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Old October 11th, 2017, 07:02 PM   #981
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St Cuthbert's Churchyard, Elsdon

This rather gruesome headstone is to be found in the churchyard of St Cuthbert's, Elsdon.

Unfortunately any inscription has long since weathered out.

It is Grade II Listed, the listing text courtesy of The British Listed Buildings web site @ https://www.britishlistedbuildings.c...n#.Wd4gFzBrxtQ

Entry Name: Pair of Headstones Circa 20 Yards South of Church of St Cuthbert
Listing Date: 29 May 1987
Grade: II
Source: Historic England
Source ID: 1041238
English Heritage Legacy ID: 236260
Location: Elsdon, Northumberland, NE19
County: Northumberland
Civil Parish: Elsdon

ELSDON Pair of headstones, c.20 yards south of Church of St. Cuthbert
NY 9393
19/20

2 headstones, sandstone:

Hannah Ord. 1754. c.4 ft. high with shaped top bearing an angel. To rear a
high-relief skull and cross bones.

Worn stone to left has, to rear, a high-relief carving of a bag of bones with a skull above. Above that a winged hourglass.

Listing NGR: NY9363793254


Image hosted on https://www.flickr.com/photos/steve-...57687865157073
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Old October 12th, 2017, 04:08 PM   #982
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Andrew John Blackett-Ord Plaque

Located in Holy Trinity Church, Whitfield, covered @
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is this memorial plaque to Captain Andrew John Blackett-Ord, photographed 29th August 2004.

Andrew John Blackett-Ord was born in 1851 at Wolsingham, County Durham, the son of Reverend John Alexander Blackett-Ord and Anne Jane Hamilton.

He married Amy Louise Jebb, daughter of Charles William Jebb and Eliza Yerbury, on 11 December 1879 and died on 20 March 1899. He lived at Whitfield Hall, Northumberland.


Image hosted on https://www.flickr.com/photos/steve-...57686983649611
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Old October 13th, 2017, 03:19 PM   #983
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Belford’s first blue plaque unveiled at special ceremony

From toiday's Northumberland Gazette @ http://www.northumberlandgazette.co....mony-1-8800643
Belford’s first blue plaque unveiled at special ceremony
13 October 2017


The Coldstream family with organisers Dr Peter Rumley and Jane Bowen.

The unveiling of Belford’s first blue plaque took place at the weekend.

The plaque has been placed on the house in which Sir William Coldstream, celebrated artist and cultural icon, was born. His father, George Probyn Coldstream, was a much-respected doctor who served the area for 16 years.

Sir William, as he became, was one of the foremost British painters of his generation, noted for the quality of his portraits. After the Second World War, he took charge of the University of London’s Slade School of Art, in which role he put Britain at the forefront of European art and, through two very important reports, shaped the future of art education in Britain.

Sir William’s five children and two of his grandchildren travelled to Belford to join in the celebration. His son Rob thanked everyone involved in organising the event, especially Jane Bowen, from Belford Museum, before unveiling the plaque.

The exhibition of Coldstream’s life and work continues in Belford Museum until Sunday, 10am to 4pm.

Read more at: http://www.northumberlandgazette.co....mony-1-8800643
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Old October 13th, 2017, 05:04 PM   #984
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War Memorial Lych Gate Cemetery, Bellingham

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17/02876/LBC | Listed Building Consent to enhance the appearance and safety of Bellingham Cemetery, Lychgate by repairing roof and pointing and install 2no black granite plaques. | War Memorial Lych Gate Cemetery Bellingham Northumberland
Reference 17/02876/LBC
Alternative Reference Not Available
Application Received Thu 10 Aug 2017
Application Validated Wed 23 Aug 2017
Address War Memorial Lych Gate Cemetery Bellingham Northumberland
Proposal Listed Building Consent to enhance the appearance and safety of Bellingham Cemetery, Lychgate by repairing roof and pointing and install 2no black granite plaques.
Status Registered
https://publicaccess.northumberland....=OUH9EWQS0J400

Images courtesy of the planning documents:


Hosted on https://www.flickr.com/photos/steve-ellwood/

Status Decided
Decision Application Permitted
Decision Issued Date Wed 11 Oct 2017


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Originally Posted by Steve Ellwood View Post
From today's Hexham Courant @ http://www.hexham-courant.co.uk/news...a1a4074648e-ds
Work to start on updating Prudhoe war memorial
7 September 2017


Chartered architect Peter Ashworth with Coun. Andy Gill.

