested. The tug did not operate as a plug-in for the study because of insufficient shore power. As a result, the tug was plugged in only for about a third of its time in dock.

The Carolyn Dorothy started working the San Pedro Bay in January 2009. Here is the Port of Long Beach's YouTube video about the vessel's arrival:

The Port of Long Beach, which handles more cargo and containers than any other U.S. port, contributed $500,000 to the cost of $8 million tug boat built by Foss. Founded in 1889, the Seattle-based firm operates one of the larger tug and barge fleets on the U.S. West Coast.

Foss developed the hybrid tug to help cut pollution from merchant vessels and improve their fuel economy. The Long Beach and Los Angeles ports are the largest contributors to air pollution in California's South Coast Basin, according to UC Riverside.

The design for the Carolyn Dorothy received the EPA's Clean Air Excellence Award for Clean Air Technology in 2008. Last May, Foss received an Environmental Excellence Award for Green Enterprising Technologies from the Association of Washington Business. The tug boat also has received attention beyond environmental circles -- the vessel was featured in an April 2010 episode of The History Channel's "Modern Marvels" TV program.
Read More: http://www.reuters.com/article/idUS37182365020101125
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Old December 12th, 2010, 10:32 PM   #82
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Originally Posted by Business Wire

Port of Los Angeles Completes One Megawatt Solar Project on Rooftop of World Cruise Center
Business Wire
December 09, 2010 05:00 AM Eastern Time

Larger Than a Football Field, Thousands of Panels Will Increase Energy Capacity and Reduce 22,800 Metric Tons of Carbon Dioxide

SAN PEDRO, Calif.--(BUSINESS WIRE)--The Port of Los Angeles has completed its World Cruise Center solar rooftop project, a 71,500 square foot, one megawatt system capable of generating approximately 1.2 million kilowatt hours of electricity annually to the Los Angeles Department of Water and Power (LADWP) energy grid.

The solar photovoltaic installation, which is expected to result in an annual $200,000 energy cost savings, is the first phase of a multi-location solar power program that will eventually produce 10 megawatts of solar system generation capacity. The $10.8 million project includes a total of 1.16 million square feet of rooftop solar panels, larger than the size of a football field. Three additional project phases are slated for completion over the next five years.

“Clean energy is essential if we are to meet the future growth and development needs of Los Angeles,” said Los Angeles Mayor Antonio Villaraigosa. “This solar project and others being initiated within our city will not only reduce our carbon footprint, but also add meaningful new jobs to our green sector workforce.”

“Solar power is one of many technologies being used at the Port of Los Angeles to promote environmentally responsible operations and development,” said Port Executive Director Geraldine Knatz, Ph.D. “We are thrilled to now be harnessing the power of the plentiful Southern California sun to reduce carbon emissions, improve air quality and increase economic opportunities for Los Angeles businesses and residents.”

Over the solar system's lifetime, it will reduce roughly 22,800 metric tons of carbon dioxide entering the atmosphere, the equivalent of cutting the annual greenhouse gases of 4,367 cars, according to the Environmental Protection Agency. (EPA calculator)

The system is comprised of 5,140, 210-watt solar modules. It was installed by the Energy Alternatives Division of San Jose-based Cupertino Electric Inc. The roof-mounted system, which collects and converts solar radiation to electrical energy, features high-efficiency crystalline modules and utilizes a self-ballasted racking system that does not penetrate the terminal’s existing roof. Electricity generated is then routed back to the LADWP through an existing electric meter at the World Cruise Center facility.

Home of the original “Love Boat” in the 1970s, the World Cruise Center is an inner-harbor facility just south of the Vincent Thomas Bridge. The solar panel project is part of a $42 million upgrade at the World Cruise Center. Earlier this year, state-of-the-art walkways were installed to travel between the terminal building and cruise ships. Painting, lighting and audio-video upgrades have been completed, as well as a new fendering system and cushion-like bumpers on the wharf to protect the cruise ships and the wharf.

