daily menu » rate the banner | guess the city | one on oneforums map | privacy policy (aug.2, 2013) | DMCA policy | flipboard magazine

Go Back   SkyscraperCity > European Forums > UK & Ireland Architecture Forums > Projects and Construction > London Metro Area > The Construction Forum

The Construction Forum For everything tall going up in London right now.



Reply

 
Thread Tools Rating: Thread Rating: 1 votes, 5.00 average.
Old October 28th, 2011, 01:04 PM   #81
Jaeger
Registered User
 
Jaeger's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2006
Location: United Kingdom
Posts: 2,364
Likes (Received): 96

I know this is slightly off topic but you do have to have some sympathy with the legal deposit libaries and other large libaries throughout the world.

In the United Kingdom the Legal Deposit Libraries Act 2003 restates the Copyright Act 1911, that one copy of every book (which includes pamphlets, magazines and newspapers) published there must be sent to the British Library; five other libraries (the Bodleian Library at the University of Oxford, Cambridge University Library, the National Library of Scotland, the Library of Trinity College, Dublin and the National Library of Wales) are entitled to request a free copy within one year of publication.

http://www.bl.uk/

http://www.legaldeposit.org.uk/

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Legal_D...aries_Act_2003

The British Library has storage facilities in Woolwich, Colindale (Newspapers) and at Boston Spa near Wetherby in West Yorkshire (which is being massively redeveloped to hold more books and newspapers) as well as it's massive site on Euston Road.

http://www.bl.uk/careers/locations.html

http://www.worldarchitecturenews.com...pload_id=10946

This article quite amusingly illustrates the problems of having to hold a copy of evertything puiblished in the nation.

http://www.guardian.co.uk/books/2007...4/architecture

It's also not just the British Library (14 million books and over 150 million items), the Bodleian (11 million books) has had to invest in a massive new storage facility in Swindon (as part of a massive redevelopment of the entire library) whilst the other deposit libaries - National Library of Scotland (7 million books), National Library of Wales (4 million books), Cambridge University (12 million books), Trinity College Dublin (5 million books) are also increasingly having to invest in ever larger storage facilities.

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/culture/b...tle-space.html

http://www.guardian.co.uk/books/2010...library-swindo

http://news.bbc.co.uk/local/wiltshir...00/9062875.stm

http://www.culture24.org.uk/history+...music/art79165

http://www.bodleian.ox.ac.uk/news/2010_mar_04

The National Archive which is based in Kew in London has even started using the space in a Cheshire salt mine to store some of it's vast array of records - LOL.

http://www.guardian.co.uk/uk/gallery...620904&index=0

http://www.nationalarchives.gov.uk/

DeepStore at Winsford (Cheshire) Salt Mine Website with video about the massive storage facilities.

http://www.deepstore.com/

Despite recent austerity measures, there are still numerous new library facilities in the UK such as the new central libraries (dubbed super-libraries) in places such Cardiff, Newcastle Upon Tyne, Swindon, Worcester (The Hive), Norwich etc and the massive library redevelopments occuring in places such as Manchester, Liverpool and Birmingham.

http://www.guardian.co.uk/books/2010...margaret-hodge

http://www.guardian.co.uk/books/2011...ingham-council

http://www.mla.gov.uk/news_and_views...l_Central.aspx

The Mitchell Library in Glasgow is the largest public reference library in Europe, and other libraries such as Chetham's (Chained) Library and the John Ryland in Manchester are also world famous. Whilst the London School of Economics is home to the vast British Library of Political & Economic Science (a United Nations depository library) and Senate House the central library of the University of London (not far from the British Library) holds a massive book collection, as does the Wellcome Library further down Euston Road from the British Library, which houses one of the largest medical collections in Europe.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mitchell_Library

http://www.manchester.ac.uk/aboutus/...=2008&month=05

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chetham's_Library

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chained_library

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/British...onomic_Science

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Senate_...ity_of_London))

http://www.kew.org/plant-cultures/wellcome.html

In London alone there are reckoned to be over 21 million academic books held by Higher Education Institutions, with a further 17 million held by London's public lending libraries on top of the 14 million kept by the British Library. London is also home to the largest independent lending library in the world, the London Library and there are numerous collections held by institutions suich as the Bishopsgate Institution , Kew Gardens (Horticultural Library), National Art Library and Royal Society (Scientific Library) as well as the capitals vast array of museums and galleries.

