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Old June 12th, 2017, 02:37 PM   #3621
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Doma Group to build new $58 million Honeysuckle high-rise
MICHAEL McGOWAN

9 Jun 2017, 10 p.m.
NEW LOOK: An artist's impression of the design for the new 21 Honeysuckle Drive residential apartments to be developed by Doma Group.

NEW LOOK: An artist's impression of the design for the new 21 Honeysuckle Drive residential apartments to be developed by Doma Group.
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THIS is what the next stage of property development in Honeysuckle looks like.

Developer Doma Group has lodged plans with Newcastle City Council for a $58 million residential building at 21 Honeysuckle Drive that, if approved, will bring another 154 apartments to the precinct.

Consisting of three seven-storey buildings, the apartments include a mix of one-, two-, three- and four-bedroom units, and 10 terrace-style dwellings as well as ground-floor commercial and retail units.

The sale to Doma was handled by the Hunter Development Corporation, and its chief executive Michael Cassel said the design of the building was “lifting the standard for new buildings and public spaces to inspire residents and visitors alike”.

Doma has emerged as the main investor in the sale of HDC land at Honeysuckle.

The company recently completed its $38 million residential building at 18 Honeysuckle Drive, opposite the new plot, and in April, HDC announced the Canberra-based developer would build a new $45 million, four-star hotel on the vacant land next to Hunter Water’s headquarters.
SET TO GO: 252 car parking spaces at Honeysuckle Drive will make way for the new development, where construction could begin later this year. Picture: Jonathan Carroll

SET TO GO: 252 car parking spaces at Honeysuckle Drive will make way for the new development, where construction could begin later this year. Picture: Jonathan Carroll

Doma’s general manager, Gavin Edgar, said in a statement that the building “brought a new level of quality to the Honeysuckle precinct”.

“Doma wants to be involved in high-quality projects that attract people – we feel this design will really achieve that,” he said.

The Newcastle Herald first reported the plans for the site in October last year, along with upgrades to the public promenade alongside the site.

“HDC will be commissioning an updated design of the Worth Place West public domain with landscaping to be aligned with construction of the new buildings,” Mr Cassel said.

But the development of the site comes with a cost for commuters, because it means the loss of the 252 car spaces currently on the site.

Another 370 spaces near Throsby Creek will be swallowed by the forecast development of land at Cottage Creek and Throsby Wharf.

The University of Newcastle’s plan to develop three sites on Wright Lane will mean the 180 spaces there are also likely to go.

The main NSW government agencies in the Hunter – HDC and UrbanGrowth – have tried to put a positive spin on the loss of spots, arguing in a parking strategy put together by Revitalising Newcastle and released in April that the city has traditionally had an “over-supply” of long-term parking that discouraged public transport.

Pending approval for the development, construction on the 21 Honeysuckle Drive site could begin late in 2017 or early 2018.

http://www.theherald.com.au/story/47...veiled/?cs=305
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Old June 12th, 2017, 02:46 PM   #3622
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Newcastle station's future revealed under state government plan to reopen the area
Brodie [email protected]_Owen

9 Jun 2017, noon

BEFORE AND AFTER: An artist's impression of how Newcastle station could look under a new plan.
SET IN TRAIN: An artist's impression of what Newcastle station could look like.
BEFORE AND AFTER: An artist's impression of how Newcastle station could look under a new plan.
BEFORE AND AFTER: An artist's impression of how Newcastle station could look under a new plan.
BEFORE AND AFTER: An artist's impression of how Newcastle station could look under a new plan.
BEFORE AND AFTER: An artist's impression of how Newcastle station could look under a new plan.
BEFORE AND AFTER: An artist's impression of how Newcastle station could look under a new plan.
BEFORE AND AFTER: An artist's impression of how Newcastle station could look under a new plan.
SET IN TRAIN: An artist's impression of what Newcastle station could look like.

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SET IN TRAIN: An artist's impression of what Newcastle station could look like.
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IT'S Newcastle station – but not as you know it.

The state government will on Friday announce plans for the future of Newcastle station, vowing the heritage-listed building won't be left to “sit and rot”, paving the way for a program of repairs that is hoped to have the dormant station buzzing with life.

In a development application to be lodged with Newcastle City Council, the state government will propose filling in the station’s platforms, removing unoriginal brickwork and reopening the area to Scott Street.

