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Old January 16th, 2012, 09:50 PM   #61
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Kenaston 6-lane plan OK'd by city committee?

A city committee says it's time to start buying up properties along Kenaston Boulevard to make way for Route 90's eventual expansion through River Heights.

On Monday, council's infrastructure and public works committee approved a plan to widen Kenaston by one extra lane in each direction from Taylor Avenue all the way to Ness Avenue, including an expansion of the St. James Bridges.

The project is expected to cost at least $130 million.

Fort Rouge Coun. Jenny Gerbasi was the lone opponent to the plan, which passed 3-1. It will head to council's executive policy committee next.

To make Kenaston a full six lanes wide, the city needs to acquire a strip of land along Kenaston all the way through the Kapyong Barracks land, including two blocks of military housing, as well as taking over another couple of blocks of private homes on the east side of Kenaston between Tuxedo Avenue and Academy Road.

The committee decided in June to hold off until the city released its Master Transportation Plan, which it did in November.

Back in June, Luis Escobar, the city's manager of transportation, said the plan only allows the city to start picking up properties one by one if and when they hit the market; there is no talk of mass buyouts or expropriation at this point.

"If it goes for sale, we'd now have the authority to be a potential buyer. We're not trying to actively knock on every-one's door to buy their property," Escobar said, noting city-owned homes could be rented out until their eventual demolition.

That's at least partly because the Kapyong lands are tied up in a legal battle between the federal government and the Treaty 1 First Nations.

"It's a bit premature for the city to assume they'll get a lane from Kapyong," Norman Boudreau, the lawyer for Treaty 1, said in June. "The city has no jurisdiction with respect to Kapyong."



This issue will be a hot topic this year.
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Old January 16th, 2012, 11:55 PM   #62
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Doesn't matter how many lanes there are if the traffic lights stay, that is what causes congestion. If they stay, they need to be in sync.
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Old January 18th, 2012, 07:13 AM   #63
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Well, at least its better than most streets in Vancouver which have only 4 lanes and no left turn lanes.
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Old January 22nd, 2012, 09:58 PM   #64
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Anyone know if they are building an overpass where the Kenaston extension will meet Bishop Grandin? And will there be an overpass at Kenaston and the Perimeter? It looks like they started building something at Kenaston/Bishop...
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Old January 23rd, 2012, 12:25 AM   #65
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Originally Posted by sublime1 View Post
Anyone know if they are building an overpass where the Kenaston extension will meet Bishop Grandin? And will there be an overpass at Kenaston and the Perimeter? It looks like they started building something at Kenaston/Bishop...

You asked this same question once before. Why ask again?

but to answer the question for you.

l did post a list on what is going up to the year 2031. Do scroll back and read please.
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Old January 29th, 2012, 02:42 AM   #66
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Well nobody answered it, so I asked again. I was hoping for someone to say "yes" or "no they won't build one" without me having to read every post in the thread.

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You asked this same question once before. Why ask again?

but to answer the question for you.

l did post a list on what is going up to the year 2031. Do scroll back and read please.
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Old February 19th, 2012, 06:58 AM   #67
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Manitoba could join Minnesota in 175-km/h rail link

Anyone wishing to travel between Winnipeg and the Twin Cities have in recent years had but two choices: fly or drive. Overnight train service vanished in the late 1960s and Greyhound abandoned the route a few years back. Unlike most Canada-U.S. pairings of major cities, there is no direct ground transport between them.

But there could be if Canada wanted to make common cause with Minnesota to build a high-speed rail link from Winnipeg through Duluth to Minneapolis.

Such a rail link would be particularly noticed during our lengthy winters -- when icy roads and airports paralyzed by snowfalls make flying or driving unpleasant propositions at best; hazardous and undependable at worst.

Now, an initiative by the State of Minnesota, the Northern Lights Express project, is proposed to upgrade existing rails to allow 175 km/h passenger trains to run between Duluth and the Twin Cities.

Every county, city and major town through which the route passes as well as the Mille Lacs Ojibwe Nation -- owner of the Grand Casino at Hinckley, backs the project.

Proponents assert hundreds of thousands of new passengers will use the service, with resulting economic activity in the billions.

Skeptics claim public subsidies of up to $83 per passenger would be required, and that the projected cost of $1 billion is understated.

