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Old July 22nd, 2017, 12:14 PM   #201
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Originally Posted by Steve Ellwood View Post
Courtesy of today's Hexham Courant @ http://www.hexham-courant.co.uk/news...16577b517b2-ds
World class dream is realised at Sill
21 July 2017



A STUNNING multi-million pound visitor centre on Hadrian's Wall welcomed its first visitors for a behind the scenes tour this week.

The Sill National Landscape Discovery Centre, built over two years at Once Brewed near Bardon Mill, at a cost of £14.8m, will not officially open its doors until July 29. But on Wednesday, the Northumberland National Park Authority, which has orchestrated the scheme, invited the Courant and other organisations for a sneak preview of a facility.

The authority's chairman Glen Sanderson spoke of his delight at the launch of the Sill, a project which was first mooted over a decade ago. He said: "We are incredibly proud of everyone who has been involved with the project getting to this stage, and we are extremely grateful to local people for buying into the scheme and what we aim to achieve here." Mr Sanderson said the local economy would benefit from the Sill, which was expected to attract 100,000 visitors per year, and provide almost 120 job opportunities.

Chief executive Tony Gates said: "We've always had a world class landscape here, and now we have a world class facility to show it off. It is an incredible vehicle for people to visit the countryside and explore our natural and cultural heritage." Mr Gates said that the building would be far more than just a visitor centre. It would provide educational opportunities for school groups, with dedicated classrooms, and exhibition areas telling the story of life within local landscapes.

Office space would be provided for businesses to operate from the Sill, while the building's impressive green roof had been covered with grassland from different parts of Northern England. Over 80 youth hostel beds will be provided in the Sill's accommodation block, while there will also be dining facilities and a shop.

Read more @ http://www.hexham-courant.co.uk/news...16577b517b2-ds

I saw a piece about this on local TV the other night,---and it looks an excellent facility,--I wish it every success,---cheers.
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Old July 27th, 2017, 12:48 PM   #202
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The Sill in Northumberland opens its doors this weekend - here's what you need to know

This Chronicle Live website view on the opening of the Sill, article from 26/07/17

EXTRACT

The Sill is a state of the art new visitors centre in Northumberland National Park and is expected to attract 100,000 people a year

It’s a big weekend for Northumberland and its visitors as its newest state-of-the-art attraction opens.

The Sill throws open its doors on Saturday and looks set to be a major hub for anyone visiting Northumberland National Park, with 100,000 people expected each year.




The new Sill National Landscape Discovery Centre (Images: newcastle chronicle)

Where is it?

The Sill National Landscape Discovery Centre is at Bardon Mill, near Hexham, Northumberland. GPS is NE47 7AN.

Telephone: 01434 344417

What is it?

The Sill is a new visitor attraction which aims to excite and inspire people of all ages to explore the landscape, history, culture and heritage of Northumberland.

The Sill features a new landscape exhibition, modern learning and event spaces, a local food café, a world-class Youth Hostel, a rural business hub, and a shop specialising in local crafts and produce.

When is it open?

It will be open daily from 9.30am to 6pm from Saturday, July 29.


Full article, includes 1 min 35 second video on http://www.chroniclelive.co.uk/whats...ekend-13387352

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Old July 27th, 2017, 06:51 PM   #203
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This isn't exclusively regional roads so slightly off topic but I rather liked it:


Huffington Post in turn from Sasha Trubetskoy,at the University of Chicago

Quote:
Back in the day, the journey from Londinium (London) to Eboracum (York) would have taken five days by carriage. Thankfully its now just a couple of hours by train.
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Old August 1st, 2017, 08:43 AM   #204
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Quote:
This isn't exclusively regional roads so slightly off topic but I rather liked it:


Huffington Post in turn from Sasha Trubetskoy,at the University of Chicago
Those are the Roman main roads. There's plenty of little ones that aren't included, such as the route from Corstopitum to Epiacum and then to Penrithium. The Maiden Way's not shown either.
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Old August 8th, 2017, 01:45 PM   #205
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One man's mission to raise the profile of Hadrian's Wall on Tyneside

From today's Chronicle Live, copyright NCJMedia Ltd @ http://www.chroniclelive.co.uk/news/...ofile-13445312
One man's mission to raise the profile of Hadrian's Wall on Tyneside
Tony Henderson 8 August 2017


View of Hadran's Wall, looking west from what is now Byker (Image: Handout)

Carving its way through the striking Northumberland landscape, the rural stretches of Hadrian’s Wall command most of the attention.

