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Old October 3rd, 2011, 07:00 AM   #21
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Hong Kong split over historic maids residency case
By Beh Lih Yi
Agence France-Presse
9:11 pm | Sunday, October 2nd, 2011

http://globalnation.inquirer.net/143...residency-case

HONG KONG—Every Sunday, the public spaces and walkways of Hong Kong are jammed with Filipina and Indonesian domestic workers using their one day off to gather with their friends and fellow countrywomen.

The gleaming skyscrapers of the financial hub are a far cry from the often poor neighbourhoods they have come from.

Now a landmark court ruling has given them a chance to apply for permanent residency – but the decision, which has polarized opinions in the southern Chinese city, has also prompted different reactions among maids themselves.

Newspapers are filled with opposing arguments and rival protests were held in the run-up to the case hearing. About 500 people held a protest Sunday against the court ruling.
For some maids, the ruling represents the hope of a better future. Lannie Hubag, 45, a Philippine domestic helper in Hong Kong since 1998, said she would consider applying for permanent residency.

“I would like to try because if I get it, my husband and two daughters in the Philippines can join me in Hong Kong and my daughters could get better education,” said Hubag.
“We’re happy with the court decision because it means the discrimination has been removed,” she added.

But costs and family ties are a deterrent for others. Speaking in her native Indonesian, Asriyatun, 34, said: “I would like to go back” without hesitation, after working for six years in Hong Kong.

Foreigners can seek permanent residency in Hong Kong after seven years of uninterrupted stay, gaining rights to vote and to live in the city without a work visa.

There are as many as 292,000 foreign maids in the city, but they were specifically excluded from being allowed to apply. In the first case of its kind in Asia, the city’s High Court ruled on Friday that the provision was unconstitutional.

Permanent residency would mean a domestic worker was no longer tied to a single employer, but could take any job and access benefits such as public housing.

According to a pro-government political party there could be an influx of as many as 500,000 people – including children and spouses of foreign maids – costing HK$25 billion ($3.2 billion) in social welfare spending.

Unemployment could jump from the current 3.5 percent to 10 percent, the Democratic Alliance for the Betterment and Progress of Hong Kong claimed.

Following the ruling, currently about 117,000 foreign maids are entitled to apply for permanent residency in the densely populated city of seven million, where rents are sky-high and the income gap widening.

“I love Hong Kong, it’s a great city and we are treated better here,” said Asriyatun, wearing a black Islamic headscarf and chatting with a group of other Indonesian maids in Victoria Park, their regular meeting spot.

“But I have no plan to apply for permanent residency when I become eligible next year. I’m here to work, I have a family in Indonesia, I want to go back.”
Others in her group agreed.

A single mother, Asriyatun left East Java when her son was eight months old to become a domestic helper in Singapore, and later moved to Hong Kong. She works for a German banker’s family and her contract will expire in 2013.

She sees her son Shendy, now 14, once a year.

“I’m here to work for a living and for my son’s future so when he grows up, he doesn’t have to go elsewhere to work and be separated from his child – just like me,” said Asriyatun.

Dolores Balladares from Asian Migrants’ Coordinating Body, which represents 8,000 foreign maids in the city, said: “It’s only a main barrier that has been removed, it doesn’t mean we get this right automatically.

“The standard of living is very expensive here, it’s not easy. After working for many years in Hong Kong, many of the foreign domestic helpers just want to go back to reunite with their family,” said Balladares, a university graduate who has been a maid for 17 years.

Hong Kong is known as a better place for domestic helpers than many other parts of Asia. The city’s foreign maids are guaranteed one day off a week, paid sick leave and a minimum wage of HK$3,740 ($480) a month.

But rights groups say they still face general discrimination and a lack of legal protection. A maid’s visa is tied to a specific employer and activists say this leaves her vulnerable.

The government was disappointed with Friday’s ruling and said it would appeal.
It is planning to seek the court’s permission to not process any foreign maids’ residency applications while the appeal is under way, and some lawmakers have called on Hong Kong to refer the issue to Beijing.

“We recognize the contribution of domestic workers and their role in our economy, they free up many local women to join the workforce,” said businessman Jeff Lam, who opposed granting maids permanent residency.