http://www.london.gov.uk/priorities/...s-about-london

http://www.londonhigher.ac.uk/filead...Keyfacts06.pdf

http://www.ucl.ac.uk/infostudies/unc...in%20today.ppt.

http://www.londonlibrary.co.uk/index.php

As well as preserving stock through new climate controlled storage facilities, major libraries such as the British Library have also invested in digitising stocks and making more items available on line. As for books they are being conserved by a specialist book and newspaper repair facility at the British Library, which is now housed in a new building to the rear of the library at St Pancras which was opened in 2007.

http://www.bl.uk/conservation

http://www.brick.org.uk/2011/03/by-the-book/

http://www.nationalarchives.gov.uk/i...s-and-work.htm


Copac is probably the most comprehensive library database in the UK encompassing the major University Research Libraries (RLUK), National Deposit Libraries and many specialist libraries.

http://copac.ac.uk/

European Library - http://search.theeuropeanlibrary.org.../en/index.html



http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-13836332



http://www.bl.uk/bipc/



Historian David Professor Starkey at the British Libraries 500th Anniversary of Henry VIII Exhibition

http://www.bl.uk/henry



British Illusionist Derren Brown at the British Library demonstrating the use of photographic memory as part of psychic phenomena



Picture below - The British Library's Additional Storage Building (ASB) in Boston Spa, central England, is seen during the installation of automated racking. The British Library is re-housing part of its collection in new facilities that will hand responsibility for the storage and retrieval of seven million items to a robotic crane rather than a librarian.






Last edited by Jaeger; November 10th, 2011 at 11:34 PM.
Jaeger no está en línea   Reply With Quote

Sponsored Links
 
Old October 28th, 2011, 01:52 PM   #82
Jaeger
Registered User
 
Jaeger's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2006
Location: United Kingdom
Posts: 2,364
Likes (Received): 96

The Wellcome Library also on Euston Road (mainly medical and scientific) - the Wellcome Trust and Colleges of the Unversity of London are part of the partnership behind the new Francis Crick Institute (UKCMRI) being built at Brill place beside the British Library. The Wellcome Library is directly next door to the modern glass Wellcome Trust building on Euston Road, which itself is right next door to the new University College London Hospital building.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wellcome_Library

http://www.wellcome.ac.uk/News/Media...ings/index.htm

image hosted on flickr

Last edited by Jaeger; October 28th, 2011 at 04:47 PM.
Jaeger no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old October 28th, 2011, 02:04 PM   #83
Jaeger
Registered User
 
Jaeger's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2006
Location: United Kingdom
Posts: 2,364
Likes (Received): 96

The Glorious Art Deco University of London Senate House Library next door to the British Museum and not far from the British Library.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Senate_...ity_of_London))

image hosted on flickr


image hosted on flickr


image hosted on flickr


Any way back to the topic on hand I guess - The new Francis Crick Institute






Last edited by Jaeger; October 28th, 2011 at 11:04 PM.
Jaeger no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old October 28th, 2011, 08:36 PM   #84
HeartDeco
Melancholiac
 
HeartDeco's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2011
Posts: 324
Likes (Received): 0



HeartDeco no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old October 29th, 2011, 01:10 AM   #85
DanLondon
Registered User
 
Join Date: May 2010
Posts: 114
Likes (Received): 0

I wonder what will become of its current Mill Hill home?

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nationa...dical_Research

Guess it will be demolished and housing built on the site. The distinctive green roof can be seen for miles around and I remember when Batman was being filmed there - will be sad(ish) to see it go but I love the new building.
DanLondon no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old October 29th, 2011, 12:26 PM   #86
Jaeger
Registered User
 
Jaeger's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2006
Location: United Kingdom
Posts: 2,364
Likes (Received): 96

Quote:
Originally Posted by DanLondon View Post
I wonder what will become of its current Mill Hill home?