But now archaeologist Nick Hodgson has set out to raise the profile of the Wall running through Tyneside. “Some of the most surprising and important advances in our knowledge of Hadrian’s Wall in recent years has taken place on Tyneside,” says Nick, archaeology projects manager at Tyne Wear Museums. Even though the Wall is so visible in its central sections in Northumberland, as far as archaeology is concerned many of the most important discoveries recently have been in the urban areas. This is partly due to more opportunities for excavation in advance of development schemes.

An example is the discovery at Byker and Throckley in Newcastle of defensive pits, which would have been filled with an impenetrable tangle of sharpened branches, in between the Wall and its ditch.

Experts have argued over how the Wall worked. Was it a defensive barrier against raiders or larger scale attacks, or a “Customs post” system of controlling movement in and out of Roman territory? Another question is what happened to the native population when this immense structure – the most massively-built of any Roman frontier barrier – began to rise in the landscape. We have found out a great deal more in the last few years about the native population and the effect the Wall had on them,” says Nick.

Nick has written a new book, Hadrian’s Wall on Tyneside, published by Tyne Wear Museums at £4.99 to celebrate WallQuest’s achievements and, he says, “ to show residents and visitors to Tyneside the wealth of Roman archaeology under their feet.”

Read more @ http://www.chroniclelive.co.uk/news/...ofile-13445312
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Old August 21st, 2017, 11:29 AM   #206
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This from the News & Star,--

Star of TV's Time Team to lead dig at Roman fort in Cumbria




Star of TV's Time Team to lead dig at Roman fort in Cumbria

K201699 Epiacum. Epiacum Roman site near Alston.

A hidden gem believed to be the highest stone-built Roman fort in Britain is preparing for an exciting month of visits and activities.

Epiacum Roman Fort, near Alston, will welcome archaeologist Stewart Ainsworth, known for his appearances on TV show Time Team, from September 8 to 10.

Mr Ainsworth will lead a landscape archaeology masterclass at Epiacum, during which he will help enthusiasts read and interpret over 2,000 years of history at the site.

Read more http://www.newsandstar.co.uk/news/St...15076e839dd-ds
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Old August 22nd, 2017, 07:16 PM   #207
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Last edited by Steve Ellwood; August 23rd, 2017 at 12:15 PM.
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Old August 22nd, 2017, 07:20 PM   #208
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Fortifying Hadrian’s Wall for the future

Courtesy of the Newcastle University web site @ http://www.ncl.ac.uk/press/news/2017/08/hadrianswall/
Fortifying Hadrian’s Wall for the future
Published on: 22 August 2017



Built to protect the Roman Empire from barbarians, Hadrian’s Wall is now facing newer threats. Parts of the famous frontier are deteriorating due to more modern problems including severe weather, wear and tear caused by tourism, damage caused by invasive plants, and erosion by animals.

Academics from Newcastle University’s School of History, Classics and Archaeology will be identifying a number of locations which need attention at the World Heritage Site – and they will be enlisting the help of a volunteer army to help them protect it.

he sites, which are spread across the length of the Britain’s finest Roman monument, include Roman cemeteries and the enigmatic earthwork known as the Vallum.The University team will train the volunteers in skills to help assess and prevent the sites deteriorating beyond repair.

This will include 3D survey with terrestrial laser scanning of parts of the ancient monument to understand more about its condition, conservation work, limited archaeological excavations and geological work to analyse and map the kinds of stone used in the Wall.

Project lead, Professor Sam Turner, Head of the School of History, Classics and Archaeology, said: “This project will give different people interested in the Wall and its landscape the chance to work together. We are very excited to have the opportunity - thanks in part to National Lottery players - to take practical steps that will help conserve the Wall and better understand our shared heritage.”

The aim is that by the time the project ends in 2021, the team of trained Wall Volunteers will be ready to continue the work the project has started.

