daily menu » rate the banner | guess the city | one on oneforums map | privacy policy | DMCA | news magazine | posting guidelines

Go Back   SkyscraperCity > Asian Forums > India > Economy and Industries > Industries, Technology & Space



Global Announcement

As a general reminder, please respect others and respect copyrights. Go here to familiarize yourself with our posting policy.


Reply

 
Thread Tools Rating: Thread Rating: 80 votes, 5.00 average.
Old March 17th, 2012, 04:33 PM   #301
karkal
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jan 2012
Posts: 11,076
Likes (Received): 7161

Novel technique using stem cells revives damaged eye

SIMPLE YET EFFECTIVE: The damaged eye (left) has total deficiency of limbal stem cells prior to operation. But the same eye has become functional after the Simple Limbal Epithelial Transplantation (SLET) procedure was done at the L.V. Prasad Eye Institute, Hyderabad. Photo: Special Arrangement

Quote:
Treating blindness caused by burns using limbal stem cells harvested from the undamaged eye of the same patient has now become cheaper, easier and safer. Results of a pilot study of the SLET (simplified technique of limbal transplantation) technique conducted at L.V. Prasad Eye Institute on six patients, and published recently in the British Journal of Ophthalmology provides the proof.
karkal no está en línea   Reply With Quote

Sponsored Links
 
Old March 19th, 2012, 08:44 PM   #302
karkal
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jan 2012
Posts: 11,076
Likes (Received): 7161

Diabetes costs India $38b annually: WHO

Quote:
With 61.3 million people in India suffering from diabetes, care for the patients’ costs over $38 billion to the country annually, says the latest study by World Health Organisation.

The world spends $465 billion annually on the lifestyle disease and this is 11 per cent of the total healthcare expense.

According to the study, 366 million people across the globe were affected by diabetes in 2011, up from 346 million in 2008. It also predicts that 552 million people will be suffering from the disease by 2030. In India, which ranks second in terms of incidence, the total number of diabetic patients will grow from 61.3 million to 101.2 million by that time.

According to Vijay Viswa-nathan, managing director of M Viswanathan Diabetes Research Centre and MV Hospitals in Chennai, which collaborated with WHO for the study, the annual cost was $31.9 billion in 2010 and it grew to $38 billion by 2011.

“The median annual direct cost per person in 2011 is $525 and indirect cost is $102. Direct medical cost includes medicine, consultation and investigation charges and direct non-medical cost in transportation expenses. Indirect costs refers to loss of salary and loss of working days of both the patient and attendee due to the illness,” he said. Globally, $1274 is spent on per person for diabetes care.

“For expenses over Rs 30,000, 81 per cent was made from personal savings of the patient and only two per cent was paid by health insurance companies.

In India, the highest incidence of diabetes is in the age group of 40 to 59 years. Within a span of 14 years between 1989 and 2005, the prevalence of the disease has increased by 72.3 per cent. While 46 lakh people died across the globe due to diabetes and related complications, in India 5.4 lakh women and 4.3 lakh men died in 2011.
karkal no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old March 20th, 2012, 03:29 PM   #303
Krishnamoorthy K
hazaron ke anna
 
Krishnamoorthy K's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2008
Posts: 9,999

Seven govt hospitals to be upgraded

Quote:
Bangalore, Mar 16,2012, DHNS:

The National Rural Health Mission (NRHM) has got a higher allocation of Rs 20,822 crore in the 2012-13 budget presented on Friday, compared to Rs 18,115 crore the previous year.

Under the Pradhan Mantri Swasthya Suraksha Yojana (PMSSY), seven government hospitals will be upgraded along the lines of AIIMS, making tertiary healthcare affordable. A cut in the prices of cancer and HIV drugs was also announced.

The National Urban Health Mission will be launched in 2012 to encompass the primary healthcare needs of people in urban areas.

Reacting to the budget, Dr N K Venkataramana, vice-chairman of BGS Global Hospitals, said making cancer drugs cheaper was a unique initiative that would help the poor.

“We hope the government will be able to utilise the National Rural and Urban Health Mission across the country and effectively implement schemes to elevate the health standards of the people,” he said.

“It is laudable that the preventive health concept is initiated through the health budget. Upgrading medical colleges on a par with AIIMS will see a major improvement in the quality of health, education and training,” he added.

However, Rajen Padukone, CEO, Manipal Hospitals, commenting on the service tax on hospitals, said, “We expected hospitals would feature in the negative list, as this is one of the services which is not opted out of choice. To that extent, there is disappointment.
We are waiting for the fine print on the status of hospitals in the exemption list.

If corporate hospitals are not exempted, it is a concern area for everyone. The hospital bill goes up by 12.36 per cent and even if the same abatement (50 per cent) is extended like the proposal last time, the increase will be 6.18 per cent, which could be a definite extra burden for patients,” he added.

Concession on preventive healthcare is a good move to encourage people to go for preventive checks.

Customs duty exemption on certain life-saving drugs for HIV, renal cancer, etc, is also a good initiative.

However, the Prime MinisterÂ’s promise to increase expenditure on public health to reach 2.5 per cent of the GDP in the next five years is not reflected in the budget.

