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Old July 22nd, 2006, 03:16 PM   #21
Rodel
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hi...

actually, i myself was asking that question in the Palawan Thread...

http://www.skyscrapercity.com/showth...=328377&page=4

I got a response from Palawan_Buddy...

guys, is it true that Palawan is now transferred to Region 6, western visayas?
nope. GMA initiated the transfer of palawan from region 4B (MIMAROPA) to region 6 in preparation for the shift to federalism. she wanted to group palawan and boracay together. But the move was scraped bec the province complained due to lack of consultation and that majority of Palawanoes does not favor it anyways. Besides, its easier for palawenoes to get to Laguna, where most of the regional offices are located, than to Iloilo.
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Old March 3rd, 2007, 09:19 AM   #22
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thank you.

Last edited by palawan_buddy; March 13th, 2007 at 12:25 PM.
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Old March 15th, 2007, 05:34 AM   #23
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Rodel View Post
hi...

actually, i myself was asking that question in the Palawan Thread...

http://www.skyscrapercity.com/showth...=328377&page=4

I got a response from Palawan_Buddy...

guys, is it true that Palawan is now transferred to Region 6, western visayas?
nope. GMA initiated the transfer of palawan from region 4B (MIMAROPA) to region 6 in preparation for the shift to federalism. she wanted to group palawan and boracay together. But the move was scraped bec the province complained due to lack of consultation and that majority of Palawanoes does not favor it anyways. Besides, its easier for palawenoes to get to Laguna, where most of the regional offices are located, than to Iloilo.
Our politicians / govt leaders can transfer Palawan to either Luzon, Visayas, or Mindanao for political reasons

BUT the fact remains that geographically Palawan is not part of Luzon island.
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Old March 15th, 2007, 06:28 AM   #24
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^ But in Social Studies and Civics and Culture books, it is being taught that Palawan belongs to Luzon geographically, culturally and politically!
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Old March 15th, 2007, 07:46 AM   #25
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^ But in Social Studies and Civics and Culture books, it is being taught that Palawan belongs to Luzon geographically, culturally and politically!
According to Encarta Encyclopaedia - Geography is a science ....

then how come the political leaders can choose which geographical islands is to be included in which region. Perhaps you have made a mistake in reading the book in Social Studies and Civics and Culture. They may include Palawan to Luzon perhaps by culture and by political reason but not by geography.


Geography, science that deals with the distribution and arrangement of all elements of the earth's surface. The word geography was adopted in the 200s bc by the Greek scholar Eratosthenes and means “earth description.” Geographic study encompasses the environment of the earth's surface and the relationship of humans to this environment, which includes both physical and cultural geographic features. Physical geographic features include the climate, land and water, and plant and animal life. Cultural geographic features include artificial entities, such as nations, settlements, lines of communication, transportation, buildings, and other modifications of the physical geographic environment. Geographers use economics, history, biology, geology, and mathematics in their studies.
Microsoft ® Encarta ® 2007. © 1993-2006 Microsoft Corporation. All rights reserved.

.

II. BRANCHES OF GEOGRAPHY

Geography may be divided into two fundamental branches: systematic and regional geography. Systematic geography is concerned with individual physical and cultural elements of the earth. Regional geography is concerned with various areas of the earth, particularly the unique combinations of physical and cultural features that characterize each region and distinguish one region from another. Because the division is based only on a difference in approach to geographic studies, the two branches are interdependent and are usually applied together. Each branch is divided into several fields that specialize in particular aspects of geography.

A. Systematic Geography

Systematic geography includes physical geography and cultural geography. These classifications are made up of specialized fields that deal with specific aspects of geography.

1. Physical Geography

Physical geography includes the following fields: geomorphology, which uses geology to study the form and structure of the surface of the earth; climatology, which involves meteorology and is concerned with climatic conditions; biogeography, which uses biology and deals with the distribution of plant and animal life; soils geography (see Soil; Soil Management), which is concerned with the distribution of soil; hydrography, which concerns the distribution of seas, lakes, rivers, and streams in relation to their uses; oceanography, which deals with the waves, tides, and currents of oceans and the ocean floor (see Ocean and Oceanography); and cartography, or mapmaking through graphic representation and measurement of the surface of the earth.