Revitalising Newcastle’s Michael Cassel said “we are going to breathe new life” into “this valuable and much-loved city asset”.

The government does not want a repeat of the dilapidated former Newcastle post office.

“We want to ensure this valuable and much-loved city asset does not sit unused any longer. The last thing anyone wants is to see this beautiful building sit and rot,” Mr Cassel said. “We are going to breathe new life into the station precinct to ensure the community can enjoy these historic buildings for years to come.”

The Newcastle station proposal comes after last year’s consultation with the community.

In a series of events, the government was told by the community it wanted the station reopened for new use as a recreation area.

The development application to be lodged with the council will prepare the station for that end goal.

As well as filling in the platform and removing unoriginal brickwork, stage one also involves restoration and maintenance of the building.
ALL ABOARD: An artist's impression of what the community proposed for the Newcastle station precinct. The state government says this concept is not part of the current development application.

ALL ABOARD: An artist's impression of what the community proposed for the Newcastle station precinct. The state government says this concept is not part of the current development application.

It will be rust and bird-proofed, with damaged windows, doors and renders to be fixed.

Upon completion, the former station will have three separate buildings – as it was originally.

Mr Cassel said the works would allow the area to be used by the public in the short term, with permanent uses for the precinct to be decided through an expressions of interest process next year.

Depending on council approval, is hoped the area could be opened to the public later this year.

The government said the restoration works should not be affected by the rezoning of corridor land – which is still to be decided.

According to a state government report on future uses for the station, the community proposed a piazza, an outdoor cinema, an art precinct and eateries. A majority of respondents rejected the use of the station as accommodation.

Meanwhile, the future of Civic station is still an unknown, with a community survey showing respondents were split on whether it should be demolished or reused.

http://www.theherald.com.au/story/47...vealed/?cs=305
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Old June 13th, 2017, 11:03 AM   #3623
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NBN News piece about Highpoint Charlestown including video



http://www.nbnnews.com.au/2017/06/13...t-development/
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Old June 17th, 2017, 12:59 PM   #3624
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Hunter Street mall redevelopment a step closer
TIM CONNELL

16 Jun 2017, 5 p.m.

Mall redevelopment a step closer
NEW LIFE: The old David Jones building on Hunter Street will be restored with an eye to the past, under plans lodged by Iris Capital. Picture: Iris Capital
Mall redevelopment a step closer
NEW LIFE: The old David Jones building on Hunter Street will be restored with an eye to the past, under plans lodged by Iris Capital. Picture: Iris Capital

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NEW LIFE: The old David Jones building on Hunter Street will be restored with an eye to the past, under plans lodged by Iris Capital. Picture: Iris Capital
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THE redevelopment of Newcastle’s Hunter Street mall could begin early next year, after its backer Iris Capital lodged a development application with Newcastle council on Friday.

Iris chief executive Sam Arnaout said the latest milestone for the East End mixed-use site, over four city blocks between the old David Jones building and Newcomen Street, marked “a very important day for Newcastle”.

“This is one of the most exciting times in Newcastle’s rich history. The people of Newcastle have watched its CBD decay for several decades and we have a real opportunity to create a legacy for Novocastrians for generations to come,” Mr Arnaout said.

“It’s exciting to be the one bringing that to fruition.”

The NSW government announced last November that Sydney-based Iris had bought the 1.66 hectare site from the listed GPT Group and state-owned UrbanGrowth NSW.

Iris is understood to have paid about $40 million.

The master-planned East End will be released in “boutique stages” of one, two and three-bedroom apartments totaling about 500, with about 4,900 square metres of mainly boutique shops and cafes at ground level and 2,700 square metres of office space.

One of East End’s architectural jewels, Mr Arnaout said, will be the historic David Jones building, to be renamed the Scotts building and restored with an awning in keeping with its original design.

The car park behind the building will make way for a new street within the development, though the state government’s half-billion-dollar city revitalisation has been criticised for a lack of parking.
UNITED FRONT: Iris chief executive Sam Arnaout, UrbanGrowth NSW program director Michael Cassel and Newcastle lord mayor Nuatali Nelmes last November. Picture: Marina Neil

UNITED FRONT: Iris chief executive Sam Arnaout, UrbanGrowth NSW program director Michael Cassel and Newcastle lord mayor Nuatali Nelmes last November. Picture: Marina Neil

Colliers International director Dane Crawford, who is managing sales for East End, said he expected a variety of buyers.