A PRUDHOE war memorial is to be updated with the missing names of those who lost their lives in conflict.

The Lychgate War Memorial, at the entrance of St Mary Magdalene Church in Kepwell Bank Top, currently commemorates 91 men who died in the First World War. Plans have been ongoing since 2013 to arrange for missing names from the First World War to be added to the memorial, as well as those from the Second World War and other conflicts. As a result, additional panels are required and Coun. Andy Gill and Sarah Eden, of Prudhoe Town Council, have been working closely with local architectPeter Ashworth to finalise the project.

Members of Prudhoe and District History Society have been compiling a list of names, mostly from the records of Our Lady and St Cuthbert’s RC Church and online sources, with support from Iain Mutch and Mick Hardy of the Ryton and District War Memorial group. Now a list of 197 names has been assembled and a faculty to carry out the work to add the panels has been granted by the Chancellor to the Faculty.

The work, which will cost £20,000 and is being funded out of Prudhoe Town Council’s budget, has now been put out to tender with a 12 month timescale to complete the project.

Peter Ashworth, who is designing the new panels, said: “I have been designing the new panels which have now been approved, so hopefully that will get the ball rolling. It would be nice to have it completed in time for the 100th anniversary of the end of the First World War in November 2018; that’s the plan.”

Read more @ http://www.hexham-courant.co.uk/news...a1a4074648e-ds
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Old October 16th, 2017, 01:26 PM   #985
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Riddle of the American Civil War veterans buried in Newcastle graveyards

From today's Chronicle Live, copyright NCJMedia Ltd @ http://www.chroniclelive.co.uk/news/...erans-13766531
Riddle of the American Civil War veterans buried in Newcastle graveyards
David Morton 16th October 2017


St John’s Cemetery, Elswick, Newcastle and Soldiers on an American Civil War battlefield, 1861-1865 (inset)

The American Civil War. Despite taking place 150 years ago on a distant continent, it remains one of history’s most evocative episodes.

The bitter conflict was fought over the principal issue of slavery. Around 700,000 soldiers died as the Union (the North) fought the Confederates (the South) in a war which tore the United States to pieces between 1861 and 1865.

A century and a half later, Damian Shiels, from County Limerick in Ireland, has moved to Newcastle to work as a PhD researcher in History at Northumbria University. He said: “I am researching the Irish of the American Civil War. In my first days here, I have been looking at local connections to the conflict. One way to do this is to examine American Civil War veterans who are buried in local cemeteries. So far I have identified three, one of whom – George H Bell – earned a Medal of Honor for his actions while in the Union Navy.“

George H Bell is buried in St John’s Cemetery Elswick, Newcastle, but Damian has discovered two other graves on Tyneside. By chance, in the same cemetery, Damian located the grave of another American Civil War veteran. He said: “US military headstones are distinguishable from those of the Commonwealth Wargraves Commission by virtue of being slightly taller and slimmer, and so even at a distance it was clear that this grave marked the resting place of former American servicemen. “ This turned out to be the grave of Philip Legers, born in New Brunswick around 1843. Legers was assigned to the 9th Massachusetts Infantry, an ethnic Irish regiment. He survived the war and in 1911 he is recorded on the UK census as Phillip Legers White, working as a shipwright in the Ordnance Works and living in Elswick. He had four children.

Damian added: “Perhaps it was his wife, Elizabeth, who caused him to move to the North East, as she had been born in Haltwhistle, Northumberland.Philip Legers passed away on June 28, 1916.