Proponents point out the environmental imperative for much higher-capacity, energy-efficient transportation services (i.e., rail) for the near future, while defenders of the status quo would instead spend the money repairing crumbling older infrastructure and building new or improved highways.

Anything's possible at this point.

But for now, an important milestone has been reached. On Sept. 2, U.S. Transportation Secretary Ray LaHood announced the Minnesota Department of Transportation would receive $5 million to complete initial engineering and environmental reviews for the project.

The grant comes from the High-Speed and Intercity Passenger Rail Program, which has on two previous occasions awarded $2.2 million and $500,000 for preliminary work on the line.

MNDOT has committed to providing $3 million of state funds. While minuscule compared to the eventual costs of the completed project, the commitments attest to the seriousness with which it is being explored.

This should be food for thought on Broadway and Main Street, and for all interested in the challenges and opportunities of intercity mass transport.

Obviously, Minnesota has demonstrated its interest in the proposition. It would seem logical it would, if approached from the Great White North, readily partner with Manitoba in looking into extending the service to Winnipeg.

After all, Minneapolis and Winnipeg, the two cities of the "upper Midwest" have enjoyed a long and close regional relationship.

Over and above that, by broadening the scope of study in such a fashion, a long-standing corridor of travel and commerce that is (from end to end) rich in natural and man-made attractions, would simultaneously be brought into the picture: The iron-mining centres of the Mesabi Range; the parks, campgrounds and resorts of Rainy River and, Lake of the Woods; the 7 Clans Casino at Warroad; La Broquerie with its French and, Steinbach with its Mennonite heritage. Both sides of the border stand to gain from such a co-operative venture.

Via and Amtrak would likely welcome a new route: There is pent-up demand now for alternative travel means between these destinations (although of undetermined amount) and the availability of such a service would likely unleash it.

It has been found, furthermore, that in just about every case where new rail service is introduced -- whether intercity or commuter -- it has generated much more traffic than had been anticipated.

Passenger volume, in turn, encouraged economic development along the rail line (because a railway is a permanent structure as opposed to a bus route).

Most beneficial for all concerned would be the wholesale improvement to the overall network of the passenger-rail providers on both sides of the border.

In particular, it could remove the hamstring created by the absence of cross-border service from Detroit-Windsor westward all the way to the Pacific coast.

Americans would thereby be enabled to connect conveniently in Winnipeg to the Vancouver-bound Canadian or the Omnitrax to Churchill.

Canadians could connect to the eastbound Empire Builder (destined for Amtrak's Chicago hub).

As point of interchange, Winnipeg would stand to witness a surge in tour-bus outings, hotel-room bookings, and other related activities.

Of course, for the whole concept to fly, the consent of CN Rail (which owns the trackage that would be used) would need to be obtained.

Railways typically object that adding passenger trains would hamper their freight operations and would require control-signal upgrades.

But would one or two passenger trains daily really be that disruptive?

After all, there once was frequent passenger service with steam and early diesel engines operating with the control-signal infrastructure of the day and with greater frequency of all sorts of trains at speeds not much inferior to the present.

The railway line involved also happens to be the one CN has designated as its major international portal in the Prairie provinces along which most eastbound freight flows to Chicago and beyond via a U.S. border crossing point at Fort Frances, Ont.

Accordingly, it is in good repair and should require only modest roadbed stabilization and improvements to track geometrics in places to render it suitable to host modern, fast passenger service.

To eliminate customs delays that could encumber schedules, pre-clearance in Winnipeg and Minneapolis could be copied from present practices at airports.

The Via Union Station at Main and Broadway already handles passenger service -- four daily trains would little strain capacity since there are presently only 12 Via trains per week.

Meanwhile, Amtrak equipment already has been tested here -- in 1984, a trainset of Amtrak bi-level, "SuperLiner" cars came up to Winnipeg from Minneapolis on a successful trial run. Compatibility, therefore, does not seem to be a problem.

In short, this is an idea whose time may or may not have come: but there is every reason why it should be investigated thoroughly and objectively. A small investment now might fetch large, long-lasting benefits down the line: we'd be myopic not to at least do the homework.

Peter Lacey is western vice-president for Transport Action Canada, a public-interest group concerned with public transportation. Jeff Lowe co-wrote this article with him.

