daily menu » rate the banner | guess the city | one on oneforums map | privacy policy | DMCA | news magazine | posting guidelines

Go Back   SkyscraperCity > Continental Forums > Africa > General Forums > Business, Economy and Infrastructure

Business, Economy and Infrastructure Our architecture, infrastructure, transport, economy and other related discussions



Global Announcement

As a general reminder, please respect others and respect copyrights. Go here to familiarize yourself with our posting policy.


Reply

 
Thread Tools
Old November 6th, 2012, 01:29 AM   #1
Geza Ulole
BANNED
 
Join Date: May 2010
Posts: 1,791
Likes (Received): 12

US$ 1.225 bio. Mtwara-Dar es salaam (532 km) gas pipeline project

Tanzanian pipeline construction inaugurated
Pipelines International — September 2012

The Government of the United Republic of Tanzania officially inaugurated the construction of the approximately 532 km long Mnazi Bay to Dar es Salaam Gas Pipeline Project in July 2012.

The project involves approximately 532 km of gas pipeline from Mnazi Bay in the Mtwara region and Songo Songo in the Kilwa District, to Dar es Salaam, with a 36 inch main line and one 24 inch spur line.

The pipeline will have a capacity of 784 MMcf/d of gas, to be used for the production of 3,900 MW of electricity. On completion, the project will allow the Mnazi Bay Concession partners and others to transport natural gas to large-scale electricity producers, and other industrial users and major population centres in Tanzania.

The start of construction comes after the Tanzanian Finance Minister Dr William Mgimwa outlined funding plans for the Mtwara to Dar es Salaam pipeline in his presentation to the National Assembly on the 2012–13 budget in June 2012.

Dr Mgimwa said that the Government expects to borrow US$ 746 million worth of external non-concessional loans, which will be used to finance various development projects, including the pipeline.


Specifically, Dr Mgimwa said that the Government will implement the construction of the pipeline using a US$ 1,225.3 million loan from the Export-Import Bank of China, which will be managed by the Tanzania Petroleum Development Corporation.

Pipeline proponent Wentworth Resources Limited, an independent oil and gas company with gas production and a committed exploration programme in the Rovuma Basin of southern Tanzania and northern Mozambique, said that, on completion, the project will allow the Mnazi Bay concession partners and others to transport natural gas to large-scale electricity producers, other industrial users, and major population centres in Tanzania.

“Since the discovery of the Mnazi Bay gas field in 1982, the substantial gas resources in this concession have been effectively ‘stranded’,” said the company, adding that gaining access to the greater markets of Tanzania is expected to allow full production from Wentworth’s existing and future gas wells.

The company said that currently three of four existing wells are being worked over to maximise their long-term productivity.

The outcome of this work will provide a basis for concluding an immediate Gas Sales Agreement to supply the pipeline and for future development of the Mnazi Bay and Msimbati gas fields.

Wentworth Executive Chairman Bob McBean said “[The project] is the beginning of Tanzania’s future as a significant gas producing country and we are proud to be a partner in this endeavour.”

Construction began immediately and is expected to take 12–14 months to complete.




http://pipelinesinternational.com/ne...urated/077220/

$1.2b project to end Tanzania power rationing

President Jakaya Kikwete launches the natural gas plant on November 8. Picture: Michael Matemanga

IN SUMMARY

Tanzania is laying a 500km (532 km) pipeline and constructing infrastructure to generate electricity from gas in a Tsh1.8 trillion ($1.225 billion)
President Kikwete was the Minister of Energy and Minerals when the generation of electricity from gas began in the country.
By 2015, the plant will be generating 2,785MW (together with the existing pipeline and generators the production will be over 3900 MW) “which will not be very far from the target of 3000MW (get the facts right that pipeline will increase Tanzania capacity to over 3900 MW).
Tanzania is laying a 500km (again it is 532 km) pipeline and constructing infrastructure to generate electricity from gas in a Tsh1.8 trillion ($1.225 billion) project that is expected to help the country meet all its power needs.

On Thursday, President Jakaya Kikwete launched the construction of Mnazi Bay and Songosongo Natural Gas processing plant and a transportation pipeline. He directed Tanzania Electric Supply Company (Tanesco) to start building the power processing plants.