Additionally, Alternative Maritime Power (AMP), currently used at some container ship terminals, will soon be available so that cruise ships can “plug in” to shoreside electrical power instead of running on diesel power while at berth. Depending on the size of the ship, estimates are that AMP will reduce nitrogen oxide (NOx) emissions by one ton (2,000 pounds) and reduce 85 percent of sulfur oxide (SOx) emissions out of the air each day a ship is at berth and plugged in.

The Port of Los Angeles is America’s premier port and has a strong commitment to developing innovative strategic and sustainable operations that benefit the economy as well as the quality of life for the region and the nation it serves. As the leading seaport in North America in terms of shipping container volume and cargo value, the Port generates 919,000 regional jobs and $39.1 billion in annual wages and tax revenues. A proprietary department of the City of Los Angeles, the Port is self-supporting and does not receive taxpayer dollars.

The Port of Los Angeles – A cleaner port. A brighter future.
Read More: http://www.businesswire.com/news/hom...-Solar-Project
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Old December 18th, 2010, 06:11 AM   #83
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Originally Posted by Los Angeles Times

State adopts network of protected marine areas
The plan restricts or bans fishing along 15% of Southern California coast, including several areas backed by environmentalists, and leaves out some areas prized by recreational and commercial fishermen.
By Tony Barboza, Los Angeles Times
December 16, 2010
Reporting from Santa Barbara

More than 350 square miles of ocean from Point Conception to the U.S.-Mexico border — about 15% of the Southern California coast — will be protected under a network of marine reserves narrowly approved by state wildlife officials.

The 3-2 vote Wednesday by the California Fish and Game Commission bans or restricts fishing in 49 protected marine areas designed to replenish depleted fish populations and protect marine life.

The regulations come more than a decade after state legislators passed the California Marine Life Protection Act, which charged Fish and Game officials with establishing a statewide chain of sanctuaries.

Wednesday's vote was the final approval after two years of contentious negotiations between conservation groups pushing for strict curbs on fishing to preserve marine habitat and recreational anglers and commercial fishing groups wary of losing territory.

California has led the nation in establishing marine reserves, an idea conceived in response to steep population declines of rockfish, cod, lobster, abalone and other ocean dwellers despite catch limits and other fishing regulations.

Scientists who helped draft the plan argued that some species could disappear entirely without fishing bans in a diverse assortment of underwater canyons, kelp forests, sandy seafloors and rocky reefs.

Commissioner Richard B. Rogers voted in favor of the plan, saying it struck an "elegant balance" between conservation and fishing interests.

"The overarching goal is to return California to the sustainable abundance I observed growing up," the lifelong scuba diver said.

Commissioner Michael Sutton, founding director of the Center for the Future of the Oceans at the Monterey Bay Aquarium, called the protections "good news for everyone who cares about the future of our fisheries and the future of our marine ecosystems."

The state Department of Fish and Game is implementing the plan in segments, dividing the coastline into four areas, plus a fifth covering San Francisco Bay.

The five Southern California counties that make up the state's most populous stretch of coastline are the third region where the protected areas were established, following the central and north-central portions of the state.

The intense, year-round use of Southern California waters for recreational fishing and the relative scarcity of rocky reef habitat in the area meant that the key places conservationists zeroed in on to protect were the same spots anglers sought to keep for fishing.

In some instances, environmentalists got what they wanted, winning protections for a large kelp forest off Point Dume, Naples Reef in Santa Barbara County and a lengthy stretch of Laguna Beach coastline.

Fishing groups prevailed in keeping Rocky Point, a richly populated reef off Palos Verdes Peninsula, and most of the waters off La Jolla open to fishing.

The move to close some waters to fishing has been fiercely resisted by commercial and recreational fishing businesses based in harbors dotting the Southern California coastline, with some lobbyists denying that fish populations were excessively harvested or depleted.

Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger has advocated for the implementation of marine protections before he leaves office.

Fish and Game Commission President Jim Kellogg, who voted against the marine protections, said the Schwarzenegger administration "tried to slam dunk this thing before they leave town."

Although the total size of the underwater reserves fell short of scientists recommendation to protect at least 20% of near-shore waters, conservationists said the strong protections adopted in some areas could preserve marine habitat for future generations.