Northern Lights Express website is at www.northernlightsexpress.org
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Old February 21st, 2012, 09:47 AM   #68
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Some photos of the Richardson International Airport.



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Old February 29th, 2012, 06:51 AM   #69
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Such a deal. The City of Winnipeg may be purchasing 20 pre-owned, 60-foot articulated buses from New Flyer Industries for less than 10 per cent of their original new cost of 625 thousand dollars each. The price is 53 thousand dollars plus tax. The articulated or split buses seat 54 versus 38 in our current fleet. Right now, the deal is just a recommendation from Transit to City Hall.

Love to see this deal come through.
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Old February 29th, 2012, 06:56 AM   #70
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The construction of a new stadium in Winnipeg has prompted those with a vested interest to hammer out a comprehensive Event Day Management Plan...that will focus primarily on traffic. The City of Winnipeg, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg Blue Bombers and BBB Stadium Incorporated have been working on it over the past three months. The next step is a number of Open Houses from March 3rd to March 8th for the public to weigh in on issues like parking, transit, active transportation choices and traffic management around the stadium.


This could get very interesting when the new stadium opens. A lot of questions will need to be answered about how the traffic will flow.

1 idea in my mind is to start building the 2 Phase of the rapid tranist to U of M. Then maybe they will be able to breath a little easier. l have a couple other ideas. It has something to do with what Quebec is doing and l like it.
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Old March 3rd, 2012, 04:20 PM   #71
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property committee will consider a plan to buy 166 Kenaston Blvd. for $220,000 as part of the widening of Kenaston.

The City of Winnipeg is poised to purchase a bungalow on Kenaston Boulevard as part of a long-term plan to widen the busy artery within Tuxedo.

The city's Transportation Master Plan calls for the widening of Kenaston between Ness Avenue and Taylor Avenue by 2016, at an estimated cost of $129 million. The work will involve the demolition of some homes, but in all likelihood this will not be done until later in the decade. The city has yet to allocate money to conduct the bulk of the work.

However, the city has started acquiring homes and other pieces of property along Kenaston, as they become available. On Tuesday, council's property committee will consider a plan to purchase a bungalow at 166 Kenaston Blvd. for $220,000.

The owner of the property approached the city in 2010 with an offer to sell, says a report to city councillors. Pending council approval, the city would maintain the property until it needs to be demolished.


Parking-meter input

WINNIPEG is asking for public input on proposed changes to parking meters.

Last year, the Winnipeg Parking Authority outlined its business plan to begin pay-parking hours at 8 a.m., raise rates on high-demand downtown streets and increase fines for common offences such as overtime parking. The parking authority also wants to add pay stations to more streets, pending public consultation.

The plan came months before the city unveiled its downtown-parking strategy, which includes getting rid of reserved parking stalls and parking subsidies that help eat up some of the 39,283 available stalls downtown. The plan recommends Winnipeg enact new policies to free up spots on the street, get rid of some surface parking lots, and encourage people to carpool or use transit or active transportation to get downtown.

Residents and businesses can participate in the public consultation on Monday between 5 p.m. and 8 p.m. at the Winnipeg Convention Centre. They can also complete an online survey at theparkingstore.winnipeg.ca/theparkingstore


Overrun on Sturgeon Road

THE Sturgeon Road bridge replacement project is already faced with cost overruns.

Winnipeg's 2012 capital budget, a spending blueprint for new construction, included $11.4 million to replace the Sturgeon Road bridge over Sturgeon Creek. A report released this week said the cost estimates are now closer to $15 million.

The 2010 and 2011 capital budgets directed $1.5 million toward the project, so Winnipeg faces a $2.2-million budget shortfall.

An administrative report recommends this additional cost be reallocated to next year's capital budget.

The city wants to award the contract to PCL Constructors Canada, which submitted the lowest bid of $11.7 million.

Council's public works committee will consider the proposal at a meeting on Monday.


Pension-shortfall plan

COUNCIL'S executive policy committee will review a plan to address the shortfall in the civic employee pension plan.

Last July, council approved increasing the city's contribution rate into the pension plan at half a per cent each year for four years. The agreement hinged on addressing the remaining shortfall in the future cost of the pension and disability benefits.

The plan involves a series of complicated financial calculations.