President Kikwete was the Minister of Energy and Minerals when the generation of electricity from gas began in the country.

As he inaugurated Tanzania’s most expensive project ever, the President said the country would take full advantage of its resources, including coal, uranium, solar and wind (u forgot geothermal the highest potentials in the region based on the volcanic activities and existence of two arms of The Great East African Rift Valley in TZ can testify this), to generate electricity.

The project by China National Petroleum Corporation, and which is being financed through a loan from China’s Exim Bank, is expected to generate 990 megawatts when it is completed in 2014.

Minister for Energy and Minerals Sospeter Muhongo said the electricity will be generated using four generators — two with a capacity to generate 300MW each, and two to generate 150MW and 240MW respectively.

By 2015, the plant will be generating 2,785MW “which will not be very far from the target of 3000MW. This milestone achievement translates into the end of power shortages, and instead the country will become an exporter of electricity,” said Mr Muhongo. (From video clips i didn't see Mr Muhongo saying so!)

The large diameter of the pipeline is expected to increase the transportation capacity of natural gas for power generation as well as industry and domestic use.

The project involves the construction of a 24-36 inch diameter pipeline from Mnazi bay in Mtwara, connected at Somanga Fungo with SongoSongo gas field in Lindi region, and then on to Dar es Salaam.

A 24-inch pipeline will then be constructed from Mnazi Bay to Somanga, and the existing 16-inch pipeline between Somanga and Dar es Salaam expanded to 36 inches. It will have the capacity to transport 210 million cubic feet of gas a day, up from the current 105 million cubic feet. The existing 16-inch natural gas pipeline from SongoSongo to Dar es Salaam — owned by private investors — has been facing capacity constraints amid growing demand for gas and energy.

At the launch, a gas expert told The East African that it would be economical to scale down on using gas to generate electricity “once our hydro power stations stabilise, and increase the use of gas for other economic activities because it (hydro) is still the cheapest energy option, and only expensive during installation.”

President Kikwete said, “In Singida region it has been discovered that winds there are faster than anywhere in the world, thus we are also developing this resource to give us 300MW of electricity,” he said, adding that the country will also use the natural gas to make plastics, fertiliser and other products.

Chinese Ambassador to Tanzania Lu Youqing said the funding provided to Tanzania was the biggest single loan disbursed by them to an individual country for an infrastructure project.

“The company to implement the project isn’t new to such ventures as it has the requisite experience, and I am confident completion of the 500km (again 532 km) line and the infrastructure at Kinyerezi will be done within the 18 months of the project schedule,” he said.

Last month, Tanzanian Prime Minister Mizengo Pinda said the country would take advantage of the recent offer by China to provide a $20 billion credit line to African countries to assist them in developing infrastructure, agriculture, manufacturing and medium-size enterprises.
http://www.theeastafrican.co.ke/news...z/-/index.html

MY TAKE
Our neighbors can not hesitate from underestimate the potentials of the project as usual but i liked that last paragraph Tanzania is eyeing the US$ 20 bio Chinese fund for Africa i should just add for biggest Urea fertilizer factory in the region for export!

Last edited by Geza Ulole; November 10th, 2012 at 04:25 PM.
Geza Ulole no está en línea   Reply With Quote

Sponsored Links
 
Old November 6th, 2012, 01:34 AM   #2
èđđeůx
DrEameR
 
èđđeůx's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2010
Posts: 15,532
Likes (Received): 1478

Quote:
The pipeline will have a capacity of 784 MMcf/d of gas, to be used for the production of 3,900 MW of electricity.
A huge or multiple natural gas power plants? Awesome project. The chemical industry could really benefit from this.
__________________
Èddeůx »» *
-\('o^)-
Sig Reconstruction
èđđeůx no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old November 6th, 2012, 10:50 AM   #3
bantugbro
Olduvai Gorge
 
bantugbro's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2011
Posts: 2,613
Likes (Received): 368

Quote:
Originally Posted by Geza Ulole View Post
easy....nothing to be upset about that fair question cooperate like Eddeux meanwhile enjoy another clip in Kiswahili while we do our things quietly.