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nationa...dical_Research

Guess it will be demolished and housing built on the site. The distinctive green roof can be seen for miles around and I remember when Batman was being filmed there - will be sad(ish) to see it go but I love the new building.
I don't think any detailed plans have been announced as of yet. You are probably right though, it will most likely be domolished as part of some new housing scheme
Jaeger no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old October 31st, 2011, 02:58 PM   #87
Jaeger
Registered User
 
Jaeger's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2006
Location: United Kingdom
Posts: 2,364
Likes (Received): 96

Back to (UKCMRI) - The Francis Crick Institute

http://www.crick.ac.uk/






Last edited by Jaeger; November 8th, 2011 at 12:45 PM.
Jaeger no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old November 8th, 2011, 12:47 PM   #88
Jaeger
Registered User
 
Jaeger's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2006
Location: United Kingdom
Posts: 2,364
Likes (Received): 96

Francis Crick Instiute Visitors Centre

http://bloomsburybytes.wordpress.com...he-microscope/

http://www.crick.ac.uk/contact-us

Models of the scheme








Last edited by Jaeger; November 8th, 2011 at 06:44 PM.
Jaeger no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old November 8th, 2011, 01:28 PM   #89
Jaeger
Registered User
 
Jaeger's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2006
Location: United Kingdom
Posts: 2,364
Likes (Received): 96



Sir Paul Nurse on the Francis Crick Institute: step aboard the mother ship of medicine

The powerhouse behind Europe's largest dedicated research building tells Nick Collins that the future of biomedicine must belong to Britain.


'You can have brilliant entrepreneurs, but if they’ve got no knowledge to work with, they’re stuffed': Sir Paul Nurse

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/science/s...-medicine.html

By Nick Collins
08 Nov 2011

In less than a year’s time, the glittering international terminal at St Pancras Station will welcome hundreds of Europe’s finest athletes to London for the greatest sporting event on Earth. Directly over the road, workmen are already busy erecting another glass-walled behemoth, aimed at attracting a similar calibre of foreign visitor.

The brains behind the Francis Crick Institute – the £650 million centre that will be Europe’s largest dedicated research building – hope that when it opens in 2015, it will lure the world’s finest minds across every area of biomedicine. And while the competitors who flock to the capital for the Olympics will leave a month later, taking their medals with them, the scientists recruited to work at the new centre just behind King’s Cross will be expected to remain for the long haul, with Britain reaping the fruits of their talent.

That at least is the ambition, says Sir Paul Nurse, the Nobel Prize-winning geneticist who is president of the Royal Society and chief executive of the new institute.

With a consortium of six of the country’s leading research institutions funding the project and space for 1,500 scientists, Sir Paul believes in aiming high.

“In the longer term, this will be so strong on the world stage that we will be able to recruit young researchers from Britain and throughout the world,” he explains. “It will be a very attractive place to come. Part of the ploy is that we attract the best in the world and they put roots down during their 10 to 12 years here, and so they remain.”

Britain is regarded as a world leader in science, but the Francis Crick Institute represents a different way of approaching biological research, aimed at boosting the rate of medicinal and technological breakthroughs.

Originally named the UK Centre for Medical Research and Innovation (a “ghastly” title, says Sir Paul), it was this year renamed after the late scientist who, with James Watson, discovered the double helix structure of DNA in 1953. This “super-laboratory” will exploit our understanding of genetics – for which the pair laid the foundations – to develop new therapies for common conditions such as cancer and heart disease.

“We’re ripping up the rulebook, frankly,” Sir Paul tells me in his glass-walled cubicle at the top of the Wellcome Trust’s headquarters in Euston, a stone’s throw from where his new office will be.

The enormous scale of the institute means that it will be able to fund scientists from a wide range of fields studying a variety of diseases.

“This institute will have a major focus on cancer research,” says Sir Paul, “but the point is that sometimes you find research in an area that doesn’t seem relevant to cancer, but actually is extremely relevant. Having a wide range of disease interests – heart disease, cancer, immunology, neurodegeneration and the like – it cross-fertilises across the field and you need a large institute to do that.”

