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Old September 3rd, 2012, 02:31 PM   #41
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Hadrian’s Wall lit up with Connecting Light artwork
by David Whetstone, The Journal, September 3rd 2012



THOUSANDS of people turned out at the weekend to see 'Connecting Light', one of the most ambitious and challenging projects of the Cultural Olympiad. Billed as a line of pulsating colours stretching the 73-mile length of Hadrian’s Wall, it cost £300,000 and comprised 400 tethered balloons lit internally by LED lights. At the official launch on Friday night at the Roman Army Museum at Greenhead, Cumbria, Linda Tuttiett, chief executive of Hadrian’s Wall Heritage, told an invited audience she had been overjoyed to read the submission by the New York art collective YesYesNo and its representative Zach Lieberman, who duly won the commission.

“His ideas fitted so closely with how we wanted to portray Hadrian’s Wall,” she said. A structure built by the Romans to keep different peoples apart was transformed by Connecting Light into a modern means of communication."

In the fading light you could see them for what they were, inflated white beachballs on scaffolding poles, their technical wizardry hidden from view. As darkness fell and the messages started coming, the balloons started to flash – red, yellow, green, violet and all shades in between. Driving along the B6318, Military Road, it was clear the artwork had generated another ribbon of light . . . as people took to their cars to drive along to get the best view.


Read More - http://www.journallive.co.uk/north-e...#ixzz25PP5apCt
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Old January 8th, 2013, 12:25 PM   #42
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Roman Camp in North Shields

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Originally Posted by Wildcat45 View Post
Steve there was also a Hoo Haa over the proposals to cut the nice trees down there. Yellow ribbons got tied round them.

As for ancient remains, my house in Haswell Gardens had an Iron lung in the garden!

To be serious, there was quite a lot of the old hosptial left.

The wall that borders the east of Haswell Gardens is the old hospital building wall. I had a window sill incorporated into my back wall there. Next doro there was the remains of a step and a bricked-up door. Indeed when the hosue was new, there were still flecks of plaster on the wall.

I was told one house there has a victorian fire place as part of their garden wall.

Just below the top soil, they left lots of building rubble. Big chunks with paint on them.

There is one part of the street - which has gardens on it, where just below the surface is the still painted floor of one of the corridors. I am sure anyone who knew the hosptial well would be able to identify exactly where it was in the building.

Haswell Gardens is a fantastic little development. I really miss living there.
Found this article from the Newcastle Evening Chronicle from 26th August 2006 - copyright NCJMedia Ltd :

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Old February 13th, 2013, 10:52 AM   #43
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Hadrian’s Wall Trust gets cash grant to
make the most of tourism

by Tony Henderson, The Journal, February 13th 2013


A CASH boost has been given to the development of eco-tourism around Hadrian’s Wall. The £589,000 Rural Development Programme for England (RDPE) grant to the Hadrian’s Wall Trust will help projects in north and west Cumbria. It covers tourism activity incorporating nature and wildlife, walking and cycling, local produce and accommodation, all linked to the Hadrian’s Wall Country brand.

The trust, which is based in Hexham, has set up a satellite office in Maryport and a new post of project manager has been created to lead work with local businesses. Rural Affairs Minister Richard Benyon said: “Hadrian’s Wall is a great place to experience our countryside. We want to help aspiring local businesses and this grant will help them make the most of the opportunities brought to the area by thousands of visitors every year.

“Our heritage sites and countryside are a real draw for holidaymakers and sightseers. There is a big opportunity to grow the rural economy through tourism.” Linda Tuttiett, chief executive of the Hadrian’s Wall Trust said: “The 150-mile Hadrian’s Wall world heritage site is the whole of the Roman frontier zone – including the Roman coastal defences at Ravenglass, Whitehaven, Workington, Maryport and Bowness-on-Solway, and the western end of Hadrian’s Wall.”