This is simply amazing....
__________________
"...your behind-the-keyboard insinuations will get good people banned for trivial reasons, please don't start with me..."
bantugbro no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old November 8th, 2012, 01:54 AM   #4
BUTEMBO21
Mutu ya Chuma.
 
BUTEMBO21's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2008
Location: Under the Sun and the Moon
Posts: 39,870
Likes (Received): 2962

Iyi kiswahili iko nguvu ku sikiya.
BUTEMBO21 no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old November 8th, 2012, 04:35 AM   #5
Dhuks
Registered User
 
Dhuks's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2011
Location: Away from the drones
Posts: 4,529
Likes (Received): 780

Quote:
Originally Posted by BUTEMBO21 View Post
Iyi kiswahili iko nguvu ku sikiya.
Kanda ya kiswahili utakosaje kuelewa hata kama lahaja ni tofauti?
__________________
<<The problem with the world is that the intelligent people are full of doubts while the stupid ones are full of confidence>>>>
Dhuks no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old November 8th, 2012, 05:46 PM   #6
Geza Ulole
BANNED
 
Join Date: May 2010
Posts: 1,791
Likes (Received): 12

Tanzania set for power boom by 2015
By In2EastAfrica Reporter


President Jakaya Kikwete launched on Thursday the construction of Mnazi Bay and Songosongo Natural Gas processing plant and a transportation pipeline. He directed Tanzania Electric Supply Company (Tanesco) to start building the power processing plants.

ENErGy and Minerals Minister Professor sospeter Muhongo shows President Jakaya Kikwete a diagram of the Kinyerezi gas receiving station and control room in Dar es salaam during the laying of the foundation stone of the gas pipeline, which is wholly owned by the government. Next to the president is the Vice-President, Dr Mohammed Gharib Bilal, and Deputy Energy and Minerals Minister steven Masele.

In his speech during the event, before laying the foundation stone at Kinyerezi construction site, President Kikwete said that Tanesco should start building the power plants at designated centres, so that when the project is completed (in 18 months), production of the 840 megawatts starts.”Construction of the power plants should go parallel with laying of the gas pipelines because waiting until the project is completed will delay production of electricity,” President Kikwete said.

President Kikwete told members of the public, who braved a sudden downpour to witness the historic event, that once the project starts electricity production, the country will have a surplus that could be sold to neighbouring countries.He explained that 2,750 megawatts will be produced at the station, once the project is in operation. He added that currently the country has capacity to produce 1,438 megawatts of electricity, while daily consumption levels stand at 900 megawatts.

The president noted that by 2015 the country’s demand for electricity will be 2,780 megawatts.”This project will have a capacity of producing nearly 3,000 megawatts of electricity, making power rationing history in the country. The project will also give us a surplus that we can sell to neighbouring countries,” he explained.

Apart from gas, President Kikwete explained that the country is endowed with many other natural resources that can be used to generate power including coal, renewable energy such as wind, geothermal, solar and uranium.President Kikwete joked that his regime has no interest of manufacturing bombs using the uranium but only to generate electricity. “Once we have local capacity in future, we will use the expertise to generate electricity using uranium.

“I have no interest in making bombs … at least not in my regime,” he joked noting that Tanzania is blessed with natural resources, the only problem is finances.He noted that the natural gas will also be used to manufacture fertilizers, such as phosphate, ammonia, urea and potash. “I have also directed TPDC to look for an investor to run Kilwa Amonia Plant project,” he added.

The Minister for Energy and Minerals, Prof. Sospeter Muhongo, noted that the construction of the project is being funded by a soft loan from Exim-Bank in China in the tune of 1.9trl/-.He assured Tanzanians that there will not be power rationing again, noting that for yesterday only, natural gas had produced 54.8 per cent of electricity, fuel 29.8 per cent and hydropower generation 15.4 per cent.

Prof. Muhongo noted that once the project is completed, it will place Tanzanians among people living in the 21st century, where there are no problems of power.The Chinese Ambassador to Tanzania, Mr Lu Youging, said that the 532- kilometre pipeline is among the biggest projects his government is running in African countries.

