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Old February 7th, 2012, 10:44 PM   #381
Milan Luka
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Absolutely. All this despite the high dollar.

If anyone from Hollywood was going to relocate here you would want it to be Cameron. (Well after Spielberg maybe). High profile, massive ego, only interested in 'big' projects. His arrival and commitment to NZ will further strengthen the local industry.

Here's hoping he's allowed to get on and do what he does without interference.
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Old February 9th, 2012, 03:14 PM   #382
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NZ's international screen accolades signal bright future

New Zealand's screen industry's continued international awards success shows local companies are in the vanguard of a changing global industry, says Film New Zealand CEO Gisella Carr. Following on from The Adventures of Tin Tin's recent win of a Golden Globe for Best Animated Feature Film, New Zealand enjoyed further success yesterday at the 10th Annual Visual Effects Society Awards. Weta Digital had an unprecedented 10 nominations, with the New Zealand visual effects company announced winners of Outstanding Visual Effects in a Visual Effects-Driven Feature Motion Picture for Rise of the Planet of the Apes and Outstanding Animated Character in a Live Action Feature Motion Picture for the character Caesar. New Zealand-made productions also claimed success over the weekend at the Annie Awards (commonly known as the animation 'Oscars'). Of the nine New Zealand nominations, two were announced winners at the weekend's awards ceremony. The upcoming BAFTA awards and Oscars also have a number of New Zealand nominations. Film New Zealand CEO Gisella Carr says the slew of wins and nominations clearly demonstrates the outstanding quality of New Zealand filmmakers, as well as underlining the changing nature of the global film industry. "Creative and technological talent will be the key to screen success this century and New Zealand has significant strengths here as shown by these awards and nominations. Beautiful and diverse locations continue to be an important ingredient of the industry, but it is only as good as our talent and we must continue to focus on this." She says the diversity of the nominations is impressive, as is the fact they recognise skills across a broad range of disciplines. "This creative and technological talent is encompassing both enormous feature films involving thousands of people but also increasingly, in the related industry gaming, can also be an individual sitting at home and generating a multi-million dollar property." Ms Carr says New Zealand is also fortunate that people are able to have global careers from home in a way that was unimaginable a generation ago. "Sir Peter Jackson, Bret McKenzie, Rob Tapert, Andrew Adamson, Sir Richard Taylor and </a>Weta Digital are among those operating from a New Zealand base. It is internationalising our industry, with overseas practitioners at the top of their game deciding to base themselves in New Zealand and people who come here to work on international productions deciding to stay." "Internationally New Zealand talent is seen as outstanding in the way we develop and utilise new technologies, in our work practices, and for the significant contribution made to the art of film," says Ms Carr. "This ongoing stream of international screen awards attests to our quality. Our people are up against the best in world here. Just to be nominated is an achievement in itself, and to win something else again. She says the spotlight will continue to be on New Zealand in other upcoming international awards with The Adventures of Tintin nominated in two BAFTA categories, and the Visual Effects on Rise of the Planet of the Apes and Bret McKenzie for his original song Man or Muppet both up for an Oscar.
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Old February 13th, 2012, 10:02 PM   #383
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Auckland’s film industry given vital boost

The future of film production in Auckland has been given a boost with the appointment of a Screen Production Attraction Specialist. Film Auckland Manager, Michael Brook announced today that Harry Harrison will join the organisation fulltime in April, and will play an important role in supporting and growing the film industry in Auckland. “Auckland’s hard working and innovative industry professionals have already contributed $2.1 billion to the local economy in 2010 alone. The creation of this role emphasises our commitment to the continuous growth of Auckland’s screen industry. “We are very fortunate to have Harry on board. His involvement in location scouting and management has already generated economic benefits for Auckland,” says Mr. Brook. As co-founder of a location scouting and management company Red Locations, Harry has been involved with international and local feature films and television dramas.