To reach that figure, expenditure should more than double in five years. Whereas, the budget provides only a 15 per cent increase, he said.
DHNS
Krishnamoorthy K no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old March 21st, 2012, 08:10 PM   #304
ChennaiIndian
Registered User
 
ChennaiIndian's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2009
Location: Chicago
Posts: 4,448
Likes (Received): 82

Thumbs up Renal transplants at Government Hospital touch the 1,000-mark

Cross-posting from Chennai healthcare thread. Courtesy: saysenthil

Quote:
Originally Posted by saysenthil View Post
Govt hospital performs its 1000th kidney transplant

The Rajiv Gandhi Government General Hospital on Tuesday performed the 1,000th renal transplant. This makes it the first government-run hospital in the country to achieve such a distinction, said Dean V. Kanakasabai.

For hospital authorities and nephrologist M.A. Muthusethupathi who did the first transplant surgery 25 years ago on July 10, 1987 at the hospital, it is time to recollect. “It is almost 25 years [since the programme was started] and 1,000 is a good number. Earlier, in 1982, we did a transplant in Government Royapettah Hospital. Then, when I was transferred to the GH, we continued it there. Every time you do a transplant you have to plan; it needed a lot more effort back then but gradually, it has become stable,” he said.

When the transplant programme began about 75 to 80 per cent of the patients had a three-year survival rate. “It is time to look back and see how the patients are doing,” Dr. Muthusethupathi said.

Another reason the program has done so well is because the State provides a life-times of free immunosuppression drugs to the patients. “When we made a request to the State government, they promptly agreed,” Dr. Muthusethupathi recalled. And, since the beginning of the programme, the patients have been receiving free supply of the drugs.

Today the drugs cost around Rs. 10,000 to Rs. 12,000 per person. The State government now allots Rs. 2 crore a year for immunosuppression therapy, Dr. Kanakasabai said. On World Kidney Day on March 8, patients who had undergone renal transplant and donors interacted with prospective renal transplant patients. The oldest patient had undergone a transplant 17 years ago. Although survival rate have improved nephrologists think they can do better. “In my own experience I have seen patients who have crossed 20 years. The problem lies in treating infections caused by immune suppression. Nowhere in the world do doctors see a 100 per cent success rate,” Dr. Muthusethupathi said.

The programme is considered a success because patients with renal failure normally have very low survival rates. “Such patients have been given a new lease of life. We would like the results to be even better. Cadaver transplant is lot more difficult. It is the logistics and that was somewhat more difficult. However, results from cadaver deceased donors are as good,” he added.

The first successful cadaver renal transplantation was performed at the hospital in January 1996. But, it was only in 2008 that cadaver transplantation picked up, Dr. Kanakasabai said.

http://health.india.com/news/govt-ho...ey-transplant/
ChennaiIndian no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old March 30th, 2012, 01:05 AM   #305
karkal
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jan 2012
Posts: 11,076
Likes (Received): 7161

‘India faces 50% nursing shortage’

Quote:
The fledgling health sector in India is facing a 50 percent shortage of nursing staff due to demand outstripping supply and many female nurses preferring to work overseas for higher compensation, a senior health official said Thursday.

"There is a 40-50 percent shortage of nursing personnel due to increasing demand for nurses, nursing and allied services in the healthcare sector across the country and globally," said V. Ravi, registrar of the state-run National Institute of Mental Health and Neurosciences (Nimhans) at an international conference here on `Nursing education & training in a global context`.

Admitting that it was becoming a challenge to maintain a healthy ratio of doctors and nurses in state-run and private hospitals across the country due to various factors, Ravi said the Indian healthcare sector would ideally require one nurse for every patient suffering critical illness and five nurses for every patient in psychiatric cases.

"As it is very difficult for any country to fully meet its nursing requirements, the stakeholders would have to use tele-nursing and auxiliary services, for providing personal patient care and create capacity building to churn out hundreds of nurses," Ravi told about 300 delegates participating in the day-long conference, organised by the private-run Dayananda Sagar Institutions in collaboration with California State University and Sagar hospitals on the city`s outskirts.

Noting that global demand for nurses was rising due to ageing population, especially in the developed countries, California state university associate professor Marilyn Stonar said despite advancement in medical science and enhanced longevity, more number of people become victims of chronic diseases such as AIDS and cancer.

"As patients suffering from chronic diseases require personal attention and caring, demand for experienced nurses is going up worldwide. There is a need to innovate newer methods of delivering nursing services to the community," Stonar said.

For instance, of the 250,000 nurses serving in the US, one-third of them are on the verge of retirement this year.

"It is not only people and patients growing old in the US, but also nurses," she quipped.

Advocating increasing use of medical technology for delivering efficient healthcare and overcome shortage of paramedical staff, Stonar the US government had stipulated two nurses for every patient in the intensive care units (ICUs), four-five nurses for every patient in day shift and six nurses in night shift.


"We are open to partner with Indian institutions like Dayananda Sagar to train more personnel in using technology for healthcare and collaborative research under education exchange programme," Stonar observed.

