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Old May 11th, 2012, 05:17 PM   #561
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Suzlon creates country's largest wind park

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The Jaisalmer Wind Park being developed by the Suzlon Group has crossed 1,000 Mw of installed capacity and has reached 1,064 Mw (one gigawatt) on April 1. This makes the wind park, the largest of its kind in the country, Suzlon claimed in a filing with the Bombay Stock Exchange.

The company initiated the development of the wind park in 2001. Suzlon said in the filing that its entire wind portfolio -- from the earliest 350 Kw model to the latest S9X - 2.1 Mw series -- has been used to create the park.

The wind park consists of a cluster of wind farm sites in Jaisalmer district, including Amarsagar, Badabaug, Tejuva and Soda Mada.

Shares of Suzlon Energy Ltd, the flagship company of the group, were down 3.58% at Rs 18.85 a little before noon on Friday, on the Bombay Stock Exchange.

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Suzlon crosses 1,000 MW in Jaisalmer

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The Jaisalmer wind park, being developed by the Suzlon Group, crossed 1,000 MW of installed capacity at the end of FY12, reaching 1,064 MW on Apr. 01, 2012.

This achievement makes the wind park the largest of its kind in India, a proud accomplishment for the state of Rajasthan and Suzlon.

Speaking on this achievement, Tulsi Tanti, chairman, Suzlon Group, said, ``Suzlon is proud to be playing such a vital role in powering the state of Rajasthan. Completing 1 GW of installed capacity is a great achievement for us as a company and for wind energy in India. We credit this achievement to the support from the Government of Rajasthan, our customers and the local communities.``

The Jaisalmer wind park is a powerful illustration of how Suzlon serves its customers and the communities we work in. We take this opportunity to renew our commitment to Rajasthan and to harness the incredible wind potential in the state.

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Old May 12th, 2012, 07:12 AM   #562
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Any pic. If it's that big, a pic of it would look fabulous
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Old May 12th, 2012, 07:16 AM   #563
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Here's one from Suzlon
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Old May 12th, 2012, 09:01 AM   #564
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That is just beautiful!! Those temples and those windmills...

Only in India!!
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Old May 13th, 2012, 05:48 AM   #565
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Mewat, Hisar use more solar power than Gurgaon

Despite the dreams of making Gurgaon the nation's first 'solar city' and many green initiatives by the state, there seem to be few takers for solar power.

According to the census report, number of households using solar energy in Gurgaon are among the lowest in Haryana. Only 0.1% houses in Gurgaon use solar energy, which is lower even than districts like Mewat, Palwal, Rewari, and Hisar.

The report enumerates the number of residential consumers in the state using solar power as the main source of lighting, a major parameter to gauge the success of transition to solar power. Of over 3,20,000 households, only 378 run on solar power, out of which 215 are in the rural areas.

Government officials attribute the low success rate of solar power in urban areas to its steep price. Solar energy costs more than twice of conventional power that you get through the grid.

"I believe once the prices of solar energy come down, it will get popular in the urban regions," said S K Singh, a scientist at the Gurgaon's Solar Energy Centre, and the director of an under-construction 1MW thermal solar plant. Singh believes that by 2014, prices of solar power will start sliding, as they already have in the past few years bringing it on a par with diesel generated power.

"Market forces will adapt to this change very slowly, especially in big industrial and commercial centres like Gurgaon, where more power is consumed at cheaper rates," added Singh.
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Old May 13th, 2012, 05:58 AM   #566
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Entire grid-connected solar capacity under Phase I of JNNSM allocated: MNRE minister

The entire capacity of 1,100 MW of grid connected solar power capacity meant for the first phase of the Jawaharlal Nehru National Solar Mission (JNNSM) has been allocated to the power producers, according to Dr. Farooq Abdullah, the union minister of new and renewable energy (MNRE).

In a written reply to a question in Lok Sabha on May 11, Dr. Abdullah said that as on date, over 979 MW capacity of grid connected solar power has been installed in the country, with maximum installations in Gujarat (654.8 MW) followed by Rajsthan (197.5 MW).

The JNNSM aims to install 20,000 MW of solar power by 2022. The mission is to be implemented in three phases, with Phase I by 2013, Phase II by 2017 and Phase III by 2022. Since launch of the JNNSM, the capacity of solar power projects has grown from 8 MW in January 2010 to the current 979 MW in the country.