It still needs to be approved by EPC and council.


Wilkes dumping targeted

COUNCIL'S public works committee will consider a proposal to install "no dumping" signs on south Wilkes Avenue.

Last month, the Assiniboia community committee recommended the signs be installed. Photographs show everything from a broken recliner, to old mattresses, tree stumps and cardboard boxes have been left on the roadside.
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Old March 4th, 2012, 07:02 AM   #72
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Thanks for updating this thread regularly!
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Old March 6th, 2012, 03:46 PM   #73
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Yw Yellow Fever.



PAT MCGRATH / POSTMEDIA NEWS ARCHIVES Enlarge Image

The City of Ottawa plans to replace its aging fleet with these new articulated buses. Winnipeg has first dibs on the old buses that were traded in.

The used bendy buses Winnipeg wants to buy have been called "lemons" and were part of Ottawa's old fleet that had faulty parts that caused some buses to catch fire.

Last week, Winnipeg Transit announced it wants to spend $1.1 million to purchase the articulated buses at a discounted rate from New Flyer Industries after Ottawa traded them in for new buses. The buses will cost $53,000 each, instead of the $625,000 they would cost if purchased new.

In total, it will cost Winnipeg $2.2 million to buy and fix up the buses.

Ottawa used the buses between 2001 and 2004, and media reports show some of the articulated buses had defective parts and faulty brakes that caused some buses to catch fire. Last April, Ottawa city council voted to replace 226 of its bendy buses with newer, fuel-efficient models.

A City of Ottawa report said transit had a large backlog of work due to "major repairs" required on some of the 226 articulated buses purchased between 2001 and 2004. The report said it would cost transit $66 million to refurbish the buses.

One Ottawa city councillor called the buses "lemons," according to media reports. City of Ottawa spokesman Jocelyne Turner said it was a business decision not to refurbish the buses.

Winnipeg Transit director Dave Wardrop said Winnipeg will be able to have "pick of the litter" and select 20 of the best buses from the 226 Ottawa traded in. Wardrop said these buses were close to 10 years old and need to be refurbished to increase the number of years they can drive on city streets.

He said Ottawa decided to trade them in because of a financing deal the city worked out with New Flyer. Wardrop said any problems have been corrected by the bus manufacturer, and city mechanics will have a closer look at the buses if the deal is approved by city council.

"Whatever minor defects or difficulties that these particular buses have associated with them have since been corrected by the bus manufacturer New Flyer," Wardrop said. "'There isn't any single concern related to this bus (type) that stands out."

An administrative report recommends Winnipeg add 20 articulated buses to its fleet amid concern there are increasing instances where buses along busy routes have left would-be passengers behind because they're overcrowded.

Articulated buses, which are about 18 metres long, carry about 40 per cent more passengers than a regular bus. A new report said 16 bendy buses that operate seven hours each day would relieve many cases of overcrowding on Winnipeg's busiest transit routes.

Winnipeg Transit estimates it will cost $11,500 to fix up each bus.

Due to the work required, Winnipeg Transit will likely not put the buses into service before 2014. New Flyer has agreed to store the buses in a heated facility for two years, which will give Winnipeg Transit time to refurbish and outfit them.

Wardrop said Winnipeg purchases and fixes buses all the time, and it's not unusual to have industrial equipment in need of repair.
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Old March 7th, 2012, 12:45 AM   #74
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Council's public works committee voted in favour of a plan to buy used articulated buses after Winnipeg Transit's director called them a "fantastic deal."

Last week, Winnipeg Transit announced it wants to spend $1.1 million to purchase articulated buses at a discounted rate from New Flyer Industries, after Ottawa traded them in for new buses. The buses will cost $53,000 each, instead of the $625,000 they would cost brand-new.

In total, it will cost Winnipeg $2.2 million to buy and fix up the buses.

The used articulated buses Winnipeg wants to buy have been called "lemons" and were part of Ottawa’s old fleet that had faulty parts that caused some buses to catch fire.

Ottawa used the buses between 2001 and 2004, and media reports show that some articulated buses had defective parts and faulty brakes which caused some buses to catch fire. In April 2010, Ottawa city council voted to replace 226 of its articulated buses with newer, fuel-efficient models.