According to Pia Hagquist, a nursing faculty member at the Central Ostrobothnia University of Applied Sciences in Finland, promoting health is more important than curing a disease in conformity with the adage that prevention is better than cure.

"The Finland government focuses on problem-based learning to promote importance of public health," Hagquist noted.

Under the education exchange progamme, nursing students from Finland have been learning nursing practices and clinical methods at Dayananda Sagar institutions since 2007.
karkal no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old March 31st, 2012, 12:06 AM   #306
karkal
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jan 2012
Posts: 11,076
Likes (Received): 7161

Finance ministry nod for maiden vaccine park

Quote:
NEW DELHI: The finance ministry has given its nod to set up the country's first integrated vaccine park.

The Rs 594-crore park spread over 100 acres at Chengalpattu near Chennai will produce all six primary vaccines used in the country's Universal Immunization Programme (UIP), besides manufacturing several new-generation vaccines.

India's UIP is one of the largest in the world that targets 2.7 crore infants and 3 crore pregnant women every year.

Union health secretary P K Pradhan said "We are taking the proposal to the cabinet now. The finance ministry has cleared the proposal."

One of the park's main intentions will be to establish vaccine security in India.

It will produce 100 million doses each of pentavelent vaccine, measles vaccine, HIB and BCG, 140 million doses of Hepatitis B vaccine, 25 million doses of vaccine against Japanese Encephalitis, and 20 million doses of anti-rabies vaccine.

"The project once approved by the Cabinet Committee of Economic Affairs will be completed in 36 months. The park will ensure vaccine availability during an emergency, insulate vaccine prices from arbitrary escalation and reduce dependence on importing vaccines," Pradhan said.

The project had received a major push from finance minister Pranab Mukherjee, who in his budget speech on March 16 had said that the park would ensure availability of life-saving vaccines at all times ensuring vaccine security. "We expect to take the project proposal to the CCEA in the next three weeks," ministry officials said.

A ministry official said, "The department of expenditure was developing cold feet over the proposal. Now with the FM's push for the park in his Budget speech, the project got a quick clearance."

The Public Investment Board had recently cleared the proposal for the park.

A ministry official said, "We need to have vaccine security in India. At present when we fall short of vaccines we have to approach private producers who jack up prices at will. Once it is approved, it will take around two and a half years before it is operational."

Experts say being entirely in the public sector, the vaccine park will help bring down the price of vaccines.

The Expanded Programme for Immunization (EPI) in India was launched in 1978. However for almost two decades, UIP did not add any additional vaccine. However, since 2006, vaccines like Hepatitis B, second dose of measles and Japanese Encephalitis (JE) have been introduced.
karkal no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old April 1st, 2012, 04:17 AM   #307
kalkibhagwan
BANNED
 
Join Date: Oct 2011
Posts: 557
Likes (Received): 1

Fertility rate in India drops by 19% in 10 yrs

Quote:
NEW DELHI: India's total fertility rate (TFR) - the average number of children expected to be born per woman during her reproductive years - has fallen by19% over the past decade. Among bigger states, the percentage decline in TFR during this period the last decade varied from as high as 28% in Punjab to 5.6%in Kerala.

Maharashtra saw the second highest dip in TFR between 2000-2010 at 26.9%, followed by Haryana and Andhra Pradesh (25%), Uttar Pradesh (23%), Rajasthan (22%), Himachal Pradesh and West Bengal (21%).

The latest Sample Registration System 2010 data finalized by the Registrar General of India and sent to the Union health ministry on Saturday says India's TFR, which had remained stagnant in 2008 and 2009 at 2.6, finally has dropped by 0.1 points in 2010. India's TFR now stands at 2.5 as against a TFR of 3.2 in 2000. Education has been found to play a major role in determining TFR.

On average, an illiterate woman in India is bearing 1.2 children more than a literate woman (3.4 against 2.2). The TFR among women who have studied till at least class X was as low as 1.9. This further dips to 1.6 among women who have studied till class XII.

The link between female education and fertility is clearly brought out by the SRS data. For instance, even in Bihar, the state with the worst overall TFR of 3.7, women who are educated up to Class X or beyond have a TFR of 2.0 or less. On the other hand, even in Maharashtra, which has an overall TFR of 1.9, women who had no education had a TFR of 6.0.

According to the SRS 2010, ten states have achieved replacement level fertility of 2.1 and below. However, 10 big states still have a higher TFR than this. These include Bihar (3.7), UP (3.5), MP (3.2), Rajasthan (3.1), Jharkhand (3),Chhattisgarh (2.8), Assam and Gujarat (2.5), Haryana and Odisha (2.3). What's worrying is that these states together account for nearly half of India's population.

States which have recorded a dip in TFR in 2010 as against 2009 include Andhra Pradesh (1.9 to 1.8), Assam (2.6 to 2.5), Bihar (3.9 to 3.7), Chhattisgarh (3 to 2.8), Haryana (2.5 to 2.3), Himachal (1.9 to 1.8), J&K (2.2 to 2),Jharkhand (3.2 to 3), MP (3.3 to 3.2), Odisha (2.4 to 2.3), Punjab (1.9 to1.8), Rajasthan (3.3 to 3.1), UP (3.7 to 3.5) and West Bengal (1.9 to 1.8). TFR in states like Delhi (1.9), Maharashtra (1.9), Gujarat (2.5), Karnataka (2) and Tamil Nadu (1.7) has however stagnated.