2. Cultural Geography


Canadian Province Capitals

This classification, sometimes called human geography, involves all phases of human social life in relation to the physical earth. Economic geography, a field of cultural geography, deals with the industrial use of the geographic environment. Natural resources, such as mineral and oil deposits, forests, grazing lands, and farmlands, are studied with reference to their position, productivity, and potential uses. Manufacturing industries rely on geographic studies for information concerning raw materials, sources of labor, and distribution of goods. Marketing studies concerned with plant locations and sales potentials are based on geographic studies. The establishment of transportation facilities, trade routes, and resort areas also frequently depends on the results of geographic studies.


United States State Capitals

Cultural geography also includes political geography, which is an application of political science. Political geography deals with human social activities that are related to the locations and boundaries of cities, nations, and groups of nations.


Country Statistics

Military geography provides military leaders with information about areas in which they may need to operate. The many other fields of cultural geography include ethnography, historical geography, urban geography, demography, and linguistic geography.

B. Regional Geography

Regional geography concerns the differences and similarities among the various regions of the earth. This branch of geography seeks explanations for the variety among places by studying the special combination of features that distinguishes these places. Regional geographers may study the development of a small area such as a city. This study is called microgeography. Or they may focus on large areas, called macrodivisions, such as the Mediterranean region or an entire continent. Regional geographers identify macrodivisions according to their cultural characteristics.

Regional geographers may divide macrodivisions into many smaller areas that share specific characteristics. For example, they may consider language, the type of agriculture or economy practiced by the population, terrain, or a combination of these factors to distinguish areas from one another.

III. METHODS OF GEOGRAPHY

The chief goal of the geographer is to describe the human environment on earth. To do this, it is necessary to collect geographical data; record the results of geographic studies in the form of charts, graphs, textbooks, and especially maps; and analyze the information. Geographers make use of a variety of techniques and tools for achieving these goals.

A. Collecting Data

Geographers may collect data in the field or from secondary sources, such as censuses, statistical surveys, maps, and photographs. Advances made since World War II (1939-1945) in the use of aerial photography, including the use of special films, and in techniques for obtaining three-dimensional views of the landscape from the air have enabled geographers to perform more detailed studies of the earth and its resources (see Aerial Survey). Geographers also have made use of radar, artificial satellites, underwater crafts called bathyspheres, and deep drilling into the earth's crust to obtain information about the features of the earth.

B. Mapping

The map is the most important tool of geography and may be used to record either simple data or the results of a complicated geographic study. In addition to providing a wealth of factual information, the map permits visual comparison between areas because it may be designed to indicate, by means of symbols, not only the location but also the characteristics of geographic features of an area.

Geographers have developed a standard pattern of map symbols for identifying such cultural features as homes, factories, and churches; dams, bridges, and tunnels; railways, highways, and travel routes; and mines, farms, and grazing lands.

C. Analyzing Geographic Information

Techniques that use mathematics or statistics to analyze data are known as quantitative methods. The use of quantitative methods enables geographers to treat a large amount of data and a large number of variables in an objective manner. Frequently, geographers collect data and form a theory to explain their observation. They then test this theory using quantitative methods. Sometimes the theories are expressed as mathematical statements, called models. Nevertheless, in geography theories are not expected to be universally precise, but rather to explain an observed tendency.