The protections are likely to take effect sometime in 2011, with about 12% of near-shore waters designated as State Marine Reserves and "no-take" areas that are off-limits to fishing, and 3% designated as State Marine Conservation Areas that allow limited commercial and recreational fishing.

Game wardens will be charged with enforcing the fishing restrictions. Researchers will monitor the reserves' effectiveness in boosting fish populations.
Read More: http://www.latimes.com/news/local/la...,1895962.story
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Old March 16th, 2011, 07:37 AM   #84
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LOS ANGELES REMAINS IN 1ST PLACE FOR THE THIRD YEAR
EPA ANNOUNCES U.S. CITIES
WITH THE MOST ENERGY STAR CERTIFIED BUILDINGS
THIRD ANNUAL LIST SHOWS DRAMATIC GROWTH, SAVINGS OF ENERGY EFFICIENT BUILDINGS

WASHINGTON – The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) is releasing a list of U.S. metropolitan areas with the greatest number of energy-efficient buildings that earned EPA’s Energy Star certification in 2010. The list of 25 cities is headed by Los Angeles; Washington, D.C.; San Francisco; Chicago; New York; Atlanta; Houston; Sacramento; Detroit; and Dallas-Fort Worth. The growth in Energy Star certified buildings across the country has prevented greenhouse gas emissions equal to the emissions from the energy use of nearly 1.3 million homes a year, protecting people’s health, while saving more than $1.9 billion.

"When it's more important than ever to cut energy costs and reduce pollution in our communities, organizations across America are making their buildings more efficient, raising the bar in energy efficiency and lowering the amount of carbon pollution and other emissions in the air we breathe," said EPA Administrator Lisa P. Jackson. "Through their partnership with Energy Star, metropolitan areas across the U.S. are saving a combined $1.9 billion in energy costs every year while developing new ways to shrink energy bills and keep our air clean."

EPA debuted its list of cities with the most Energy Star certified buildings in 2008. Los Angeles remains in first place for the third year; the District of Columbia and San Francisco hold second and third respectively for the second year; and Detroit and Sacramento are new to the top ten. New York City climbed five spots to claim fifth in the rankings and California boasts more cities on EPA’s list than any other state in the country with a total of five.
Surpassing the growth of the past several years, in 2010 more than 6,200 commercial buildings earned the Energy Star, an increase of nearly 60 percent compared to 2009. Since EPA awarded the first Energy Star to a building in 1999, more than 12,600 buildings across America have earned the Energy Star as of the end of 2010.

Energy use in commercial buildings accounts for nearly 20 percent of U.S. greenhouse gas emissions at a cost of more than $100 billion per year. Commercial buildings that earn the Energy Star must perform in the top 25 percent of buildings nationwide compared to similar buildings and be independently verified by a licensed professional engineer or registered architect each year. Energy Star certified buildings use 35 percent less energy and emit 35 percent less carbon dioxide than average buildings. Fourteen types of commercial buildings can earn the Energy Star, including office buildings, K-12 schools, and retail stores.
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STACY KIKA
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Old March 16th, 2011, 07:16 PM   #85
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I'm digging the green font "milq".
__________________
"Self defense is not violence" - Malcolm X
"I love Los Angeles. I love Hollywood. They're so beautiful. Everything's plastic, but I love plastic. I want to be plastic." - Andy Warhol
Minimum parking standards are fertility drugs for cars. - Donald Shoup
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Old March 17th, 2011, 07:44 AM   #86
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I always do green where green is concerned
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Old September 28th, 2011, 04:03 PM   #87
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WHO | World Health Organization
Public Health and Environment (PHE)
Database: outdoor air pollution in cities
http://www.who.int/phe/health_topics.../en/index.html

LA seems okay as compared to Europe such as Paris.