Kerala is the only state which has recorded an increase in TFR - from 1.7 in 2009 to 1.8 in 2010.

According to the National Population Policy 2000, India should have reached there placement-level fertility rate of 2.1 by 2010, and ought to attain population stabilization at 145 crore by 2045. Population stabilization is when the size of the population remains unchanged. It is also called the stage of zeropopulation growth. However, India now expects to reach the population stabilization TFR of 2.1 at 165 crore by 2060. Union health minister Ghulam Nabi Azad recently said "We have seen a steady decline in TFR that has come down by 42% from the mid-1960s. We may see a drop of 0.1 point in the TFR, which is currently at 2.6," Azad had said.
http://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/i...w/12487718.cms
kalkibhagwan no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old April 1st, 2012, 04:19 AM   #308
kalkibhagwan
BANNED
 
Join Date: Oct 2011
Posts: 557
Likes (Received): 1

Polio case in West Bengal wrong: Health Ministry

Quote:
Central Health Ministry has said that the so-called polio case of 18 years girl, Sumi Naskar from West Bengal, which had alleged that she is suffering from polio has been tested negative.
According to Health Ministry statement that two stool samples of the girl were collected on 13 March and 14 March and sent to the Institute of Serology Kolkata for investigation. Stool samples are collected from all AFP cases and tested to rule out polio as a cause of the illness. both the stool samples of the child were found negative for polio in the Institute of Serology Kolkata. As thorough investigations were being carried out, a section of media flashed Sumi's case as a 'polio case' and reporting it as a huge setback to India's polio eradication program, statement says.
Sumi is one of the many AFP cases detected this year and investigated for polio. In 2012 so far, around 9,000 AFP cases have been investigated by NPSP with the support of local health authorities. All the stool samples of these AFP cases have tested negative for polio.
India has not reported any case of polio since 13 January 2011 and has been struck off the list of countries with active endemic wild polio transmission in February 2012, statement says.
kalkibhagwan no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old April 2nd, 2012, 07:08 PM   #309
kalkibhagwan
BANNED
 
Join Date: Oct 2011
Posts: 557
Likes (Received): 1

India Goes After U.S. Junk Food Brands


Quote:
Major U.S. junk food brands have become a punching bag in a new truth in labeling campaign that charges companies like PepsiCo and McDonald’s with “falsely advertising” their fat, sodium and sugar soaked ingredients.

India’s Center for Science and Environment tested 16 popular brands late last week, accusing most of them with misleading the public through wrong health claims and insufficient labeling. The Center is the country’s leading, independent research and advocacy organization on health and the environment, based in New Delhi.

See: Eat At Your Own Risk: India Gets Health Conscious–Center for Science and Environment’s Down to Earth magazine.

PepsiCo, Nestle, McDonald’s and KFC denied that they were misleading the public with their labels.

The Center is ultimately trying to push the government to force the snack makers and fast food giants like Yum! Brands to more precise label the content of their foods sold in India, much in the way they are labeled in the U.S. market.

“Most junk foods contain very high levels of trans fats, salt and sugar, leading to diseases such as obesity and diabetes,” said CSE Director Sunita Narain in an article in The Economic Times. “We need stronger regulations that will reduce fats, sugar and salt in junk foods, and force companies to provide information to the public mandatorily,” she said, opening a new front against multinational and Indian packaged foods companies almost a decade after the pesticides-in-cola controversy.

According to the Center’s study, released last Friday, junk food like potato chips, fried hamburgers and salty egg noodles “almost wipe out one’s daily permissible limits of bad fat, salt and sugar in just one serving.”

The National Institute of Nutrition and the World Health Organization both have set certain benchmarks of how much salt, sugar, carbohydrates and fats every individual can have on a daily basis to stay healthy. These benchmarks add up to what constitutes a balanced diet. For instance, the National Institute of Nutrition’s benchmark for the maximum salt intake per day is 6 grams, while a normal 80-gram packet of Maggi branded raman noodles has over 3.5 gram of salt, nearly 60% of the national recommended daily allowance for sodium.

“Coming at a time when the world is struggling to contain non-communicable diseases, when schools across the country are banning sale of junk foods on their campuses, when several countries are trying desperate measures such as ‘fat taxes’, this study tells us that we need stronger regulations that will reduce the quota of fats, sugar and salt in junk foods, and ones that will force companies to provide information to the public mandatorily,” Narain said in an article on the firm’s website last week.
http://www.forbes.com/sites/kenrapoz...k-food-brands/
kalkibhagwan no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old April 21st, 2012, 05:06 AM   #310
purty_trash
Bawla bhoot
 
purty_trash's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2011
Location: Indistaan
Posts: 445
Likes (Received): 7

Asia’s first vascular robotic surgery

Quote:
In what could be termed a path-breaking innovation, Sir Ganga Ram hospital performed Asia's first robotic vascular surgery.