IV. HISTORY OF GEOGRAPHY

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Geography and Some Explorers
A boyhood fascination with explorers did not gain Polish-born English novelist Joseph Conrad any points in school. But it ignited his lifelong love for geographic exploration in the pursuit of new scientific knowledge, which he calls “militant geography,” and inspired him to launch his career as a seaman. In this 1924 National Geographic article, published in the year Conrad died, Conrad considers geographers and explorers of the past and examines their motives. “Of all the sciences, geography finds its origins in action,” he asserts. Conrad’s strong feelings about exploration are especially evident as he recalls bringing a ship through the infamous Torres Strait between Australia and New Guinea, accompanied by the ghosts of navigators who had gone before him. This article reflects the conventions and biases of the era in which it was written.
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Hundreds of individuals have contributed to the development of geography, and the fruits of their work have accumulated over several thousand years. Many travelers, surveyors, explorers, and scientific observers have added to this growing store of information. Only since the late 1700s, however, has it been possible to collect and record truly accurate geographic information. Modern concepts of geography were not widely supported until the mid-1800s.

A. Early Geographers


Ptolemy’s Map of the World






Ptolemy’s Map of the World
This map shows the world as Greek geographer and astronomer Ptolemy envisioned it in the 2nd century ad. Ptolemy’s map, based on the accounts of sailors, traders, and armies who had traveled in Europe, Africa, and Asia, shows the Indian Ocean as an enclosed body of water. This misconception persisted in Europe until 1488, when Bartolomeu Dias rounded the Cape of Good Hope in southern Africa and sailed from the Atlantic Ocean to the Indian Ocean.
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Mercury Archives/The Image Bank



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The earliest geographers were concerned with exploring unknown areas and with describing the observable features of different places. Such ancient peoples as the Chinese, Egyptians, and Phoenicians made long journeys and recorded their observations of strange lands. One of the first known maps was made on a clay tablet in Babylonia about 2300 bc. By 1400 bc, the shores of the Mediterranean Sea had been explored and charted, and during the next thousand years, early explorers visited Britain and navigated most of the African coast. The ancient Greeks, however, gave the Western world its first important knowledge relating to the form, size, and general nature of the earth.

During the 300s bc, the Greek philosopher and scientist Aristotle became the first person to demonstrate that the earth was round. He based his hypothesis on the arguments that all matter tends to fall together toward a common center, that the earth throws a circular shadow on the moon during an eclipse, and that in traveling from north to south new constellations become visible and familiar ones disappear. The Greek geographer Eratosthenes was the first person to accurately calculate the circumference of the earth.

The Greeks' travels, conquests, and colonizing activities in the Mediterranean region resulted in the accumulation of considerable geographic information and stimulated geographic writing. The Greek geographer and historian Strabo wrote a 17-volume encyclopedia titled Geography, which served as a valuable source of information for military commanders and public administrators of the Roman Empire.

During the ad 100s, the Alexandrian astronomer Ptolemy compiled most Greek and Roman geographic knowledge up to his time. He also proposed new methods of mapmaking, including projection and the creation of atlases. In his famous Geographike syntaxis, Ptolemy divided the equatorial circle into 360 degrees and constructed an imaginary north-south, east-west network over the surface of the earth to serve as a reference grid for locating the relative positions of known landmasses, such as islands and continents. Although he used less accurate measurements of the circumference of the earth than those of Eratosthenes, Ptolemy nevertheless contributed useful descriptions and maps of the known world. His maps clearly indicated his understanding of the problems involved in representing a spherical earth on a flat surface.

B. Medieval Geography

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GREAT WORKS OF LITERATURE
Hakluyt: From Voyages and Discoveries
The English geographer and writer Richard Hakluyt (1522?–1616) was a tireless promoter of English expansionism. To make his country’s exploits more widely recognized, Hakluyt wrote the Principal Navigations, Voyages and Discoveries of the English Nation (1589), a compilation of fact and fancy. Commercial firms conducted much of this exploration. Anthony Jenkinson, the subject of this excerpt, represented the English Muscovy Company. In 1561 Jenkinson traveled across Russia and opened trade relations with the Persians. This passage records his journey down the west coast of the Caspian Sea into what is now Azerbaijan.
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During the Middle Ages, Europeans carried on little travel and exploration and practically no advancement in geography. Among Europeans, only the Vikings of Scandinavia were active in exploration. The Arabs of the Middle East, however, interpreted and tested the works of the earlier Greek and Roman geographers and explored southwestern Asia and Africa. As early as the 700s, Arab scholars were translating the works of the Greek geographers into Arabic. Only after these Arabic texts were translated into Latin did Greek geographic learning spread into Europe. Among the major figures of Arab geography were al-Idrisi, who was known for his detailed maps, and Ibn Battūtah and Ibn Khaldun, both of whom wrote about their extensive travels. The Mongols and Chinese also learned much about the geography of Asia.