Read More - http://www.journallive.co.uk/north-e...#ixzz2KlsYfyIl
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Old March 20th, 2013, 12:14 PM   #44
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£10.5m visitor centre on Hadrian's Wall to boost Tourism
by Tony Henderson, The Journal, March 20th 2013


Once Brewed park visitor centre near Hadrians Wall

A VISITOR centre to boost Northumberland National Park takes a big step forward today. The £10.5m Sill building would replace the current 1960s Once Brewed tourism information centre and youth hostel on Hadrian’s Wall. The aim of the new centre is to inspire visitors to explore the whole of the national park and its landscape, history and wildlife. It is expected to increase visitor numbers from the current 45,000 a year at Once Brewed to 120,000, generating £1.4m for the economy and creating and supporting 60 jobs.

Today, Northumberland National Park and the Youth Hostel Association will announce they have appointed award winning Newcastle-based Jane Darbyshire and David Kendall Architects to explore initial concepts for The Sill. The move is part of development work following the award of almost £400,000 a year ago by the Heritage Lottery Fund to work up ideas for the venture. This will lead to a bid for a full grant of more than £6m.

“This will be a flagship centre for the national park and will be of the landscape and inspired by the landscape,” said Sill project co-ordinator Laura Sole.


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Old April 3rd, 2013, 01:03 AM   #45
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Fascinating exercise for anyone that is interesting,
If you imagine the original square roman fort which would have been present at pons aelius; stone outer walls, N-S-E-W gates with intersecting centre, home to my knowledge of up to 1000 troops, being about 80x80m.

Then look on googlemaps of the site where this fort supposed to have stood, by the castle keep/ moot hall, it becomes apparent the roughly square shaped area of land of similar dimensions as to where the fort would have stood. Draw a line from the SE corner of the moot hall to the SW corner of the bridge hotel, then north to the railway forming the northern wall, and fnally back down from the NE corner of the northumberland hotel.

I myself find that although no actual real physical presence of the fort survives, but the imprint on the topography- the romans i expect would have levelled off this hillock formed by the burn up dean st and quayside to the south, remains to this day. This bit of land engineered to e a defensive spot obviously was advantaged in the medieval times and the hint remains to this day.

When this thread talks about 'old newcastle' that is what i thought it meant, however the map extends to st johns, bigg market etc. which i think dilutes what could be just the square shaped land containing the keep, pub, moot hall, hotel, black gate and maybe throw in the cathedral too.

If this specific area was landscaped to further its identity with perhaps a small visitor centre then it would create a specific node that would better present itself than the current arbitrary mass of land that is currently identified
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Old April 3rd, 2013, 02:53 PM   #46
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Quote:
Originally Posted by No Opinion View Post
Fascinating exercise for anyone that is interesting,
If you imagine the original square roman fort which would have been present at pons aelius; stone outer walls, N-S-E-W gates with intersecting centre, home to my knowledge of up to 1000 troops, being about 80x80m.

Then look on googlemaps of the site where this fort supposed to have stood, by the castle keep/ moot hall, it becomes apparent the roughly square shaped area of land of similar dimensions as to where the fort would have stood. Draw a line from the SE corner of the moot hall to the SW corner of the bridge hotel, then north to the railway forming the northern wall, and fnally back down from the NE corner of the northumberland hotel.

I myself find that although no actual real physical presence of the fort survives, but the imprint on the topography- the romans i expect would have levelled off this hillock formed by the burn up dean st and quayside to the south, remains to this day. This bit of land engineered to e a defensive spot obviously was advantaged in the medieval times and the hint remains to this day.

When this thread talks about 'old newcastle' that is what i thought it meant, however the map extends to st johns, bigg market etc. which i think dilutes what could be just the square shaped land containing the keep, pub, moot hall, hotel, black gate and maybe throw in the cathedral too.