Mr Youging noted that China which is the second largest economy after United States of America (USA), has US 50 billion dollars invested in Africa and for Tanzania, a total of 300 Chinese companies are investing to the tune of one billion US dollars.The China National Petroleum Corporation (CNPC) Vice-President, Li Xinhua, assured the government that the project will adhere to quality standards and environmental requirements.

“We will prove to everyone that Tanzania made the right choice in choosing CNPC to run the projects,” Mr Xinhua stressed.The project is jointly undertaken by a unit of CNPC called China National Petroleum Corp and the state run Tanzania Petroleum Development Corporation (TPDC).

By ROSE ATHUMANI, Tanzania Daily News

Do you have a story or an article to publish? Please email us to submit@in2eastafrica.net.
http://www.dailynews.co.tz/index.php...r-boom-by-2015


9th November 12
Minister: Gas enough for over 90 years of electricity supply
Sylivester Domasa
President Jakaya Kikwete yesterday inaugurated the construction of Mnazi Bay and Songosongo Natural gas processing plant and transportation pipeline in Kinyerezi, Dar es Salaam that is scheduled for completion in just two years.

During the inauguration, Minister for Energy and Minerals, Prof Sospeter Muhongo, made a grand announcement asserting that the current exploited gas can serve the country’s electricity demand for well over 90 years and that is not inclusive of offshore drilling.
Christened, the Jakaya Kikwete Pipeline, the project is expected to generate 3600MW that is approximately a 10 percent excess of the 2015 national target which was set at 2780MW for both domestic and industrial usage.
Addressing the gathering, Kikwete, accompanied by the Vice President Dr Mohamed Gharib Bilal reaffirmed his administration’s will to end power rationing. He conceded that for decades, the country has been grappling with power shortages due to dependency on hydro power.
The president was optimistic that after acquiring loans from development partner and the government of China amounting to some USD 1.2bn (about 1.92trn/-) that the project would run smoothly.
“We have decided to invest in natural gas power generation…we will generate electricity for internal or local uses but where necessary the exceeding electricity will be sold to other countries to earn foreign exchange…” said the president.
He explained that the government’s decision to invest in natural gas energy and not in a fertilizer processing plant, which was an initial option, was the right choice and that strategies to revamp investment in the fertilizer project will proceed after the gas project is complete.
The president instructed the government owned utility firm, Tanzania Electric Supply Company (Tanesco) to start networking and to set up power generating stations in Dar es Salaam in preparation to distribute gas for domestic use.
Tanzania is now producing 1438MW but upon completion of the project then the country will enjoy 54.8 percent of electricity from natural gas, 29.8percent of electricity by heavy oil and 15.4percent from water. Upon implementation, the project will save the government over US $24 billion which is spent in purchasing heavy oil to generate electricity annually.
The minister highlighted that the project will ensure the reliable supply of electricity, help protect the environment from deforestation which currently is on the rise to meet demand in the urban centres. At the moment, Dar es Salaam alone consumed 40,000 sacks of charcoal a day.
TPDC Managing Director Yona Killagane said the 532-kilometre long pipeline will be laid down by the Chinese Petroleum and Technology Development Company (CPTDC), a unit of China National Petroleum Corp (CNPC) and state run TPDC.
China’s Ambassador to Tanzania, Lu Youqing assured the general public that the government of china will continue supporting different development projects in the country strengthening the longtime good relationship between the two governments.
THE GUARDIAN
http://www.ippmedia.com/frontend/fun...le.php?l=47811


Last edited by Geza Ulole; November 9th, 2012 at 08:36 AM.
Geza Ulole no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old November 21st, 2012, 06:13 PM   #7
Geza Ulole
BANNED
 
Join Date: May 2010
Posts: 1,791
Likes (Received): 12


Ross Campbell questions Bob McBean, executive chairman of Wentworth Resources, on the potential of East Africa, the challenges of delivering large-scale gas projects and how to build effective and collaborative industry partnerships