Successful scientific research is an undoubted driver of the economy through the development of new technology. Importing new expertise has the potential to generate money as well as life-saving discoveries. In its early days, the institute – a merger of Cancer Research UK and the Medical Research Council’s (MRC) research units – will be populated by scientists from those two centres. But it will quickly look to cement its status by recruiting “very significantly on a worldwide basis”.

However, there are obstacles to Sir Paul’s plans. David Cameron has personally expressed his support, designating the centre as a critical national infrastructure project and protecting it from spending review cuts. But the Government’s immigration cap may prevent it from attracting precisely the people it was designed to accommodate.

“Immigration is a real problem,” says Sir Paul. “The Government has shot us in the foot with the most highly trained, creative scientists subject to restrictions, in the sense of having caps on numbers.”

While Premier League footballers enjoy special exemption from new visa restrictions imposed last year, scientists are subject to quotas that could see them turned away.

Sir Paul was among a number of leading scientists who have lobbied the Government to offer researchers and industry leaders the same exemptions enjoyed by top athletes – but to no avail.

“The Government wants long-term economic growth and it should be welcoming these people with open arms,” he says. “If we’ve got a brilliant cancer research scientist in the US who wants to come here, why on earth do we keep them out?”

He is quietly confident that within four years, he and other experts will have persuaded the Government to re-examine its policy and open the borders to foreign scientists.

“You can have brilliant entrepreneurs, but if they’ve got no knowledge to work with, they’re stuffed,” he says. “Although I am irritated by it, I think the Government will learn and change its mind in the next several years and make it easier again.”

The masterplan is for scientists to arrive at the institute in their late twenties or early thirties and remain for more than a decade – a period when their drive and imagination are high but one in which they might struggle to find senior positions at universities. They will then move on to jobs elsewhere, aided by the institute’s links with its funding bodies – including the MRC, Wellcome Trust, Cancer Research UK, UCL, Imperial and King’s College London.

So the institute will act as a magnet for talent, but it will also be a “mother ship” to protect its employees at the most vulnerable stage of their careers, before sending them out into the world.

“We’re positioning this institute to be a major training centre and feeding centre for the rest of the country,” says Sir Paul. “The notion here, which is very different to most institutions, is not to hang on to our best people, but to export them. Normal institutions, when they have a star, do everything they can to hang on to them. Our job is to make stars and then get rid of them.”

Looking further ahead, Sir Paul believes that his leadership could have a direct impact on the health service in Britain, by acting as a “catalyst for driving the NHS as a research engine”. While its critics perceive the NHS to be a drain on resources, it has the potential to be used for research which would be the “envy of the world’’, he says.

“The NHS is a real resource if we have the imagination to use it. It would make places like the Crick Institute more effective because we could work more efficiently with the public care-delivery system as a whole in driving new treatments.

“This is a place where we can develop basic science and understanding, and feed that into a UK-wide NHS component, together with pharmaceutical companies.”

It is an ambitious vision, and one that still requires significant funding: Cancer Research UK aims to raise £100 million for construction of the laboratories at the Francis Crick Institute. But it is one that has the potential to transform not just British science, but our understanding of some of the most challenging problems in modern medicine.

Last edited by Jaeger; November 8th, 2011 at 01:36 PM.
Jaeger no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old November 8th, 2011, 02:01 PM   #90
potto
Registered User
 
potto's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2002
Location: London
Posts: 14,420
Likes (Received): 1315

yum yum, but London also desperately needs to make accommodation much more value for money if it is to retain scientific, cultural and entrepreneurial talent for 10+ years. Certainly the environment around Euston needs to be more attractive. Bring on the Euston Boulevard!

oh the joys of joined up thinking :sigh:
potto no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old November 8th, 2011, 03:50 PM   #91
Rational Plan
Registered User
 
Rational Plan's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2004
Location: Slough
Posts: 3,201
Likes (Received): 219

Quote:
Originally Posted by Jaeger View Post
Back to (UKCMRI) - The Francis Crick Institute