“To give them permanent residency, however, is a separate story,” said Lam, who himself has a Filipina domestic worker to help with house chores.
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Old October 5th, 2011, 05:45 AM   #22
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Baldoz allays fears of exodus to Hong Kong
By Philip C. Tubeza
Philippine Daily Inquirer
3:37 am | Wednesday, October 5th, 2011

http://globalnation.inquirer.net/145...s-to-hong-kong

Labor Secretary Rosalinda Baldoz on Tuesday allayed fears of Hong Kong citizens that Filipinos might flood the former Crown colony if Filipino domestic helpers there were allowed to apply for permanent residency.

Baldoz pointed out that overseas Filipino workers (OFWs) go only to destinations where their skills and labor are needed and that Filipinos who go to Hong Kong for work would still have to pass its strict requirements.

“The thing is, we only go to a market where’s there’s a need for us. We don’t go there just to be able to avail of that privilege so to speak, but simply because there are local employers who are in need of our services. That should be emphasized,” Baldoz said in an interview.

“We have to pass through their immigration requirements, education, and health requirements. Of course, there’s also the actually need of employers who are hiring,” she added.

A recent court ruling in Hong Kong allowed foreign domestic helpers to apply for permanent residency if they had continuously worked in the city for seven years. The ruling provoked a public outcry and the Hong Kong government has promised to appeal the decision.

Baldoz said she welcomed the ruling of the Hong Kong Court of First Instance granting the right to abode to foreign domestic workers.

She praised Filipino domestic helper Evangeline Vallejos, who initiated the first of several legal challenges, raising the issue of discrimination in HK laws that banned permanent residency for foreign domestic workers but not for others types of workers.

“We are proud of Ms. Evangeline Vallejos and we admire her courage in challenging the decision of the Hong Kong Registration of Persons tribunal which has denied her application for permanent residency after staying in Hong Kong for 25 years,” Baldoz said.
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Old October 7th, 2011, 07:31 AM   #23
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Passion For Reason
OFW triumph in a Hong Kong court
By: Raul C. Pangalangan
Philippine Daily Inquirer
9:44 pm | Thursday, October 6th, 2011

http://opinion.inquirer.net/14775/of...ong-kong-court

A Hong Kong court recently ruled in favor of a Filipina maid’s petition for permanent residency based on Hong Kong’s Basic Law, the equivalent of the territory’s constitution.
The decision pits Hong Kong’s declared commitment to the rule of law against its fears of an immigration deluge. It parallels the Filipinos’ own local debates on whether white-collar professionals should be exempt from the strict exit regulations applied to OFWs.

We all—Hong Kong Chinese or Pinoy—go into intellectual contortions to craft class-neutral regulations to camouflage class-based prejudices. It exposes both societies’—Hong Kong’s and Pinoy’s—own self-contradictions, or in the words of a philosopher, the “incongruity between the [‘official political dogmas’] they had accepted [and] the social life they in fact lived out in their relations to one another and to their subordinates.”
Evangeline Banao Vallejos has worked as a maid in Hong Kong since 1986 under a succession of fixed-term contracts. By the time she applied for permanent residency, she had been a Hong Kong resident for more than 22 years, but for the brief intervals she would spend in Manila as required by Hong Kong each time a contract expired.

The Hong Kong court found that the entire family of her employer “treated her as part of their family,” supported her residency application, and would continue to employ her should she gain such residency. She had “integrated into the local community,” was “active … in volunteer work [for her] church” and “wishe[d] to retire in HK” with her husband. Her children were all grown up, married and financially independent—causing none of the immigration nightmares raised by critics. In the language of public interest litigation, she was the ideal Hohfeldian plaintiff, a sort of pre-beatification Rosa Parks of the 21st-century civil rights movement.

Since its historic handover back to Chinese sovereignty in 1997, Hong Kong has been governed by a charter, the Basic Law, that would secure for the next 50 years the “one country, two systems” approach to signal the world that Hong Kong will continue to be the center of Asian markets, and signal Hong Kong’s people that Beijing would continue to respect their human rights.

The Basic Law gave permanent residency to people “not of Chinese nationality who entered Hong Kong with valid travel documents, have ordinarily resided in Hong Kong for a continuous period of not less than seven years and have taken Hong Kong as their place of permanent residence.” This would give rise to the “right of abode,” to remain in Hong Kong without “any restriction in respect of his or her employment, place of residence and duration of stay.”