Bob, very glad you can join us here today. For those of our readers who might not know Wentworth Resources can you share with us briefly some information about your company?
We created Wentworth Resources in late 2009 to acquire an interest in three Rovuma Basin concessions: a working interest in the Mnazi Bay Concession in southern Tanzania; a working interest in the Onshore Rovuma Block in northern Mozambique; and a net profits royalty interest in Offshore Area 1, also in northern Mozambique. My partners and I were particularly interested in Mnazi Bay because it contained two stranded Tertiary gas fields on tidewater. The fields contain in excess of .5Tcf of P50 contingent resources and prospective P50 resources approaching 2Tcf. At that time of our transaction there was virtually no local market for the gas. Since several of my partners and I had been involved in successfully monetising gas in the United Arab Emirates and Qatar we thought that if we could gain a foothold in the concession and the area we could help fund a drilling programme that could prove up sufficient resources to develop, finance and build a large-scale petrochemicals project to monetise this gas.

We finalised our transaction in July 2010 so it has been just over two years since taking control of our assets. In that time we have seen over 100Tcf of gas discovered by others in the Rovuma and Rufiji basins of Tanzania and Mozambique. The government of Tanzania is building a 532km gas pipeline from Dar es Salaam to us in Mnazi Bay and a 300MW gas-fired power plant is being developed in the nearby town of Mtwara, Tanzania. None of these gas discoveries or projects existed when we entered the Rovuma Basin so while the area has changed dramatically our focus, plans, and objectives remain basically the same.
A lot has been said recently about East Africa’s hydrocarbon potential and its Rovuma Basin has been touted as "the next Qatar". What analogies do you see with Qatar and how much potential is there in the basin both for gas and oil?
Neil Kelly [Wentworth Non-executive Director] and I were directly involved in developing two of the earlier projects for Qatar’s North Field gas in the 1990’s. I developed the QAFAC project, which has gone on to become of the world’s most successful gas-to-petrochemicals projects, and Neil was the first Managing Director of RasGas, which to date has developed and built seven LNG trains. We see a lot of similarities between Qatar in the 1990’s and East Africa now. We also see the potential and we are working with the Tanzanians and the Mozambicans to realize that potential.

Given where we and others are with drilling in the area’s basins I believe the potential is much greater than what we know today. Certainly there will be additional gas resources discovered and developed and there appears to be further potential for commercial oil in the system.
What challenges do you see the region encountering in commercialising this potential and in attracting more investors to unlock its full potential?
The challenges of developing natural gas are the same all over the world. All parties involved, including host governments, have to be on the same page in that they have to work together to develop the gas business in such a way that it benefits all stakeholders. They have to know up front and be comfortable with the fact that developing a gas business requires: technologies and technical expertise; substantial amounts of capital relative to crude oil development; a well trained workforce; significantly more infrastructure; longer lead times between investment and cash flow; and markets that are ready, willing and able to take and pay for the gas and/or its derivatives.

As far as attracting and retaining investors, any country that is new to the gas business would do well to study and understand how Qatar did it. They brought in world class partners. They created joint venture agreements that aligned everyone’s interests. They have honoured contracts once executed and that is critical to those of us who are investing, and we focus on this issue first and foremost.
What experiences from your previous roles at QAFAC and DUGAS are you drawing from that are helping you realise the vision of large-scale gas monetisation projects in Tanzania and Mozambique?
First I learned to seek partnerships with governments. We have a unique opportunity in Tanzania because we participate in the Mnazi Bay concession under the terms of a Production Sharing Agreement. The government benefits from that agreement directly through its share of the profit petroleum and TPDC, the national oil company, has a 20% working interest in the concession. In the beginning, even before we had completed the transaction to enter into Tanzania, I went to see the President, the Minister of Energy and Minerals, and the national oil company. I proposed that we develop a downstream gas monetisation project within the framework of the PSA so that all interests would be fully aligned.

I also learned that oil and gas projects should add value beyond just generating profits. At DUGAS our associated gas processing eliminated flaring from the field, and the sales gas coming out of the plant is what powers DUBAL, the world’s largest modern aluminium smelter. QAFAC, the project in Qatar, produces methanol and MTBE from natural gas and butane, and those products help diversify the Qatari economy beyond LNG.