The graphics used there make think a new travelodge is opening.
Rational Plan no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old November 8th, 2011, 03:52 PM   #92
Jaeger
Registered User
 
Jaeger's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2006
Location: United Kingdom
Posts: 2,364
Likes (Received): 96

Quote:
Originally Posted by potto View Post
yum yum, but London also desperately needs to make accommodation much more value for money if it is to retain scientific, cultural and entrepreneurial talent for 10+ years. Certainly the environment around Euston needs to be more attractive. Bring on the Euston Boulevard!

oh the joys of joined up thinking :sigh:
The environment around Euston is gradually improving, and there have been massive developments in recent decades such as the British Library, Wellcome Building, UCL Hospital, St Pancras Station and now the massive Kings Cross area redevelopment which will include new accomodation as well as a new artistic and cultural quarter. The area also has the advantage of being sandwiched between the Bloomsbury and Camden areas which are both very vibrant.

I also doubt that very many potential academics will live in the immediate area, prefering to live throughout London amd making use of the vast and growing transport links, with new schemes such as Crossrail set to have an even greater impact in terms of commuting from different areas throughout London and it's suburbs.




Last edited by Jaeger; November 8th, 2011 at 09:36 PM.
Jaeger no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old November 8th, 2011, 09:05 PM   #93
Jaeger
Registered User
 
Jaeger's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2006
Location: United Kingdom
Posts: 2,364
Likes (Received): 96

Quote:
Originally Posted by Rational Plan View Post
The graphics used there make think a new travelodge is opening.
The building looks very impressive in the models above. Although the architecture of this building will untimately be based around functionality.

I am also sure if what goes on in this building helps elevate the suffering related to conditions such as cancer, multiple sclerosis, heart disease and numerous other conditions, then for many people it will be amongst the most beautiful buildings ever created.

This is also one of the reasons why I believe this is one of the most important building projects occurring in London at the present time, and one which may has the potential to impact on the lives of so many.








Last edited by Jaeger; November 9th, 2011 at 04:32 PM.
Jaeger no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old July 26th, 2012, 02:58 AM   #94
woodgnome
CEO, Dingly Dell Corp.
 
woodgnome's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2007
Location: London
Posts: 843
Likes (Received): 311





__________________
London is not a city. It is more like a country, and living in it is like living in Holland or Belgium. Its completeness makes it deceptive - there are sidewalks from one frontier to the other - and its hugeness makes it possible for everyone to invent his own city. My London is not your London, though everyone's Washington, DC is pretty much the same.
The London Embassy - Paul Theroux
woodgnome no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old July 26th, 2012, 03:57 PM   #95
TheWalker
TheWalker
 
TheWalker's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2011
Posts: 293
Likes (Received): 2

The Francis Crick Institute will be a fantastic contribution to London, the country and the world!!
TheWalker no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old July 26th, 2012, 10:14 PM   #96
delores
Registered User
 
Join Date: Dec 2005
Posts: 4,931
Likes (Received): 111

the only thing that irritates me about this design is the blob inside the large atrium, it seems to of been redesigned again in that animation. It just looks a bit of a 'wacky' meaningless element in a building that seems to be really well resolved in most cases.
delores no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old July 27th, 2012, 03:23 PM   #97
kerouac1848
Registered User
 
kerouac1848's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2009
Location: NW London
Posts: 2,758
Likes (Received): 269

This is u/c i think.
kerouac1848 no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old October 25th, 2012, 01:48 AM   #98
woodgnome
CEO, Dingly Dell Corp.
 
woodgnome's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2007
Location: London
Posts: 843
Likes (Received): 311

Can universities afford to stay single any longer?

-- Link to Guardian article --

If you see a scientist wandering through St Pancras station looking a bit green, don't assume they've had a dodgy crossing on Eurostar. It's probably jealousy. Work is under way just outside to build the Francis Crick Institute: a research behemoth that looks set to project three London universities into the global superleague for biomedicine. The site will not be ready until 2015, but already the building is casting a big shadow over the rest of the country.

The Crick, as it is known in academia, is intended to develop better treatments for diseases by bringing together scientists from different disciplines to study everything from stem cells to influenza. It is also a thundering testament to the power of partnership.