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The World's Greatest Overland Explorer
When Marco Polo returned to Venice, Italy, from his 24-year excursion to Asia in 1295, he told of things medieval Europeans could not imagine: rocks that burned, houses that were moved around on immense wagons, and the great Kublai Khan himself, surrounded by staggering luxury. Marco Polo gave Europeans their first glimpse of life in the Far East, but many disbelieved his stories. A 1928 National Geographic article traces his journey and points out that much of what Marco Polo described was true.
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The trips of Venetian explorer Marco Polo in the 1200s, the Christian Crusades of the 1100s and 1200s, and the Portuguese and Spanish voyages of exploration during the 1400s and 1500s opened up new horizons and stimulated geographic writings. During the 1400s, Henry the Navigator of Portugal supported explorations of the African coast and became a leader in the promotion of geographic studies. Among the most notable accounts of voyages and discoveries published during the 1500s were those by Giambattista Ramusio in Venice, by Richard Hakluyt in England, and by Theodore de Bry in what is now Belgium. Voyages and studies during this period proved beyond a doubt that the earth is a sphere. Previously, many people, including Christian leaders, believed the earth was flat.

C. Geography from the 17th to the 19th Century

Important in the history of geographic method is Geographia generalis (1650) by the German geographer Bernhardus Varenius. Varenius suggested that geography be divided into three separate branches: the first dealing with the form and dimensions of the earth; the second with tides, climates, seasons, and other variables that depend upon the relative position of the earth in the universe; and the third dealing with comparative studies of particular regions on the globe. His work remained a standard authority for more than a century.

The first comprehensive geographic work printed in English was published in 1625 by the English geographer Nathaniel Carpenter, who emphasized the spatial relationships among the physical features on the earth's surface. His approach became an important geographic point of view.

Many other European contributors increased geographic knowledge during the following two centuries. During the 1700s, the German philosopher Immanuel Kant played a decisive role in placing geography within the framework of science. Kant divided knowledge gained from observation into two categories. One category, comprising phenomena recorded according to logic, resulted in such classifications as the orders, genera, and species of plants and animals, regardless of when or where they occur. The other category included phenomena perceived in terms of time and space—classification and description according to time is viewed as history, and classification and description according to space is viewed as geography. Kant subdivided geography into six branches, one of which, physical geography, was considered essential to the five other branches. The other branches recognized by Kant were mathematical, moral, political, commercial, and theological geography.

Alexander von Humboldt and Carl Ritter, both of Germany, made major contributions to geographic theory in the early 1800s. An extensive traveler and a brilliant field observer, Humboldt applied his knowledge of physical processes to the systematic classification and comparative description of geographic features observed in the field. He devised methods for measuring the phenomena he observed. Humboldt produced a number of excellent geographic studies based on his travels in America. His work Kosmos (1844), which describes the physical geography of the earth, is considered one of the great geographic works of all time.

The views of Ritter differed in part from those of Humboldt. Whereas Humboldt promoted the systematic approach of treating physical features separately, Ritter endorsed a regional approach to geography. He stressed the comparative study of particular areas and the features that characterize those areas. His 19-volume work Die Erdkunde im Verhältnis zur Natur und Geschichte des Menschen (Geography and Its Relation to Nature and the History of Man,1822-1859) is an excellent geographic analysis of Asia and parts of Africa. Ritter was a keen field observer, well trained in natural sciences and history. He called his work comparative geography, considering it comparable to comparative anatomy, and proceeded from observation to observation to arrive at laws and principles. Ritter also believed that without systematic studies regional studies would be impossible.