However, the Immigration Ordinance excluded “foreign domestic helpers” (or FDH in the idiom of Hong Kong law), relying on the definition of the term “ordinarily resided.” FDH did not meet that test, it was argued, because inter alia they are typically allowed into Hong Kong solely on fixed-term contracts and must leave Hong Kong once these expire; they live in the homes of their employers and do not establish an independent household; they are banned from bringing in their dependents “to ensure that they will maintain genuine links in their own country,” otherwise the surge in immigration would overwhelm Hong Kong’s resources.

The court rejected the view. How different is the FDH from any other person employed in Hong Kong under their labor laws? They are equally subject to whatever privations or luxuries any employee faces in the open market. The court also held that the issue of FDH maintaining bonds with the home country is not relevant because what the Basic Law requires is merely “ordinary residence.”

We Filipinos are used to seeing our courts decide highly contentious disputes. In Vallejos v. Commissioner of Registration, the Hong Kong courts faced precisely one such case where the “socio-economic and political implications of a particular outcome necessarily transcend the legal analysis of the issues.” The court then says: “But it is important that such public discussions should not be allowed to confuse the proper remit of the adjudicative function of the court in the case itself. In the performance of his judicial duty, a judge should always focus on, and only focus on, the legal merits of the issues which he or she has to determine.” As a Filipino law professor, I urge local judges to read the decision both for the nuance of its language and its careful reasoning.

The decision of the Hong Kong Court of First Instance will obviously not be the end of the story. The case will be appealed possibly all the way to Beijing, where a different interpretive tradition prevails and where the Basic Law, a constitution unto the Hong Kong Special Administrative Region, is but a statute unto the National People’s Congress.

I have read some of the arguments of the Hong Kong critics of the decision, who apparently have launched a signature campaign against the maids and garnered more than 90,000 signatures. One said: “We don’t think this is discrimination. We have rules, they come to Hong Kong just to make money.” But couldn’t this be said as well of all the “gweilos” who come to Hong Kong to enjoy job and business opportunities not available in the home country—and then we call one group “expatriates” and the other, FDH. And, typical of a legal system built on case-law, can the “just to make money” argument apply to Evangeline, who has invested 22 years of a life embracing a community that wouldn’t consider her its own?
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Old October 7th, 2011, 07:54 AM   #24
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Wow, that's pretty big news.
But what happens once the Filipinos come over to HK, how are they going to make a living?
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Old October 7th, 2011, 11:06 AM   #25
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Just like any other immigrant ever in the world ever has.
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Old October 7th, 2011, 04:29 PM   #26
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Legal right to apply for residency is one thing, but making a living in fast-paced HK is a big problem. As I understand it, many DH will not want to continue working as such if they can apply for residency in HK. So what then?
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Old October 7th, 2011, 08:51 PM   #27
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Quote:
Originally Posted by _00_deathscar View Post
Just like any other immigrant ever in the world ever has.
Sure, but it will take ages for them to own a proper house. Especially when even the native HongKong college graduates can't afford houses of their own.
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Old October 8th, 2011, 07:53 AM   #28
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Quote:
Originally Posted by lkiller123 View Post
Wow, that's pretty big news.
But what happens once the Filipinos come over to HK, how are they going to make a living?
There are already a significant number of Filipinos who have permanent residency in HK but not necessarily domestic helpers.

That is for them to decide what they are going to do with their lives and the kind of work they are going to find. Most likely they will find work in the number of Philippine based firms that have offices in HK.

Honestly, I'm not in favor of granting permanent residency to domestic helpers that fact they went to HK under contract even if they have been there for 7 years or more.

HK is already over populated. What more if permanent residency is granted to these large number of domestic helpers not just from The Philippines but also from Indonesia or any other country that send contract workers to the region.

And most like to domestic helpers granted permanent residency, I would not be surprised if they also bring their families to HK as well.

The territory is already having problems with people from Mainland China coming in. Being lenient on this will cause more people to come in already limited land.
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Old October 8th, 2011, 08:08 AM   #29
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Old October 10th, 2011, 09:06 AM   #30
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Filipino maid in Hong Kong can’t believe she made history
By Yolanda Sotelo
Inquirer Northern Luzon
1:46 am | Sunday, October 9th, 2011

http://globalnation.inquirer.net/149...e-made-history

URDANETA CITY, Pangasinan—Evangeline Vallejos is happily incredulous that she won her case for permanent residency in Hong Kong, for which she had been fighting for three years.