These include 30 Days of Night, Underworld: Rise of the Lycans, Spartacus; Blood and Sand, Sione’s II: Unfinished Business and Emperor. Harry has also volunteered a lot of his time to the industry through serving on the Film Auckland Board as well as helping develop protocols and policy in relation to the screen industry. “I am looking forward to working with fellow professionals in the screen industry and those already attracting international business to our shores,” says Mr. Harrison. “There is much potential for further growth of the film industry in Auckland and I am grateful for this opportunity to be part of it,” he says. Film Auckland is part of the Business Sector and Development Group in Auckland Tourism, Events and Economic Development (ATEED). Originally from Scotland Harry settled in New Zealand in 2000. He has a Masters Degree in Social Anthropology from London School of Economics and Political Science as well as a background in Project Management that has seen him work in Edinburgh, Glasgow, London and India.
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Old February 13th, 2012, 10:32 PM   #384
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The creation of this role emphasises our commitment to the continuous growth of Auckland’s screen industry.
You have got to love the unabashed enthusiasm, but Auckland's film sector is currently struggling.

In 2011 both the main studio complexes essentially went under, with one being bailed out by the Auckland Council.

The expansion that happened for Narnia has not been followed up with films of a similar size, and there is a huge over capacity with regard to studio space at the moment.

http://www.nzherald.co.nz/business/news/article.cfm?c_id=3&objectid=10724158
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Old February 14th, 2012, 12:55 AM   #385
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I think the last Narnia or last two in the trilogy went offshore.
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Old February 14th, 2012, 03:17 AM   #386
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I am sure that Emperor is going to be bigger than Narnia. Spartacus has also been good as all 3 seasons have been filmed in Auckland and I am sure that should there be a 4th season it will also be filmed here. Things can only get better by appointing a Screen Production Attraction Specialist - let's at least hope so.
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Old February 14th, 2012, 03:27 AM   #387
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Quote:
huge over capacity with regard to studio space at the moment.
The article you linked to says the exact opposite to this:

Quote:
Producer Murray Francis said Auckland's lack of studios was already preventing international business from coming to New Zealand.

"To call yourself a studio you need to have at least four [studios], and that's what we need in Auckland right now to attract major funding and major American productions," Francis said.

"The lack of studios is taking a lot of business away from New Zealand."
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Old February 14th, 2012, 07:23 AM   #388
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Originally Posted by SYDNEY View Post
I am sure that Emperor is going to be bigger than Narnia. Spartacus has also been good as all 3 seasons have been filmed in Auckland and I am sure that should there be a 4th season it will also be filmed here. Things can only get better by appointing a Screen Production Attraction Specialist - let's at least hope so.
Bigger than Narnia in what way? production? budget? appeal? how?
Narnia 1 made in Aucks, had a 180 million dollar budget and grossed close to 750 million world wide..it was a big production.
I reckon Auckland's current strength lies with its many international and monopoly of local Television productions like Spartacus, Legend of the Seeker etc

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Old February 14th, 2012, 08:41 AM   #389
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The article you linked to says the exact opposite to this:
In the meantime, TVNZ's abandonment of Avalon Studios in Wellington leaves a big surplus in facilities.
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Old February 14th, 2012, 10:16 AM   #390
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I really hope someone buys up Avalon and makes good use of it since TVNZ ditched it. It's a large well equipped complex. The potential...

Quote:
Avalon’s purpose built studios are supported by an extensive and well designed infrastructure that will enhance your working environment and help to achieve the very best from your cast and crew.

The studios, production offices and support facilities are all housed under one roof making for safe, secure and comfortable working conditions.

The talent dressing rooms all have showers and changing areas and are positioned close to the studios, make-up positions and wardrobe. There are cast and crew dressing rooms and changing areas for extras. The green rooms have direct access to the studios and are large and comfortable.

The set build and construction areas are immediately adjacent to the studio entrances with direct under cover vehicle access from the loading bays. The paint spray shop is in a bay off the main set construction area and close to the prop store.

Within the complex are a range of cutting rooms as well as track laying facilities and

there is access to a large viewing theatre within the TVNZ archive that can be used for watching dailies.

The back lot is suitable for building large green screens and provides the opportunity to shoot natural light sequences without leaving the complex. There is also a water reservoir that doubles as a wet stage.

You’ll find within the complex a cafeteria as well as plenty of space on the back lot to bring in your own location caterers when necessary.

And if you need to fly talent to and from the studios or to locations there is a licensed helicopter pad on site.

