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Old May 3rd, 2012, 09:11 PM   #2941
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Auckland becomes Fair Trade city

Auckland has become New Zealand's third official Fair Trade city, joining Wellington and Dunedin. There are now more than 300 Fair Trade businesses throughout Auckland and Fair Trade campaigner Sam Drumm says that means Auckland finally has the numbers.
The Aucklander met Drumm in December when Auckland had 240 Fair Trade businesses and at the time Drumm, and his team of five staff plus 15 volunteers, were working hard on their Make Auckland Fairtrade (MAFT) campaign, aiming to line up 280 Fair Traders.

Auckland mayor Len Brown will will launch Auckland's status as a Fair Trade City today, joining a network of 1000 towns and cities around the world. He will make the official announcement and be presented with a certificate by Papua New Guinea Fairtrade coffee farmer, Michael Toliman at a special event at Auckland City Library at 10am. Mr Brown says the move is a good one. "We have a great sense of what's fair in New Zealand, and offering a fair deal to farmers and workers in developing countries is something that more and more businesses and individuals in Auckland are very keen to do," he said.
Len Brown says Auckland Council will play its part through measures such as using Fairtrade Certified coffee and tea at its offices and at meetings.

The news comes just ahead of Fair Trade Fortnight running from May 5-20. Auckland had to fulfil five criteria set out by the Fair Trade Association of Australia & New Zealand, all of which have now been achieved. Fairtrade steering group representing different sectors is formed to co-ordinate action around the goals and develop them over the years. Fairtrade ANZ CEO Stephen Knapp said in a statement that New Zealand was one of the world's fastest growing markets for Fairtrade Certified products, with sales growing by 24 per cent to reach $45.4 million last year despite the economic downturn. "And with Auckland now an active Fair Trade City, these numbers are only set to increase, benefiting even more farmers in developing countries around the world, including some of our Pacific neighbours."

Drumm says he is delighted Auckland has finally been awarded Fair Trade status and believes that all Aucklanders have a part to play in creating a fair system. "Fair trade is a serious issue, and it's everyone's responsibility. Lots of things in life aren't fair, but trade can be if we all work together and make our choices count. Every year Kiwis, sometimes without even knowing it, are helping put millions back into co-operative farmer groups in developing countries just by picking up a bunch of bananas, a bag of coffee, a t-shirt or a bar of chocolate that has one simple green and blue label on it - Fairtrade."

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Fair Trade Auckland - Fair Trade New Zealand
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Old May 3rd, 2012, 11:55 PM   #2942
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Redacted;

Could you get some more information about this exciting new development? It looks great!
Here's the SOURCE, you have to register your interest. Other news is that the building to the left of Queen's Court (the ugly pink one) will be demolished and replaced with a mixed-use tower. If you look at the Queen's Court floor PLAN you will see internal access provided for both future developments
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Old May 4th, 2012, 01:33 AM   #2943
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Last chance for say on 'super brothel'
Today is the last chance the public has to have their say on whether a 'super brothel' should be allowed to be built in central Auckland. Wellington property developers John and Michael Chow want to build a 15-storey tower building, including a brothel, on the site of the demolished Palace Hotel in Victoria St. On April 3, the council called for public submissions on the bid, setting a May 4 deadline.

The plan is that the first two levels of the black-toned glass building will be blank and layered by a LED screen mesh facing Victoria St. This will carry graphic images for events such as a countdown to the New Year. Property magnate Sir Robert Jones is among those who have already voiced opposition to the plan, with Robt Jones Holdings Auckland director Greg Loveridge saying the scale and look of the building on its northern face were objectionable. "It will be 15 floors of concrete sheer wall so it won't look very nice.'' Robt Jones Holdings owns Telco House next to the site.