“Unbelievable,” she said on Saturday when reached by the Inquirer in China where she was vacationing with her employers. “But I am very happy I won. Ang tagal kong hinintay ito (I have long waited for this).”

Vallejos, 59, has been employed as a maid in Hong Kong since 1986. She said that while she was not sure she would win the case, she trusted the law granting permanent residency to foreigners who had lived in the Chinese territory for seven years.

She said many Filipino workers in Hong Kong were happy about the court decision handed down on Sept. 30 because it paved the way for thousands of others to seek permanent residency.

But in Barangay Paurido where Vallejos’ family lives, there was hardly a stir when news broke of her legal victory.

Family members took pride in her achievement. But while a door has been opened for them to live in Hong Kong, Vallejos’ husband, Zacarias Oria, said they were not planning to do so.

And Vallejos—who is using her maiden name as it appears in her passport—has not discussed with the family the possibility of settling there, Oria told the Inquirer in an interview recently.

In reports, Justice Johnson Lam was quoted as saying in his decision that the immigration provision denying foreign maids the right to gain permanent residency after seven years, which is granted to other foreigners, was inconsistent with Hong Kong’s Constitution.

But the Hong Kong government will appeal Lam’s ruling, the reports said.

Fighter

Oria, 60, said he received a call from his wife shortly after the decision was issued.

“It was a very brief call. She just said, ‘Nanalo ang kaso (The case won),’ then the phone went dead. Then I saw the news on TV the next day,” he said.

Oria, a tricycle driver, has visited his wife in Hong Kong only twice. “Life is difficult there, and there are no available jobs for men. Most jobs there are for women,” he said.

Vallejos’ legal fight and her eventual victory did not come as a surprise for Oria and their five adult children.

Oria described his wife as “a fighter who will not stop fighting for what she thinks is right.”

“Matapang siya, palaban (She’s brave, aggressive),” he added. “That’s why I was not afraid when she decided to pursue the case for her permanent residency.”

The children, all now employed and raising their own families, said they were proud of their mother.

“Imagine, she is only a maid and a high school graduate but she managed to fight for her permanent residency in Hong Kong,” said her third child, Ryan.

Vallejos managed to send the children to college with her earnings as a maid.
Reggie, 36, has a degree in electronics and communication engineering; Renante, 34, in architecture; Ryan, 32, in accountancy; Gilbert, 29, in nursing; and Jaime, 27, in business management.

Helping hand

According to Ryan’s wife, Shiery, Vallejos is helping other maids in Hong Kong who are grappling with various problems, including abuse by their employers, early termination of work contracts, and illness.

“Siya ang sumbungan (They take their problems to her). She never lets them down. She goes with them to the labor department to seek settlement of the cases. Most of the time, she is able to get help and benefits for distressed OFWs (overseas Filipino workers),” Shiery said.

It helps that Vallejos’ employers, whom she has been serving for 25 years, are kind and supportive of her advocacy. It was they who encouraged her to pursue the permanent residency case, Shiery said.

She said the house of Vallejos’ employers was always open to her fellow Filipinos as well as her guests from the Philippines.

Vallejos has apparently become so close to her employers that one of them flew to the Philippines in July to stand as sponsor at the wedding of her youngest son.

Shiery and another daughter-in-law, Erna (Renante’s wife), also worked in Hong Kong as maids on Vallejos’ prodding.

“She wanted us to experience her life as a domestic helper,” said Shiery, a management graduate. “We stayed there for two years. It’s a difficult job.”

Happy family

Before she went to work as a maid in Hong Kong, Vallejos was a washerwoman in Urdaneta City.

Oria said he and his wife had agreed that she would work overseas and he would stay to tend to their children.

“Ang hirap kasi ng buhay namin noon. Inaapi kami dahil wala kaming pera (Our life was so hard then. We experienced being oppressed because we had no money),” Oria said.

It was inevitable that the children, some of whom were mere toddlers when their mother left, grew closer to their father.