Read more @ http://www.ncl.ac.uk/press/news/2017/08/hadrianswall/

Cc Newcastle University - Developments
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Old August 25th, 2017, 12:58 PM   #209
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Roman remains found on new housing site

From the Newcastle City Council web site @ https://www.newcastle.gov.uk/news/ro...w-housing-site
Roman remains found on new housing site
25 August 2017


Photo credit: The Archaeological Practice. Archaeologists revealing walls of Roman buildings discovered on site.

Remains discovered at a Newcastle City Council and Leazes Homes housing development have been described as “perhaps the most significant find in the region for over 50 years” by Richard Carlton, the archaeologist who unearthed them.

When work on the new development in the Benwell area of the city began it was no surprise when Roman remains were discovered but what was surprising was the type and scale of what was found. Although small scale archaeological trenching was carried out before the building work began it was only when a local firm, the Archaeologist Practice, carried out a detailed excavation of the site as it was being prepared for build that the real importance of the find became apparent.

The Vicus, or civilian settlement, they found is located to the West and South of Condercum Fort and includes a number of open fronted buildings, cobbled surfaces and water channels indicating that this was the commercial or industrial area of the settlement. What makes this site particularly special is that unlike other vicus buildings excavated in Newcastle these buildings were made of stone rather than timber. One of the buildings has substantial buttresses indicating that it was probably a two storey warehouse – the first of its kind to be found in Newcastle. As well as the buildings the archaeologists found coins and Roman pottery including an almost complete amphora, a vessel that was used to transport liquids such as wine and olive oil. While the finds are still being analysed they are believed to date back to the second or third century and it is hoped they will improve our understanding of what life was like for people who living under Roman rule.

Keepmoat Regeneration, part of the ENGIE group, who are developing the site on behalf of the Council and affordable housing provider Leazes Homes have resumed work on the site, which will deliver a mix of 32 new two and three bedroom homes at affordable rent, but plans are in place to stop work again if more remains are found.

Councillor Kim McGuinness, Newcastle City Council’s Cabinet Member for Culture and Communities, said: “Although we knew there was likely to be Roman remains it wasn’t until they were uncovered that we realised the importance of the site. We believe these finds could be of national significance. We are working closely with the developers and archaeologist so the remains can be carefully examined and analysed. We also hope to raise funds so some of the smaller artefacts can be put on display in the local community for everyone to see."

Read more @ https://www.newcastle.gov.uk/news/ro...w-housing-site


Cc Remembering HISTORIC NEWCASTLE - Old Photos, Maps, even Stories . . .
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Old August 30th, 2017, 11:44 AM   #210
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This from the News & Star,--

£1.3m to be ploughed into conserving Hadrian's Wall



A lottery funding boost of £1.3m will be invested in essential conservation work on Hadrian's Wall.

Parts of the Roman Wall have deteriorated due to severe weather conditions, wear and tear caused by tourism, damage caused by invasive plants, and erosion by animals.

But now the National Lottery has awarded cash from its Heritage Lottery Fund for essential studies and maintenance work to be carried out.

Read more http://www.newsandstar.co.uk/news/13...f1cc3209014-ds
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Old September 6th, 2017, 11:20 AM   #211
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This from the News & Star,--

£1.3m plan to create flagship family attraction at Roman fort in Cumbria



A £1.3m project that will see a Roman fort march into a new era has won political praise.

English Heritage's team at Birdoswald, near Brampton, have plans for a landmark upgrade to the attraction.

Supporters say the work is designed to make the attraction a "flagship family-friendly" site.
It will include enhanced educational assets for school visits and overall better visitor facilities.

Penrith and the Border MP Rory Stewart was briefed on the project by English Heritage's regional head of projects and performance Simon Bean, area manager Lynn Rylance and site manager Vic Cunningham.

Read more http://www.newsandstar.co.uk/news/13...3a6105ba6f0-ds
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Old September 10th, 2017, 07:03 PM   #212
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Exciting new Hadrian's Wall find likened to lottery win by archaeologists

Courtesy of today's Chronicle Live, copyright NCJMedia Ltd @ http://www.chroniclelive.co.uk/news/...-find-13598616
Exciting new Hadrian's Wall find likened to lottery win by archaeologists
Mike Kelly 10 September 2017


Vindolanda in Northumberland (Image: Newcastle Chronicle)

A major new find of Roman artefacts in the North East has been likened to winning the lottery by archaeologists.