As far as first phase is concerned, apart from grid connected solar power capacity, the sanctioned capacity for off grid applications is over 118 MW. No direct financial assistance is provided by the government for setting up solar power projects connected to the grid. One scheme of 1000 MW has been implemented through a mechanism of bundling of solar power with thermal power from unallocated quota of the Government.

For projects connected to less than 33 kV grid, a scheme of generation based incentive has been implemented under which a total of 98 MW capacity projects were allotted. To support deployment of off grid solar applications, the Government provides capital subsidy upto 30 per cent of the benchmark cost and / or soft loan at a rate of 5 per cent interest.

The minister also ionformed the House that MNRE has a research and development scheme whereby up to 100 per cent support is provided to research institutions in the public as well as private sector to undertake research on various aspects of solar technology including solar photovoltaics (PV) and the storage.
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Old May 13th, 2012, 06:20 AM   #567
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Solar power plant in Sunderbans sets up model precedent

Sunderban (West Bengal), May 12 (ANI): World Wide Fund for Nature (WWF), in collaboration with the Centre for Appropriate Technology Incorporated (CAT) and Projects Australia is setting up a solar power station in the Rajat Jubilee village in Sunderban area of West Bengal.
Talking to mediapersons here, WWF official Anurag Danda, said that that they took up this task to address the power woes of the villagers.
"Sustaining these power stations in the remote locations without grid connectivity is quite challenging. CAT, Projects Australia, and WWF India, collaborated and Project Australia tapped into the funds that were made available by the Australian government under the Asia Pacific Partnership for Clean Development Mechanism. It took us about 13 months to work out the details with the community," he said.
The power station is being managed by the villagers and is governed by a group of council members who take the decisions regarding its maintenance.
Currently, there are a total of 57 consumers and solar energy is used to light up 10 streetlights and 3 community building, and everybody still gets 200 watts of power per minute.
The batteries are kept in the power station and are recharged every evening on the payment of monthly rental of Rs.125.
Danda added that the villagers were trained to operate the system.
" Community members went through an energy education programme. They are able to calculate how much which equipment consumes and therefore they budgeted for a 24 hour period," he said.
The villagers expressed happiness due to uninterrupted power supply.
"Earlier, due to frequent power cuts, children were not able to study. However, now they are able to study late in the evening. Power generation has made us less dependent on kerosene lamps," said Pushpa Mandal, a local woman.
The project has become a role model for other villages that reel under severe power crisis. (ANI)
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Old May 13th, 2012, 11:04 AM   #568
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Yagya View Post





Suzlon creates country's largest wind park



Suzlon crosses 1,000 MW in Jaisalmer
http://economictimes.indiatimes.com/...w/13096149.cms

Gehlot is doing great..largest wind park and a lot of solar projects..more publicity pls from his govt..

Had read it in some report than Rajasthan has the highest potential for renewable energy sources in India...
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Old May 13th, 2012, 11:05 AM   #569
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Quote:
Originally Posted by adam_india View Post
Here's one from Suzlon
+1
Wow...i just love the rajasthani landscape...
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Old May 13th, 2012, 04:43 PM   #570
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Quote:
Originally Posted by adam_india View Post
Any pic. If it's that big, a pic of it would look fabulous
They're spread over various locations in Jaisalmer. But I guess the most famous view is the Bada Bagh one.


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Originally Posted by Yagya View Post
c
cc:Philippe and Angie
image hosted on flickr

Jaisalmer Camel Polo Club by oneredpanther, on Flickr

If you notice carefully in the horizon then you can see the windmills.

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Originally Posted by Yagya View Post
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Last edited by Yagya; May 13th, 2012 at 05:00 PM.
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Old May 13th, 2012, 08:57 PM   #571
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wow! awesome jodhu!
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Old May 13th, 2012, 08:57 PM   #572
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Wow is not the word for the pictures...

Grt post Yagya..
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Old May 14th, 2012, 09:22 AM   #573
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Gives an overview of PV projects in India.

PV Utility Scale Map India 2012
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Old May 14th, 2012, 06:49 PM   #574
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Old May 15th, 2012, 06:25 AM   #575
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India may auction offshore wind farms

According to reports, the government has initiated the process of putting in place a policy to auction, or award, offshore wind farms in a way that could be similar to the auction of oil and gas blocks. The ministry of new and renewable energy has constituted an inter-ministerial panel of secretaries, which also includes heads of pertinent organizations such as Coast Guards, to frame policy guidelines, approve and oversee execution projects and identify private or public sector partners.