Producing methanol, ammonia/urea and other products derived from natural gas in East Africa will generate benefits well beyond profits. These products replace costly fuel and fertiliser imports and allow for incremental consumption of both. The amount of drilling and field development work that has to happen to supply gas to a project provides greater gas production for power generation. One petrochemicals project alone can generate 3,000 construction jobs and over 600 permanent full time jobs. We, as operator, will train our permanent employees and in addition the contractors will also provide construction training. The technical skills taught during the construction phase will be used throughout the life of not only our project but all projects in the region.
You have a rather hectic schedule of drilling exploration and development wells over the next 12 months. Can you share with our readers what you have planned and how much upside there is at Mnazi Bay and Onshore Rovuma?
In Tanzania our plan is to acquire new 3D seismic in the offshore section of the Mnazi Bay concession. We have two prospects already identified by 2D seismic and we want to high grade those and better understand the entire marine area geology. Once the new seismic is interpreted we will make drilling decisions.

In Mozambique, our operator Anadarko has proposed, and we have agreed, to drill two wells in the Onshore Rovuma Concession in 2013. Depending on rig availability our plan is to spud the first well in July. We are especially pleased to have Anadarko as our operator because their knowledge of the basin’s geology has grown substantially since the last onshore well was drilled in 2009. Their understanding of the coastal and offshore geology and their drilling success offshore should benefit our work onshore.

As for the upside, we are confident that we will be able to discover additional gas resources in Tanzania and prove up existing resources. In Mozambique the geology suggests that a gas discovery is more likely than oil but if there is oil in the system we want to be the ones to discover it.
Is demand from Dar es Salaam strong enough to buy all of your future production or will you have to plan to sell it further afield?
The government has provided us with a list of all current and proposed gas-fired power plant projects. It is a total of ten projects with combined electricity production capacity of over 2,000MW. Those projects are designed to consume over 500 million cubic feet of gas per day. So the short answer to your question is “yes”, there could be sufficient demand to consume everything we produce from Mnazi Bay. However, other producers are expected to bring incremental production online over time so we have to wait to see if and when that production is available to help satisfy the overall demand.

It is also important to note that the government of Tanzania wants methanol and ammonia/urea production so as additional gas comes on stream I think it is likely that some of our production can be used to supply a petrochemicals project.
Almost all recent E&P successes in East Africa have been a result of industry working together on frontier basins. You are in business with some world-class partners like Anadarko and PTTEP, each enjoying significant success over the past two years. Are partnerships the key to unlocking East Africa? And what makes for a mutually beneficial partnership in today’s market?
The complexity and the amount of capital required to be in our business means that good partnerships are critical to success. Our partnership with Anadarko is a good example of how we benefit from a company with proven upstream operating success while we have a lot to offer on the midstream and downstream sides of the business.
You successfully dual listed on London’s AIM exchange late last year during very tough market conditions. What was the thought process in deciding to raise capital in London and in reflection was that the right move?
We inherited an Oslo Stock Exchange listing when we did our initial transaction and in late 2010 we started the process of raising additional equity capital. At that time we found that most of the institutions that were interested in investing in a company like ours were either in London or conducting most of their trading through the London Stock Exchange. As a result we made the decision to co-list our shares. In spite of the difficult market conditions at the time our last placement was 40% oversubscribed, so it was a positive move.
We’ve witnessed a number of growing small-cap companies getting into financial trouble with capital commitments they can’t honour and debilitating cash-flow constraints. How well funded are Wentworth for your upcoming drilling program and other project developments?
We are well funded, at least for the remainder of our 2012 commitments and for our 2013 committed work. Our capital requirements could change if we decide to accelerate the timing of drilling one or more wells in the Mnazi Bay concession but we are trying to weigh our desire to do this against the expected timing for completion of the new Tanzanian gas pipeline. If we wait until first gas production into the line we can use the cash flow generated from sales and cost recovery to fund future drilling. That would push our timeline out somewhat but the benefits of self-funding and generating additional cost recovery funds are pretty attractive.
How would you describe Wentworth in one sentence to a prospective new investor?
Wentworth Resources is a pure, low entry cost Rovuma Basin play with: existing gas production; substantial near term revenue and profit growth; exciting exploration acreage; all led by a team of professionals with proven gas monetisation experience.
A common theme in recent interviews with other O&G CEOs has been the human capital crunch our industry is now battling with. How are you finding, recruiting, retaining and incentivizing skilled workforce in East Africa?
We are fortunate in that we inherited a solid team of people in Tanzania and we intend to recruit and train from there and other areas where we operate. We also have an office in Calgary where we have access to a large pool of experienced professionals. As for attracting, retaining and incentivizing good people it helps to have a new company with great growth prospects.
Your career has lasted over 40 years in the oil and gas business. Looking now and reflectively across your career how can we better engage graduates and young business professionals to work in the oil and gas industry and is there any advice would you pass on to a recent graduate considering a job in oil and gas?
The health of our industry has a lot to do with attracting new students into the professions that we require. Currently it is not difficult to attract graduates to our industry but it is cyclical.