Another German geographer, Friedrich Ratzel, also made significant contributions to geographic knowledge. He is best known for his work Anthropogeographie (1882), which attempted to show that the distribution of people on the earth had been determined by natural forces. Describing geography as the science of distribution, he favored the study of restricted areas, which he claimed would provide the basis for generalizations about larger areas or about the world as a whole. The German geographers Ferdinand von Richthofen and Alfred Hettner brought the ideas of Humboldt, Ritter, and Ratzel into a coherent system. Die Geographie: Ihre Geschichte, ihr Wesen, und ihre Methoden (Geography: Its History, Its Nature, and Its Methods,1927), by Hettner, is a valuable work on the history of geographic methods.

Outstanding among French geographers of the late 1800s was Paul Vidal de la Blache, who opposed the idea that the physical environment strictly determines human activities. He believed that human beings could mold their physical environment. He favored studies of small areas, stressing both physical and cultural processes in the distribution of the earth's features.

During the 1800s, many geographic societies emerged. Many sponsored geographic study and exploration and published geographic journals. Among the earliest of these societies were those founded in Paris, Berlin, and London, during the 1820s and 1830s. Of particular significance to geography in the United States was the founding of the American Geographical Society in 1851 and the National Geographic Society in 1888. International geographic conferences were initiated in 1871 at Antwerp, Belgium.

D. The 20th Century


GIS Image






GIS Image
A Geographic Information System (GIS) is a computer system that synthesizes, analyzes, and displays many different types of geographic data in an understandable form. The GIS-generated image seen here shows the locations, represented by black dots, of industries releasing toxic chemicals in Los Angeles County. This image has been superimposed on census tracts—color-coded according to the distribution and size of different racial or ethnic groups in the area—from the United States Bureau of the Census. The green areas are inhabited mostly by Asians, the blue areas by blacks, the purple areas by Hispanics, and the yellow areas by non-Hispanic whites. The image was produced as part of a study carried out at the University of California in Santa Barbara to examine the relationships between pollution, race, and residential patterns. The image illustrates how a GIS can combine and clearly display many kinds of information for a given geographic area.
Encarta Encyclopedia
L. Burke/National Center for Geographic Information and Analysis

During the first half of the 1900s, many geographic writers—British, American, French, and German—continued to carry on the tradition of early pioneers in geography. Studies of small areas all over the world, based on field observations, extended the frontiers of geographic knowledge, but the methods inherited from the late 19th century remained essentially unchanged. Beginning in the 1950s, however, geographers made increasing use of quantitative methods. The change in methodology in the 1950s and 1960s was so rapid that it is sometimes called the quantitative revolution. Geographers have also broadened their efforts to find practical applications for geographic studies.

Quantitative methods have been particularly useful in applications of location theory, a branch of geography that studies the factors that influence the location of geographic elements, such as towns or factories. Location theory was introduced by the German agriculturist Heinrich von Thünen in the early 1800s. The German geographer Walter Christaller made great contributions to location theory during the 1930s, by analyzing the location of urban centers. But it was not until the 1950s that their work was widely valued.

By the 1960s the field of geography had divided into several schools of thought. Disagreement between scholars of different schools—such as those who supported quantitative method and those who favored the descriptive approach—sometimes arose. Since the 1970s, however, different methods have been commonly used together and applied to many new areas of geographic study.

Computers have become a particularly useful tool in geography. During the 1960s, the Canadian government built the first geographic information system, or GIS, a computer system that records, stores, and analyzes geographic information. These computer systems can create two- or three-dimensional images of an area that are used as models in geographic studies. They are designed to process massive amounts of data, and help scientists conduct research much more quickly and accurately. The GIS has many applications in government and business. By the early 1990s, about 100,000 of these systems were in operation.