Thousands of a objects have been discovered in a barracks beneath the fourth-century fort of Vindolanda, south of Hadrian ’s Wall near Hexham in Northumberland. It is one of the site’s earliest barracks and dates from around 105AD, which is before Emperor Hadrian began the 73-mile defensive barrier in 122AD. The find includes two extremely rare cavalry swords – one of them complete, still with its wooden scabbard, hilt and pommel – and two wooden toy swords. One has a gemstone in its pommel.

Other weapons, including cavalry lances, arrowheads and ballista bolts were also left behind on the barracks floor and their discovery has also generated a bit of a mystery for those at the dig.

Dr Andrew Birley, Director of Excavations at Vindolanda, said: “You can imagine the circumstances where you could conceive leaving one sword behind rare as it is…. but two? Both blades came from separate rooms, and are likely to have belonged to different people. One theory is that the garrison was forced to leave in a hurry, and in their haste they left not only the swords but also a great number of other perfectly serviceable items which would have had great value in their time.”

The latest discoveries cap a momentous few weeks of discoveries at Vindolanda. Test pit excavations, below the stone foundations of the last stone fortress revealed a layer of black, sweet smelling and perfectly preserved anaerobic, oxygen free, soils in an area where they were completely unexpected. Hidden in this soil were the timber walls and floors, fences, pottery and animal bones, from the abandonment of a Roman cavalry barrack. The excavated rooms included stables for horses, living accommodation, ovens and fireplaces. While excavating the material from the corner of one of the living rooms the tip of a thin and sharp iron blade was found resting in its wooden scabbard. Further work revealed the whole sword.

Read more @ http://www.chroniclelive.co.uk/news/...-find-13598616
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Old September 11th, 2017, 11:00 AM   #213
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This from the News & Star,--

Volunteers get hands dirty in Roman dig



An army of volunteers donned their wellies and got their hands dirty in the search for hidden Roman treasure.

Dozens of people turned up at Carlisle Cricket Club over the weekend to be part of a massive archaeological dig.

It has emerged that the site was once home to a fourth century Roman bathhouse. Efforts are now underway to unearth some of its hidden treasures, which could be of global importance.

Read more http://www.newsandstar.co.uk/news/Vo...cd50acb4dc7-ds
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Old September 16th, 2017, 05:30 PM   #214
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Roman road unearthed at Corbridge

Courtesy of the Hexham Courant @ http://www.hexham-courant.co.uk/news...61eee5443aa-ds
Roman road unearthed at Corbridge
15 September 2017



A COMMUNITY archaeology group has unearthed evidence of a long lost Roman road.

It had long been assumed there was once a road linking Roman Corbridge with its cavalry garrison to the well-established fort of Epiacum (known in recent times as Whitley Castle), near Alston.

And two members of Altogether Archaeology have now unearthed a road that, while it doesn’t run all the way to Epiacum, does head south-west out of the village. Martin Green and Greg Finch had long known of the rumoured road.

Greg said: “There’s often been speculation there was a road leading into Corbridge from the south-west. A book published in the 1730s contained a map with a line drawn from Corbridge to Whitley Castle/Epiacum and since then, people have claimed to find bits of Roman pottery and the like on nearby riverbanks. It was all highly speculative and it was dismissed, because there were no other signs.”

That was until the advent of LIDAR surveys around a decade ago. The ‘light detection and ranging’ laser beams, usually emitted from a light aircraft, capture images of even the smallest lumps and bumps in the landscape in a way traditional aerial photographs can’t. When the duo got hold of the LIDAR images of Hexhamshire and the Allen Valleys, they homed in on an area midway between Hexham and Allendale.

Read more @ http://www.hexham-courant.co.uk/news...61eee5443aa-ds
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Old September 20th, 2017, 03:50 PM   #215
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Fancy taking part in an excavation of a Roman fort? You can and here's how

From today's Chronicle Live, copyright NCJMedia Ltd @ http://www.chroniclelive.co.uk/news/...roman-13646637
Fancy taking part in an excavation of a Roman fort? You can and here's how
Tony Henderson 20 September 2017


The aerial view of Epiacum Roman fort and its setting, with the proposed dig test pits marked by the yellow dots (Image: Handout)

The first dig for 60 years is set to start at a Roman fort in Northumberland dubbed one of the best preserved in the empire.