A report said Ottawa's transit company, OC Transpo, had a large backlog of work due to "major repairs" required on some of the 226 articulated buses purchased between 2001 and 2004. It said it would cost OC Transpo $66 million to overhaul the buses.

Media reports show one city councillor called the buses "lemons."

Winnipeg Transit director Dave Wardrop told council's public works committee this morning that the buses are a fantastic deal and will help reduce overcrowding on city buses. He said Winnipeg will send in its mechanics, and pick the 20 best out of the 226.

Wardrop said some of Ottawa's old buses had an assortment of issues, but these have been sorted out.

"I have no reason to believe that these buses are going to be any more problematic than others," Wardrop said.

Public works chairman Coun. Dan Vandal (St. Boniface) said based on advice from city administration, Winnipeggers are going to get value for their money. He said Winnipeg Transit has confirmed the issues with the buses have been resolved, and will help accommodate the growth in ridership.

Vandal said transit expects to add 55,000 additional service hours in 2012, compared to 2011.

"We're taking the best professional advice from our administration," he said following this morning's public works meeting. "Is there some risk? There's likely some risks but based on their advice this is a good deal."

An administrative report recommends Winnipeg add 20 articulated buses to its fleet amid concern there are increasing instances where buses along busy routes have left would-be passengers behind because they're overcrowded.

Articulated buses, which are about 18 metres long, carry about 40 per cent more passengers than a regular bus. A new report said 16 articulated buses that operate seven hours each day would relieve many cases of overcrowding on Winnipeg's busiest transit routes.

Winnipeg Transit estimates it will cost $11,500 to fix up each bus.

Due to the work required, Winnipeg Transit will likely not put the buses into service before 2014. New Flyer has agreed to store the buses in a heated facility for two years, which will give Winnipeg Transit time to refurbish and outfit them.


l just dunno what to say here on this issue. The city is on the right path for once. Just the city is still stuck in the mid 80's. The busses have probably have a 10yr life spand on them tops. When the times comes to replace these ones will be very interesting.
l can see a trend here where Winnipeg will be get "hand me downs" from other cities. While other cities are up to date and keeping up with the changes.

Remember this is 2012 people. Not 1986. When l remember seeing these types of buses in Vancouver when Expo 86 was on. This tells you something.
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Old March 8th, 2012, 08:53 PM   #75
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The city will not move ahead with a 20-cent bus fare hike this June.

Mayor Sam Katz said that the province confirmed it will not allow the city to devote all the proceeds from the fare hike to rapid transit. Katz said that means the motion to raise bus fares to cover the city's portion of the second phase of rapid transit is dead.


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In order for the bus fare hike to move ahead the province had to amend its current 50-50 transit funding agreement.

A cabinet spokesman said the province has no plans to amend the current agreement to allow funds generated by future fare increases to be dedicated for any purposes other than Winnipeg Transit operations.

Winnipeg's master transportation plan initially slated the second phase of rapid transit for 2031. It was moved up to 2016.

Katz said Winnipeg will likely need to identify a source of funding for the second rapid transit corridor by the end of 2013 to meet that 2016 target.
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Old March 9th, 2012, 12:16 AM   #76
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Local Government Minister Ron Lemieux questioned the city’s commitment to rapid transit today.

In a scrum with reporters outside his office at the Legislative Building, Lemieux reiterated the NDP government’s commitment to funding one-third of the cost of the second leg of the southwest rapid transit corridor.

He also pointed out that the province now pays slightly more than half of all city roads and bridge construction costs, as well as significant policing costs. "We provide the most generous support to the city of Winnipeg, bar none, of any other relationship between a province and a city across Canada," Lemieux told reporters.

He said the city gets sufficient provincial funding to give it "enough flexibility" to come up with its share for rapid transit — if it’s a priority.

"I don’t know what the problem is at the city, quite frankly, because as I’ve said before, a number of months ago, let’s get on with it."

Lemieux said the back-and-forth with the city over rapid transit funding conjures up a scene from Oliver Twist. "If I seem a little bit agitated by this... it’s like I’m in a skit in Oliver Twist, ‘More please, can we have more please?’" the cabinet minister said in a plaintive voice. "Some days, that’s the way that I feel."


What to say here? hmm Simple. "SAM THE RECORD MAN IS NOTHING MORE THEN A BROKEN RECORD".