Recalled Ryan: “Sometimes she would be jealous because of our close relationship with our father. She would say, ‘I know I did not raise you.’ But ours is a happy family. We would make her laugh and everything would be all right again. She would laugh again.”

The children also said their mother tried to make up for her absence by constantly phoning and talking to them.

They said she always reminded them not to fight and to always stand by one another.
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Old October 17th, 2011, 04:17 AM   #31
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Don't fuel bias against helpers, authorities told
The Standard
Monday, October 17, 2011

Human rights and labor groups want official help to overcome discrimination against foreign domestic helpers.

Thirty-nine associations issued calls yesterday for the government to abide by a High Court ruling that a ban on helpers applying for right of abode is unconstitutional and also to help silence politicians cashing in on prejudice.

Open Door employers' group Doris Lee said the government "should be leading the way to end discrimination and not participate in fomenting discrimination in the home and in society."

Politicians have jumped on the issue and hurt helpers by saying they may take resources from others, Lee said.

The pleas came ahead of a second judicial review tomorrow. It has been filed by Filipino couple Daniel and Irene Domingo, who started as domestic helpers in the 1980s and have held "unconditional stay" endorsements since 2007. Their two eldest children are permanent residents, and their youngest - seven this month - is set to become one.

The main issue is whether an agreement by the Domingos with the director of immigration to withdraw a first appeal against the ban on permanent status in exchange for unconditional stay status means the court cannot look at whether they were residents before 2007.

The Court of First Instance's Justice Johnson Lam Man-hon ruled on September 30 that Philippine domestic helper Evangeline Banao Vallejos, who has worked in the territory since 1986, has the right to apply for abode.

In front of the HSBC headquarters, where Lee spoke, about 20 right-of- abode petitioners - half of them helpers - held placards reading "No discrimination" and "We love HK."

Eman Villanueva of the Asian Migrants Coordinating Body noted that the 39 groups fighting discrimination are not involved in the judicial reviews.

And Unison executive director Fermi Wong Wai-fun said: "We appreciate the contribution of foreign domestic helpers, especially Filipino and Indonesian ladies who take care of the elderly, the sick and babies. Because of their contribution many Hong Kong-Chinese ladies can go to work and realize their potential."

League of Social Democrats legislator Leung Kwok-hung said nobody should be discriminated against "by legislation, by any political structure or any human being."

He lamented that his party is the only one involved. The Democratic Party is silent on discrimination because of upcoming district council polls, so it is "selling its soul" for votes.

The groups singled out legislator and former secretary for security Regina Ip Lau Suk-yee for actions "that promote social exclusion and racial discrimination." She has urgently called for a reinterpretation of the Basic Law.
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Old October 29th, 2011, 07:32 PM   #32
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Beijing worried by maid court ruling
The Standard
Friday, October 28, 2011

A senior Beijing official has expressed concern over a High Court ruling which found that the Immigration Ordinance barring foreign domestic helpers, who have lived in Hong Kong for at least seven years, from right of abode breached the Basic Law.

Li Fei, deputy director of the Legislative Affairs Commission under the National People's Congress Standing Committee, said in Beijing: "The court in the SAR is handling the case. We are concerned about the first ruling. We will continue to monitor the next judicial procedure."

Li, however, refused to say whether the NPCSC interpretation of the Basic Law is a solution. "The case is part of an ongoing proceeding and that's all I can answer," he said.

Meanwhile, at least a dozen foreign domestic helpers were seen in the Immigration Tower in Wan Chai yesterday making inquiries about their application for the right of abode.

Secretary for Security Ambrose Lee Siu-kwong said on Wednesday that the number of right-of-abode applications had jumped from one a month to an average of 16 to 18, and 20 were recorded on Tuesday alone.

Lana, who has worked here for 16 years, said yesterday: "I'm just trying. If I don't succeed, that's no problem."

Jingky, who has 11 years of working experience, took a form along with two other friends. "Many Filipino friends want to give it a shot now," Jingky said.

Lolita Aquino, 54, who brought along all her relevant documents, said she was not young anymore but hopes to stay on in Hong Kong.

On Wednesday, the government's bid for a stay of execution of the Court of First Instance ruling in favor of domestic helper Evangeline Banao Vallejos was denied.