People are being invited to join in the excavations, which start on Saturday, at Epiacum fort, near Slaggyford in the South Tyne Valley. The diamond-shaped fort is on the Maiden Way Roman road and halfway between Hadrian’s Wall in Northumberland and another Roman base near Stainmore on the border of Cumbria, County Durham and North Yorkshire. It is believed that Epiacium was built to oversee the traffic in lead and silver from the Alston ore field.

An aerial survey by English Heritage revealed signs of more than 3,000 years of human habitation around the fort site.

They include evidence of:
* Prehistoric roundhouses and settlements.
* The eight-acre fort with its associated civilian settlement and a possible parade ground.
* Possible Dark-Age long houses and medieval settlements
* At least six bastles, or fortified farmhouses.
* 17th – 19th Century drift and pit mines with spoil heaps and 19th century shielings, or shelters.
“Is the large rectangular shape a Roman parade ground or an early timber fort? Are the hollows and humps a medieval village? Support our test pit digs and find out,” said Elaine Edgar, who lives at Castle Nook Farm at the site.

She set up Epiacum Heritage Ltd as an independent, not-for-profit organisation responsible for the stewardship, management and development of the scheduled monument fort, and which works to explore and develop the site for public participation and access. There will be a charge to diggers of £30 a day for taking part in the excavations from September 23 and 24, and from September 27 - 30 and October 1. There will be family field days on September 23 and 24 with half day sessions available, for accompanied six – 16 year olds at £8 child and £15 adult per half day.

Read more @ http://www.chroniclelive.co.uk/news/...roman-13646637
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Old September 23rd, 2017, 03:22 PM   #216
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Coopers Stdios - Coopers Auction Mart

A short section of Hadrian's Wall was discovered under Coopers Studio on Westgate Road, Newcastle which confirmed the alignment of the Wall.

These photographs taken during a visit to the premises during the Heritage Open Days, 9th September 2017.

Evidently it was considered to have the Wall on public view but due to various reason, such as dampness etc have left it concealed from view.










Images hosted on https://www.flickr.com/photos/steve-...57688723797756
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Old September 29th, 2017, 03:06 PM   #217
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Nighthawk raiders using metal detectors to plunder historic items from Roman town

Courtesy of today's Chronicle Live, copyright NCJMedia Ltd @ http://www.chroniclelive.co.uk/news/...ctors-13688090
Nighthawk raiders using metal detectors to plunder historic items from Roman town
By Tony Henderson 29 September 2017


Corbridge Roman Town - Hadrian's Wall (Image: The Historic England Archive)

Nighthawks using metal detectors are stealing objects from the site of what is the only known major Roman town in the North East.

Archaeologists from Historic England have found evidence of damage being caused by illegal metal detectorists or ‘nighthawks’ in the scheduled, protected area around the remains of the visitor-attraction Roman Town of Corbridge which forms part of the Hadrian’s Wall world heritage site in Northumberland.

The Roman Town of Corbridge is a scheduled monument, which means that it is protected by law against ground disturbance or unlicensed metal detecting. The illegal operations are taking place at night the farmland protected area around the English heritage town site. This year – and also the last two years – nighthawks have moved in after ploughing has taken place, which can bring objects closer to the surface and within range of metal detectors. The latest holes left by the nighthawkers were discovered by English Heritage staff 50 metres to the south of their site.

Mike Collins, inspector of ancient monuments for Hadrian’s Wall at Historic England in the North East, said: “Corbridge Roman town has been targeted repeatedly over the years by nighthawks. We are working closely with colleagues from English Heritage and Northumbria Police to combat the theft of historic objects and artefacts from the site. Nighthawking is a serious offence that robs us all of the information and understanding of our past that the Roman town at Corbridge can give. This is a crime pure and simple. They are stealing the information, heritage and understanding that this material can give us and it is immensely frustrating.”