The panel is using the petroleum ministry’s exploration block auctions as a model. Sources said it was too early to say whether sites would be auctioned or allotted. They added the ministry’s move has been sparked by “a slew of requests from various quarters for allocation of sites” . Indian companies’ appetites have been whetted due to financial incentives that make wind farms an attractive way to meet the Renewable Portfolio Standards, under which it’s mandatory to source a certain percentage of energy from renewable sources.

A feasibility study conducted in collaboration with Scottish Development International, a Scotland government initiative to push commerce and trade, identified Kerala, Karnataka and the hills of Goa as potential sites.

It showed Gujarat coastal areas as having reasonable potential too, but prone to severe cyclonic conditions. Wind farms cannot work in wind speeds of less than 8 kmph or over 55 kmph. At present, India has an installed wind power capacity of 13,066MW. The ministry’s strategy paper for 2011-17 pegs the potential for generating power from wind farms at 48,500MW. It has set a target of increasing the contribution of renewable energy to the country’s total energy mix to 6% by 2022, with about 10% contribution to the total electricity mix.

The International Wind Turbine Manufacturers Association estimates 65GW of wind power could be installed in India by 2020 and the capacity could reach 160GW by 2030. Wind power costs between Rs 3.50 and Rs 4 per unit against Rs 2.50 a unit for electricity from coal-fired plants. In case of wind farms connected to the grid, the power is made affordable by pooling them with normal supplies.

ONGC has identified one location each at Bombay High South and Tapti basin near Surat for setting up wind farms on its abandoned and unmanned oil and gas pumping platforms.
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Old May 15th, 2012, 06:28 AM   #576
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Wind energy remains preferred investment proposition of renewable investors in India

According to reports, despite policy and regulatory uncertainties, tight credit situation and cautious market sentiment, wind energy remained a preferred investment proposition of renewable investors in India through 2011.

Of the total investment of $10.2 billion in renewable energy, $4.6 billion was invested in wind energy. India had the third-most new installations in 2011, behind China and the US. Overall the country added a record 2,827 MW against 2,140 MW in 2010. An additional 2,500-3,200 MW of new wind power installation is expected in 2012.

While venture capital and private equity companies made a strong comeback with about $400 million investment, asset financing at $3.8 billion topped wind energy investment in India, despite higher lending rates.

As for the investment themes within the sector, wind IPPs (independent power producers) remained the buzzword for the investor community; for example, Mytrah Energy India received funding from PTC, IDFC and others, INOX Group got funding from IFC etc. Secondly, wind equipment manufacturers with attributes like strong order books and sales diversification could also attract investment e.g. Regen Powertech from TVS Capital and Summit FVCI, Azure Power from Deutsche Investitions and others.

The emergence of wind IPPs on the Indian energy landscape has resuscitated the investment rationale for the sector and it could primarily be ascribed to the policy and regulatory environment over the last decade. Notably, the sector has undergone a paradigm shift from non-specialist organisations entering the space to reap benefits of tax legislation to specialised wind developers who base their strategies on improved incentive structures and better asset economics, thus, making it a strong investment case.

On the policy/regulations front, although the Accelerated Depreciation policy has been withdrawn, Generation-based Incentives (GBI) and State Feed-in-Tariffs have taken precedence as the primary policy instruments to enhance generational efficiencies. Furthermore, the introduction of domestic carbon certificates, or renewable energy certificates (RECs), have provided wind IPPs an option of selling power to state utilities at subsidised tariff. Policy initiatives i.e. implementation of open access to third parties (intra/inter-state), concessional wheeling charges and introduction of zonal tariffs (Maharashtra has already introduced) are expected to facilitate creation of an efficient wind power market.

Favourable incentive structures have led to the adoption of different business/revenue models e.g. preferential tariff model, REC model and captive model, by the wind energy developers in order to maximise revenue/returns.

However, to sustain the growth momentum at the last five years’ CAGR of 19%, the wind energy sector would require a level of preparedness at the central/state government level with respect to creating appropriate financial structures, sufficient grid/evacuation infrastructure, implementation of open access and clarity around applicable charges by concerned agencies in the case of inter-state/intra-state transmission and announcement of zonal tariffs.