If this specific area was landscaped to further its identity with perhaps a small visitor centre then it would create a specific node that would better present itself than the current arbitrary mass of land that is currently identified
One of the ‘problems’ when discussing the Roman Fort is the lack of real knowledge about what it exactly looked like due to the later construction of the Norman Castle and Keep and to a degree evidence destroyed by the Victorians during the construction of the rail viaduct. To prove the shape would mean the demolition of the Castle Keep, former Northumberland County Offices, Bridge Hotel, railway viaduct and the Moot Hall, something that isn’t going to happen any time soon. However the latest thoughts on the size of the fort are that it was somewhere in the region of 95m x 67m – as it would have followed the outline of a cohort fort it would have been roughly rectangular in shape, roughly as it still had to fit within the confines of the promontory.

The number of troops accommodated at the fort is also debatable as no barracks have been discovered on the site.

On the matter of the fort’s location is still a matter of conjecture as to whether it was part of Hadrian's Wall, perhaps controlling an access gate.

Of course the name often associated with the fort is Pons Aelius but that in real terms relates to the river crossing over which it guarded, Pons Aelius being translated as ‘Bridge of Hadrian’.

Whilst the promontory looking over the Tyne gave a good defensive position to protect the bridge it was not a site that the Roman military engineers would have immediately chosen as it did not give ready access to deploy the garrison. This was due to the steep cliffs on all but the western side of the site. Thus the ability for troops to pass in and out of the fort was very restricted and thus this idea of the conventional gates associated with a Roman fort was not one found here.

Of course “real physical presence of the fort” does survive, albeit concealed beneath the area of Castle Garth and much of it has been revealed during archaeological digs, the last being in 1996.

Not sure that the Roman army engineers would have needed to do much in the way of having ‘levelled off this hillock’. There was certainly archaeological evidence of ploughing (ardmarks) of the land in the pre-fort period (narrow rig and furrow). Unproved but the site may well have been the site of a settlement prior to the building of the fort.

On the matter of the ‘Old Newcastle Project’, perhaps you are missing the point – this is a specific project dealing only with the area of the Black Gate, Castle Keep and St Nicholas’s Cathedral Church. Worth taking a look at the projects web site @ http://www.oldnewcastle.org.uk/old-newcastle-project

You mention a ‘visitor centre’ well that is one of the functions that Black Gate will perform – this is from the above web site:

Heritage Lottery Funding has been secured to create an accessible, heritage-led education and interpretation centre in the vacant and closed Black Gate, transforming its current lifeless and substantially ignored presence into a hub of heritage activity that will be open and available to the entire community and visitors from near and far. The Black Gate will combine with medieval neighbours, the Castle Keep and St. Nicholas Cathedral to provide an outstanding and dynamic heritage asset that will tell the story of the remarkable history of the City and the ingenuity of countless generations of its inhabitants.
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Old April 3rd, 2013, 08:18 PM   #47
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One of the ‘problems’ when discussing the Roman Fort is the lack of real knowledge about what it exactly looked like due to the later construction of the Norman Castle and Keep and to a degree evidence destroyed by the Victorians during the construction of the rail viaduct. To prove the shape would mean the demolition of the Castle Keep, former Northumberland County Offices, Bridge Hotel, railway viaduct and the Moot Hall, something that isn’t going to happen any time soon. However the latest thoughts on the size of the fort are that it was somewhere in the region of 95m x 67m – as it would have followed the outline of a cohort fort it would have been roughly rectangular in shape, roughly as it still had to fit within the confines of the promontory.

The number of troops accommodated at the fort is also debatable as no barracks have been discovered on the site.

On the matter of the fort’s location is still a matter of conjecture as to whether it was part of Hadrian's Wall, perhaps controlling an access gate.

Of course the name often associated with the fort is Pons Aelius but that in real terms relates to the river crossing over which it guarded, Pons Aelius being translated as ‘Bridge of Hadrian’.

Whilst the promontory looking over the Tyne gave a good defensive position to protect the bridge it was not a site that the Roman military engineers would have immediately chosen as it did not give ready access to deploy the garrison. This was due to the steep cliffs on all but the western side of the site. Thus the ability for troops to pass in and out of the fort was very restricted and thus this idea of the conventional gates associated with a Roman fort was not one found here.