The historic Palace Hotel was demolished on Auckland Council orders in November 2010 after the Chow brothers' low-rise redevelopment left it unstable.
Last December the brothers, whose wealth stems from their sex and property development businesses, announced the replacement at 75 Victoria St West would be a 15-storey building that would include a brothel, Penthouse Club, hotel and offices.
Heritage campaigner Alan Matson said the scale of the proposal had more than a minor effect on the formally recognised character of the adjacent 20th century buildings. Auckland's Catholic leader Bishop Pat Dunn is also among opponents. An Auckland Council report has said commercial sex premises were lawful and fell within a range of commercial and entertainment activities permitted under the district plan. An council hearing of the resource consent bid is expected to take place in about five weeks.
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Old May 4th, 2012, 10:43 AM   #2944
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Other news is that the building to the left of Queen's Court (the ugly pink one) will be demolished and replaced with a mixed-use tower
Best news in quite a while and can't come soon enough.

Also, the design of the proposed tower looks a really good one. I like the roof.
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Old May 4th, 2012, 07:33 PM   #2945
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Rudman's city: Industry tapping taxpayers for dry dock a tad rich

It makes me a bit nervous lining up alongside such luminaries of the right as councillors Cameron Brewer and Dick Quax, but you have to agree with them. Is it the core business of local government to subsidise a dry dock for rich boys' toys? Council-owned Waterfront Auckland sees Wynyard Quarter as the perfect location for a $45.3 million lift-out facility where the super-rich can raise their gin palaces out of the tide and have the barnacles scrubbed from their bottoms. The boats, that is. The problem is, the capitalist system that made the boat owners so wealthy has also ordained there's no profit to be had in building and operating such a dry dock. The private boat builders know the only way they'll make money out of such a facility is to find a sugar daddy who's a sucker for a good yarn. Waterfront Auckland seems to have fallen for it hook, line and sinker, with talk of "strategic investment" and "partnerships" and the mirage that $16.8 million of ratepayers' money invested in the $45.3 million dry dock now, will lead to "a further $90 million of private investment" some time in the never never. Over 25 years, the superyacht refit business will, we're told, bring in $161 million to the Auckland economy.

Now maybe it will. But if this is likely, then why aren't the banks and the moneybags who covet these playthings, and the boat-builders, rushing in with their chequebooks to reap the rewards? Is it sheer coincidence that Waterfront Auckland's chairman is former Waitakere City Mayor Bob Harvey? A decade ago, Waitakere City invested $4.6 million to buy and sound-proof the old Enza cool sheds in Henderson Valley to try to create the Hollywood of the Antipodes. Last year, the studio's majority partner, Tony Tay Film, went into liquidation, and another Auckland City company, Auckland Council Properties (ACP), subsequently bought for just $1.5 million the 55.6 per cent majority stake Tony Tay owned. This it added to the 44.4 per cent it had inherited from Waitakere City when it was absorbed into the Super City. ACP chief executive Gary Swift called it "a good investment" at a "significant discount to the value of the underlying asset". As owner of the other "half" of the company, he could have equally bemoaned the collapse in market value of the council's existing shareholding.

Unlike councillors Quax and Brewer, I'm not of their minimalist school when it comes to council investment in infrastructure. I just reckon if ratepayers' money is to be spent, the line between investment and benefit to ratepayers should be direct, not mystical. That's why I see no reason for spending $28.7 million of our money on converting historic Shed 10 on Queens Wharf into an overseas cruise ship terminal. We're told it's to make Auckland "world class" and to boost tourism business. But the only thing the ordinary ratepayers will get for their money is their newly liberated wharf closed to the public for lengthy periods, and streets overcrowded each time the bus convoys pass by laden with day-trippers bound for Rotorua. The cruise ship terminal is a tool the tourism industry and the port company require to make more money. It should be funded from within the industry, not subsidised by ratepayers, most of whom will never step aboard such a vessel.

