daily menu » rate the banner | guess the city | one on oneforums map | privacy policy | DMCA | news magazine | posting guidelines

Go Back   SkyscraperCity > Continental Forums > OZScrapers > Local Projects & Discussions > Western Australia



Global Announcement

As a general reminder, please respect others and respect copyrights. Go here to familiarize yourself with our posting policy.


Reply

 
Thread Tools
Old January 14th, 2018, 02:39 AM   #2461
Urbania
Urban Athiest
 
Urbania's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2008
Location: Perth
Posts: 1,978
Likes (Received): 1175

I wouldn't be surprised if the ACT leap-frogs over WA by the next census.
Urbania no está en línea   Reply With Quote

Sponsored Links
Old January 14th, 2018, 03:10 AM   #2462
HighgateJohnny
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jan 2012
Location: Highgate 6003
Posts: 2,072
Likes (Received): 1628

Percentage of total population
  • New South Wales 32%
  • Victoria 26%
  • Queensland 20%
  • Western Australia 10%
  • South Australia 7%
  • Tasmania 2%
  • ACT 2%
  • Northern Territory 1%

Percentage of Apartments
  • New South Wales 47%
  • Victoria 23%
  • Queensland 17%
  • Western Australia 5%
  • South Australia 4%
  • Tasmania 1%
  • ACT 2%
  • Northern Territory 1%
__________________

olio gris liked this post

Last edited by HighgateJohnny; January 14th, 2018 at 03:16 AM.
HighgateJohnny no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old January 15th, 2018, 06:34 AM   #2463
olio gris
Registered User
 
Join Date: Nov 2013
Posts: 1,523
Likes (Received): 1362

Quote:
Originally Posted by HighgateJohnny View Post
Percentage of total population
  • New South Wales 32%
  • Victoria 26%
  • Queensland 20%
  • Western Australia 10%
  • South Australia 7%
  • Tasmania 2%
  • ACT 2%
  • Northern Territory 1%

Percentage of Apartments
  • New South Wales 47%
  • Victoria 23%
  • Queensland 17%
  • Western Australia 5%
  • South Australia 4%
  • Tasmania 1%
  • ACT 2%
  • Northern Territory 1%
Thanks for clarifying that we misinterpreted the ABS’s (admittedly ambiguous) graphic. Or was I the only one who thought the graphic suggested that 47% of NSW residents live in apartments?
__________________

eugenius liked this post
olio gris no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old January 15th, 2018, 07:09 AM   #2464
docker
A 'Refined Bogan'
 
docker's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2006
Location: Kalamunda, Perth
Posts: 6,896
Likes (Received): 1639

Ooh, i totally misunderstood that diagram. I thought it was suggesting 5% of WA’s housing stock was apartments, whilst 47% of NSW was apartments.
__________________
I AM ME!

A video of my month long travel in the GMT Zones +8 and +9: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ESV_t0Z12EE

eugenius liked this post
docker está en línea ahora   Reply With Quote
Old January 15th, 2018, 10:20 AM   #2465
lukeyp
Registered User
 
Join Date: Oct 2015
Location: Perth
Posts: 1,037
Likes (Received): 481

Oh. Okay that makes more sense.
lukeyp no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old January 15th, 2018, 11:18 AM   #2466
Urbania
Urban Athiest
 
Urbania's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2008
Location: Perth
Posts: 1,978
Likes (Received): 1175

Quote:
Originally Posted by docker View Post
Ooh, i totally misunderstood that diagram. I thought it was suggesting 5% of WA’s housing stock was apartments, whilst 47% of NSW was apartments.
That's what I thought as well. I'll retract my ACT comment...
Urbania no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old Today, 10:27 AM   #2467
CityEdge
Registered User
 
Join Date: Dec 2012
Location: Perth
Posts: 294
Likes (Received): 174

http://www.lboro.ac.uk/gawc/world2016t.html

Some commentary:
Economists rank cities globally into a hierarchy of classifications. Perth is in the "beta" rank. Other cities with it include, Brisbane, Philadelphia, Berlin, Vancouver, Montreal, Abu Dhabi, Doha.

Cities Perth outranks: Rio de Janeiro, Denver, San Diego, Detroit, Phoenix, Chennai, Edinburgh, Cleveland, Minneapolis, Seattle, St Petersburg, etc.

Given Perth's size (2m), this is impressive; "winning" requires a mix of size and sophistication. Most likely, the export of high margin raw materials enables the city to hit well above its weight.

A word of caution to those who might think Perth is on its way up; this is not guaranteed. Scholars no longer conceptualise global economic development as a catching up process. On the contrary, the highest ranking places tend to reinforce the subservient role of lower ranked places, often via persistent colonial institutions. These hierarchies, for the most part are fairly stable; when change occurs it is sudden and disruptive (e.g. Middle Eastern cities).

While the system is exploitative, the impetus is on subservient places to ensure they enact policies which nurture their best potential. Even then, like a football field, not every player's peak condition is the same.

Herein lies my interest in policies that unlock growth in Western Australia. There's always been something about this place, so beautiful, so young, yet locked in economic subservience, that has never sat well with me.
CityEdge no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old Today, 10:31 AM   #2468
CityEdge
Registered User
 
Join Date: Dec 2012
Location: Perth
Posts: 294
Likes (Received): 174

more commentary:
Surprised that Perth outranked Seattle. 9 months ago Seattle was like Perth in the midst of the mining boom, plus some. Construction cranes everywhere, lots of well paid workers throwing money around, etc.

Reply:
Seattle is booming; however, Perth's isolation and dominance on the west coast of a continent boost its importance. Seattle lacks certain functions nearby neighbours (LA, SF) likely have. This is why Perth has a lot of potential, it is the alpha dog on the west coast of a continent. The only catch is it's lacking scale. If the west coast had multiple large cities, Perth would be complimented by the scale economies, though it might not maintain it's #1 rank if a new, larger city appears. California is a great example of what can happen when urban-merit drives urbanisation and not political forces (e.g. capital city status). SF was dethroned somewhere between 1920-1940 by LA, but was mostly complimented by the rise of LA. Even though SF doesn't rank as high as LA, it is today carrying a weight it never could have in isolation.

Adding on, it should be surprising that Perth is on par with Philadelphia. Philly is quiet in global terms, but very large and an integral part of the US's northeast corridor. It is largely hidden in the shadows of NYC and DC but is the US's 7th largest agglomeration with 7.35 million people. Another interesting fact about Philly, in the 18th century, Philadelphia was the alpha city of the British-American colonial cities - due to the Quakers being open to different cultures, Germans poured in and it quickly rose to #1 and developed strong links with London and Paris in their heydays. I mention this to demonstrate that this #1 status is largely forgotten (though you get a sense of it from 18th & 19th century architecture) and people assume NYC has always been #1. In fact, it is rare, in the long term for city hierarchies to be perfectly stable. This is why the stability of Australia's state urban hierarchies has caught scientific attention because it is extreme and very persistent.
CityEdge no está en línea   Reply With Quote


Reply

Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Related topics on SkyscraperCity


All times are GMT +2. The time now is 12:57 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.11 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2018, vBulletin Solutions Inc.
Feedback Buttons provided by Advanced Post Thanks / Like (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2018 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.

vBulletin Optimisation provided by vB Optimise (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2018 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.

SkyscraperCity ☆ In Urbanity We trust ☆ about us | privacy policy | DMCA policy

tech management by Sysprosium