Experts claim that the use of the robot for mending blood vessels – including treating blockages – will usher in high-level of precision, unlike the traditional open surgeries which generally leave behind big scars.

“We conducted four robotic vascular surgeries in April. It is for the first time in Asia that such a surgery has been performed,” said Dr Arvind Kumar, director, Institute of Robotic Surgery (IRS).

The recovery time for robotic surgeries is few hours compared to days in open surgery.
The current cost of robotic surgery is Rs 65,000, which is higher than other forms of surgeries. But doctors at SGRH assure to work on cost reduction.

“It is not just the initial investment but the recurring cost is high too. The software installed in the robot allows the use of attached instruments only 10 times. Thereafter new instruments have to be used. We are negotiating with the company so that the price would be reduced,” said Dr Kumar.

With the help of institutes like council of scientific and industrial research, IRS is planning to conduct research to have cost-effective improvement in existing technology, he added.
The hospital has conducted over 30 surgeries using the da Vinci Robot that cost Rs 10 crore.
purty_trash no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old May 15th, 2012, 08:24 PM   #311
karkal
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jan 2012
Posts: 11,076
Likes (Received): 7161

Hospitals eye 'halal' certification to attract patients from Middle East

Quote:
CHENNAI: There are two things that worry almost every patient from Islamic countries who come to Indian hospitals: the meat they eat and the direction of Mecca. With more than 75% of the medical tourists being from the Middle East, hospitals are eyeing 'halal' certification to make them feel at home.

On Monday, Chennai-based Global Health City said it has became the first in the country to receive the 'halal' certification from the Halal Development Authority. The certification would mean they get 'halal' meat in food and have 'quiblah' (the direction of Mecca) signs in every room and prayer hall. Muslims offer prayers facing 'quiblah.'

At least five leading hospital groups in the country including Apollo Hospitals and Fortis are in talks with the authority, said Halal India general manager Mohamed Noman Lateef. In Chennai, Mehta Hospitals and Lifeline Hospitals have also sent applications for the certification.

Halal India, is an independent Halal Certification body which is recognised by the Indian government and deals with certification of food, cosmetics and drugs as per the Shariah law. Halal is anything that is legal or lawful for Muslims. In terms of meat, halal applies to the kind of meat (pork is banned), their health condition and the way they are killed. The butcher must make a recitation to God and cut the jugular vein, carotid artery and the windpipe with a sharp knife. The animal can't be stunned before it is killed.

To ensure the meat used in the Global hospital's kitchen is 'halal,' officials from Halal India visited the slaughter house from where the meat is purchased. "It's not just about food or prayer hall, it's about lifestyle. For any Muslim it is important that any business performed in their daily lives is clean, hygienic and not detrimental to either their health or wellbeing as specified in the religious text. In that sense, it is a new benchmark for quality," said Halal India business development manager Sheetal Bajaj.

Hospital chairman Dr K Ravindranath said Halal certification was a form of approval that boosts patients' confidence. "To earn the certification, Global Health City had to meet strict Islamic guidelines dealing with hygiene and dietary regulations of global standards." The hospital's international business vice-president M Zakariah Ahmed said after Joint Commission International (JCI) this would be one of the biggest certification process hospitals in the country are aiming for.

Every room will also have a sticker that gives the exact direction of Mecca. "I tell every patient the food is halal. But I feel they would be happy to see the certification," said Global Hospital's international patients executive Vireesh Singh. "We tell them that we make public announcements for prayer and ensure that we give women a separate place during prayer," he said.

Transplant surgeon Dr Madhu Shankar agrees. "People from the Middle East have a different culture. We don't enter the female patient's room without their permission. A female nurse will walk in first and seek permission for a male doctor's entry," he said.
karkal no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old June 16th, 2012, 03:53 PM   #312
karkal
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jan 2012
Posts: 11,076
Likes (Received): 7161

The new obesity





karkal no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old June 16th, 2012, 10:51 PM   #313
kalkibhagwan
BANNED
 
Join Date: Oct 2011
Posts: 557
Likes (Received): 1

^ Ah... so propoganda of dharavi, the allegedly eviler than evil caste system, the "pagan" culture of India, the "poorer than sub saharan africa" kind of idiotcity wasn't enough, we have a new nautanki brewing up... and I assume they might have just taken 12-20 people from each state and would have reached the conclusion isn't it ?? These idiots shouldjust mind their own business.. we can and will look after ourselves THNAK YOU!!
kalkibhagwan no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old June 29th, 2012, 02:04 PM   #314
Krishnamoorthy K
hazaron ke anna
 
Krishnamoorthy K's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2008
Posts: 9,999

Hospital on wheels for labourers

Quote:
AHMEDABAD: In a unique initiative, the state government is fabricating a hospital on wheels for laborers who work at construction sites. The special bus will have the latest equipment to treat labourers for trauma and common diseases and even house a makeshift ward to deal with mass emergencies.

Initially, the medical vehicle will employ a doctor and two paramedics.