Justice Johnson Lam Man-hon ordered that the application of Vallejos be sent to the Registration of Persons Tribunal, which has to follow the September 30 ruling.
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Old February 24th, 2012, 05:53 AM   #33
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Hong Kong government appeals ruling on Filipino maid’s residency
Philippine Daily Inquirer
3:11 am | Friday, February 24th, 2012

http://globalnation.inquirer.net/266...17;s-residency

HONG KONG—Hong Kong’s government argued Tuesday against a landmark ruling that could let foreign maids gain permanent residency as it appealed a case that has raised concerns about ethnic discrimination and strains on social services.

In the ruling in September, a lower court judge found that an immigration provision denying foreign maids the right to apply for permanent residency after seven years—as other foreign residents can—was unconstitutional.

The case has divided Hong Kong, with some arguing that barring maids from applying for residency amounts to ethnic discrimination. Some groups fear the case will result in a massive influx of maids’ family members arriving in Hong Kong, putting a strain on the densely populated city’s social services and health and education systems, but supporters of the maids say those worries are unfounded.

On the first day of a scheduled three-day hearing, government lawyer David Pannick argued that the court’s ruling was wrong because it places limits on lawmakers’ ability to decide who is eligible to permanently settle in Hong Kong.

The judge in Hong Kong’s Court of First Instance had found in favor of Evangeline Banao Vallejos, a Filipino woman who had worked as a maid in Hong Kong since 1986. Vallejos sought a judicial review after her bid for permanent residency was rejected.

Pannick rejected arguments by Vallejos’ lawyers that denying maids the right to apply for residency undermined the rule of law. He said the Basic Law, Hong Kong’s mini-constitution, was not intended to be a “straitjacket” that prevented lawmakers from having flexibility when setting immigration policies to advance Hong Kong’s interests.

“Our argument is that the concept of ‘ordinary residence’ allows for a measure of discretion by the legislature,” Pannick told a three-judge panel in Hong Kong’s Court of Appeal. According to immigration provisions, foreign maids in Hong Kong are not considered “ordinarily resident.”

Mark Daly, one of Vallejos’ lawyers, would not comment on the government’s position but said, “We’re quite confident in our arguments.”

There are about 292,000 foreign domestic helpers in Hong Kong, and most are women from the Philippines or Indonesia. Others come from Thailand, Nepal, India, Pakistan and Sri Lanka. About 95 percent of Hong Kong’s 7.1 million people are ethnically Chinese.

By the end of 2010, 117,000 of the city’s foreign maids had been in Hong Kong for more than seven years, the September ruling said, citing government figures.

Hong Kong permanent residents enjoy certain privileges including the right to vote and work without needing a visa.

A handful of protesters gathered outside the courthouse as the hearing began, chanting slogans in support of the government’s appeal.
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Old February 26th, 2012, 12:41 PM   #34
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Helpers must wait for ruling on abode
The Standard
Friday, February 24, 2012

The Court of Appeal has reserved its judgment on an appeal over the right of foreign domestic helpers to apply for permanent residence.

Both sides finished their final submissions yesterday after a three-day hearing.

The government is appealing a decision by High Court judge Johnson Lam Man-hon that an immigration provision denying maids the right to apply for permanent residency after a stay of seven years is unconstitutional.

Gladys Li Chi-hei, SC, counsel for Filipino domestic helper Evangeline Banao Vallejos, said terms and conditions of employment contracts solely protect the interests of employers.

They cannot be regarded as governing the length of stay of helpers.

Li said such contracts signed by foreign domestic helpers list only the responsibilities of employers and employees.

Government counsel David Pannick, QC, argued that the contracts are legally binding.

Li said foreign domestic workers have normal social lifestyles, similarly to those of civil servants and other foreigners living in Hong Kong.

Although the workers' conditions of stay are peculiar, "[the government] cannot find them to be different from others who are `ordinarily resident."'

Li said helpers are also entitled to religious freedom and more, no different again to those who are "ordinarily resident."

The Basic Law should not restrict eligibility to apply for permanent residence, she told Justice Andrew Cheung Kui-ning.

Pannick said the government should remove foreign domestic helpers from the list of those who are eligible to apply.

Vallejos, who has worked in Hong Kong since 1986, sought a judicial review last year.

In September, Justice Lam referred Vallejos' case to the Registration of Persons Tribunal for reconsideration.