Microsoft ® Encarta ® 2007. © 1993-2006 Microsoft Corporation. All rights reserved.
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Old March 15th, 2007, 06:01 PM   #26
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at present Palwan is already claim by the secessionist from Mindanao.

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Old March 16th, 2007, 11:18 AM   #27
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palawan is part of luzon bec majority of palawenyos are Tagalog.
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Old March 16th, 2007, 06:23 PM   #28
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Quote:
Originally Posted by palawan_buddy View Post
palawan is part of luzon bec majority of palawenyos are Tagalog.
how about eastern Mindanao ? majority of the people there were Visayans,
Should SSC Phil include eastern Mindanao to Visayan Region ?
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Old March 17th, 2007, 05:11 AM   #29
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^ Stop it! Read your Filipino Geography books and refresh your stock knowledge, okay?
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Old April 3rd, 2007, 04:30 AM   #30
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PRIDE OF PLACE
The Mangyans of Mindoro

By Augusto Villalon
Inquirer
Last updated 01:26am (Mla time) 03/26/2007

MANILA, Philippines – Heritage covers such scope that its totality is difficult to grasp. Many of us compartmentalize heritage into one of its many components: music, dance, visual arts, architecture, literature, language, costumes, cuisine, depending on where our interests may happen to lie.

Often we fail to realize that all of the components interrelate, that each component forms a vital part that weaves into the splendid tapestry of our own national identity.

Focused (or hung up) as many of us might be on Philippine lowland Christian culture, our many cultural communities and indigenous peoples have gone unnoticed and misunderstood.

Among them are the Mangyans of Mindoro.

The Philippines is an archipelago of 7,107 islands with a population of 84 million speaking over 120 languages.

Out of the 110 indigenous peoples (IP) groups in the country today, only four still use their original scripts. Other ethno-linguistic groups now write in the Roman alphabet of the colonizers.

The endangered script of the Hanunuo and Buhid Mangyans from Mindoro, and of the Tagbanua and Palawan tribes from Palawan were declared National Cultural Treasures in 1997, and were inscribed in the Unesco (United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization) Memory of the World Register in 1999.

However, the Hanunuo Mangyan script is very much alive and being taught in Hanunuo Mangyan schools.

Mangyan is the generic name for the eight IP groups found in the mountainous regions of Mindoro island—the Alangan, Bangon, Buhid, Hanunuo, Iraya, Ratagnon, Tadywan and Tau-buid, a combined population of 100,000.

Distinctive heritage


Mangyans, with eight different languages and cultural traditions, possess a rich and distinctive cultural and literary heritage. One manifestation is the various traditional musical instruments used during festivities, special occasions and for courting: guitar, violin, flute, gong, and jew’s-harp.

With a pointed knife, Hanunuo Mangyans inscribe notes and poems on bamboo trees in the forests or on bamboo slats. These ambahans—written or recited in poetic language—allegorically express situations or characteristics.

The Hanunuo and Buhid Mangyans weave and embroider their own traditional attire. The Iraya and Alangan Mangyans skillfully weave nito and rattan into elaborate baskets. The other groups also produce baskets, bags, hats, hammocks and other crafts made of forest vines, and all the eight tribes practice beadwork. These are a main source of their livelihood.

Mangyans plant upland rice, corn, beans, bananas and root crops using swidden farming done in total reverence for the environment.

Mangyans have strongly retained their cultural identity. Much of their traditions and beliefs are in practice, despite some having converted to Christianity. Intermarriage with non-Mangyans is limited.

The Mangyans, considered as the first inhabitants of the island of Mindoro, believe that “land is life” and from it emanates their distinct and rich culture.

Unfortunately they do not have security of land tenure. Their unrecognized traditional right over their ancestral domain is evident in the continuous influx of so-called government development projects. Private business interests have also harassed them: mining, tourism, hydro-power, and even reforestation. Illegal titling of lands by non-Mangyans also continues.

The implementation of these projects often undermines their culture and traditional right to protect, manage and utilize the resources in their ancestral domain. More important, the Mangyans have lost their land to these projects.