"The bus will be different from the 108 emergency vans," says a senior official of Ahmedabad Municipal Corporation ( AMC). "It will be a hospital under one roof. It will be capable of launching immunization drives, performing routine check-ups for vector- and air-borne diseases, and offering on-the-spot pathological analyses. It will be fitted with life-saving devices."

The official added that though the initial cost of the bus will be around Rs 35 lakh, it will escalate with the addition of more equipment. "We will be the first municipal corporation to get this bus in Gujarat," the official said. The success of the hospital will determine its adoption by other municipal corporations.

"Small accidents at construction sites are a reality and often treatment becomes costly," says builder Nilesh Parmar from Naroda. "The bus, in a way, can be a huge help for labourers. Developers' associations can be approached for contribution to this effort."

The state government also plans to have a portable X-ray unit, a computerized lab, and an ECG machine on board. "There are hospitals on wheels in the country with X-ray machines which can produce X-ray films in three minutes," the official said. For the equipment to work, an onboard generator set will be available.

"We will charge a token fee from labourers," the official said. "There could also be an emergency number on which developers can call the mobile van."
TOI
Krishnamoorthy K no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old July 6th, 2012, 02:59 PM   #315
Krishnamoorthy K
hazaron ke anna
 
Krishnamoorthy K's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2008
Posts: 9,999

Kasturba Medical College, IISc doctors chart new path in IVF treatment

Quote:
MANIPAL: In what is termed a ground breaking study, a team of researchers led by Dr Satish Adiga of Kasturba Medical College (KMC), Manipal and Dr Hanudatta Atreya of Indian Institute of Science (IISc) Bangalore have for the first time in the country, developed a non-invasive marker which they claim can help infertility experts pick the right embryo for 'in vitro fertilization' (IVF) to increase the success rate.

Other members involved in the study include: Dr Guruprasad Kalthur (KMC), Shivananda Pudakalakatti (IISc), Shubhashree Uppangala and Fiona D'Souza (both KMC).

IVF, commonly used as the treatment for infertility, has a relatively low success ratio of about 30-40 per cent in India. This is because process of selecting embryos for implanting in mother's womb depends only on its appearance (morphology) which is highly subjective.

The findings of the team have been published in 'NMR in Biomedicine' journal in the last week of June. Dr Adiga, "Further research is on to identify genetically healthy embryos based on the non-invasive approach. It can help prevent abortions and reduce incidence of genetic abnormalities in babies."

The metabolomic profile is a unique chemical signature of the activities of embryos which is reflected in the culture medium where they are developed in the laboratory. "We are experimenting with different molecules which are either released or taken up by embryos using highly sensitive nuclear magnetic resonance approach. Uptake of pyruvate by the embryo and pyruvate/alanine ratio in culture medium can serve as a potential biomarker," Dr Atreya said.

The finding opens up the possibility of an easy and non-invasive way of identifying healthy embryos, an eminent IVF expert and co-author of the paper Dr Pratap Kumar said. "This is a significant step forward towards improving the IVF success by our team," said Professor Sripathi Rao, Dean, Kasturba Medical College, Manipal. The department of science and technology, government of supported the work.
TOI
Krishnamoorthy K no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old August 2nd, 2012, 11:50 AM   #316
murlee
ВANNED
 
murlee's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2009
Location: Chennai/Faridabad
Posts: 10,614
Likes (Received): 4094

A long but very good article.. Good read.

Baby Formula
Innovation in healthcare: How Abhay and Rani Bang beat infant mortality



Quote:
Making a Difference
SEARCH's home-based newborn care in 39 villages of Maharashtra's Gadchiroli district has had great impact
Between 1995 and 1998, newborn mortality fell by 62 per cent in Gadchiroli
By 2003, the infant mortality rate fell from 121 to 30 per 1,000 live births in Gadchiroli
The national infant mortality rate is 53 per 1,000 live births
The health ministry has made home-based newborn care national policy. It has been implemented in 21 states
WHO and UNICEF have endorsed Rani and Abhay Bang's approach. It has been implemented in other Asian/African countries

Community-based Approach

Live close to the community and understand its health problems
Provide appropriate health care for immediate needs
Conduct studies with the involvement of local people
Develop low-cost solutions appropriate for the rural setting to empower locals to solve their health problems
Design and conduct field trials with scientific rigour
Publish results of trials, demonstrate the efficacy of the model to policy makers
__________________
"Nearly all men can stand adversity, but if you want to test a man's character, give him power". -- Abraham Lincoln

Last edited by murlee; August 2nd, 2012 at 12:01 PM.
murlee no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old August 17th, 2012, 12:54 PM   #317
Gudavalli
Moderator
 
Join Date: Aug 2011
Location: Hyderabad, Bath
Posts: 15,081
Likes (Received): 4036



Quote:
AHMEDABAD: Leading global healthcare brands are lining up to manufacture from Gujarat. After Vicks and Colgate Palmolive, US-based Abbott Laboratories plan to set up a manufacturing unit in Gujarat to produce its nutraceutical range-Ensure and PediaSure at Jhagadia.

Abbott has acquired 45 acres of land for the plant, which will be its second unit in India. It will be set up with an initial investment of Rs 360 crore.