But most important of all at Avalon you will enjoy high quality production that will be evident and identifiable on screen and the service and support from our dedicated staff will ensure your stay with us is hassle free and you can concentrate on ”film” making.

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Old February 14th, 2012, 08:07 PM   #391
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Why did TVNZ ditch Avalon and what/where are the facilities they have replaced it with?
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Old February 14th, 2012, 09:56 PM   #392
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Why did TVNZ ditch Avalon and what/where are the facilities they have replaced it with?
'Cause they only had one regular show being produced there,

They have moved all production to the mothership in Auckland

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Old February 14th, 2012, 11:54 PM   #393
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Why did TVNZ ditch Avalon and what/where are the facilities they have replaced it with?
Over the years TVNZ have been moving its productions to Auckland. As more shows left, maintaining all that 23,000 square metres of largely unused space was costing a few million a year, so the studios are up for sale in 2013, completing TVNZs full shift north.
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Old February 18th, 2012, 03:05 AM   #394
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Banking on return of blue magic

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Sir Peter Jackson's Weta Digital is expecting that film director James Cameron will make Avatar 2 and 3 in Wellington, film industry sources say.

It is a job that could be worth hundreds of millions and employ hundreds of people for several years but it is not yet a done deal.

Confidence that Cameron would choose Weta and Wellington again to make Avatar 2 and 3 rose when the director recently bought two farms in the Wairarapa.

Cameron having a base here is seen as a "positive" sign that his decision will favour Weta. He has expressed a desire to shoot the sequels here but a decision is yet to be announced by his company Lightstorm Entertainment.

About $362 million was spent in New Zealand making the first Avatar 3-D film, employing hundreds of digital animators in Wellington for years on the complex computer-generated images.

Avatar employed more than 1500 people in New Zealand and injected about $100m into the Wellington economy alone. As well as the digital animation, Weta did the conceptual design, specialty costumes, props and weapons for the film.

Two Weta sources said they hoped Wellington would be picked. "Fingers crossed," one highly placed source said.

The other said Cameron's move to the farm, which is about 15 to 20 minutes by helicopter from Weta's base near Wellington airport, gave greater confidence.

Film Wellington manager Delia Shanly said they had heard the rumours of Avatar sequels being made in Wellington, but there was nothing concrete.

"It would be absolutely amazing to have them back here," she said. "It put so many millions into the Wellington and New Zealand economy. It would just be amazing (to get parts 2 and 3)."

While Cameron's decision to buy a farm here did not make the decision a certainty, "it is not unpromising – it is a very good sign".

In another good sign for Weta, US director Steven Spielberg this week confirmed that Peter Jackson would direct the second Tintin movie in a planned trilogy. Spielberg said Jackson would go into production on the Tintin sequel as soon as he finishes work on The Hobbit films.

Released last year, the first Tintin film has already made US$371m worldwide.

Avatar also got $52m in tax breaks from Kiwi taxpayers despite it becoming the biggest selling movie of all time, making more than US$2.8 billion for Twentieth Century Fox studios.

That is part of Fox Entertainment Group, in turn owned by media mogul Rupert Murdoch's News Corporation.

In the 2010 June year, Twentieth Century Fox made a US$1.35b profit on the back of Avatar and Ice Age. Some estimates put Avatar's absolute profits for Fox at more than US$1.15 billion, even more profitable than Cameron's other blockbuster, Titanic.

Shanly said the tax breaks were vital for the film sector to attract filmmakers to New Zealand.

New Zealand was also attractive for non-unionised labour and skilled staff at companies.

"If we didn't have a 15 per cent tax break we wouldn't even begin a conversation with these [overseas] film makers," she said.

New Zealand was never going to be the $2 Shop of film making and should not try to be a cheap destination.

But people like Cameron were attracted here by highly skilled people who can deliver.

"We have a huge reputation for our talent and they can make something happen, even it has never been done before," Shanly said.

Part of the production of Avatar was based in Wellington, including the world-class facilities at Stone Street Studios, Weta Workshop and Weta Digital. The three groups are jointly owned by Sir Peter Jackson, Sir Richard Taylor and Jamie Selkirk.