Mangyan settlements are mostly found in the interior, mountainous region of Mindoro, in land classified by the government as Forest Zone and Public Domain.

The Mangyans’ subsistence-level livelihood is based on swidden cultivation: planting upland rice, sweet potatoes, corn, beans, bananas, cassava, yams and other root crops.

The few with low-lying farmland in irrigated areas have ventured into lowland farming, planting cash crops and permanent crops, particularly fruit trees. Some gather vines and firewood.

Most Mangyan settlements are not accessible by road. Rivers that flood during the rainy season separate settlements from each other, often cutting off direct access to government social services like education and health.

Mangyan education

There are few public elementary schools, no public high school, and no functional health center. Public elementary schools in Mangyan communities usually do not offer all the elementary grade levels. Classes are multi-grade. Teachers do not report regularly. There are few or no books at all for students.

Students walk for hours and make numerous river crossings to go to school, which can be dangerous for young children.

High expenses prevent attendance by Mangyans in high school, which are situated in the lowlands. Individual sponsors or nongovernment organizations support the few who do finish secondary and tertiary levels. Functional literacy for adults and out-of-school youth is continuously provided by nongovernment organizations and, lately, by the government.

Aside from educational problems, there also exists a difficulty of access to government health units or health centers, which are located in town centers or lowland communities.

Few Mangyan local government units or barangays have been established. The majority of the Mangyan population belongs to lowlander-led barangay units.
Before the last decade, no Mangyan was elected to a municipal or higher position, further limiting the indigenous people’s opportunities to be heard and to participate in decision-making. There are also very few Mangyan government employees.

Discrimination by lowlanders hinders Mangyans from attaining the development level they deserve. Lowlanders often buy their products at very low prices. Often the Mangyans are exploited.

The Mangyan situation illustrates the complexity of heritage conservation. To preserve the endangered traditional script, language, literature, crafts and lifestyle, there is need to improve their education, livelihood and governance.

However, any government or NGO assistance given to the Mangyans must not be done in an insensitive manner. Any kind of help must be granted with vision—in the framework of true understanding of the Mangyan culture, ensuring its preservation, but also giving the people the benefits of the 21st century.

At 6 p.m. today, the Mangyan Heritage Center will launch a major exhibit on Mangyan culture at the GSIS Museum. The exhibit will feature old and contemporary photographs depicting the Mangyan’s way of life; as well as artifacts from the different Mangyan tribes, such as the rich Hanunuo Mangyan poetry and syllabic script.
Elaborate Mangyan handicrafts, books and greeting cards will be available for sale. The exhibit runs until April 20, and is open Tuesday-Saturday, 8:30 a.m.-4:30 p.m.

To volunteer assistance, or to inquire about the purchase of Mangyan crafts and products, e-mail mangyanhc@catsi.net.ph or visit www.mangyan.org.

Feedback is welcome at pride.place@gmail.com


ELABORATE baskets woven by the Iraya Mangyan
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Old April 5th, 2007, 05:15 AM   #31
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Last Tuesday, there were 80,000-100,000 people in Puerto Galera! What more now?
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Old April 5th, 2007, 04:20 PM   #32
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The World Famous Moriones Festival
When:2 - 8 Apr 2007 (various dates)
Where:Marinduque
Getting there: (1)Take a bus to Batangas City Port via Batangas-Balanacan Ferry (2)Take a bus to Dalahican Port via Dalahican -Balanacan or Dalahican-Sta. Cruz Ferry
Airfare: Twice a week via Asian Spirit
The towns of Boac, Mogpog and Gasan on the island province of Marinduque are the setting for the Moriones Festival celebrated during holy week each year.
Costumed and masked islanders proceed through the towns to depict the story of the conversion of Longuinus, the Roman centurion who pierced Jesus' side with his spear, and his subsequent beheading.
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Old April 11th, 2007, 04:34 PM   #33
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Mindoro is part of MiMaRoPa, right? and Puerto Galera is part of Mindoro?