But Pannick said handling of the case will only resume if or when the appeal fails.
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Old February 27th, 2012, 11:08 AM   #35
Celebriton
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Democracy should win above communism in this case.

If majority of HKer reject permanent resident for low skilled workers, the government should listen and obey to it. No more minority voice win over majority in the name of goodwill like the old day communism.

If HK can't accept the migration of mainland Chinese to HK, the non-Chinese should not be allowed to migrate to HK, not even one.


Why rejecting Filipino maid for permanent resident, viewed as violating human rights?

While calling mainland Chinese tourist as locust and parasite, viewed as the heroic thing?

Is HKer hate Chinese people and shame to be a Chinese?

Last edited by Celebriton; February 27th, 2012 at 11:15 AM.
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Old February 27th, 2012, 02:14 PM   #36
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The issue has nothing to do about low-skilled, highly-skilled, or where the people in question are from. It's about whether people who stay because of employment visas qualify as immigrants that can qualify for residency status after the statutory 7-year requirement. Should someone on a work visa fall under the same legal scheme as an immigrant who has moved to Hong Kong as a permanent home?

The court's ruling will impact all such people on work visas, regardless of whether they're Filipino or Chinese from the mainland.
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Old February 27th, 2012, 08:39 PM   #37
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How much foreigners will became HK citizens if the law passed?
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Old February 28th, 2012, 02:39 AM   #38
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Celebriton View Post

How much foreigners will became HK citizens if the law passed?
From an article posted earlier, 117,000 foreign maids qualify.
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Old February 28th, 2012, 12:39 PM   #39
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Quote:
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From an article posted earlier, 117,000 foreign maids qualify.
Call me racist or whatever you like, but I do not support this. I think personally that domestic helpers are unskilled workers who are here to earn a living for their families wherever they came from. If we give permanent residency to them, they will be eligible for welfare and will be on their own without the legal necessity for their employers to aid them.

This decision is therefore an economic disaster because if this happens, we will have large numbers of people coming here as dependents who will be "parasites" if you like in our tax system. I think that if they let these helpers gain permanent residency, they will also then be able to acquire citizenship without having any qualification or real contribution to Hong Kong and its economy.

From an ethical perspective, it seems all nice, but I think that overall, once I weigh all the information here, I do not think that this is a good idea at all.

This is as good as having no immigration laws at all because with the notion that not allowing people, who are unlikely to make a contribution to Hong Kong's economy, in to the city is racism. This, I believe, is entirely ridiculous. Why do other countries have certain restrictions on who can acquire permanent residence and who can't? Are they all being racist or are they trying to maintain some order and control? Why are they not under the radar with the pretext racism?
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Old February 28th, 2012, 02:30 PM   #40
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Quote:
Originally Posted by shree711 View Post
Call me racist or whatever you like, but I do not support this. I think personally that domestic helpers are unskilled workers who are here to earn a living for their families wherever they came from. If we give permanent residency to them, they will be eligible for welfare and will be on their own without the legal necessity for their employers to aid them.

This decision is therefore an economic disaster because if this happens, we will have large numbers of people coming here as dependents who will be "parasites" if you like in our tax system. I think that if they let these helpers gain permanent residency, they will also then be able to acquire citizenship without having any qualification or real contribution to Hong Kong and its economy.

From an ethical perspective, it seems all nice, but I think that overall, once I weigh all the information here, I do not think that this is a good idea at all.

This is as good as having no immigration laws at all because with the notion that not allowing people, who are unlikely to make a contribution to Hong Kong's economy, in to the city is racism. This, I believe, is entirely ridiculous. Why do other countries have certain restrictions on who can acquire permanent residence and who can't? Are they all being racist or are they trying to maintain some order and control? Why are they not under the radar with the pretext racism?
I think a smart immigration policy is to take in the highly-skilled workers. They can apply to immigrate to Hong Kong outright. If skilled workers come to work on business visas, then they should have the option to gain citizenship after 7 years.

I think that sort of policy is not racist at all.

The foreign maids do contribute to Hong Kong's economic well-being. Their low wages mean more locals can go out to work. But if that means they need to be fired before hitting the 7-year mark, it may eliminate the need for full-time maids altogether, shifting the demand to short-term temporary housekeepers, who will likely be locals.
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