Of course “real physical presence of the fort” does survive, albeit concealed beneath the area of Castle Garth and much of it has been revealed during archaeological digs, the last being in 1996.

Not sure that the Roman army engineers would have needed to do much in the way of having ‘levelled off this hillock’. There was certainly archaeological evidence of ploughing (ardmarks) of the land in the pre-fort period (narrow rig and furrow). Unproved but the site may well have been the site of a settlement prior to the building of the fort.

On the matter of the ‘Old Newcastle Project’, perhaps you are missing the point – this is a specific project dealing only with the area of the Black Gate, Castle Keep and St Nicholas’s Cathedral Church. Worth taking a look at the projects web site @ http://www.oldnewcastle.org.uk/old-newcastle-project

You mention a ‘visitor centre’ well that is one of the functions that Black Gate will perform – this is from the above web site:

Heritage Lottery Funding has been secured to create an accessible, heritage-led education and interpretation centre in the vacant and closed Black Gate, transforming its current lifeless and substantially ignored presence into a hub of heritage activity that will be open and available to the entire community and visitors from near and far. The Black Gate will combine with medieval neighbours, the Castle Keep and St. Nicholas Cathedral to provide an outstanding and dynamic heritage asset that will tell the story of the remarkable history of the City and the ingenuity of countless generations of its inhabitants.
Post #30 seems to indicate the area was wider than you state, including the lit and phil, St. Johns etc. clearly worthy of praise yes, but keeping 'old Newcastle' as specific to the probable location of the fort would be more defining.

I understand my observations are entirely conjectural. But it does seem to fit. One benefit of the Romans to us folk is that they did standardise a lot of their forts and buildings and so if indeed their was a fort, then we can infer as to its proportions and form etc. from other similar forts.

As for establishing the existence of the fort i would say it is nigh on irrefutable. Nevermind it being named in the Notitia Dignitatum, circumstantial evidence seems to co-oberate this. As hadrians wall originally terminated at pons aelius then it does seem to suggest there would have been a military presence. As the wall extended later the fort would probably not have been as important but it does seem unlikely they would have left the furthest east tyne crossing undefended. As for restricted access yes, but as many chares negotiate the steep slope- they aren't cliffs then secondary access would have been possible

I do not for a second recommend demolishing the castle etc! That would be a tad stupid, although i'm sure the victorians did try. What i think is that the area could be better defined through the landscaping, thats all. As hopefully it might! Good news for the black gate, although i think a custom built heritage visitor centre- of modest scale would be cheaper, maybe like the St. Pauls tourist information centre. Maybe not that design but the same scale.

Opening up the ground for landscaping could present an opportunity for an intensive archeological investigation of the area and maybe answer some of our questions. It is a mixed blessing that Newcastle has been continuously occupied for so long, from pre roman as you state, that evidence of past eras seem to disappear over the centuries.
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Old April 3rd, 2013, 09:15 PM   #48
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Quote:
Originally Posted by No Opinion View Post
Post #30 seems to indicate the area was wider than you state, including the lit and phil, St. Johns etc. clearly worthy of praise yes, but keeping 'old Newcastle' as specific to the probable location of the fort would be more defining.

I understand my observations are entirely conjectural. But it does seem to fit. One benefit of the Romans to us folk is that they did standardise a lot of their forts and buildings and so if indeed their was a fort, then we can infer as to its proportions and form etc. from other similar forts.

As for establishing the existence of the fort i would say it is nigh on irrefutable. Nevermind it being named in the Notitia Dignitatum, circumstantial evidence seems to co-oberate this. As hadrians wall originally terminated at pons aelius then it does seem to suggest there would have been a military presence. As the wall extended later the fort would probably not have been as important but it does seem unlikely they would have left the furthest east tyne crossing undefended. As for restricted access yes, but as many chares negotiate the steep slope- they aren't cliffs then secondary access would have been possible

I do not for a second recommend demolishing the castle etc! That would be a tad stupid, although i'm sure the victorians did try. What i think is that the area could be better defined through the landscaping, thats all. As hopefully it might! Good news for the black gate, although i think a custom built heritage visitor centre- of modest scale would be cheaper, maybe like the St. Pauls tourist information centre. Maybe not that design but the same scale.