“Owner-occupiers will be drawn to the unique design concept and apartments on offer. Many will be the downsizers and empty-nesters currently driving strong demand for good quality three-bedroom apartments,” Mr Crawford said.

“Naturally, the balance will be made up with investors looking to capitalise on Newcastle’s rapid increase in desirability.”

Iris’s development application is a step towards ending the long stalemate over the mall, which has included debate over building height limits ultimately imposed by Newcastle council.

Mr Arnaout said the planning approval process had been “rigorous, tough and contested”.

“The Newcastle community and council helped shape the development, and we respect the decisions that were made before Iris Capital purchased the site,” he said.

“I think the design not only respects the city’s heritage but works with it. We’ve selected award-winning international architects to deliver a world-class design.”

http://www.theherald.com.au/story/47...closer/?cs=305
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Old June 19th, 2017, 02:20 PM   #3625
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render of Iris Capital's Newcastle East End plan.

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Old June 24th, 2017, 12:06 PM   #3626
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'Unprecedented': inside the billion-dollar construction boom changing the face of Newcastle
Brodie [email protected]_Owen

23 Jun 2017, 9:30 p.m.

NEWCASTLE is a construction zone, with more than $1.6 billion worth of development set to change the city’s skyline.

Construction activity in the city centre has ramped up in recent months as work on the light rail network coincides with a number of major projects, particularly in the West End, breaking ground and taking shape.

Nearly $900 million worth of construction is already under way, with the state government’s light rail and interchange projects taking the lion’s share of the development pie with a combined value of $583 million.

But the private sector is also flourishing – and developers say the activity taking place is “unprecedented” in Newcastle’s history.

The Newcastle Herald can reveal more than $640 million worth of development is still in the pipeline, with private sector investment in residential projects set to overtake government-funded projects over the next two years.

Among the big-ticket projects slated to start are the $222 million redevelopment of Hunter Street Mall, the $73 million Verve Residences in Newcastle West and the $71 million Railway Lane Apartments in Wickham.

According to Cordell property data, a further $274 million worth of other projects have either been approved, waiting approval or in the planning stage.

Major residential projects currently under construction include the $44 million aged care facility and $26 million Holiday Inn Hotel, both on King Street, the $13 million Aero Apartments on Hunter Street and the $10 million Bishopsgate Apartments in Wickham.

[IMG]http://nnimgt-a.akamaihd.net/transfo..._h678_fmax.jpg[/IMG]

TOOLBOX TALK: Workers on site at the Aero Apartments development. Picture: Max Mason-Hubers

The hive of activity, however, is not limited to high rise.

The Newcastle Interchange at Wickham is inching closer to completion and work has begun on a light rail depot across Stewart Avenue, in the place of the former Wickham train station.

Work to prepare the track for the Supercars race later this year has crews busy along Wharf Road and Watt Street.

And Newcastle council’s $36 million Bathers Way project continues at South Newcastle beach, King Edward Park and up to Strzelecki Lookout.

Colliers International, a leading property manager in the Hunter, said the city should expect to see cranes in the sky for at least the next five years.

“There has never been so many tradies in town,” Colliers’ Newcastle director Chris Chapman said. “The coffee shops used to be full of young professionals; now they’re filled with tradies. And this is only the beginning, we’re only just getting started.”

Property Council Hunter director Andrew Fletcher said demand for residential property in Newcastle was “the strongest in history”.

“We’ve seen nearly $2 billion of private investment since the heavy rail line was truncated,” Mr Fletcher said.

Lord Mayor Nuatali Nelmes said the growth was because the council had fostered “strong partnerships” between various levels of government and the private sector. “No other council has been able to do it, but this council has,” she said.

As new works get under way, all eyes are on how long the current period of growth can be sustained, and whether Novocastrians are comfortable to wear the inevitable pain before the gain.

‘Things are really taking off now’



BEFORE: Core Project Group directors Tom Elliot and Jamie Lind are riding the wave of Newcastle's construction boom. Picture: Max Mason-Hubers

For a long time, Newcastle had “flat feet”. Now it’s running full steam ahead.