For what l have to say now is this and l wish it was a broken record playing over and over again. "You are outta here". Now let's get ready for another election to replace him.
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Old March 10th, 2012, 12:15 AM   #77
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The future of Winnipeg's second rapid-transit corridor is up in the air after a city-provincial spat over how to pay for it hit a dead end.

On Thursday, the province confirmed it will not let Winnipeg devote the proceeds of the 20-cent bus fare hike to cover part of the cost of extending the city's first rapid-transit line to Bison Drive near the University of Manitoba. No other Canadian city has forced those who ride the bus to cover a share of the cost, and provincial officials have said they want to find another way to pay for future rapid-transit corridors.

Mayor Sam Katz said the move kills the city's funding source for the second phase of the corridor.

"This is over for the time being," Katz said Thursday morning, following a press conference at the Millennium Library. "What happens to rapid transit now? Your guess is as good as anybody's."

The death of the fare hike comes before a March 20 council vote on the 2012 operating budget, which includes Winnipeg Transit's spending plans, and just one month before buses are set to roll on the city's first rapid-transit corridor. The 3.6-kilometre bus-way from Queen Elizabeth Way at The Forks to Jubilee Avenue at Pembina Highway is set to open April 8.

The cost of extending the bus-way for the second phase of the corridor is estimated at $270 million.

Winnipeg's master transportation plan initially slated the second phase of rapid transit for 2031, but it was moved up to 2016 after Fort Rouge Coun. Jenny Gerbasi argued the city should set more aggressive timelines. Coun. Justin Swandel (St. Norbert) then proposed a 20-cent fare hike to cover the city's portion of the cost of the second phase.

Katz said Winnipeg will likely need to identify a source of funding for the second rapid-transit corridor by the end of 2013 to meet that 2016 target. He said the city has done its job and identified ways to pay for the corridor, and that the province has not stepped forward and done the same.

"There are no funding sources, so I don't know if everybody is truly committed to this or what's going to happen in the future," Katz said.

Local Government Minister Ron Lemieux questioned the city's commitment to rapid transit and said the longer the city delays it and plays "mind games and word games," the project will keep being pushed further into the future.

"I don't know what the problem is at the city, quite frankly, because as I've said before, a number of months ago, let's get on with it," he said.

Lemieux reiterated the NDP government's commitment to funding one-third of the cost of the second leg of the southwest rapid-transit corridor. He also pointed out the province now pays slightly more than half of all city road and bridge-construction costs, as well as significant policing costs.

Lemieux said the city and province have proven they can work together to get things done. He said he was confident Ottawa would contribute to the project, especially if the city and province present a united front as they did -- along with business and labour -- in seeking federal funding for CentrePort.


Feels like a story that can be made into a book soon called: My day with Sam " The Broken Record man" Katz.
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Old March 10th, 2012, 07:20 AM   #78
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I always wonder why Winnipeg built its ring road so far away from the city limit? Its basically useless in term of reducing the traffic congestion around the city.
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Old March 10th, 2012, 11:34 PM   #79
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Quote:
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I always wonder why Winnipeg built its ring road so far away from the city limit? Its basically useless in term of reducing the traffic congestion around the city.
Yeah, its longer than Edmonton's (78km Edmonton vs 90km Winnipeg) and Edmonton is more spread out than Winnipeg is


I think there's a few things here: When the Ring Road around Peg was built, it was meant to be in check with growth estimations at the time; Winnipeg growth slowed down as we all know

And secondly, there are parts of the Perimeter which do aide in traffic decongestion, and these areas border city limits (such as the west portion from Portage to Roblin), the NE portions aroung Lag to McPhillips is fairly busy as much traffic traverses around there, and the South Portion from Lag to Pembina is fairly busy.

Some portions of the road feel like city limits, some feel like you're in the middle of no where, whereas in Edmonton I noticed you always feel like you're in the city limits to a degree
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Old March 25th, 2012, 10:47 PM   #80
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Hi everyone, I'm wondering if anyone knows any websites or books that summarize all of the different rapid-transit plans Winnipeg had over the years? It's for an assignment I have..

I know I'm missing a lot because plans come and go pretty quick, and old plans are basically erased from public memory. If anyone knows any good references, please let me know.
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