The £630m project brings together University College London, King's College and Imperial College, with investment from three of the biggest public funders in this area. It has had the domino effect of putting considerable pressure on universities outside the capital to form alliances in order to stand a chance of competing. The standard refrain from other vice-chancellors is "even Oxbridge are terrified of the Crick".

Professor Sir Steve Smith, vice-chancellor of Exeter University, explains: "Throughout the world concentration of research funding is the name of the game, therefore for the country the Crick is the right solution. But what does that mean for universities outside the south-east? How can you possibly compete as a single institution, whoever you are?"

Arranging marriages between universities is no small task, not least because the game-changing Research Excellence Framework, which will distribute more than a billion pounds of government research cash to universities a year, pits institutions against each other and fuels a climate of intense rivalry. This is further ingrained by the international obsession with league tables. Professor Robert Lechler, vice-president for health at King's College and one of the architects of the Crick partnership deal, is frustrated with these barriers. "For the first time ever London is seriously at risk of getting its act together, with a real readiness to engage in partnership work, which is incredibly exciting. But there is no real financial incentive. The REF breeds inter-institutional competition when we need collaboration."

According to insiders, the Crick university union was a long way from love at first sight. The institute was originally intended to be a much smaller-scale merger with the National Institute for Medical Research, and the big London research universities entered a furious competition to win the contract. UCL came out on top as the exclusive partner in 2006. When the original plan ballooned, and King's College and Imperial began campaigning to be included, UCL was reportedly less than enthusiastic about having other institutions muscling in.

Lechler is not keen to talk about this troubled courtship. "At the end of the day it is about trading autonomy for success, and I think we are ready to do that," he says. He is determined to move away from the culture of automatic rivalry – at least within London. "We've all got a history of poaching and in the run up to the REF it's like the football transfer market," he admits. "However, I have reached the point where if it's an inter-London institutional transfer I question whether there is sufficient reason for them to move. Or could it be a joint appointment?"

However, Sarah Jackson, director of the N8, a partnership between eight big-hitting research universities in the north, including Manchester, Durham and Leeds, is pragmatic about what is achievable. "You have to acknowledge the reality that this is a very competitive sector, and you won't change that," she says. "Our institutions collaborate in some areas — where it makes sense — and compete in others. We are comfortable with that."

The N8 has had some major successes, including research council funding for a £3.2m high-performance computing centre. Sharing expensive new research equipment has become a key driver for the group, especially since the government slashed capital funding last year. The N8 model is now regarded in government circles as something worth emulating — but this hasn't happened overnight. Jackson says: "Partnership takes time to build. You can't write trust into a contract. It has taken us five years to build a relationship where the pro vice-chancellors can be totally honest with me and with each other."

This is a cautionary message for the M5 partnership, which sprang up earlier this year involving five research universities from the middle of the country, including Birmingham and Lancaster.

Until recently Lancaster was planning a major "federal" partnership with Liverpool University, but this has been dropped. The official line was that "transformational benefits" couldn't be achieved right now. But sources close to the process say the deal collapsed largely because of opposition from staff. As one academic notes: "It's not a command and control situation. You've got to bring everyone with you."

Lancaster is continuing to pursue other partnership options, and strikingly its vice-chancellor, Professor Mark Smith, suggested in a recent internal management meeting that Lancaster might consider becoming "the junior partner" with a world leading university. This highlights one of the key dilemmas of big university partnerships: someone will inevitably come out on top, and it may not be your institution. As Steve Smith says: "The issue isn't really money – it's kudos. If you put in a joint REF submission, for example, how do you divide the credit? How do you convey this to the international league tables? These things worry vice-chancellors."

The N8 computing centre is a case in point. It is physically based at Leeds, so much of the credit will gravitate there, although Manchester officially won the grant. Luke Georghiou, vice-president for research at Manchester, says: "There is an element of kudos attached to big equipment and you have to learn to accept that."