For next three-five years, owing to factors like scalability, cost effectiveness, strong wind potential and inherent strengths in the manufacturing segment, wind energy is expected to present compelling growth opportunities in the form of project-based opportunities and value chain enablers.
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Old May 15th, 2012, 07:34 PM   #577
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Old May 16th, 2012, 07:04 AM   #578
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Taking wind out of growing sector?

Accelerated Depreciation, an important driver of growth for Indian wind energy sector, was modified in April this year, forcing strong reactions from the industry. Along with this, the ambiguity on generation based scheme (GBI) has created confusion among independent power producers (IPPs). There is fear that the rapid advance in wind sector made till last year may suffer a big setback at least in the short run due to these two moves. However, the long term perspective is still healthy, reports Keshav Chaturvedi.



In early April 2012 the Finance Ministry announced that it was ending the decade long support for the wind sector that amounted to 80 per cent accelerated depreciation. It was a mechanism whereby 80 per cent of the capital cost qualified for tax break in the first year itself. Former secretary, Ministry of New and Renewable Energy (MNRE), V Subramanian says, “In my opinion both the accelerated depreciation (AD) and generation based incentive (GBI) scheme should have been persisted with for another five years. Market forces in the meantime would have ensured that the capacity addition through generation based scheme would have grown while the percentage of developers availing accelerated depreciation would have come down.”

While talking to media, Union Minister for New and Renewable Energy Farooq Abdullah stressed that accelerated depreciation has encouraged companies to erect most of India’s 16,078 megawatts (MW) of wind capacity. However, this capacity addition was done keeping tax incentives in mind rather than efficient generation of power.

MNRE was instrumental in extending the 80 per cent accelerated depreciation scheme for another three years from 2009 onwards. This year too they had made a representation to the Finance Ministry for the continuation of the scheme for some more time.

However, it seems that Finance Ministry went by the observation of the Integrated Energy Policy Committee of Planning Commission that was of the opinion that the incentives for the wind energy sector should be based on generation rather than installation.


Harnessing power: Wind sector added 3100 MW capacity in 2011-12

Right now, Indian wind energy sector is dominated by wind turbine manufacturers. There are in all 18 manufacturers with two more to start their operations soon. These manufacturers also have a unique identity as a developer. This twin role was facilitated by the accelerated depreciation scheme.

In last decade and a half, this scheme has been at the heart of wind energy expansion. At the beginning of the Tenth Plan period (April 1, 2002) the total installed capacity in wind power sector was 1,628 MW. In last 10 years, it has registered almost tenfold increase and today it stands at 16,078 MW. Even during the last financial year ending on March 2012, the sector recorded a capacity addition of 3,100 MW out of which 70 per cent was under accelerated depreciation scheme.

However, under new notification, all the wind farms built from April 1, 2012 will be able to claim accelerated depreciation to the tune of only 15 per cent of the cost of equipment. Along with this, there is no clarity on the generation based incentive scheme and its extension. So, the sector right now is in a state of suspended animation.

Industry watchers think that in the short term there may be a slump in activities. ICRA, an associate of Moody’s Investors Service, is of the opinion that discontinuation of the AD benefit can lead to a fall in capacity addition between 800-1,000 MW in coming months or a year. According to an estimate, the demand for wind turbines may witness a slump. This slump may be to the tune of 400 MW. While it said that in the long term the industry will come to terms with this hiccup.

Discontinuation of AD benefit would keep capacity addition for FY2013 lower than that achieved in FY2012. This can lead to adverse impact on the balance sheets of the turbine manufacturers that dominate the industry. Suzlon, Gamesa and Denmark’s Vestas Wind Systems, the biggest publicly traded turbine suppliers to the market, have been making maximum noise.

Indian Wind Turbine Manufacturers’ Association (IWTMA), an umbrella body of leading wind turbine manufacturers in India, has urged the government to reconsider the decision to build confidence in those investors who are planning to enter the market. They have also urged the government to take up this issue keeping in mind the capacity addition target of 5,000 MW per annum during the Twelfth Plan set by the MNRE. Wind power generation has been growing at a rapid speed in the country and this fiscal year witnessed a milestone installation of 3,100 MW. It is a major contributor to achieve the goal of 15 per cent share on renewable power by 2020 set under National Action Plan on Climate Change (NAPCC). Unlike other sectors, private investment is driving the growth of this sector.