Several leading global pharma and FMCG companies are eyeing the state for greenfield projects. Israel's Teva Pharmaceutical Industries along with the US-based Procter & Gamble is setting up a Rs 500 crore plant to manufacture its Vicks range of products in Sanand.

Scotland-based pharma and lifesciences companies are also eyeing Gujarat for an entry into the Indian market. Mark Dolan, country manager, Scottish Development International attributes the trend to the quick materialisation of discussions. "Gujarati and Scottish businesses hold many common values and attitudes. Every opportunity to meet and discuss business is maximised with discussion quickly getting down to detail." Dolan met a couple of pharmaceutical and lifesciences companies in Ahmedabad in the first week of August to explore business opportunities.

Singapore-headquartered Biosensors International, too, plans to start manufacturing from Gujarat. The medical device company specializes in developing, manufacturing and licensing technologies for cardiological procedures.

Another US-based generic pharma manufacturer Amneal Pharmaceuticals has set up a formulation unit along with a research and development centre near Changodar and plans to start operations out of its facility. New Jersey based Apicore LLC, manufacturer of specialty active pharmaceutical ingredients (APIs) have also expressed their plans to set up base in the state.

"A foreign company looks at state government's investment friendly policies, labour availability and customer base in the region. Gujarat is a perfect destination for foreign pharma companies as the state offers single-window approval, low cost of land, skilled labour and is a hub for pharma and generic medicines," said Ankit Suri, associate vice president, Tecnova India, a management consulting firm specialized in designing 'India entry strategy' for international players. According to HG Koshia, commissioner of Food and Drugs Control Administration (FDCA), the state has seen a surge in enquiry from international pharmaceutical companies after the introduction of the e-governance initiative.
Gudavalli está en línea ahora   Reply With Quote
Old August 17th, 2012, 02:11 PM   #318
Gudavalli
Moderator
 
Join Date: Aug 2011
Location: Hyderabad, Bath
Posts: 15,081
Likes (Received): 4036



Quote:
NEW DELHI: PM Manmohan Singh gave the National Health Mission pride of place in his I-Day speech but a fierce policy row clouds the initiative, highlighting sharp differences over a major policy revamp that includes an ambitious plan for universal health coverage.

Health ministry's unwillingness to pay anything more than lip service to a common health mission for urban and rural areas is a major flashpoint, although not the only one, over changes in health policy keenly advocated by the Prime Minister's Office and Planning Commission.

NHM will have separate strategies for urban and rural areas, but will subsume the National Rural Health Mission that accounts for 73% of the ministry's spending. But while NHRM is to be expanded to address "threats to health in both rural and urban areas", the ministry is insisting on separate missions.

The divergence is part of ongoing policy skirmishes with Planning Commission drawing flak for advocating a switch to "managed healthcare" — read as privatization of public health services. Similarly, a divide over proposed changes in budgetary processes indicate polarized views in government.

The slug fest has seen PMO advice the ministry to be more conciliatory while it is felt the 12th plan draft's terminology could be misread. This is despite the draft stating, "...expansion of good quality affordable public sector care will cause a shift towards public sectors providers freeing vulnerable population from dependence on high cost and often unreachable private sector health care."

Sources said the argument to encourage "competition" between government health providers and private care was scotched in its infancy. The healthcare system will not be privatized although a government controlled corporation can oversee the functioning of the health network.

The NHM has run into resistance with the health ministry insisting on retaining separate rural and urban missions even if an overarching structure is put in place.

This has put it at odds with PMO and the plan panel as the new policy sees the increasing rate of urbanization and transformation of areas into an urban and rural mix necessitating a unified approach to coordinate planning, resources and implementation.
Gudavalli está en línea ahora   Reply With Quote
Old August 17th, 2012, 07:08 PM   #319
Gudavalli
Moderator
 
Join Date: Aug 2011
Location: Hyderabad, Bath
Posts: 15,081
Likes (Received): 4036



Quote:
Firstpost spoke to Dr. Srinath Reddy, Chairman of the High Level Expert Group and the President of Public Health Foundation of India on Universal Health Care (UHC) and the way forward. Here are some excerpts from the interview.

Q. Your thoughts on UHC and the HLEG-recommendations, given the widespread apprehensions of the Planning Commission not implementing them in full.

Cashless, universal healthcare should be the model we should move towards and the vision of the UHC should be included in the Plan document. UHC should be the comprehensive framework for the country’s public health planning and we have to take it forward sequentially.

Policy makers will respond to well-articulated public demands and hence there should be public debates on the issue. The states can in fact become the champions of UHC.

Dr Srinath Reddy believes there is no need to cut back on public health spending. Firstpost
Q. One of the reasons cited for the Planning Commission going slow on UHC is financial constraints – the slowdown of the economy and squeeze on resources

An economic slowdown in fact demands more investment in the social sector. During the financial crisis of the 1990s, East Asian countries, who were badly affected, continued to invest in health and education. In fact, besides protecting people from economic shocks, it can also contribute to growth and employment. We should learn from their experience. Investing in health will also create a lot of jobs.