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Old September 30th, 2011, 09:37 AM   #88
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LA looks like there is a green dot covering a orange one.
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Old October 1st, 2011, 07:54 AM   #89
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Originally Posted by ddxv View Post
LA looks like there is a green dot covering a orange one.
http://www.who.int/entity/phe/health...ase_8_2011.xls

25 is yellow.
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Old January 25th, 2012, 03:55 PM   #90
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California OKs $6.5 million to plan Ballona Wetlands restoration
Conservationists are at odds over how drastically to alter the existing landscape of the degraded marshland, one of the few remaining in Southern California.
By Tony Barboza, Los Angeles Times
January 21, 2012

In a first step toward restoring one of Southern California's few remaining wetlands and opening it to the public, the state has approved spending $6.5 million for planning a massive restoration of the degraded Ballona Wetlands — but conservationists are at odds over what that means for the future of the site.

Though construction is still years away, the question of how drastically to alter the existing landscape in order to revive the remaining 600 acres of the Ballona Wetlands is polarizing conservationists who fought for three decades to protect the site from the sort of development that ate up most of it.

"It's going to be a delicate balancing act," said Lisa Fimiani, executive director of Friends of Ballona Wetlands and a cautious supporter of restoration. "It's going to be: What habitat do you want to bring back and at what cost? Because some of it will be altered."

PHOTOS: A visit to Ballona Wetlands

Restoring the site will require some large-scale changes, said restoration supporters like Shelley Luce, executive director of the Santa Monica Bay Restoration Commission, a state organization whose nonprofit foundation will use some of the money to collect scientific data and conduct environmental reviews.

Initial proposals call for spending $100 million to remove concrete levees and truck out tons of sediment dumped on the property, allowing water from Ballona Creek and the sea to flow into the wetlands. Bike paths would be built atop earthern flood-control berms on the reserve's perimeter and public boardwalks would allow visitors access to the site without disturbing plants, birds and other wildlife.

"We have the potential at Ballona to restore this degraded and damaged habitat and return it to a beautiful, sustainable natural refuge for people and wildlife," Luce said.

The vast coastal wetlands once spanned 2,000 acres at the mouth of Ballona Creek, covering much of what is now Marina del Rey, Playa del Rey and Venice. Only a quarter remains today, much of it a dry, fenced-off expanse of brush that is littered with garbage in places, surrounded by high-rises and subdivisions and criss-crossed by congested boulevards.

Developers and environmental activists wrangled over the site for decades before the state agreed in 2003 to spend $139 million to acquire it as an ecological reserve. Still, state officials and a number of environmental groups say it is far from a healthy, functioning ecosystem.

The soil was raised high above sea level with the sediment scooped out decades ago when Marina del Rey was built. Though the open space supports wildlife, much of the habitat is degraded and ocean waters must again reach deep into the marshlands if plants and animals are to thrive again, restoration proponents say.

Critics say the reserve is not as degraded as portrayed by restoration proponents. Some local environmentalists oppose the project, which they say would disrupt rare birds and flowers that already live there.

"We are opposed to industrial-scale habitat conversion, including bulldozing that destroys current ecosystems," Kathy Knight, conservation chair of the Sierra Club Airport Marina Group, told members of the the Coastal Conservancy, which approved funding for the studies on Thursday.

Instead of a grand reshaping of the site, Knight and other critics said, funds would be put to better use on more delicate improvements, such as using volunteers and schoolchildren to plant native vegetation or buying up surrounding property to use as a buffer zone.

For now, the bulk of the reserve remains off-limits to the public except through guided tours or by special permission.

On a tour of the wetlands Thursday, two dozen state government officials had to be escorted by a ranger into one area near Marina del Rey, ducking below bushes and squeezing through an opening in a chain-link fence.

On the other side stretched a field of vegetation, its silty soil pocked with gopher holes and marred with pieces of discarded clothes and trash. A narrow, steep-banked channel known as the Fiji Ditch, an official for the Conservancy noted, is the only vein of ocean water that still penetrates the wetlands.
Read More: http://www.latimes.com/news/local/la...,2930790.story
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Old June 30th, 2013, 07:10 AM   #91
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Originally Posted by Metro - Los Angeles County Metropolitan Transportation Authority - The Source



Video from press conference announcing Metro’s e-bus purchase
Posted June 28, 2013 by Anna Chen

Cleaner air, here we come. Yesterday, the Board approved the contract to purchase Metro’s first electric buses.
http://thesource.metro.net/2013/06/2...-bus-purchase/
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