That’s the view of Tom Elliot and Jamie Lind, who are a success story from the city’s building boom and responsible for millions of dollars worth of construction in the West End.

The duo head up local firm Core Project Group, which was established six years ago, quickly rising to become one of the city’s leading builders.

The company’s major projects are clustered within a short walk from each other – a $44 million aged care building, $4 million five-storey child care centre, both on King Street, and a $21 million office block on Stewart Avenue.

They say they are projects that will reshape the West End, bringing people and jobs for years to come.

Mr Lind said the level of construction activity in Newcastle was “unprecedented”.

“Newcastle has got a really positive vibe about it at the moment,” he said. “We had flat feet for a while there, but things are really taking off at the moment. For so long, Newcastle hasn’t been led well, but the state and federal governments put their money where their mouth is and kicked it all off.”

Mr Lind said the redevelopment of the Newcastle Court House, which was followed by the light rail project and new university building, sparked a flurry of construction activity in the city centre.



AFTER: What Core Project Group's Stewart Avenue development will look like.

“People realised there was investment happening here, and they wanted to be where the action was,” he said.

But with renewed investment came increased competition, particularly from out of town firms, which puts pressure on builders to remain cost competitive.

There is also pressure to attract skilled labour, Mr Lind said.

“There’s a shortage of it over the state,” he said, adding that builders were adapting their techniques in response.

Mr Elliot said it was his hope that healthy development activity continued beyond the next five years.

“We should keep the momentum going, but we shouldn’t necessarily be relying on the government to do that for us,” he said.

“We need to keep promoting Newcastle as a great place to live and work.”

Pain before gain: business chamber



DIVERSION: Hunter Business Chamber has warned of pain in the CBD as new projects take off. Picture: Max Mason-Hubers

THE Hunter Business Chamber has warned of “difficult days” ahead for CBD businesses as the city undergoes intense construction activity.

But chamber president Bob Hawes, who was formerly the head of the Hunter Development Corporation, says other businesses will flourish as a result of increased demand for construction material.

It is the double-edged sword the business chamber is trying to manage as concern grows amongst CBD retailers about their survival once new major works begin.

With Supercars and Bathers Way works in full swing, this week East End businesses met to discuss the financial situation confronting them.

Mr Hawes admitted many Hunter Street retailers could experience a similar situation, particularly after street blocks begin to close for light rail works, but said there was no “one size fits all” solution.

“Businesses who rely on the regularity of foot traffic, that’s where you will see disruption and some concern,” he said. “[But] it’s a like a fitness program, it will be the pain before the gain.”



A map showing development activity in the Newcastle CBD. Picture: Colliers International

Mr Hawes said it was key businesses knew what was coming and when.

Meanwhile, the Property Council has signalled that Newcastle may be experiencing “two-speed” growth.

The industry advocacy group said there was a deficit of 30,000 homes in the Lower Hunter.

“Despite all the inner-city apartments, we still have a chronic housing shortage across the Hunter,” Property Council Hunter director Andrew Fletcher said, adding that the “biggest threat” to Newcastle’s growth was housing affordability.

http://www.theherald.com.au/story/47...s=305#slide=38
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Old June 24th, 2017, 12:15 PM   #3627
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Round of applause for iconic city building
23 Jun 2017, 7 a.m.

ITS proper name is the City Administration Centre.

Some call it “the champagne cork”, “the wedding cake” or “the shuttlecock”.

To Newcastle City Council veteran Graham Barrie, it’s always been the “Roundhouse”.

“Even back in the early 80s, our staff indoor soccer teams were called the Roundhouse Rebels and the Roundhouse Rats," Mr Barrie says.

Whatever your name for it, the iconic building celebrates a milestone on Friday – 40 years since its official opening on June 23, 1977.

Mr Barrie had already been with the council for 10 years when the building opened and says it has always been a source of pride.

"Everyone was excited about having this round building there," he said. "It was this unique design and there was no other building in Newcastle like it."

Newcastle Herald history columnist Mike Scanlon said the then Newcastle council deserved credit for having “the foresight to create something totally different back then, something that might, over future decades, still seem modern. As such, I think they succeeded admirably”.

“When finished, although still a controversial design, the innovative building made a bold statement of a city on the march. Its colour matched City Hall's stonework and its deep recessed windows cut down the sun's heat,” Scanlon wrote in 2015.