The wider protected area of about a mile around the core of the English Heritage Roman town site contains the homes and shops of the Roman urban population who lived at Corbridge. “Aerial images and geophysical surveys are showing what an important urban site we are dealing with at Corbridge, which appears to be the only major Roman town in the North East, with its sophisticated centre,” said Mike.

Read more and see video @ http://www.chroniclelive.co.uk/news/...ctors-13688090
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Old September 30th, 2017, 11:07 AM   #218
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There will always be unscrupulous people,--thankfully they are a small minority,--unfortunately though--these people are spoiling and damaging these Historical remains.
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Old September 30th, 2017, 11:29 AM   #219
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Revolutionary discovery centre, The Sill, inspiring the next generation right on our doorstep

Courtesy of the Chronicle Live, copyright NCJMedia Ltd @ http://www.chroniclelive.co.uk/news/...iring-13681643
Revolutionary discovery centre, The Sill, inspiring the next generation right on our doorstep
By Michael Muncaster 30 September 2017


The Sill National Landscape Discovery Centre at Once Brewed in Northumberland National Park (Image: newcastle chronicle)

Surrounded by miles of beautiful countryside, Britain’s only national landscape discovery centre is thriving.

The Sill – named after nearby ridge the Great Whin Sill – is one of the biggest projects ever undertaken by an English national park. The £14.8m state-of-the-art visitor centre features exhibitions celebrating the county’s landscape, culture and heritage. There is also a 86-bed youth hostel, rural business hub, 90-seater café, gift shop and learning and event spaces, which all overlook Northumberland National Park.

Since opening on July 29, a staggering 28,500 people walked through the doors of the attraction in August. And at the hostel, which costs an average of £17 a night, more than 2,000 guests stayed during the month.

Tony Gates, chief executive of the Northumberland National Park Authority, said: “The centre has been transformational for us. It has been a really successful start and the feedback we’ve had shows 98% of visitors said they’ve had a positive experience. When we opened in the height of the holidays we had lots of families and we are getting more people who are retired too. We are now getting into the period where are seeing different types of people like university students and school children using the building. It is a tremendous building in a tremendous place and they have enjoyed what we have to offer.”

Read more and see video @ http://www.chroniclelive.co.uk/news/...iring-13681643
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Old October 3rd, 2017, 05:54 PM   #220
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A part of Hadrian's Wall has been found in Newcastle city centre, shedding new light on its route

From today's Chronicle Live, copyright NCJMedia Ltd @ http://www.chroniclelive.co.uk/news/...found-13705748
A part of Hadrian's Wall has been found in Newcastle city centre, shedding new light on its route
By Tony Henderson 3 October 2017


Simon Brooks showing the section of Hadrian's Wall that's been found on Westgate Road outside the Mining Institute (Image: Newcastle Chronicle)

The section of the wall has been revealed outside the Mining Institute on Westgate Road. It was reportedly last seen during an excavation on the site in 1952.

But Simon Brooks, acting general manager of the Mining Institute, said: “There was some controversy about whether the Wall had been found. A lot of people were sceptical but now we have proof positive and we are delighted.”

Site investigations are being carried out by Newcastle-based The Archaeological Practice. Archaeologist Alan Rushworth said: “Various people had cast doubts about what had been found in 1952 but this now adds a lot more precision about the course of the wall.”

The wall has also been previously located under the Coopers Mart building at the bottom of Westgate Road, now occupied by Ryder Architecture. The remains of a milecastle - a small Roman fort - have also been found near Newcastle Arts Centre on Westgate Road.

The investigations have also uncovered the 6ft wide foundations of Westmoreland House, which was demolished to make way for the Mining Institute building in Neville Hall, which opened in 1872. The origins of the house, which was the property of the powerful Neville family, date from the 14th century and what has been revealed is probably the base of a wing from the 17th century. A dig inside the institute has revealed a cellar of Westmoreland House, which had been filled in with slag to level the ground after the demolition of the building probably from industrial works in what is now known as the Stephenson Quarter. Mixed with slag is waste such as animal bones, oyster shells and clay pipes.

“It looks like they are using whatever they could get their hands on to fill in the cellars,” said Alan.


Read more and see video @ http://www.chroniclelive.co.uk/news/...found-13705748


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