Ramesh Kymal, chairman of IWTMA said, “The withdrawal of AD has also come at a time when continuity of generation based incentive (GBI) remans a question mark. Urgent intervention is required on continuity of GBI in the Twelfth Plan period as requested by the industry during the discussions of the 12th draft plan. On a broader note, it is rather ironical that high efficiency coal and oil fired boilers continue to get AD, while it has been denied to a source of power generation which is clean.”

Kymal, who is also the managing director, Gamesa Wind Turbine Pvt Ltd, says, “Accelerated depreciation in itself is a tax deferral and not a subsidy. It has been a driver of growth for the industry from its inception. It is all the more necessary to continue with it in the wake of economic slowdown, increase in interest rates and escalation in all input costs.” The industry has already made a joint representation to the Ministry of New and Renewable Energy (MNRE).

Sameer Gupta of ENERCON says, “Mainly the turbine manufacturers will suffer the most because they will not get the business in absence of IPPs. We will lose the retail investors, i.e. IPPs because they forayed into wind sector due to the scheme of 80 per cent AD. They had the option of using their money in their other businesses. Now with the AD gone, the retail investors would be affected and they would not be willing to set up projects. In addition to this, there is no clarity on GBI. However, to attract the retail investors, we need AD, otherwise wind sector will not survive, as the cost of setting up a project is very high. These are infrastructure projects and the developers are getting a very low margin of interest.”

While manufacturers are queuing up to make a pitch for the continuation of accelerated depreciation scheme, there are some industry experts who feel it is time that the scheme be withdrawn, as it has out lived its utility.

Rajan Deb, Director, Consolidated Energy Consultancy Ltd (CECL) says, “The removal of 80 per cent of AD may have a short-term impact on the installation of turbines across India but it would be a good thing for the sector in the long run. It would keep non-committed players out of the business and will encourage serious committed individuals with knowledge of the sector and willingness to do business to enter the market. So, I agree the total installation may see a decline for some time, but the quality of installation in terms of actual generation will be a huge improvement.”

It is true that accelerated depreciation did encourage many business houses and individuals to enter the market who had no knowledge of the sector and they weren’t interested in generation part of the operations. Jaisalmer in Rajasthan has witnessed many high profile people putting up wind turbines solely with the purpose of saving tax.

The renewable energy accounts for 12 per cent of the total installed energy capacity but in generation terms it still hovers at around 5 per cent. This gap in installed capacity and actual generation is also one of the reasons to do away with the AD scheme.

Deb says, “The hue and cry is being made due to the double whammy of removal of AD and ambiguity on GBI. This twin situation can actually have an adverse impact on the sector. However, as the market is now established and grown in size, it will not die. The only thing is we will see a restructuring and maturing of the sector.”



Preparing for shake-up: Turbine installations may see a dip in the short run

However, Arvind Prasad, managing director Ushdev Power and head of the Indian Wind Power Association says, “Investment could come to a standstill.”

But industry experts say that this move is going to have tremendous impact on the sector in the long run. They feel now the time and conditions are right for the foreign players and private equity fund owners to come in. As they are not interested in accelerated depreciation, they would only invest money if the project is viable. Due diligence will have to be done and the entire focus will shift from installing a turbine to actual generation.

This shift will also signal another long-term change. The sector would move from being manufacturer dominated to IPP dominated. Even in the last one year, the quiet shift was visible. It is estimated that out of the overall domestic wind-based capacity addition of 3,000 MW during FY2012 (against 2,350 MW in the previous FY), a large chunk was driven mainly by growing demand from the IPP segment. Ever since the GBI has been introduced, their numbers in percentage terms have gone up to 30 from negligible just three years ago.

Another impact of the removal of accelerated depreciation would be on the hyper demand of the turbines. As the AD was claimed during half yearly closing of books on September 30 or on March 31, most of the turbine installation peaked during these two months.

If a developer installed a turbine on September 30, he could claim the entire 80 per cent of the AD, however, if he installed it on March 31 he was eligible for 40 per cent AD in that financial year and the rest would roll over to the subsequent financial year. This led to peaking of demand around these two months. It led to unnecessary pressure on the manufacturers and a lot of substandard equipments were also sourced by those who wanted tax benefit above all.