There was also live action shooting in other parts of the city for Avatar.

The film was seen as a technological breakthrough by Weta Digital, following on from the visual effects work in Jackson's King Kong and The Lord of the Rings films.

For Avatar, Weta used high definition video cameras attached to an actor's face to capture highly realistic facial animation for the characters in the science fiction film.

The fact that Weta had delivered in the first Avatar and helped make Cameron pots of money were seen as factors in Wellington's favour.

Making the sequels would also add to the continuity of the movies and maintain Cameron's vision for the world of Avatar, set on the fictional planet Pandora.

It would also slot in nicely to the Weta work schedule, after the two Hobbit films are completed during the next two years. However, Wellington could be over-ruled by a producer who was looking at the bottom line, possibly seeking bigger tax breaks elsewhere.

Fox did not respond to requests for comment about Avatar.

Reports last year also cast some doubt about a return to Wellington for the Avatar sequels.

Cameron and his team have moved to the MBS Media Campus in Hollywood where Pirates of the Caribbean and Iron Man were made. Avatar producer Jon Landau said in June last year that the campus would be the "heart of the next two Avatars".

But at the time Weta boss Joe Letteri said Wellington was still in the running for Avatar 2 and 3, and that Cameron had visited Weta to discuss its possible involvement. MBS Media could be used for performance capture with other work done in Wellington.

WETA is the second largest digital animation company in the world, just behind US giant Pixar, with about 900 staff now working on two Hobbit movies and visual effects for Superman – Man of Steel.

The first Hobbit film should be finished at the end of this year and the second the year after. The Superman film is slated for 2013, as well as another film, Elysium, with Weta doing work on conceptual designs and physical effects.

Elysium is another science fiction film set on a planet in the distant future, written and directed by Neill Blomkamp, who also directed District 9. Elysium stars Matt Damon, Jodie Foster and the main production is being done in Canada.

The follow-up Avatar movies are expected to be shot back to back and released in December 2014 and 2015 respectively, according to reports last year which quoted Cameron saying he was working on the two scripts.

However, the first film was long delayed and some international references suggest Avatar 2 will come out in 2016, not 2014.

Given the huge amount of work and time taken to produce the first Avatar film a decision on where to make it could be made in coming months.

The first Avatar is the biggest selling movie of all time, unadjusted for inflation, making about US$2.8 billion worldwide. Cameron's Titanic, made in 1997, grossed US$1.8 billion, at the time also the biggest selling movie.

Despite the huge success of Avatar, which earned US$350m for Cameron alone, New Zealand taxpayers kicked in almost $53m to make it.

Avatar received a total of $52.9 million from the Large Budget Screen Production Grant based on qualifying spending of $362.8m, according to Film Commission figures.

The grant was given to the film production company 880 Productions, part of the Fox studios empire.

Weta Digital's Letteri was travelling overseas and could not be reached for comment.

A Weta spokesman in Wellington said there was "not much we can say". The decision was up to Cameron's production company: "They have all the cards."

Letteri is expected to attend the Oscars on February 26, where he is nominated for a Visual Effects award for work on Rise of the Planet of the Apes.

It is the sixth Oscar nomination for Letteri, who was also won the award for Avatar in 2009 and King Kong as well as two Lord of the Rings films by Jackson. He was nominated but did not win for I, Robot.

Meanwhile, Shanly said having Cameron living in New Zealand would bring the film world closer to Wellington, given his international connections.

The first Avatar film did not involve much location shooting – most work was done in a studio.

Avatar was "the most prominent film in the Western world, so having that based in Wellington, showed that Wellington could perform" Shanly said.

It was the first major international film done in Wellington that was not made by Jackson.

Cameron was a director at the top of his creative game who had chosen Weta to create a "ground-breaking" vision of the science fiction world of Pandora.

"He chose Wellington. That is a real stamp of approval," Shanly said.