Opening up the ground for landscaping could present an opportunity for an intensive archeological investigation of the area and maybe answer some of our questions. It is a mixed blessing that Newcastle has been continuously occupied for so long, from pre roman as you state, that evidence of past eras seem to disappear over the centuries.
I think the pamphlet at #30 pre-dates the Old Newcastle Project as such and thus the confusion, the Project being a spin off as it were.

Indeed the standardisation of Roman forts does allow for various 'educated guesses' to be made but I'm sure that in the case of Pons Aelius the shape of the available land meant that some restrictions in size of buildings and slight alignments had to be changed from the 'norm'.

"As for establishing the existence of the fort I would say it is nigh on irrefutable." - I don't think anyone doubts the existence of the Roman fort, various digs over the years have proved this, so not sure as to the meaning of your comment?

Yes if the Victorians had been permitted they would have demolished the Castle Keep so that they could place their railway viaduct slightly to the south of its present position. (an American tourist was overheard to say, "why did they build the Castle Keep so close to the railway viaduct?". Advances in technology will hopefully mean that at some stage in the future, radar type ground penetration devices may be able to see under standing buildings and questions answered, but not in my life time.

What areas are you suggesting for landscaping?
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Old April 3rd, 2013, 11:46 PM   #49
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I think the pamphlet at #30 pre-dates the Old Newcastle Project as such and thus the confusion, the Project being a spin off as it were.

Indeed the standardisation of Roman forts does allow for various 'educated guesses' to be made but I'm sure that in the case of Pons Aelius the shape of the available land meant that some restrictions in size of buildings and slight alignments had to be changed from the 'norm'.

"As for establishing the existence of the fort I would say it is nigh on irrefutable." - I don't think anyone doubts the existence of the Roman fort, various digs over the years have proved this, so not sure as to the meaning of your comment?

Yes if the Victorians had been permitted they would have demolished the Castle Keep so that they could place their railway viaduct slightly to the south of its present position. (an American tourist was overheard to say, "why did they build the Castle Keep so close to the railway viaduct?". Advances in technology will hopefully mean that at some stage in the future, radar type ground penetration devices may be able to see under standing buildings and questions answered, but not in my life time.

What areas are you suggesting for landscaping?
Sorry, i thought you implied the fort was not proven to be in existence, when in fact you were just referring to not having its exact location and dimensions pinned down. Apologies!

I don't think it will be too long before they 'radar' or use advanced underground devices. In fact, maybe the Old Newcastle project should try to link with the local universities and actually commision another major archeological operation. Any new evidence uncovered may promote the tourist and educational aspect of the new exhibition facilities- creating a buzz and publicity to boost its openings.

As for landscaping, it is my hope they will try to define the area and give it a general tidy-up. It seems currently to be a neglected back space, with signs dotted around, arbitrary car parking, bins, poorly maintained surfaces, railings etc.
What could work as a concept would be to reinforce the thresholds to the site by using the (perhaps) NSEW orientation of the original fort openings;
NORTH; the black gate being a principle threshold with the (scrap my old idea for visitor centre) learning, exhibition centre based here;
WEST; the current open side between the bridge hotel and keep, with a better defined surface treatment, some planting.
SOUTH, the castle steps from quayside
EAST; i've yet to work that one out!!

To further milk the fort metaphor, it would be great to allow a walk around the 'cliff' top around the moot hall, perhaps a temporary raised accessible platform to give people a sense of what the fort would have been like to walk around its perimeter walls?
There does seem an urban infill gap between the top of the castle steps and the bridge hotel, but looking again at it to put in a new building here would obscure and diminish the keeps impact on the tyne gorge vista so again, a little undecided!