Instead of the city propping up unprofitable business adventures, there are plenty of other projects crying out for funds that have no appeal to private enterprise but will be of direct benefit to all - or groups - of ratepayers. Just the other day came a story that Auckland's 777 community sportsfields are closed more than 20 per cent of the time - more in winter when most needed - because of poor drainage. The cancellation of organised team sport during the winter months - there are 4666 rugby, soccer and league teams in Auckland - disrupts the plans of thousands of kids each weekend. Accelerating the sanding and other remedial work on these grounds would make Auckland much more "world class" than building a dry dock, in these kids' eyes at least. Then there's the derisory $0 proposed to maintain our precious volcanoes in the original draft of the Long Term Plan. Imagine what $16.6 million could do for them. And have I mentioned the St James Theatre ...
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Old May 4th, 2012, 07:41 PM   #2946
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Dr Joel Cayford: Auckland spaces keep on falling

Albert Park is one of Auckland's oldest public spaces, reflecting the formality and culture of early British colonisers and a clear planning distinction between public and private. Opened in 1979, Aotea Square reflects an altogether different history. It and Mayoral Drive were built following the demolition of lower Greys Inn Rd and much of old Auckland's urban fabric, enabling the creation of decongested road access to the CBD and high capacity central city car-parking. Meeting the accessibility and mobility needs of private car owners was a far greater priority than the creation of a successful public space at Aotea Square.

If Auckland's citizens or visitors feel some sort of connection with a public space it is more likely to be successful, but Aotea Square's success is limited to skateboarders and the protesters who recently occupied it. Public spaces reflect the character of a city. My favourites include the South Bank in London, Xocalo in Mexico City, and Odori Park in Sapporo.

The earliest public spaces - Greek agora - were formed within a civilisation which valued democracy and recognised and accepted cultural difference. Public spaces provided citizens the means of building community life. They were places where people would meet, greet, talk and learn about each other. They were building blocks for tolerance and understanding. If urban public spaces merely exist to provide more air, a view of the horizon to break the monotony of endless buildings, as a setting for alien artworks or as places to park vehicles, they will not be successful. Or if they are designed mainly as gathering places for consumers, like outdoor shopping malls dominated by shops and places to spend money, rather than time, then the broader public interest will not be served.

From a purely functional point of view, public places do need to provide seating, toilets and simple food. But to be successful they must also provide reasons to be there that are more than merely offering a place to chill or wait for the theatre or film to start - though people-watching appeals to many. To be successful, to form part of the infrastructural heart and soul of a city, public spaces need safe places for children and the elderly, familiar connections for people from different cultures, and embodied reminders of a city's history, ancestry and heritage.

Little of this heart and soul is evident in Aotea Square, though it is improving. The children's playground at Wynyard Quarter is one of the greatest successes of that public space, though sadly its footprint is zoned for high-rise development. And maritime heritage and character reminders there are at huge risk from development pressure and a light-handed regulatory approach from Auckland Council.

Queens Wharf is Auckland's most recent public space. It was opened to the public two short years ago and rapidly became a political football. The moth-balled McCully Cloud and some cheap security fencing around its heritage shed are the visible reminders of that history. A sad superficial legacy for a place that embodies and still exudes Auckland maritime history. At least twice in its short public life Queens Wharf has shown its potential. The first was when two Chinese warships came to visit. Queens Wharf became a magnet for Auckland's Chinese community, largely absent from the CBD following the loss of the waterfront Oriental Market. The second was early in the Rugby World Cup when Queens Wharf and downtown Auckland glowed with the energy and laughter of its Tongan and Samoan peoples.

Today, despite the sign that insists Queens Wharf is open to the public, it has been taken over by airport buses, taxis, casual traffic, and its very own roundabout and traffic lights. It is often dangerous for pedestrians entering and exiting the ferry terminal. As a Devonport resident I now enjoy easy access to airport buses, but this traffic is the thin end of the wedge, building up to the establishment of a primary cruise ship terminal with its associated traffic demands which risks being the kiss of death for a truly great public space on Queens Wharf. Thankfully, two thirds of submissions to Auckland Council's Annual Plan oppose a Queens Wharf cruise ship terminal. If the council does not heed these submissions, I will be among those who claim the council is suffering from agoraphobia, a fear of public places.
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Old May 6th, 2012, 09:21 PM   #2947
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Decision on Harbour Bridge cycleway due