Egos may become less ruffled when a partnership happens across countries. Warwick University has teamed up with Monash University in Melbourne. The deal was three years in the making, while the two leadership teams hammered out issues such as credit sharing and what their priorities should be. But the institutions appointed a joint pro vice-chancellor last month – something Warwick vice-chancellor Professor Nigel Thrift admits would have been harder to pull off with a partner in his own back yard. "It wasn't the main reason for choosing Monash, but it does take the pressure off," he says. "You aren't competing in the same arena and that certainly helps."
__________________
London is not a city. It is more like a country, and living in it is like living in Holland or Belgium. Its completeness makes it deceptive - there are sidewalks from one frontier to the other - and its hugeness makes it possible for everyone to invent his own city. My London is not your London, though everyone's Washington, DC is pretty much the same.
The London Embassy - Paul Theroux
woodgnome no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old January 16th, 2013, 02:34 AM   #99
woodgnome
CEO, Dingly Dell Corp.
 
woodgnome's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2007
Location: London
Posts: 843
Likes (Received): 311

Nobel prize-winner wants new lab to culture British scientists

-- Link to Independent article --

When the Francis Crick Institute opens next to London's St Pancras station in 2015, Nobelist Paul Nurse expects its labs won't only grow bacteria, mould or stem cells. They will also grow science talent.

"As soon as someone becomes a star, universities do everything to hold on to them," says Nurse, a 2001 Nobel Prize winner in physiology or medicine for work on cell cycle regulation and a former president of Rockefeller University in New York. "As soon as we have a star, we will do everything to get rid of them."

Nurse is leading a four-year effort to build the facility at a cost of 600 million pounds ($962 million). At 1 million square feet and with as many as 1,500 employees, including 1,250 scientists, he says the Crick Institute will become Europe's largest science research center in one building.

His ambition is for the eight-story Crick Institute to rival the US.'s Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory. "This can become a very attractive place, a magnet for international recruitment," said Nurse, who still oversees a research lab and serves as president of the Royal Society, a position once held by Isaac Newton. "We will very rapidly turn into the same type of location as these other international institutions."

Located at a transportation crossroads, the Crick site is near research centers and hospitals, with rail links to Oxford, Cambridge and Paris. It is within two hours by train from a majority of the U.K.'s population, Nurse says.

The institute will combine scientists from the National Institute for Medical Research in north London and Cancer Research UK's London Research Institute in central London. It will also train scientists from about age 30, who will stay 10 to 12 years. "I want to go for youth," says Nurse, 63, who did his Nobel Prize work before he turned 40. "We don't give enough freedom to young people. They are often at their most creative at this point."

The institute will focus on research into cancer, heart disease, stroke, infection and neurological diseases and turning scientific discoveries into treatments. In the journal The Lancet on May 19, editor Richard Horton quoted unidentified senior researchers as criticizing the Crick Institute for lacking a "scientific strategy" and potentially drawing talent away from other institutions.

Nurse, who replied with an 80-page document explaining the institute's strategy, says Horton "got it completely wrong." Rather than poach the country's best and brightest scientific minds, Nurse says the center will send them out. "They will go around the world but we will see a significant number stay here in the U.K.," he says.

Nurse has top researchers behind him. Mark Walport, director of the Wellcome Trust, the world's second largest biomedical charity after the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, says Horton wrote "nonsense." "There's a very strong vision," Walport, who becomes the U.K. government's chief scientific officer on April 1, said in an interview. Horton declined to comment further, Lancet spokeswoman Daisy Barton said.

Drugmakers are disputing how much the U.K. government pays for prescription products used by the state-operated National Health Service. Through their trade group, the Association of British Pharmaceutical Industry, they say investment in research and development in the U.K. may decline unless the nation's health system buys new medicines they discover and produce.

The government-funded Medical Research Council is paying 300 million pounds of the Crick's construction costs, Wellcome is providing 120 million pounds and Cancer Research UK is contributing 160 million pounds. Imperial College London, King's College London and University College London are pitching in 40 million pounds each. The total includes contingency funds.

The expected 120 million-pound annual budget will come from the same sources. Cancer Research will fund 40 million to 50 million pounds a year and the Wellcome Trust will give an undetermined amount, the heads of both groups said. The remainder will come from the government and the universities.