“The radical circular building was also an engineering marvel. To combat the very high water table, erecting the structure first required virtually building an underground dam and using a mixture, (from memory) of fly ash (from the burning of coal at power stations) and an extremely quick-setting cement slurry to prevent any collapses into the excavation.”

The site was earmarked as early as 1950 for development to ease overcrowding at City Hall.

The then Newcastle Town Clerk, Bill Burges, said at the opening of the city's new circular administration building on June 23, 1977, that it had taken five years of negotiation before any land sale was even considered.

“And even then, the land's owners, the firm of Fred Ash Ltd, would only consent to sell if Newcastle council also bought its 1905 Hunter Street store and its "new" (1925) Burwood Street warehouse,” Scanlon wrote.

The council agreed. Architects Romberg & Boyd combined with Wilson & Suters to tackle the project. The acquisition plan was completed in May 1969 and work began in April 1972 to construct eight storeys above ground plus three levels of basement parking.

Newcastle Lord Mayor Nuatali Nelmes said it was one of the city's landmarks.

"It's testament to the building's original design that it still looks so striking and unique, 40 years after it first opened,” she said.

http://www.theherald.com.au/story/47...cs=305#slide=7
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Old June 24th, 2017, 12:19 PM   #3628
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Newcastle and the Hunter are showing signs of returning to traditional strengths, says report
Joanne McCarthy

20 Jun 2017, 6 a.m.

THE Hunter region, and particularly Newcastle, are showing encouraging signs of returning to the traditional strengths of the pre-mining boom area, says co-author of a report on Australian regions in a post-mining boom, climate change transition era.

Manufacturing employment and investment figures in the coastal half of the Hunter were “a positive”, said State of the Regions co-author Dr Ian Manning, with 23,295 people employed in manufacturing in 2017, compared with 21,499 in 2012 and 17,832 in 2002.

The report was released by the Australian Local Government Association on the eve of its national general assembly in Canberra this week.

Even in the Upper Hunter where the mining boom from 2005 has had its greatest impacts on labour availability and increased employment costs, and the high boom-induced exchange rate devastated many in the non-resource sector, manufacturing continues to employ more than 7000 people, the report showed.

“Manufacturers took a real shock during the mining boom but those that survived are real survivors,” Dr Manning said.

“It’ll take some time yet to convince people the exchange rate is back under control and it will be worth investing in again, but the fact that Newcastle has a manufacturing tradition and a fair amount of intellectual support for that, in addition to a marketing culture, are signs of it going back to its traditional strengths.

“Newcastle can look forward, even if coal disappears suddenly, because it has a diversified economic base and there’s quite a lot to fall back on.”

Newcastle was in direct contrast with its southern manufacturing centre counterpart Wollongong, which State of the Regions report data showed had “failed to diversify out of primary metal smelting”.

The annual report, prepared by the National Institute of Economic and Industry Research, found the mining boom “brought costs as well as benefits”, and “if commodity prices stay around current levels, by 2020 Australia would probably have been better off without the mining boom”.

“Whatever the case may be by 2020, the current reality as the mining boom subsides is that Australia will have to return to knowledge and innovation as the foundation of its prosperity,” the report found.

On a national level the report found that of all industries manufacturing suffered most during the mining boom.

“Hours worked have fallen even more rapidly than in agriculture,” the report found.

“Despite this, the industry remains the most substantial of the trade-exposed industries, generating more hours of work than either agriculture or mining.”

State of the Regions compares current and pre-boom data going back to 1997 to chart productivity, inequality and opportunities for growth both in and between Australia’s 67 regions. The data includes hourly pay rates, household income, household debt, per capita disposable income, property values, construction and employment figures and innovation indicators such as patent registrations.

The lower half of the Hunter centred on Newcastle had an annual average patent registration rate of 146 from 2009 to 2017, giving it a national regional ranking of 21. The inland Hunter had an annual average of 49.1 over the same period, with a national regional ranking of 38. The central Sydney metropolitan area had an annual average of 735.3 patent registrations, with a regional ranking of 2. The figure includes 116.5 “hi tech” registrations per year, and 65.8 information technology registrations.

”Patents is an indication of the amount of research and development that’s going on,” Dr Manning said.