Read more @ http://www.chroniclelive.co.uk/news/...erans-13766531


The matter of US War Graves has been mentioned on the forum in the past @

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Originally Posted by Steve Ellwood View Post
Not heard of one in Jesmond Old Cemetery but just over the road at All Saints Cemetery lie the remains of Michael Joseph Quigley (1837-19214) who has a headstone commemorating the fact that he fought in the American Civil War. Fighting for the Union Army, Company A, 8th New Jersey Infantry, he was wounded in his left arm which left it almost paralysed. After the cessation of the Civil War he was employed in Government Service but was to return to Britain in 1876. On his return he lived in St Lawrence Square (Walker Road) and received a pension from the US Government.

Quigley was English by birth, having been born in Bradford in 1873.

These photographs taken in May 2003:




Images hosted on http://ellwood.fototime.com/All%20Saints%20Cemetery


Another example of a American Civil War memorial can be seen in Preston Cemetery, North Shields:

Who would ever think that a man from North Shields would fight for the Union Army in the American Civil War and then return to his home town?

Well that is exactly what happened to John Pendergast.

Pendergast was born in Ireland but came to live in North Shields as a baby, so for all intense and purpose he was a "Shields lad".

Whilst in his 20's, Pendergast emigrated to the United States of America, where in 1862 he enrolled as a Private in Captain Lewis Beckworth's Company of the 13th Connecticut Infantry. The Contract entered into meant that Prendergast had to serve either three years or until the war had ended, whichever came first.

Pendergast served the Union Army until August 1865 when he was discharged at Savannah. Having been discharged from the Army, he then returned to his home town of North Shields where he married and settled down.

John Pendergast died in Liddell Street, North Shields, 5th May 1901 at the age of 60 and is buried in Preston Cemetery where his grave is marked by a United States of America Military headstone.


Image hosted on http://ellwood.fototime.com/Preston%...%20-%20Vol%202

Evidently there was another grave within Preston Cemetery with a United States of America Military head stone but this has mysteriously disappeared in recent years!
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Old October 16th, 2017, 02:22 PM   #986
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That s a really interesting story:
It looks as if the markers were supplied undated and then the dates were added to this one in sort of UK fashion. I wonder if there was a warehouse with all vet's markers stored and waiting and you then asked and had it shipped...

Given the horrendous casualty rates in the Civil War it's possible - about as many dead [or more on latest research] than in all of the US's other wars combined..
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Old October 16th, 2017, 02:43 PM   #987
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Quote:
Originally Posted by newcastlepubs View Post
That s a really interesting story:

It looks as if the markers were supplied undated and then the dates were added to this one in sort of UK fashion. I wonder if there was a warehouse with all vet's markers stored and waiting and you then asked and had it shipped...

Given the horrendous casualty rates in the Civil War it's possible - about as many dead [or more on latest research] than in all of the US's other wars combined..
My understanding of 'War Graves' in the UK is that the family of the deceased would have to apply to the authorities, whether UK of US for a headstone to be erected. So I would doubt that there are a supply of ready made headstones waiting for the veterans to pop their clogs. Of course it means that a family who wouldn't have been financially able to afford a grave marker are able to have a headstone erected at a nil cost.

Found this piece of ancestry.com @ http://search.ancestry.co.uk/search/db.aspx?dbid=1195

Quote:
About Headstones Provided for Deceased Union Civil War Veterans, 1861-1904

On March 3, 1873, Congress passed an act that allowed for all honorably discharged veterans of the Civil War to be buried in national military cemeteries. In February of 1879 Congress passed another act which stated that the government would erect the same gravestones for Union soldiers buried in private cemeteries as those buried in national cemeteries.
Perhaps it was more a case of the headstones in the UK being sculptured to a preset design rather than being shipped from the states.?

Also worth a read - https://www.cem.va.gov/history/hmhist.asp
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Old October 16th, 2017, 03:45 PM   #988
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Steve Ellwood View Post
My understanding of 'War Graves' in the UK is that the family of the deceased would have to apply to the authorities, whether UK of US for a headstone to be erected. So I would doubt that there are a supply of ready made headstones waiting for the veterans to pop their clogs. Of course it means that a family who wouldn't have been financially able to afford a grave marker are able to have a headstone erected at a nil cost.

Found this piece of ancestry.com @ http://search.ancestry.co.uk/search/db.aspx?dbid=1195


Perhaps it was more a case of the headstones in the UK being sculptured to a preset design rather than being shipped from the states.?