The government's spending on Crick contrasts with the fiscal gloom facing it elsewhere, as it pares jobs and budgets during an economic downturn. In Spain, the Prince Felipe Research Center, a government-funded biomedical research facility built in 2005, dismissed 108 of its 258 workers and halved the others' salaries last year after the cash-strapped regional government trimmed its budget amid a deteriorating economy and rocketing unemployment.

Crick Institute leaders say the British economy hasn't suffered as badly and the two largest political parties support it. The project began in 2007 during the Labour Party's leadership and has received the Conservative Party's backing since it formed a coalition with Liberal Democrats in 2010. Nurse says he hasn't lost sleep about the budget. "I worry about the air conditioning," he says. "I'm confident the Crick will be close to the top in priorities for all the organizations that are supporting us."

Right now the Crick Institute is a building frame with heavy equipment on the ground and a 160-foot crane overhead. Temperature control is a critical detail for main contractor Laing O'Rourke Plc. If power were lost, researchers could lose years of frozen specimens and fragile material. Two double- skinned tanks with enough diesel fuel to run generators for a week have been installed underground.

The tanks concern some neighbors, as does security. Robert Henderson, whose apartment overlooks the site, worries harmful pathogens could be compromised in an accident or security breach. Henderson, a retired civil servant, says that documents he's obtained show that "level-four" bacteria and viruses will be stored at the site.

Level-one labs don't usually require special containment equipment or contain agents known to cause ill effects in immunocompromised adults. Level-two facilities contain moderate hazards to people and the environment, while a level-three laboratory may house potentially lethal agents. Level four indicates the presence of pathogens that present a high risk to individuals of life-threatening diseases, that are often fatal and for which there are no treatments or vaccines. "It's going to be extremely dangerous," Henderson said. "They are classifying it as level-three plus. They are going to be using level-four toxins."

Crick spokesman John Davidson says the building will have an "enhanced containment level-three" laboratory so that scientists can study H5N1 influenza virus without endangering local birds. The lab won't contain level-four pathogens such as Marburg, lassa fever or ebola virus, Davidson says. There are already more than 100 level-three labs in London operating without mishaps, Nurse says.

In exchange for an exemption from the U.K.'s 20 percent value-added tax on the building costs, the institute isn't allowed to commercialize more than 5 percent of its activity, such as licensing discoveries, for the first 10 years.

Britain's largest pharmaceutical company and biggest private investor in R&D, GlaxoSmithKline, is "waiting" before getting involved, Chief Executive Officer Andrew Witty said. Glaxo traces its roots to a nearby 1932 building on Euston Road that was once headquarters of its forerunner, Burroughs Wellcome & Co., and now houses part of the Wellcome Trust, which was endowed by founder Henry S. Wellcome's fortune. "It wouldn't be the biggest shock for GSK to be back on the Euston Road," Witty said during an October press conference at the Wellcome Trust's nearby central London location. "We'll see."
__________________
London is not a city. It is more like a country, and living in it is like living in Holland or Belgium. Its completeness makes it deceptive - there are sidewalks from one frontier to the other - and its hugeness makes it possible for everyone to invent his own city. My London is not your London, though everyone's Washington, DC is pretty much the same.
The London Embassy - Paul Theroux
woodgnome no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old January 24th, 2013, 06:04 PM   #100
Angle42
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Posts: 235
Likes (Received): 1

Quote:
Originally Posted by kerouac1848 View Post
This is u/c i think.
I'm not sure if there is another thread covering construction but the Construction News page on the Crick Web site has some nice pictures of how the work is getting on.
Angle42 no está en línea   Reply With Quote


Reply

Thread Tools
Rate This Thread
Rate This Thread:

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off



All times are GMT +2. The time now is 02:54 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
Feedback Buttons provided by Advanced Post Thanks / Like v3.2.5 (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2014 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.

vBulletin Optimisation provided by vB Optimise (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2014 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.

SkyscraperCity ☆ In Urbanity We trust ☆ about us | privacy policy | DMCA policy

Hosted by Blacksun, dedicated to this site too!
Forum server management by DaiTengu