“What it says is a region is one where people are developing new products. What we can say from these figures is that Newcastle is not doing too badly. It’s far from the worst but it should be better and I think it could be better as soon as attention turns to the development of products and services.”

Dr Manning said the State of the Regions report, with its 2017 theme of “Pillars of Regional Growth”, was a challenge to local government.

“Local government needs to get its act together. I’m not exactly sure that Newcastle, Port Stephens, Maitland, Cessnock, Singleton and Lake Macquarie councils are really as vibrant as they should be in a planning for the future sense,” he said.

“What I do observe is that there are now councils, particularly regional councils in Queensland, getting their acts together, maybe because they’ve had a sort of a fright. The downturn in the coal industry has hit much harder in Queensland regional areas than the Hunter.”

http://www.theherald.com.au/story/47...-world/?cs=305
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Old June 27th, 2017, 10:54 AM   #3629
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Stockland announces August opening for next stage at Green Hills
DONNA SHARPE

27 Jun 2017, 5 a.m.



CONSTRUCTION ZONE: Stage one works underway at the Stockland Green Hills redevelopment.

The next stage of the Stockland Green Hills redevelopment will open early August

Stockland announced this week that the redevelopment is on schedule and the next stage will include 17 new retail stores including Bed Bath N’ Table, home decor store Habitania and Darrel Lea as well as 320 additional roof top car parking spaces.

The third stage will open in November with a new full-line Target store and 80 additional specialty stores.

Since unveiling the first stage of the $412 million redevelopment and expansion in April, Stockland has made significant progress with the next stage of the development schedule to open in just weeks.

“We’re delighted to see our customers embracing the new centre so enthusiastically as we continue to transform Stockland Green Hills into an even more vibrant, thriving shopping leisure and entertainment destination that will be the pride of the Hunter,” said Stockland Green Hills Centre Manager Chris Travers.

“We’re making great progress with many more retailers opening in August and more new retailers scheduled to open ahead of Christmas.

“There is much more to come this year for our customers and the community,” he said.

Following customer feedback, Stockland is also working towards opening additional customer amenities, including more toilet facilities as soon as possible and we’ll update the community closer to the confirmed opening date,” Mr Travers said.

“There is an incredible buzz around the centre and we can’t wait to deliver the next stage in August – delivering more exciting new retailers, more services and better entertainment and dining options.”

The redevelopment is on track to generate more than 2600 jobs, including 1350 construction jobs, 1250 direct full time jobs in retail, customer service, hospitality and wider benefits for the regional economy creating 1200 jobs for local suppliers.

On completion mid next year the centre will more than double in size to around 74,000 square metres and will feature the first new David Jones department store in the Hunter, a new 900-seat Hoyts cinema and around 225 tenancies with a new dining and entertainment precinct.

http://www.theherald.com.au/story/47...s=310#slide=22
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Old June 28th, 2017, 10:57 AM   #3630
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Chorus of concern for the Cambridge Hotel's future
CARRIE FELLNER

28 Jun 2017, 7 a.m.



TRANSFORMATION: An impression of what a residential tower could look like on the site of the Cambridge Hotel. It's hoped the developer will keep the pub open.

OVER the decades it has become one of the city’s most beloved live music venues, with the likes of the Screaming Jets, Silverchair and Blink 182 gracing its stage.

But this year could be the swan song for the Cambridge Hotel, with the owners of the watering hole listing it for sale after 25 years.

The Newcastle Herald can reveal the landmark pub on Hunter Street – and an adjoining carpark – is being marketed to developers, with concept plans for a new 153-apartment tower.

But co-owner John Palmieri, a Newcastle-based litigation lawyer, denied the sale would spell last drinks at the venue. He anticipates the pub will form part of the new development, to meet strong demand within the precinct.

“We’re hoping the developer that ultimately acquires it will see fit to make sure they maintain a hotel within the complex,” he said.

“I’m pretty confident that will happen. There would be nothing to replace it in terms of what it can offer.”

Mr Palmieri said it had been a privilege to own what had been a “great asset” for the community and launching pad for young artists.

“It’s got a special place in Newcastle’s history ... [I remember] Silverchair having their album launch there when they were young boys.”

The pub made international headlines in 2015 when US rapper Childish Gambino was booed off stage after a bizarre DJ set.

