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Old November 23rd, 2011, 06:25 AM   #1
xzmattzx
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Port Deposit, MD

Port Deposit is a town in Cecil County, on the Susquehanna River north of where the river empties into Chesapeake Bay. The population is around 650.

Port Deposit was given its name in 1813 by Levin Winder, Governor of Maryland. The town flourished as a shipping center, marking the point where Susquehanna River traffic could go farthest downstream, and Chesapeake Bay ships could go furthest upstream. Tobacco, coal, whiskey, grain, and lumber were shipped to and from here.

In the early to mid-1800s, granite deposits north of the town were quarried for their quality. The granite was used extensively in Baltimore, as well as in Washington DC and even Philadelphia. This same granite was used throughout Port Deposit, for foundations of most houses and as an exterior building material for the prominent houses, churches, and institutional buildings.

Port Deposit was also famous for the Tome School for Boys, started by Jacob Tome in 1894. The school is considered the first non sectarian prep school in the United States. After Tome's death in 1898, it evolved into the Tome Institute, which provided education from kindergarten through high school. A new campus on a bluff above the city was constructed around the turn of the century. However, this campus was appropriated by Congress for use as a Naval training center, and the US Naval Training Center, Bainbridge, opened in 1942. USNTC Bainbridge remained open until 1976.


The entranceway to the old Washington Hall, which was part of the Tome Institute, on S. Main Street. Washington Hall was built in 1894.



The Tome Gas House, across the railroad tracks from S. Main Street. The gas house was built in 1850 for Jacob Tome.



Houses on S. Main Street.



A twin house on S. Main Street.



Houses on S. Main Street.



Houses on S. Main Street. The McClenahan House, built in the 1880s, is on the left.



The Vanneman House, on S. Main Street. The house was built in 1816.



Houses on High Street from S. Main Street.



The Tome Carriage House, on S. Main Street. The structure was built in 1850 and was the carriage house for Jacob Tome.



A house on High Street, above the terraces.



A house on S. Main Street.



The Steps, which connect S. Main Street to the end of High Street. The staircase was built to not only connect the two streets, but also to provide access to the Tome School for Boys from Main Street.



The Port Deposit Town Hall, on S. Main Street. The building was formerly Adams Hall, built in 1905 as a gymnasium for the Jacob Tome Institute.



The McClenahan-Newbitt House, on S. Main Street. The twin houses were built in the 1880s.



Red Brick Row, on S. Main Street. The row of houses was built in the early 1800s.



Port Deposit Presbyterian Church, on S. Main Street. The church was built in 1902.



The Touchstone House, on S. Main Street to the right of Port Deposit Presbyterian Church, was built in 1857.



Houses on S. Main Street. The Nesbitt House is on the right. It was built in 1888 by Henry Clay Nesbitt. The house on the left was built in the 1840s.



The Rowland House, on S. Main Street. The house was built in 1856 for James Rowland, and served as the manse for the Presbyterian church from 1904 to 1983. The old Commercial and Farmers Hotel, built in 1818, is in the background.



The Gerry House, on S. Main Street. The house was built in 1813 by Daniel Megredy. The Marquis de Lafayette was entertained here in 1824 as he toured the United States after the Revolutionary War.



Buildings on S. Main Street. The Rappaport Building, on the right, was built in the 1850s.



Houses on High Street.



Cecil National Bank, on S. Main Street. The bank was built in 1906 and is now an office building.



The Carson and Oldham Buildings, on N. Main Street. Both structures were built in the late 1800s.



The Bee's Nest, on N. Main Street. The house was built in 1902.



Buildings on N. Main Street. The Abrahams Building, now the home of the Water Witch Fire Company, was built before 1867 and is on the right.



Jefferson Hall, on N. Main Street. The structure was originally a bank, then was expanded with wings in the 1890s when it became part of the Jacob Tome Institute. Jefferson hall was built in 1834.



Houses on N. Main Street.



The old Municipal Building, on N. Main Street. The structure was built in 1868 and is now used as the Harmony Lodge.



Houses on N. Main Street.



Nesbitt Hall, on N. Main Street. The structure was built in 1837 as a Methodist church, then became a public school when a new Methodist church was built in 1872. The hall is now used by Tome Memorial Church.



A house on N. Main Street.



Houses on N. Main Street.



A house on N. Main Street.



Tome Memorial United Methodist Church, on N. Main Street. The church was built in 1872.



A house on N. Main Street.



St. Teresa's Roman Catholic Church, on N. Main Street. The church was built in 1867.



A house on N. Main Street.



Bethel A.M.E. Church, on N. Main Street. The church was built in 1911.



The Creswell House, on Center Street. The house was built before 1820. John A.J. Creswell, Postmaster General under President Ulysses S. Grant, was born here in 1828.



A house on Jacob Tome Highway.



Looking down Jacob Tome Highway at the center of Port Deposit.



Looking down the Susquehanna River towards where it empties into Chesapeake Bay. Several bridges are in the background.



Four bridges cross the Susquehanna south of Port Deposit, at the towns of Perryville and Havre de Grace. The four bridges, from front to back, are the Millard E. Tydings Memorial Bridge, which carries I-95; the B & O Susquehanna Railroad Bridge, which carries CSX railroad lines; the Thomas J. Hatem Memorial Bridge, which carries U.S. Route 40; and the Amtrak Susquehanna Railroad Bridge, which carries Amtrak passenger lines.



Cliffs of granite can be seen all along the Susquehanna River in this area. These same cliffs can be seen from I-95 when driving over the river.

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Old November 30th, 2011, 10:54 PM   #2
deadmaker7
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Love it. I don't know why but towns and cities in hilly areas are often much more interesting than in flat areas. Not that there isn't something to be said for both. But the hills and cliffs create many interesting architectural innovations through necessity of invention.
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Old December 1st, 2011, 07:59 PM   #3
Chadoh25
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Cute town!
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Old December 2nd, 2011, 06:11 AM   #4
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Nice town, scenery really adds to its small town architecture!
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Old December 8th, 2011, 08:30 PM   #5
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Port Deposit's a cool little out of place town. But thanks in part to the dam upriver it's incredibly flood-prone and ends up evacuated at least once a year it seems.

There's also the massive former naval facility - Bainbridge, you mentioned it - just over the town that's completely sealed off, with hardly any pictures of the abandoned buildings inside. I've heard of people sneaking in and looking around, but it's also apparently guarded. Never tried going myself.
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