"And Wellington did it extremely successfully."
http://www.stuff.co.nz/business/indu...-of-blue-magic
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Old February 28th, 2012, 11:42 PM   #395
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Bret McKenzie wins Oscar

Bret McKenzie has won an Oscar for his original song Man or Muppet in The Muppets film. The sweet comic duet was sung by Jason Segel and his Muppet brother in the film, the first big-screen adventure in 12 years for Kermit the frog and company. McKenzie, one half of comedy duo Flight of the Conchords, was musical supervisor on The Muppets, a role that involved overseeing the songs on the film and writing three himself. Earlier Muppet flicks had been nominated for four music Oscars but lost each time, including the song prize for The Rainbow Connection, Kermit's signature tune from 1979's The Muppet Movie.

''I grew up in New Zealand watching the Muppets on TV. I never dreamed I'd get to work with them,'' said Wellingtonian McKenzie,'' and joked about meeting Kermit for the first time. ''Like many stars here tonight, he's a lot shorter in real life.'' He thanked his two children and wife Hannah Clarke, who was at the awards and wearing Kiwi label Zambesi. His parents were also mentioned for "never telling me to get a real job".
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Old March 2nd, 2012, 08:34 AM   #396
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Scale of Hobbit shoot revealed | The Hobbit Production Video #6


On set in New Zealand for the filming of Peter Jackson's The Hobbit, the massive scale of The Hobbit production has been revealed in Sir Peter Jackson's latest on-set video. The video, posted this morning on Facebook, also promotes New Zealand tourism with a large portion of the comments posted raving about New Zealand's scenery. In the video Sir Ian McKellen - who plays the wizard Gandalf - says New Zealand is shown at its ''spectacular best". "Don't feel sorry for actors leaving home for seven-and-a-half weeks. We are very, very well looked after.'' The catering team estimated 100kg of meat was cooked each day for crew on location, and up to 300 coffees were made each morning. On location in Central Otago up to 10 helicopters were in the area ferrying cast, crew, gear and food to remote mountain top locations, as well as doing aerial shooting.

Near Turoa ski field on Mt Ruapehu a massive elevated structure was built so the crew did not damage vegetation. And in Pelorus Bridge, between Blenheim and Nelson, the river was bridged to film the dwarves travelling down the river in barrels. But at the last minute the whole set-up had to be dismantled when police warned of severe weather coming on the notoriously fast-rising river. "I have never see a crew pack up their gear so fast,'' Jackson said. The next day the whole area they had been shooting in was under water. Two crews were criss-crossing the country doing the location filming and met half way, celebrating with a day 127 "half-way hoodie". The shoot has now returned to Miramar in Wellington for the final 100 days of shooting.
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Old March 6th, 2012, 06:33 AM   #397
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The Rock's godly new role


New Zealand will once again be the home of Hercules, but this time it's a pro-wrestler and not Kevin Sorbo in the legendary role. According to entertainment website Variety, Dwayne "The Rock" Johnson will be returning to the country he grew up in to star in the blockbuster based on the comic book Hercules: The Thracian War. Directed by Brett Ratner, the film will start shooting in October. The Samoan star Johnson was born in California but lived with his mother's family in Auckland as a child. He attended Richmond Road Primary School in Ponsonby before returning to his native America. He started his career as a pro-wrestler before going on to star in huge Hollywood films The Mummy Returns, Fast Five and more recently Journey 2: The Mysterious Island.
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Old March 17th, 2012, 11:25 PM   #398
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The Emperor: Whenuapai goes Hollywood


Tommy Lee Jones strides past, the very image of his character, General Douglas MacArthur. A plucky RNZAF flight lieutenant asks if he would like to join the air force. "Not yours," he drawls. The two Hollywood stars have maintained a low profile while shooting the World War II drama The Emperor in New Zealand. But yesterday, the Herald on Sunday was given exclusive access to the big-budget production. Nearly 300 extras, plus dozens of crew members, were on location at Whenuapai Air Base in West Auckland as they recreated General MacArthur's arrival in Japan at the end of Word War II. In a break from filming, Fox, who plays Japanese expert General Bonner Fellers, says he has been "pretty slammed with work" during his two-month stay, though he did manage to get a few days off while his wife Margherita Ronchi and two children Kyle and Byron were here.