The future of a proposed cycleway across the Harbour Bridge will be decided by Auckland Council next week. The proposal is for a four metre-wide, 1000m long pathway underneath the deck of the city side clip-on of the bridge. It would take up to a year to build at a cost of $23 million, paid for through a public-private partnership. Pedestrians and cyclists would pay a proposed $2 toll to use the cycleway.
Next Tuesday the transport committee will vote on whether to support the project. Their support would allow the final stages of the design process to go ahead, including local consultation, consenting and construction approval.

Project director Bevan Woodward says a potential funder for the cycleway has been found and a naming rights sponsor. He says the project would require $2 million of funding from council for pre-construction costs but these would be reimbursed once construction began. "The pathway can be built at minimal or no cost to Auckland Council, the revenue projections show council receiving healthy dividends from the pathway's toll revenue in return for underwriting some of the project risk. "The majority of the project risk will be carried by the private debt and equity funders."
He says the pathway will have tourism, commuting and recreational benefits and construction could begin as early as next year.

Heart of the City chief executive Alex Swney says the project will add to the waterfront. "This project ticks many of the boxes contained within its own Auckland Plan - it celebrates our harbour, our environmental credentials and the growing cycling commuter community. "It is funded from a partnership with the private sector and adds to our tourism offering on our waterfront - it's now over to Auckland Council to support this project through the next phase of delivering this project."

At the current traffic levels 1000 people would be able to be on the bridge at any one time, which would allow for about 5000 people to cross the bridge in an hour. In 20 years the number would have to be reduced to 500 at any one time because of increased traffic demands. The number of users would need to be limited by using a toll gate. The project's $23m cost would be recoverable through tolls of $2 for an estimated 20 years. The cost for add-ons, such as feature lighting, would be $1.8m and about $2.1m for observation decks.
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Old May 6th, 2012, 11:31 PM   #2948
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From Rhubarb Lane to this .... http://cityworksdepot.co.nz/
Looks as if I spoke to soon - this area could be our next inner-city hub of cool

Workshop Outlet Store
The brand new Workshop Outlet at Shed 4 is a huge space, which features an installation by Martin Poppelwell and Enuake Sirikige. There is an expansive array of samples, seconds, denim and end of line stock from Workshop, Helen Cherry as well as a selection of international brands. Open 10am - 6pm Monday - Friday and 10am - 5pm Saturday - Sunday.

Let's not forget Deus Ex Machina which is one of the trendiest places in the CBD ...









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Old May 6th, 2012, 11:38 PM   #2949
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this area could be our next inner-city hub of cool
Oh yes! a new concentration shops like Britomart area.
Oh how it would be nice if I could open my own shop (food, fashion or design) ...
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Old May 7th, 2012, 12:58 AM   #2950
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Oh yes! a new concentration shops like Britomart area.
Oh how it would be nice if I could open my own shop (food, fashion or design) ...
+1 ... I have so many concepts floating around in my head but I am too scared to take the plunge - the World economy is so f**king erratic !!!!!!! and I don't want to gamble with my home
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Old May 7th, 2012, 01:39 PM   #2951
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Oh yes, Syd you are right, in time like this is not helpful make loans or anything like that, putting at risk what you have ... what you meant in particular? Besides what I mentioned is the dream of every Italian immigrant, who moved and settled permanently abroad ...
To give you an example of my idea would be to make a concept store, with fashion and design in my case, however, entirely Made in Italy ... I do not know if I would compete in Auckland, but the thing I'd really like. Unfortunately it remains a utopia, it would be a lot if I could in the coming years to come and stay ...