well anyway, i read from another forum something about a Jurassic Park in Puerto Galera where a lot of naughty things happen, what exactly is that place, and why in all places, in there?
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Old April 14th, 2007, 04:39 PM   #34
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Honda Bay, Puerto Princesa City:







Dos Palmas, Puerto Princesa City


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Old April 14th, 2007, 04:50 PM   #35
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Dos Palmas, Puerto Princesa City, Palawan











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Old April 16th, 2007, 11:05 PM   #36
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Great photos!!!
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Old April 18th, 2007, 05:15 PM   #37
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Quote:
Originally Posted by palawan_buddy View Post
Dos Palmas, Puerto Princesa City, Palawan












It's so serene...
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Old April 26th, 2007, 02:38 PM   #38
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PUERTO PRINCESA VOTERS WILL DECIDE ON MAY 14--- if puerto princesa will become a HIGHLY URBANIZED CITY.
personally, i can't believe na highly-urbanized na kami!!!!
---------------------------------------------------------------
Puerto Princesa now a highly-urbanized city

President Gloria Macapagal-Arroyo has converted Puerto Princesa City in Palawan into a highly-urbanized city in consonance with the national government’s policy to support the initiative of local governments to become self-reliant communities and effective partners in attaining national goals.

In his regular weekly press briefing in Malacañang yesterday afternoon, Executive Secretary Eduardo Ermita said the President effected the conversion of Puerto Princesa into a highly-urbanized city through Proclamation No. 1264 which she signed on March 26.

According to Ermita, Section 453 of the Local Government Code (LGC) of 1991 “provides that it shall be the duty of the President of the Philippines to declare a city as highly-urbanized within thirty (30) days after it shall have met the minimum requirements prescribed in Section 452 of the same Code, upon proper application therefore.”

On Jan. 15, 2007, the Sangguniang Panglungsod of Puerto Princesa through its Resolution No. 614-2007 requested the President to declare the city as a highly-urbanized city.

The Office of the President conducted a thorough verification and found out that Puerto Princesa has met the minimum requirements prescribed for a city to be classified as highly-urbanized.

The LGC’s Section 452 states “that cities with a minimum population of two hundred thousand (200,000) inhabitants as certified by the National Statistics Office and with the latest income of at least Fifty Million Pesos (P50,000,000.00) based on 1991 constant prices as certified by the City Treasurer, shall be classified as highly-urbanized cities.”

“Whereas, it is a declared policy of the government to support local governments’ initiative to attain their fullest development as self-reliant communities and make them more effective partners in the attainment of national goals,” the President said in the proclamation.

The proclamation also provides that Puerto Princesa City will legally be declared as a highly-urbanized city only upon ratification through a plebiscite by the qualified voters of the city.

The rules and regulations implementing the LGC of 1991 state the following procedures:

a. Resolution – The interested city shall submit to the Office of the President of the Philippines a resolution of its Sanggunian adopted by a majority of its members in a meeting duly called for the purpose, and approved and endorsed by the city mayor. Said resolution shall be accompanied by a certification as to income and population.

b. Declaration of Conversion – Within thirty (30) days from receipt of such resolution, the President of the Philippines shall, after verifying that the income and population requirements have been met, declare the city as highly-urbanized.

c. Plebiscite – Within one hundred twenty (120) days from the declaration of the President of the Philippines or as specified in the declaration, the Commission on Elections (Comelec) shall conduct a plebiscite in the city proposed to be converted. Such plebiscite shall be preceded by a comprehensive information campaign to be conducted by the Comelec with the assistance of national and local government officials, media, non-government organizations and other interested parties.

released 3/29/2007


http://thenewsvlog.wordpress.com/200...rbanized-city/
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Old May 2nd, 2007, 03:59 PM   #39
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the PUERTO PRINCESA PLEBISCITE will be deferred. reason: not enough ballot. source: local news/comelec officials
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Old May 15th, 2007, 11:56 AM   #40
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