The sale – through Colliers International – coincides with the redevelopment of the Store building and the westward march of the city’s apartment boom. The concept plan has been designed to show buyers what could be done with the site, which has a 60 metre height limit.

Mr Palmieri purchased the building with two friends in the 1990s, on the advice of late real estate agent Max Street. It was a gamble at the time, he said, because the suburb was the “downtown Beirut” of Newcastle.

“He [Mr Street] saw great potential in Newcastle West. He convinced me there was an opportunity there. It’s taken a long time to come to fruition but he was right,” Mr Palmieri said.

The Cambridge is managed by licensees Russell Richardson and Dru Russell but neither could be reached for comment.

http://www.theherald.com.au/story/47...cs=303#slide=1
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Old July 6th, 2017, 11:49 PM   #3631
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some views from cathedral yesterday
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Old July 8th, 2017, 01:48 PM   #3632
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Aero Apartments hits milestone and becomes Newcastle's tallest - for now
Brodie [email protected]_Owen

6 Jul 2017, 8 p.m.



antage pointThe view from Aero Apartments. Pictures: Marina Neil
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THIS is the view from Newcastle’s tallest building.

And, as Jonathan Craig, director of GWH Build puts it, “it’s come out of nowhere in the last six months”.

The 15-storey Aero Apartments on Hunter Street in Newcastle West has reached a milestone, with the top floor now complete.

The sold-out apartment complex is the latest addition to the city’s skyline, a building which will soon be home to dozens of new residents as the area undergoes rapid transformation as part of a boom that still has some way to go, with the Newcastle Herald revealing last month $640 million worth of city development was still in the pipeline.

It is a boom writ large in the West End.

While giving the Herald a tour of the new development, which is slated for completion in December, Mr Craig pointed out the number of cranes in the sky.

“At the moment we’re the tallest building in Newcastle … but probably for a very short time,” he said.

“That in itself is extremely positive for the city.”

The developers have backed up an industry view that the current building environment is unprecedented in the city, describing the health of the sector as “extremely buoyant”.

And, while admitting it is “crystal ball gazing”, they predicted demand for residential apartments would remain healthy “as long as the investment is there”.

A key reason why GWH bought the Hunter Street site was its proximity to the Newcastle Interchange at Wickham.

“I think people beyond Newcastle are starting to realise how good Newcastle actually is. We’re seeing more money coming in from outside, from an investment perspective,” GWH Build development manager Michael Noonan said.

“While the government is still spending money on infrastructure, there is going to be demand.”

Mr Noonan added that future work to be undertaken by the University of Newcastle would underpin further development in the city.

“There’s still a lot of untapped potential,” he said.

“[The university work] will underpin the rental market. There’s a lot of uni students coming in, they’ll want to live close to where they’re going to uni.

“There’s a fairly strong vibe at the moment and we don’t see that stopping anytime soon.”

A three-bedroom apartment at Aero sold for between $870,000 and $964,000.

The majority were local buyers, the developers said.

The total value of the development, according to Cordell property data, was $13 million.

More than $900 million worth of development that is already under way in the CBD, with the lion’s share being light rail works.

http://www.theherald.com.au/story/47...cs=305#slide=1
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Old July 8th, 2017, 01:57 PM   #3633
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whats the crane count for the hunter does any one know
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Old July 9th, 2017, 03:13 PM   #3634
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Three currently, one for West End, one for Pilotis and one for Aero, the only other cranes Iv also seen outside the CBD is one in Warners Bay for Shearwater and another in Belmont.
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Old July 9th, 2017, 03:27 PM   #3635
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Cell.Phone View Post
Three currently, one for West End, one for Pilotis and one for Aero, the only other cranes Iv also seen outside the CBD is one in Warners Bay for Shearwater and another in Belmont.
how many at green hills
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Old July 9th, 2017, 09:21 PM   #3636
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Aero isnt tallest in newasctle. its 45m
Mccaffery still tallest at 53m

http://www.skyscrapercenter.com/comp...t=Show+Results
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Old July 13th, 2017, 12:32 AM   #3637
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if you like the beatles. there career in 5mins by a drummer on newcastle rooftop awesome
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tTnxmn2jWjo
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Old July 18th, 2017, 11:57 AM   #3638
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Uni of Newcastle Hunter Street Building nearing completion. Few pics





https://twitter.com/David_Threlfo/st...28349881372672
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