PS: I apologize to the others, but you know, it's nice to have dreams and to be able to speak with someone who is happy for you!
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Old May 7th, 2012, 09:32 PM   #2952
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Patron calls for waterfront gallery to showcase contemporary art

Auckland needs to start planning for its own version of London's Tate Modern art gallery on the waterfront before Wellington does, says a leading arts patron. John Gow is asking the Auckland Council to include the project in its long-term budget, but stresses he is not asking for money at this stage. Mr Gow - who owns the Connells Bay Sculpture Park on Waiheke Island, co-founded the island's Sculpture on the Gulf exhibition and was a major private funder of the city's new Q Theatre - wants the council to consider the visionary concept of an international contemporary art gallery on the Auckland waterfront.

Most countries have a contemporary gallery dedicated to "today's" art, he said in a submission on the council's long-term budget. Mr Gow said New Zealand punched above its weight in contemporary art and it needed to be recognised that, internationally, art museums were among the most visited destinations anywhere. "Such arts facilities are magnets for international travellers and Auckland needs to catch up. If we don't do it, Wellington will." Mr Gow said that besides Britain's Tate Modern, housed in the former Bankside power station on the River Thames, there were contemporary museums in Sydney, Melbourne and Brisbane. New York's Museum of Modern Art had its own institution dedicated solely to contemporary art.

The arts in Auckland are facing tough times with talk of a $12.4 million top-up from ratepayers for the $121 million upgrade of the Auckland Art Gallery and the Auckland Theatre Company seeking to raise $41 million for a new theatre project at Wynyard Quarter. Mr Gow said a centre for contemporary art was a 10- to 20-year project and although there was no need for funding at this stage, the Government, Auckland Council and the private sector would need to pitch in. In the meantime, there was the possibility of using the New Gallery, across the road from the Auckland Art Gallery, or Shed 10 on Queens Wharf to exhibit local and international contemporary art.

Auckland Art Gallery director Chris Saines applauded the idea of beginning a conversation for a contemporary art gallery in Auckland. "Cities worldwide have outgrown their foundation art institutions and sought to branch out into the establishment of more contemporary annexes, just as Brisbane did a number of years ago and Melbourne did some time before that," Mr Saines said. He understood that some people might ask why the city should be considering a new gallery when it had just upgraded the Auckland Art Gallery, but said there would come a point in about 10 to 15 years when it would be needed. "Visions have to start somewhere."

Arts patron Dame Jenny Gibbs said the city had only just completed the beautiful expansion of the Auckland Art Gallery and was not short of space. But Dame Jenny - who with former husband Alan Gibbs established the New Gallery opposite the Auckland Art Gallery in 1995 to showcase modern New Zealand art - said a contemporary art gallery was an excellent idea in the longer term. Last year, Auckland arts commentator Hamish Keith floated the idea of building an offshoot of Wellington's Te Papa on Wynyard Quarter, prompting former Auckland Art Gallery director Rodney Wilson to call for a "bold, provocative, widely appealing" contemporary art gallery instead.
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Old May 7th, 2012, 09:36 PM   #2953
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Sultan puts BNZ tower on block

The Sultan of Brunei is negotiating to sell an office block to Robert Holden's Conrad Properties in the latest in a series of deals sweeping Auckland and Wellington worth about $450 million. The deal, which is some weeks from settling, could see the ex-BNZ block at 125 Queen converted into apartments. Real estate agent Graham Wall said the property was under contract.
BNZ left the block, which is now substantially empty, and moved to 80 Queen St, but Foodstuffs Auckland created a New World Metro in its basement.

Chris Dibble, associate research director at Jones Lang LaSalle, said the deal was the latest of many. "The commercial real estate investment sector is on fire as another major transaction is announced in a matter of weeks," Dibble said. "Telecom Centre on Victoria St in Auckland, Bowen Campus in Wellington, Beca House in Auckland and now 125 Queen St are under due diligence or unconditional. These assets have a combined value of around $450 million," he said. "The assets vary across a number of styles, size, quality, age, building design, future proofing and location, but they all have a single common denominator: investors are keen to unlock their potential."