"We went to Piha and it was frickin' fantastic. We had such a nice weekend there. We spent the entire time in the water. The kids spent six years in Hawaii when I was working on Lost so for them to get back in the surf was awesome, we had such a blast." The family have gone home to Oregon and Fox says he is desperate to join them when filming ends next week. "I'm really excited to go home. It's so hard for me being away from the three most important people in the world to me." In the meantime, he has been indulging his love of wine - and has taken a particular liking to Waiheke Island's Destiny Bay vineyard. He visited the winery last weekend and met owners the Spratt family.

Fox says most fans recognise him as Jack out of epic TV fantasy Lost. "But honestly, I don't get recognised most of the time. I try to keep a low profile." Today, the famously gruff Jones is off-limits for interviews. But he mingles freely with the crew, standing in line for lunch and sitting down to eat with co-workers. Jones came to New Zealand with wife Dawn Laurel, and the couple flew to Queenstown for a sightseeing trip last weekend. Jones has a special connection with the country: his eldest son Austin was born here in 1982 while he was filming pirate film Nate and Hayes. Kiwi producer Tim Coddington worked on that film with Jones. "I remember feeling sorry for Tommy at the time, having his first-born son while he was filming," Coddington says.

The cast and extras spent up to 18 hours on set yesterday as Whenuapai was turned into Atsugi Airfield in Japan, where MacArthur arrived in August, 1945, to accept the Japanese surrender. The production team had earlier turned Southdown Freezing Works into war-ravaged Tokyo. Director Peter Webber, whose credits include The Girl With the Pearl Earring, says it is a great showcase for New Zealand filmmaking. The Kiwi-dominated crew has brought a refreshing "can-do" attitude. "In some countries you get this thing where people are a bit like 'oh that's not my department' but here everyone mucks in." The film deals with whether Japan's wartime ruler, Emperor Hirohito, should be tried and hanged as a war criminal - a subject that Webber says still resonates today. "The Americans dealt with this in 1945 - I would argue with more intelligence than the situation was handled in Iraq. Japan rose from the ashes and the rubble and became a world power."
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Old March 22nd, 2012, 08:38 PM   #399
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New Zealand fears competition with low cost and trembles