All in all, basically i think the old newcastle project would best showcase and boost its endeavour in looking again at the history of the site through investigative archeology, but also to redefine this mini area of the city centre. To do with its own unique expression, throughout some of its history the castle keep, walls and associated castle complex buildings would have been a defined area seperate from the sprawl of the medieval town. Why not subtlety revisit this? But instead of it being for the medieval elite, it is for educational and touristic purposes
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Old April 6th, 2013, 01:14 AM   #50
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I was wondering if you guys cared to speculate or add any info or anything that has previously tried to address the question of 'What was the original course of Hadrians Wall through areas of Newcastle'?



This image shows the following-

  • Medieval walled town in yellow.
  • Castle Garth in Yellow
  • Possible fort location and bridge in Red.
  • Red dots indicate established location of wall
  • Purple dots indicate speculated and investigated location of wall, to no avail.

Dots from left to right

- Newcastle Arts Centre milecastle 4
- Remains by Lit and Phil. Not 100% on this, but seem to remember seeing a plaque or remains of the wall at this location
- Trial at car park adjacent to Dean Street with no evidence found
- Speculative location adjacent to Sallyport Tower
- Trial pit near Gibson Street found remains
- Remains found under recently built hotel
- 1920s archeological dig found evidence around ouseburn but not at far right location as speculated



This above image is my stab at the route. Entirely speculative of course.
There seems concrete evidence of HW route over westgate road, but disappears once within the centre.

Now i know that the evidence has been wiped from the city centre due to 2000 years adaptive settlement, but if a bronze age house and ridge and furrow field evidence can be found in the city centre then a whacking great wall but have some evidence we havent found!

So im willing to guess that like Westgate road, HW route may have been continued by the street patterns of the town.

Denton Chare via cathedral (which may have been established on HW foundations, to low bridge follow a roman like straight line through the centre. It is speculated that HW route bends down further south, to meet the fort, however the fort required space for troops to vacate, so my logic is that there should be ample space between the wall and the ridge top of the tyne gorge to allow soldiers to alight the fort.

From here Im guessing the route may have been incorporated for the town wall- as the town wall unusually dips down at pandon before rising to Sallyport tower- historically the weakest spot of the town wall, where people would 'sally forth' to this part in defense. So such a weak spot cannot have been missed from the design of the wall, so im stabbing a guess that this part of the wall might have taken advantage of HW.

From there its a case of joining the dots of established finds until Byker, where the high street and fossway seems romanlike straight to Wallsend fort.

Any thoughts on this guys would be greatly appreciated. Newcastle in Hadrians wall has a globally significant find within our city. And i personally dont think we highlight it enough. Tracing a better idea of the route would go a long way to helping Newcastle in its global and regional identity
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Old April 6th, 2013, 02:08 AM   #51
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We have discussed the Roman Wall and its route through Central and Suburban Newcastle, a few times on the forum.

Links to those discussions can be found in the Index Thread under R for 'Roman Sites'.
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Old April 9th, 2013, 12:08 PM   #52
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Quote:
Originally Posted by No Opinion View Post
What was Hadrians wall original course through Newcastle?

- Newcastle Arts Centre milecastle 4
- Remains by Lit and Phil. Not 100% on this, but seem to remember seeing a plaque or remains of the wall at this location
- Trial at car park adjacent to Dean Street with no evidence found
- Speculative location adjacent to Sallyport Tower
- Trial pit near Gibson Street found remains
- Remains found under recently built hotel
- 1920s archeological dig found evidence around ouseburn but not at far right location as speculated

So im willing to guess that like Westgate road, HW route may have been continued by the street patterns of the town.

Denton Chare via cathedral (which may have been established on HW foundations, to low bridge follow a roman like straight line through the centre. It is speculated that HW route bends down further south, to meet the fort, however the fort required space for troops to vacate, so my logic is that there should be ample space between the wall and the ridge top of the tyne gorge to allow soldiers to alight the fort.