My advice to recent graduates is to get as much early technical training as possible with companies that have well recognized programmes.
Finally Bob, the question we ask all executives, a little off key but what three luxury items would you take to a desert island? [NB: you may NOT choose a boat, raft, yacht, satellite phone, or book on practical raft-building for dummies etc!)
My IPod with Creedence Clearwater Revival and Neil Young collections, and the book “The Match” by Mark Frost; my wife Barbara; and my labrador, Sam.
http://www.oilcouncil.com/executive_...ews/bob_mcbean
Geza Ulole no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old November 22nd, 2012, 07:59 PM   #8
bantugbro
Olduvai Gorge
 
bantugbro's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2011
Posts: 2,613
Likes (Received): 368

Quote:
Originally Posted by Geza Ulole View Post


Finally Bob, the question we ask all executives, a little off key but what three luxury items would you take to a desert island? [NB: you may NOT choose a boat, raft, yacht, satellite phone, or book on practical raft-building for dummies etc!)


My IPod with Creedence Clearwater Revival and Neil Young collections, and the book “The Match” by Mark Frost; my wife Barbara; and my labrador, Sam.


http://www.oilcouncil.com/executive_...ews/bob_mcbean
__________________
"...your behind-the-keyboard insinuations will get good people banned for trivial reasons, please don't start with me..."
bantugbro no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old November 23rd, 2012, 09:07 AM   #9
Geza Ulole
BANNED
 
Join Date: May 2010
Posts: 1,791
Likes (Received): 12

Aminex says gas pipeline gives clear route to monetising Tanzanian gas assets
Mon 9:10 am by Jamie Ashcroft The economic viability of the assets are being enhanced by a project to build a pipeline from the region up to the capital Dar es Salaam.

Aminex (LON:AEX) says a new gas pipeline in Tanzania is a clear route to monetising its two gas assets.

The Kiliwani and Ntorya gas fields are among the group’s assets in Tanzania that are estimated to contain over 11 trillion cubic feet of discovered and undiscovered gas in place.
The potential economic viability of these assets are being enhanced by a project to build a pipeline from the region up to the capital Dar es Salaam. The pipeline has been commissioned by the government and it is being built by the Chinese.
Aminex says it is holding talks with the Tanzania’s state oil company over the possibility of connecting Kiliwani to the pipeline.
Meanwhile Aminex continues to advance its exploration work in the highly prospective area, in and around the Ruvuma basin, with seismic surveys planned both on and offshore.
It is hoped that new partners will be brought in to help take the projects forward.
"With over 11.4 TCF of discovered and undiscovered potential in our Tanzanian properties, Aminex is implementing an aggressive seismic exploration programme to develop existing leads and target upcoming drilling both onshore and in the deep water,” said chief executive Stuard Detmer.
“The Tanzanian government's forward-looking pipeline project is progressing and will connect Aminex's two existing discoveries at Ruvuma and Kiliwani North to the key natural gas market in Dar es Salaam, providing a clear route to monetisation in 2014.
“Our strategy of managing risk and focusing resources on Africa is progressing with the launch of the Ruvuma farm out process and the divestiture of our US assets, now scheduled for early 2013.
“It is an ambitious programme that will move us towards our goal of becoming one of the leading companies in the East African region."
Aminex also said it is in negotiations for a US$15 million bridging loan and it expects to conclude these talks in the near future.
http://www.proactiveinvestors.co.uk/...ets-50492.html

Tanzania to monetise gas fields with pipeline

Thu, 22 November 2012

New pipelines in Tanzania will help monetise two gas assets says indepenedent oil company Aminex PLC.