New Zealand, an important center for the global film industry, may soon lose palatability, in favor of other cheaper locations.
Wellington has an international business location in the map of the world's most popular film. Apart from the breathtaking scenery and unspoiled nature, the ocean country, and its capital in the first place, they also offer advanced logistics facilities for the production of action movies and cartoons. Weta Digital (special effects), Weta Workshop (costumes and sets) and the Stone Street Studios, belonging to Jackson, the award-winning magician tricks and costumes by Richard Taylor and Jamie Selkirk, have won major contracts in the special effects in film success, such as X-Men, The Chronicles of Narnia, Gulliver's Travels and the remake of A-Team. Weta Digital is now the second most important group of digital animation in the world after the U.S. Pixar.
The enigma Avatar - This hard-won record, however, could easily be lost as more and more countries seek to attract large film productions, promising favorable conditions, and spent, low labor costs. By the time Steven Spielberg confirmed that the second film of Tin Tin, probably to be followed by a third party, will be directed by Jackson. Filming will begin as soon as the Kiwi director has finished production of The Hobbit, the film based on the novel by Tolkien sees Ian McKellen and Martin Freeman among its performers and will be inaugurated next November in Wellington. Projected in theaters last year, the first cinematic adventure of Tin Tin, entitled The Secret of the Unicorn, has so far grossed $ 371 million worldwide and the second episode promises to be another hit.
Despite the confirmation of Steven Spielberg and the contract to provide special effects to the new movie Superman-Man of Steel, the Kiwi film industry trembles for the possible loss of what promises to be a new box office success. The stakes are high. More than 360 million New Zealand dollars were spent in New Zealand (of which at least 100 in the city of Wellington) and 1500 people were employed in the production of the first episode of Avatar, James Cameron's sci-fi blockbuster, which tore up the record profits recorded by the Titanic. Hundreds of animators have worked for years on complex computer-generated images. The Weta team has also produced the conceptual design, costumes, weapons and equipment for the film ecologist.
Avatar was an important film for the film industry downunder because it was the first big international success, to have been produced entirely in New Zealand, apart from the films of Jackson, however, were playing at home. Now in Wellington is feared that the Lightstorm Entertainment, the company Cameron, Avatar chooses to turn two three beyond, in a low cost of the new film meccas. A decision that it would deal a serious blow to New Zealand after the Twenty Century Fox, which produced the first Avatar, reported profits of 1.35 billion U.S. dollars (thanks to Avatar and Ice Age cartoon ) and has been assigned tax rebates for over $ 53 million from the Government of New Zealand kiwi.
Tax - The Large Budget Screen Production According to Grant (LBSPG), in fact, the film productions that spend more than 15 million NZ dollars in the southern country, can access contributions equal to 15% of costs carried out. Since 2007, the grants were extended to films that take place only post-production work, or visual effects and digital at a cost ranging from 3 to 15 million dollars. "We enjoy a great reputation around the world - Delia says Shanley, manager of the Wellington Film - for the talent of our engineers in the field of special effects and film production." Without these facilities, Shanley admits, however, the big American studios would never come close to New Zealand. Since 2003 the Government of Wellington has paid 189.4 million dollars to foreign productions. Efforts that have contributed to the generation for the local film production, foreign profits to 542 million dollars in 2009 alone, placing the country third in the world after Canada and Britain in this business.
Competition - Many countries have sniffed out the deal and are now put on the market with competitive packages. South Korea, for instance, recently announced it would invest $ 178 million U.S. computer graphics industry, with a focus on 3D technology, in a clear attempt to tap into a highly profitable business, revived by their avatar. Tax incentives have also been promised by the State of California, has announced that claims for at least 20% of costs, and that of Florida in recent days launched a fiscal stimulus package by the value of 300 million dollars for various industries, that of 'entertainment included. Many U.S. states are preparing similar packages to bring the film industry within the U.S. borders, after the mass exodus in recent years due to high domestic production costs. Other countries are at the forefront of Canada, the Czech Republic, Ireland and Mexico.
Breath - The news that Cameron has bought a farm in the Wairarapa region, a ten-minute helicopter flight from the roofs of Jackson's Weta, has made many think that the brilliant American director will rely more on talent from New Zealand for his works. At the same time, however, Cameron and his team have moved their place of work in the MBS Media Campus in Hollywood which produced such films as Pirates of the Caribbean, and Iron Man The New Zealand remains in suspense.
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Old April 2nd, 2012, 10:47 PM   #400
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NZ $3 billion screen industry soaring

Thirty-five feature films were made in New Zealand in the 2011 year, according to a Statistics New Zealand survey. The survey, covering the 12 months to March 31 last year, reflects the ebb and flow of the screen industry economy, with overall turnover including advertising up 4 per cent to $2.99 billion. The figures show how the film business is focused on activity in Wellington attached to Sir Peter Jackson's interests, including his post-production house and Weta Workshop. The period covered would have included preliminary work on The Hobbit. Figures represent economic activity as a whole rather than success for individual companies, and do not include detail about individual screen projects. They do incorporate more than $200 million of state grants and subsidies for both the film and television production industry, as well as advertising production and sale of television time and subscriptions to pay television.

Total broadcasting industry revenue - including free-to-air and pay TV subscriptions - was up 7 per cent to $1.26 billion. That represents 40 per cent of the gross revenue for the whole screen industry. On a smaller scale, cinema exhibition revenue was up 6 per cent to $163 million, largely due to the higher charges on tickets for 3D movies. "These figures highlight the determination of those making local films and working on international productions to make great movies," says New Zealand Film Commission chief executive Graeme Mason. "It also emphasises the importance of the sector's contribution to the New Zealand economy." The survey shows fewer businesses were taking part in the industry but 180 earned over $1 million a year - 18 more than in 2010.

The majority of these businesses are in the production or post-production sectors. The film industry in Auckland has sought to define screen industry activity as being based here. But regional data in the survey continued to define Auckland as the base for broadcasting and television production, while Wellington was the main base for film. Auckland-based businesses that took part in the screen survey increased gross revenue by $135 million to $2.3 billion in 2011. The vast majority of revenue for Wellington-based screen industry businesses was in feature film work, which overall was worth more than $500 million in 2011. Revenue for South Island-based businesses rose 17 per cent to $91 million, with most of the growth from increases in production and post-production.
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