Capital that has been looking for a home is flowing strongly back into commercial real estate, Dibble said. "Commercial property continues to enlist enquiry as investors move away from equities and other asset classes as fixed asset increases become a strong focus for investors across the globe," he said. "These transactions, once transacted provide solid evidence that the market upturn is well on its way," Dibble said. "Once all of the transactions conclude and pass the rigorous levels of due diligence that is required in today's market this may lead to one of the strongest years of commercial real estate transactions, which have been depressed since 2008."

Jones Lang LaSalle predicted approximately $1.5 billion of commercial (office, retail and industrial) real estate at more than $5 million would transact in 2012, compared to $1.1 billion in 2008.
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Old May 7th, 2012, 09:42 PM   #2954
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Super brothel 'a curse' on Auckland

A proposed 15-storey super brothel in central Auckland would lead to an explosion of sexually transmitted diseases, child sex slavery, moral bankruptcy, drug warfare and a curse on everyone in New Zealand, according to submissions to Auckland Council. John and Michael Chow plan to build a development called the Penthouse Club, which would include a brothel and entertainment facilities, on Victoria St, opposite SkyCity. One submission said it would create a "sin precinct" It would be built on the 552 square metre site of the former Palace Hotel, a Victorian-era heritage building which crumbled during refurbishments under the Chows' care in 2010. Of the 200 submissions to the council on the plan, only one conditionally supported it.

The majority highlighted issues of morality, criminality and health, while a handful - including one from the Historic Places Trust - were concerned about the building's lack of heritage sensitivity. A submission from Mary Pepping said the complex would increase sexually transmitted diseases such as "Aids, cysts, cold sores, gonorrhoea, herpes and have other undesirable effects on the community". Another was more specific about these effects. "How would you expect children, families and ladies to visit a place if a brothel is present? It would attract violence, drug wars and proliferate scrupulous (sic) business dealings."
Brett Erceg said in his submission that he had visited brothels "many times" and had sex with "many Asian ladies" so knew about the effects of such an establishment. "I have witnessed underage Asian girls asking for work." He said the business would only encourage that sort of activity. "If you consent to this development you will consign some children to sex slavery," submitter Paul Francis wrote.
Magno Gull said that, as a Christian, it was one of his rights to protest this kind of activity which "undermined morals and families". Clive and Eileen Auckram said people must think not only of their children but of their children's children.
The project would turn Victoria St into a "sin precinct" and open the floodgates for more brothels, they said. Many submissions were identical, apparently based on a template from conservative lobby group Family First. Joan Bernich was shocked that anyone would think of putting a brothel so close to a place of worship "and a tourist spot" such as the Sky Tower.

Associate pastor of the Otara-based Christ for Every Nation Church, Mary Paki, said a people or nation bent on doing wrong against God would also experience an escalation in crime. The Crowsen family suggested that, from a Christian point of view, brothels were "an abomination against God". The development would lead to a curse being cast on not only the brothel operators, but its clients, the council and the whole of New Zealand. David Hare believed the development would put pressure on marriages by promoting "pornography and other illicit activities". Jeremy Ruane exclaimed his shock simply. "At the end of Federal St we have a house of God. At the other the house of sod!" Submissions closed last Friday but some were still trickling in yesterday. The council will now hold a resource consent hearing where council-appointed commissioners will consider the proposal. The Chow brothers own a string of Wellington brothels including Ill Bordello and the Splash Club, as well as the Mermaid strip club.
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Old May 7th, 2012, 11:09 PM   #2955
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Its a shame in some ways that the Casino and Brothels aren't located on K Road, then we could have a really cool "Sin Precinct."
A bit like what Perth has, where all the debauchery is conveniently contained in just a couple of streets. Is that not easier than spreading it thinly across the shopping & business district?