Q. There is a lot apprehension on privatisation of healthcare, in the guise of efficiency and capacity constraints, through public private partnerships (PPP)

To me, PPP is partnership for public purpose and not partnership for private profit. We have to first define public purpose and its pathways. Public sector should set the terms. It should lead to socialisation of the private sector.

Q. In the context of UHC, there is this tendency of outsourcing healthcare to insurance companies. States such as Tamil Nadu now have a system of insurance companies, paid for by the government, providing services.

What we proposed is health assurance than health insurance. According to our UHC plan, the State should be the main provider of healthcare, but could involve others such as the private sector and NGOs. We had proposed two options, one of which in fact rules out private insurance coverage. The insurance schemes are the ATMs for private hospitals.

We are living in a mixed health system. If we do not strengthen the public health systems, by default the private sector will expand its presence.

Q. Some strongly argue against tertiary healthcare under UHC because it might eat up all the money

Some elements of tertiary healthcare are required for even maintaining primary and secondary healthcare. For instance, It’s inconceivable that snake-bite victims cannot be given ventilator support if needed.

Q. There is this routine argument that the country’s health systems do not have the appropriate “absorption capacity” for large amounts of money. In fact, it is pointed out that the health ministry could not fully spend the allocation for the last Plan period. Such situations favour the advocates for PPP and privatisation.

We have to rapidly strengthen capacity and put in the money – absorption capacity will improve. The UHC roadmap gives a lot of emphasis on strengthening primary health care and district level capacity. Financial protection (allocation of funds) alone is not enough; there should be adequate infrastructure, trained healthcare workforce, essential drugs, and community-involvement

Q. There are many centrally funded vertical health schemes that seem to fragment the public health sector in India. Wouldn’t there be a conflict between them and the UHC?

They should be transitioned into the UHC. UHC should be the comprehensive framework. Otherwise, it will further fragment the scene.
Gudavalli está en línea ahora   Reply With Quote
Old August 17th, 2012, 07:09 PM   #320
Gudavalli
Moderator
 
Join Date: Aug 2011
Location: Hyderabad, Bath
Posts: 15,081
Likes (Received): 4036



Quote:
India is undergoing a revolution in the health sector and will become the first country in the world to disassociate healthcare from affluence, according to Devi Prasad Shetty, founder and chairman, Narayana Hrudayalaya Hospitals and chairman, Healthex International 2012.

Seven to ten years from now, there will be an interesting scenario in India where millions of people living in slums with no amenities will have access to high tech healthcare with dignity, he pointed out.

India will prove to the world that a country does not need to be affluent to offer affordable healthcare to its citizens. For this transformation to take place, there is a need for us to create over two to three million beds in hospitals around the country. Along with each bed, the equipment required and the industry size needs to be determined, he said.

The reason for my optimism regarding this massive transformation in India in the near future is because the Indian Government is in talks to conceptualize a law called ‘Right to Healthcare’. In my opinion, 'Right to Healthcare' will soon become a reality just as the Right to Information or the Right to Education. Political parties, political leaders and citizens of the country support this initiative and I believe that there will not be any opposition for them when this campaign begins.

The question that would arise is whether we have that kind of money to pay for healthcare for everyone in the country. Interestingly, healthcare need not be as expensive as it is today as this is one industry that is not dependent on any natural resource like steel, petrol or cement. We do not need any of those. All we need is human skill.

We produce the highest number of doctors, nurses and medical technicians in the world. We also have the largest number of US FDA approved drug manufacturing units outside the US. In fact, we have the capacity to make medicines for the whole world. In spite of these positives, we are still in a mess as people do not have available cash to pay for healthcare. Right to Healthcare will insure that the government comes up with various schemes to suit the working class and underprivileged.

A simple example of how this will happen is that of what Karnataka did 10 years ago with the insurance called Yashaswini. 1.7 million farmers initially paid Rs. 5 per month and the Government paid Rs. 2.5, today the premium has increased to Rs. 10 and we are close to three million people contributing money. People in Karnataka have many schemes available to them like Yashaswini, Vajpayee Arogya, Suvarna Arogya Yojana, etc.

But in North India, such schemes do not exist. For instance, if the police force is unwell they could access any of the 400 network hospitals and get any treatment free of cost. The Arogya Bhagya scheme of Police will provide cashless service. Even though North India has the same amount of police force, such schemes are not available to them making healthcare a financial burden. They are entitled for reimbursement but unfortunately it is very hard for them to get the reimbursement money from the Government. The whole purpose to create this system of Right to Healthcare’, is to encourage the Government to come up with schemes which will allow underprivileged people to participate in the delivery of healthcare.
Gudavalli está en línea ahora   Reply With Quote


Reply

Thread Tools
Rate This Thread
Rate This Thread:

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off



All times are GMT +2. The time now is 07:41 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
Feedback Buttons provided by Advanced Post Thanks / Like v3.2.5 (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2014 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.

vBulletin Optimisation provided by vB Optimise (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2014 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.

SkyscraperCity ☆ In Urbanity We trust ☆ about us | privacy policy | DMCA policy

Hosted by Blacksun, dedicated to this site too!
Forum server management by DaiTengu