Now with this scheme gone, the inflated demand for turbines would be rationalised and in time the premium charged by the manufacturers may also come down. With the number of installations coming down and non-serious players being filtered out, the inflated demand for land may also ease a bit bringing down the cost of land acquisition. This will make turbines cheaper and also bring down the entire cost of project substantially.

Deb says, “In such a scenario we may witness sooner than later a situation where the cost of installing a well researched, well executed wind farm project in the right place becoming cost-competitive enough with the conventional energy. In such a scenario where efficiency will rule over everything else, even GBI may become redundant one day.”
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Old May 16th, 2012, 07:12 AM   #579
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Govt examining report on guideline violation in solar mission

The government is examining the report of an inter-Ministerial panel which probed charges against developers under the Jawaharlal Nehru National Solar Mission of violating guidelines to bag more projects that permitted, the Rajya Sabha was told today.

"An Inter-Ministerial Committee consisting of representatives of Ministries of NRE, Power and Corporate Affairs was set up by MNRE to inquire into the allegations that some solar developers had violated the guidelines of JNNSM to get more projects than permissible," New and Renewable Energy Minister Farooq Abdullah said in a written reply to the House.

On action taken by the government on the report, Abdullah said, "The Committee has submitted its report... The report is being examined by the government."

Replying to a question on target of wind and solar energy, he said, "Against a target of 2400 MW set for 2011-12, a wind power capacity of 3196 MW was installed. For the 11th plan as a whole, a capacity of 10,260 MW was installed against a target of 9000 MW."
For solar energy, the government launched the JNNSM in Jan 2010 with a target of 20,000 MW of grid connected solar power by 2022 distributed over three phases, Abdullah said.

"For phase-I, a target of 1100 MW was set upto 2013 and a capacity of 979 MW has already been installed in the country," he said.
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Old May 17th, 2012, 06:36 AM   #580
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Kalam asks scientists to tap immense bio-fuel potential

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C. Jaishankar

Former President A.P.J. Abdul Kalam on Sunday asked the Council of Scientific and Industrial Research (CSIR) laboratories and others to extensively research burning of bio-diesel in internal combustion engines with high efficiency.

Speaking at Central Electrochemical Research Institute (CECRI) in Karaikudi after inaugurating the Centre for Innovation in Energy Research on the CECRI campus, he said bio-fuel was an important alternative to the petroleum fuels. The country had immense potential to grow bio-fuel crop “Jatropha” on a large scale. Once it was grown, the crop could have a life span of 50 years. Moreover, it could grow on wasteland. Each acre would produce about 2 tonnes of bio-diesel at about half a dollar per litre.

Bio-diesel was carbon neutral and many valuable by-products could be produced from this agro-industry. Intense research was needed to burn bio-fuel in internal combustion engines with high efficiency, and this should be an urgent R&D programme.

Mr. Kalam said India had the potential to produce nearly 60 million tonnes of bio-fuel annually, thus making a significant and important contribution to the goal of energy independence. Indian Railways had already taken a significant step of running two passenger locomotives and six trains of diesel multiple units with 5 per cent blend of bio-fuel sourced from its in-house esterification plants. The full chain of economic process such as farming, harvesting, and extraction to esterification, blending and marketing was needed to be studied further.

He said the country must be determined to achieve energy independence within 2030. For achieving this mission a proper policy must be formulated, funds guaranteed, and the public-private partnerships explored. The country had an installed capacity of about 199,000 MW of electricity, which was 3% of world capacity. Forecasts of the country's energy requirements by 2030, when our population might touch 1.4 billion, indicated that demand from power sector would increase to about 400,000 MW. The energy growth rate would of 5 per cent per annum. Hence, all forms of power generation must be given equal priority to achieve the target.

Mr. Kalam said the Global Innovation report for 2011 placed India in the 62 position and gave 56 rank in competitive index. Switzerland, Sweden, Singapore and Hong Kong had secured top 4 positions in innovation report. If India had to graduate from the present position in competitiveness and innovation index it should become equal to economically developed nations within the top 10. It was essential to building indigenous design capability through research and technological development.
The Hindu

Focus should be on renewable energy, says APJ Abdul Kalam
Focus should be on renewable energy: Kalam

Centre for biofuels set up at NIIST

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