Last edited by AK-Sam; May 7th, 2012 at 11:24 PM.
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Old May 8th, 2012, 12:25 AM   #2956
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Personally I hate it's location. It's such a high profile spot and likely to become more so once Federal Street is shared.
Around the corner on Hobson Street or Nelson Street would be a much better location for it. A little bit out of the way but still close enough to the casino to service the clients.
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Old May 8th, 2012, 02:42 AM   #2957
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Holy Trinity Cathedral Design Winner Announced




The new look of Holy Trinity Cathedral in Parnell has been unveiled tonight (Monday May 7) with the announcement of a winning architectural design for a new Chapel at the south end of the Cathedral. The winning firm is Fearon Hay. Competition judging panel chair, David Sheppard (President-elect of the New Zealand Institute of Architects), said: “With walls of glass and a canopy roof with applied mosaic artwork, this winning design, in its inherent simplicity and economy of means, provides a powerful starting point for achieving an inspiring, useful and ‘of its time’ Chapel. It promises to become a perfect complement to the great works of St Mary’s, Architect Towle’s Chancel, Dr Toy’s Nave and forecourt, and Jacky Bowring’s memorial gardens.”

Cathedral Dean, Jo Kelly-Moore, also a competition judge said: “We are very excited by the vision and possibilities of Fearon Hay’s design. Each week literally thousands of people come to the Cathedral precinct, whether it is for a few quiet moments or as part of a large gathering. The dimensions of this project have as their main purpose enabling the Cathedral to better serve the people of Auckland and New Zealand. We all agreed that Fearon Hay had understood and interpreted that purpose. Like the great Cathedrals of Europe, these mighty buildings take generations to build. This is this generation’s contribution to the Cathedral.”.

The design competition was run through the New Zealand Institute of Architects and the winning design was chosen from a short list of four of the country’s top architects: Athfield Architects, Fearon Hay, Architectus, and RTA Studio and Pete Bossley in collaboration. The design competition is part of a larger project instigated by the refurbishing and expanding of the Cathedral organ. All this work will be integrated with the new Chapel to be built at the south end of the Cathedral. Also the Cathedral and St Mary’s will be linked. It is anticipated that work on the entire project will cost in the vicinity of $10 million and commence in 2013. “Plans are to complete everything to coincide with the bicentenary of Christianity in Aotearoa New Zealand on Christmas Day 2014” said Dean Jo Kelly-Moore.

Fundraising is already underway and, with foundational pledges in hand, work will continue on fundraising during 2012. All the designs were displayed publicly and public feedback was taken into account by the judging panel comprising president-elect of the NZIA, David Sheppard, convenor; Dean of Auckland, The Very Reverend Jo Kelly-Moore; Archdeacon of Auckland, The Venerable Carole Hughes; and Chair of the Cathedral Resources Board, Mr David Grove.

A brief history of the Holy Trinity Cathedral site


1843 Bishop Selwyn bought the land for a Cathedral for Auckland. He described it as a noble site.


1935 publishing heiress Mina Horton bequeathed funds to build a Cathedral.


1959 work started on the liturgical East end (geographic South end) designed by local architect Charles Towle .


1973 stage 1, the sanctuary, now referred to as “the gothic section”, was first used. Until then St Mary’s Church, across Parnell Road, acted as pro Cathedral.


1982 St Mary’s was moved across the road adjacent to the Cathedral, as St Mary’s in Holy Trinity, similar to St Margaret’s in Westminster.


1992 the nave, designed by Professor Richard Toy was added.


The Cathedral is oriented so that great windows, intended for the south, look out the 5km to the volcanic cone of One Tree Hill, framed by Mt St John and Mt Hobson.
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Old May 8th, 2012, 01:45 PM   #2958
DML2
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Lol at the people getting uptight about the brothel. Especially whomever said this: ''It would attract violence, drug wars and proliferate scrupulous (sic) business dealings." What a dumbass
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Old May 8th, 2012, 02:47 PM   #2959
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I don't mind people making such cases against it, if they can provide evidence and further information. Something they have failed to do here.

They just make themselves sounds stupid writing things like 'drug wars'
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Old May 8th, 2012, 02:49 PM   #2960
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Isn't prostitution a legal and protected industry here? I guess its not common public knowledge.

Otherwise their opinions would change in a flash.
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