The statement comes from their newly released Interim Management Statement (IMS) for the period 1 July to mid-November 2012.

Early in the reporting period Aminex published the results of an independent technical evaluation of the Ruvuma and Nyuni Area production sharing agreements (PSAs). The study attributed 11.4 Tcf total discovered and undiscovered mean gas initially in place for the two licences combined, with 5.75 Tcf attributed to the Ruvuma PSA and 5.67 Tcf to the Nyuni Area PSA. The total 11.4 Tcf estimate represents the equivalent of 1.9 Bbbl.

Concurrently, the Tanzanian Government announced the launch of construction of a 36 inch diameter pipeline which will pass through the Ruvuma PSA, the site of the company's Ntorya-1 discovery, to Dar es Salaam with a 24 inch diameter spur line to Songo-Songo Island where Aminex and partners have a development licence for the 45 Bcf Kiliwani North discovery. The new pipeline and associated gas processing facilities are expected to be commissioned in the first half of 2014 and will provide a direct route to market for gas from Aminex's two discoveries.

In addition to above, Aminex held talks with the Tanzanian state oil company in early November regarding the technical engineering design for tying in Aminex's Kiliwani North-1 (KN-1) gas well to the planned gas processing facility on Songo-Songo Island and pipeline to Dar es Salaam.

Article continues below…

Aminex had previously completed the engineering design for the local 6 inch pipeline connecting KN-1 to the existing local gas processing facility and the 6 inch pipe has already been purchased and delivered to Tanzania. Only minor adjustments to the design will be required to enable the tie-in to the new gas processing facility.

The new Songo-Songo gas processing facility and pipeline are now expected to be commissioned and put into operation in the first half of 2014, providing Aminex with a route to monetisation of KN-1 gas. Kiliwani North holds discovered mean gas initially in place of 45 Bcf and the tie-in is designed to handle an optimum production level of 20 MMcf/d.

Aminex CEO Stuard Detmer said "With over 11.4 Tcf of discovered and undiscovered potential in our Tanzanian properties, Aminex is implementing an aggressive seismic exploration programme to develop existing leads and target upcoming drilling both onshore and in the deep water.

“The Tanzanian Government's forward-looking pipeline project is progressing and will connect Aminex's two existing discoveries at Ruvuma and Kiliwani North to the key natural gas market in Dar es Salaam, providing a clear route to monetisation in 2014.”
http://pipelinesinternational.com/ne...peline/078920/

Last edited by Geza Ulole; November 23rd, 2012 at 09:13 AM.
Geza Ulole no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old September 25th, 2014, 03:14 PM   #10
Jachi
We are the change
 
Jachi's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2014
Location: Kuala Lumpur
Posts: 70
Likes (Received): 37

Kinyerezi Gas Power Plant 70% Complete

__________________

bantugbro, alama liked this post

Last edited by Jachi; September 25th, 2014 at 03:18 PM. Reason: Correction
Jachi no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old September 25th, 2014, 07:46 PM   #11
bantugbro
Olduvai Gorge
 
bantugbro's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2011
Posts: 2,613
Likes (Received): 368

Quote:
Originally Posted by Jachi View Post
This means everything is on track with this project....
__________________
"...your behind-the-keyboard insinuations will get good people banned for trivial reasons, please don't start with me..."

kiligoland liked this post
bantugbro no está en línea   Reply With Quote


Reply

Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off



All times are GMT +2. The time now is 10:55 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
Feedback Buttons provided by Advanced Post Thanks / Like v3.2.5 (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2014 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.

vBulletin Optimisation provided by vB Optimise (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2014 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.

SkyscraperCity ☆ In Urbanity We trust ☆ about us | privacy policy | DMCA policy

Hosted by Blacksun, dedicated to this site too!
Forum server management by DaiTengu