Also worth a read - https://www.cem.va.gov/history/hmhist.asp
I suppose there would be a template - it just interested me that one of them seemed to have been cut at one time and the dates added later [in a different hand or certainly non template]
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Old October 16th, 2017, 03:57 PM   #989
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Quote:
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I suppose there would be a template - it just interested me that one of them seemed to have been cut at one time and the dates added later [in a different hand or certainly non template]
John Pendergast does not have any details inscribed on his headstone, so it could well be that the family themselves had to pay for and arrange for inscriptions as may have been the case for Michael Joseph Quigley?

There is a photographs on the History web site @ http://www.history.com/news/civil-wa...iously-thought of headstones of the Civil War dead at Antietam National Cemetery. That image shows that not all markers have inscriptions.


Credit : http://www.history.com/news/civil-wa...iously-thought
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Last edited by Steve Ellwood; October 16th, 2017 at 04:14 PM. Reason: Added image from History web site
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Old October 16th, 2017, 04:37 PM   #990
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Steve Ellwood View Post
John Pendergast does not have any details inscribed on his headstone, so it could well be that the family themselves had to pay for and arrange for inscriptions as may have been the case for Michael Joseph Quigley?

There is a photographs on the History web site @ http://www.history.com/news/civil-wa...iously-thought of headstones of the Civil War dead at Antietam National Cemetery. That image shows that not all markers have inscriptions.


Credit : http://www.history.com/news/civil-wa...iously-thought
Aye looks that way. Presumably the US government pays for the headstone and then you have to shell out for any other inscriptions.
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Old October 16th, 2017, 07:53 PM   #991
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Exchange of emails with Damian Shiels and he tells me:

"A lot of the stones seem to have been put up at the same time in 1930 in ceremonies overseen by the Consul, I assume at the behest of one of the local veteran organisations, but there is lots more exploring to be done."
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Old October 17th, 2017, 12:23 PM   #992
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Plessey Road, Blyth - Tour of Britain Plaques

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17/02328/FUL | Install two flower beds/planters, each with a sign commemorate the Tour of Britain cycle race | Public Convenience Plessey Road Blyth Northumberland NE24 4AA
Reference 17/02328/FUL
Alternative Reference Not Available
Application Received Fri 30 Jun 2017
Application Validated Tue 11 Jul 2017
Address Public Convenience Plessey Road Blyth Northumberland NE24 4AA
Proposal Install two flower beds/planters, each with a sign commemorate the Tour of Britain cycle race
Status Decided
Decision Application Permitted
Decision Issued Date Fri 01 Sep 2017
https://publicaccess.northumberland....=OSCZKWQS0IN00

The application seeks approval for the installation of 2no commemorative artwork signs on land at Plessey Road, Blyth.
Must say I hadn't expected the commemoration to take the format of spray painted images of the Tour - these photographs taken 14th October 2017.






Images hosted on https://www.flickr.com/photos/steve-...57661573747148
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Old October 17th, 2017, 03:13 PM   #993
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Must say I hadn't expected the commemoration to take the format of spray painted images of the Tour - these photographs taken 14th October 2017.



Images hosted on https://www.flickr.com/photos/steve-...57661573747148
They almost have 'please deface me' written on them...hmmmm
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Old October 17th, 2017, 04:17 PM   #994
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Plessey Road, Blyth - Tour of Britain Plaques

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They almost have 'please deface me' written on them...hmmmm
Yes that's what I thought but according to a neighbour they have been alone - turns out the same artist had painted a mural of the Tour on the public toilets which were on that site, now demolished.
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Old October 18th, 2017, 05:08 PM   #995
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William George Minnis - Blacksmith

Interesting to come across the grave of William George Minnis in Whitley Bay Cemetery on 10th September 2017.

The plaque on the headstone confirms that his trade was as a Blacksmith at Wallsend Shipyard where he worked for 22 years. Passing away in 1916 at the age of 52 the stone was erected by his colleagues in the Blacksmith Department.




