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United States Urban Issues Discussions and pictures of highrises, urbanity, architecture and the built environment of US cities



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Old February 17th, 2012, 07:45 PM   #21
Northsider
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Chicago's population is down 25% from it's peak population of 3.6 million in 1950.
Almost every non-sunbelt city's population is down from 1950...if not every city. Still, that's a sad number to digest.
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Old February 17th, 2012, 09:32 PM   #22
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Originally Posted by Northsider View Post
Almost every non-sunbelt city's population is down from 1950...if not every city. Still, that's a sad number to digest.
Interesting that the two most densely populated cities in the US, New York City and San Francisco, are both at all time highs in population.
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Old February 18th, 2012, 01:22 AM   #23
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NYC is unique, San Fran is tiny (literally). Almost all major US cities in the last census either saw their population decline or saw their population growth slow down since 2000. Even NYC's population growth was much smaller than anticipated.

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Still, that's a sad number to digest.

It's not ideal, but why do we have to assume that everyone wants to live in a city? I lived in Chicago for 36 years, and I had enough, moving my family to the south suburbs in December 2010. The city is at fault for not being able to keep it's residents.
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for the Pelasgians, too, were a Greek nation originally from the Peloponnesus
The Roman Antiquities of Dionysius of Halicarnassus
http://penelope.uchicago.edu/Thayer/...assus/1B*.html

Macedonia, of course, is a part of Greece". Strabo, VII, Frg. 9
http://penelope.uchicago.edu/Thayer/...ragments*.html

But north of the gulf, the first inhabitants are Greeks called Epirotes....
Procopius
http://books.google.com/books?id=9m6...page&q&f=false

Last edited by chicagogeorge; February 18th, 2012 at 03:25 AM.
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Old February 18th, 2012, 11:14 AM   #24
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Originally Posted by prelude91 View Post
Interesting that the two most densely populated cities in the US, New York City and San Francisco, are both at all time highs in population.
Since you brought it up, let's see the five biggest US cities density:
NYC 10,630/km2
Los Angeles 3,124.45/km2
Chicago 4,447.4/km2
Houston 1,505/km2
Philadelphia 4,405.4/km2
Phoenix 1,188.4/km2
So it's quite clear that the density of Chicago it's not even half of NYC.
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Old February 18th, 2012, 10:44 PM   #25
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Originally Posted by Northsider View Post
Almost every non-sunbelt city's population is down from 1950...if not every city. Still, that's a sad number to digest.
Not Seattle. We peaked once in 1960, fell 13% at the 1986 estimate, and have easily surpassed that figure now, despite a dramatic reduction in household sizes. The trick was turning a predominantly single-family city into one that's now a little over over half multifamily by unit count. In fairness, some of our original house development was in the 50s and 60s in some outer and hard-to-get to neighborhoods.
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Old February 25th, 2012, 01:35 AM   #26
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Originally Posted by mhays View Post
Not Seattle. We peaked once in 1960, fell 13% at the 1986 estimate, and have easily surpassed that figure now, despite a dramatic reduction in household sizes. The trick was turning a predominantly single-family city into one that's now a little over over half multifamily by unit count. In fairness, some of our original house development was in the 50s and 60s in some outer and hard-to-get to neighborhoods.
Yeah, I recall when "neighborhood" Seattle was mostly single-story wooden houses & bungalows as far as the eye could see. Not surprising given the plentiful local lumber supply. Now you've lots more apartment buildings.

I see that both Portland & much moreso Vancouver have been building up too, with a significant increase in population, density & urban feel.

By contrast many cities which went the way of large-scale housing & apartment demolition--in many cases promoted by Federal policies--ended up with....Surprise! Surprise! Lower populations!
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Old October 4th, 2013, 10:29 PM   #27
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Originally Posted by chicagogeorge View Post
That's a stereotype. I never get that impression when I visit. I will say, that I think people on the street here in Chicago are more willing to engage a complete stranger in conversation.

Personally I love NYC.

Diversity: NYC
Density: NYC (almost too much in some spots, I mean do you really want to live packed in like a sardine?)
Neighborhoods: NYC more distinct neighborhoods thanks to geography, but Chicago's not far behind
Mass transit: NYC easily
Aesthetics: Chicago imho
Skyline: NYC bigger, Chicago's better imho
Crime/Poverty: Worse in Chicago as a result to the gang problem here
Restaurant: Toss up, but I will go with Chicago
Museums: NYC, there is just way more of them.
Theater: NYC, Chicago is the "Second City" not the "First"
Cost of living: Cheaper in Chicago, you can get more for less
Suburbs: Both are similar. At least the ones outside NYC I have been too
Politics: NYC Boss Tweed era long gone. Chicago is the most politically corrupt city in the US.
Climate: Similar, NYC's more stable however (due to the Atlantic). Chicago's winters are definitely colder, and Chicago is also more humid during the summer, more like Philadelphia. Day to day temperature swings are wilder here
Excellent objective analysis
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Old October 9th, 2013, 09:29 PM   #28
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I think NYC's greatest attribute can also be its biggest turn-off, depending on the person. Manhattan (and even huge sections of the boroughs to some extent) have a level of intensity that can be off-putting . Waking up to a street covered in shadows most of the day and coming home to cramped spaces, trash on the streets, big crowds everywhere you go can be stressful after a while. Even if you live in the boroughs, your path is going to undoubtedly lead to Manhattan.

The next tier of cities have a level of density that's less overwhelming but functional. If you're looking for NYC urbanity, there's nothing really comparable in the US, so you're going to run into this every time a New York compared with other US cities thread comes up. I think NYC realizes that it needs more open space and trees, as evident by its plans for the riverfront.

As for Chicago, its one major ace in the hole is the lakefront.



http://www.allabouthoneymoons.com/_b...moons_Articles

The fact I found this image on a page with Hawaii and Puerto Vallarta speaks a lot. What seperates it from resorts (besides the fact its frozen for like 3 months lol) is that its walking distance from all the trappings of a diverse working city. You can literally walk two minutes from one of the world's largest downtowns with one of the most exclusive shopping streets to the beach. You'd be hard-pressed to find this anywhere in the world. Either you get tourist-oriented resort neighborhoods such as Copacabana, Gold Coast and Miami Beach, or you get major cities with waterfronts with docks and utilities, such as Tokyo and New York. Chicago's lakefront is that healthy medium between the two.
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