Images hosted on https://www.flickr.com/photos/steve-...57661613032588
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Old Today, 01:23 PM   #996
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Honouring role played by Admiral Collingwood

From today's News Guardian @ http://www.chroniclelive.co.uk/news/...entre-13787672
Honouring role played by Admiral Collingwood
David Sedgwick 20 October 2017


Captain Andy Jordan, Royal Navy, Commanding Officer HMS Collingwood and Captain Stephen Healy, Master at the Newcastle upon Tyne Trinity House raise a glass of 'grog' to toast Vice-Admiral Lord Cuthbert Collingwood at a previous event. Picture by John Tuttiett.

A special event is being held to honour one of the region’s biggest war heores.

The annual Trafalgar Day ‘Toast the Admiral’ event is being held on Saturday at the Collingwood Monument in Tynemouth. Now in its eighth year, dignitaries, honoured guests and members of the public will toast the role played by Admiral Collingwood’s role in the Battle of Trafalgar.

North Tyneside has the greatest monument to the Admiral at Tynemouth looking out to sea.

Coun Cath Davis, chairman of North Tyneside Council, said: “The council hosts this special event to commemorate Trafalgar Day and raise awareness of the achievements our very own Admiral Collingwood and his place in the nation’s history. “Our pride in our maritime history is also matched with our pride in our Royal Navy. It is with great pride that we welcome Captain Andy Jordan RN, the former Commanding Officer for HMS Collingwood, to address this year’s event – I’m sure Admiral Collingwood would approve.”

Invited guests and members of the public will arrive at 11.40am, with a welcome by Coun Davis at 11.50am before the raising of the Blue Ensign and the toast at noon. The significance of holding the toast at noon is based on the fact that 12midday was the time at which the first shot was fired in the Battle of Trafalgar on October 21, 1805.

Read more at: http://www.newsguardian.co.uk/news/h...wood-1-8814762


From the Morpeth Herald @ http://www.morpethherald.co.uk/news/...wood-1-8813428
Raise a glass to Admiral Lord Collingwood

19 October 2017



Morpeth residents are invited to join town councillors and other invited guests for a toast to naval hero Admiral Lord Collingwood on Trafalgar Day (Saturday).

Those who wish to participate are asked to come along to Morpeth Town Hall at 11.40am. The toast will take place at 11.59am.

Tyneside-born Cuthbert Collingwood became the hero of the Battle of Trafalgar (1805) after taking control when his friend Nelson was fatally wounded. For the sake of the nation, he was persuaded to remain as Commander-in-Chief of the Royal Navy, but he was always eager to return to his Morpeth home in Oldgate.

Read more at: http://www.morpethherald.co.uk/news/...wood-1-8813428

Previous discussions on Admiral Lord Collingwood can be found @

Quote:
COLLINGWOOD - ADMIRAL LORD CUTHBERT COLLINGWOOD . . .
Collingwood (Admiral Lord Collingwood) his '200th Anniversary' in 2010
http://www.skyscrapercity.com/showpo...&postcount=824
Collingwood Monument, Tynemouth
http://www.skyscrapercity.com/showpo...&postcount=615
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Collingwood Wave (proposed 'wave' sculpture at Broad Chare, a memorial to Lord Collingwood)
http://www.skyscrapercity.com/showpo...3&postcount=23
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Morpeth Town Hall sculpture of Admiral Lord Collingwood (unveiled 2013)
http://www.skyscrapercity.com/showpo...&postcount=401
Old Cuddie - Collingwood Street was named after "Old Cuddie", Admiral Lord Collingwood (Evening Chronicle, 11th December 1953)
http://www.skyscrapercity.com/showpo...&postcount=152
Lord Collingwood and Trafalgar Day 2013, and three 'Collingwood Monument' Photos
http://www.skyscrapercity.com/showpo...&postcount=615
Lord Collingwood and Trafalgar Day 2014 - "A Toast to Vice-Admiral Lord Collingwood"
http://www.skyscrapercity.com/showpo...&postcount=414
http://www.skyscrapercity.com/showpo...&postcount=415
Collingwood House, Oldgate, Morpeth - Lord Collingwood's Family home
http://www.skyscrapercity.com/showpo...0&postcount=47
http://www.skyscrapercity.com/showpo...postcount=1210
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