Any thoughts on this guys would be greatly appreciated. Newcastle in Hadrians wall has a globally significant find within our city. And i personally dont think we highlight it enough. Tracing a better idea of the route would go a long way to helping Newcastle in its global and regional identity
A lot to think about there and the course of Hadrian's Wall through the City centre has been a matter of much discussion and debate.

As you will know before the discovery of Mile Castle 4 it was thought the wall was further towards the north of Westgate Road.

The remains at the Lit and Phil have been discussed on the forum before and a search will provide (if I remember correctly) a nice early photograph of a couple of workers standing in a trench outside the building with a section of what is claimed to be Hadrian's Wall exposed. There are plans to expose the wall here and have it as a feature for visitors to see the remains via a perspex screen.

Also discussed on the forum before was the discoveries during the archaeological dig at Melbourne Street/Gibson Street where a 13m section of the foundations of the wall were located together with other evidence of its alignment.

Was looking through Archaeologia Aeliana 1st Series, Vol. 1, 1822 and noted these observations concerning the discovery of walls in Collingwood Street which may have been part Hadrian's Wall.

Mr. Ventress has favoured us with notes of his observations to the following effect : On May 17, 1852, the labourers of the Water Company, in laying down pipes in the centre of Collingwood-street, at 92 feet from its east end, came upon a piece of Roman wall at right angles to the street, and 2 feet 1 1 inches in thickness. At 50 feet nearer to the east end of the same street another Boman wall, 6 feet 6 inches thick, -was found running in the same direction.

Dr. Bruce inspected these remains.

On 23 Dec. 1853, a drain from the Turf Hotel, leading across Collingwood-street, was renewed, and at 18 feet from the front of the hotel, and 121 feet from the east end of the street, Mr. Ventress saw the outside face of a piece of Roman wall. It was running diagonally in the street, S.W. to N. E., and striking for the angle of the Cloth -market and Mosley-street. The cut was about 4 feet wide, and that distance of wall was seen. The depth from the street pavement to the base of the wall was 9 feet. The wall had six courses of stones, the bottom one projecting 2 inches, and the entire thickness of the wall at its base was 9 feet. Mr. White was present.
The inner face of the wall is visible in one of the cellar apartments of the fish-shop in Collingwood-street.

On the following day, the Gas Company made a trench 16 inches wide and 20 inches deep, at 18 feet west of Mr. Gibson's Bank Buildings, and cut through a wall 9 feet thick, the southern face of which was 16 feet 4 inches north of the railing which surrounds the church of St. Nicholas. This wall was laid upon rough quarried flags about 4 inches thick. It appeared to be running to a point between Collingwood- street and Denton-chare ; but in so circumscribed an excavation, it was
difficult to ascertain the precise bearing. Mr. V. has one of the facing-stones. If this was the great wall, its course will be rather more to the north than that laid down by Mr. Maclauchlan in his Survey of the Barrier.

The foundations of the new Town-hall Buildings are laid in virgin clay, without a trace of disturbance or occupation, save a framework of wood to the north end of them, supposed to have been connected with a well, as water was plentiful at that place.

No remains have been observed in draining Westgate-street and Puddingchare, but the partial use of a drift in the latter may have concealed the great wall.

It is possible that Horsley's line of wall from the east may be that of the military way. Just north of the ancient passage formerly gained by the Nether Dene Bridge, in Dean -street, appearances of a side wall of Roman masonry were observed in 1852, possibly in connection with a viaduct there. (Eon plan.) All relics of the great wall at its presumed passage over the dean had long disappeared, for the remains of old English buildings of brick had substituted themselves.
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Old April 9th, 2013, 04:53 PM   #53
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I'm sure there was some of part of the wall discovered / preserved in the basement of the Coopers building, further along Westgate Road towards Castle Keep from Lit & Phil. There is something to that effect written on the windows of the Coopers building.

http://*************************/new...rs_studios.htm

http://www.english-heritage.org.uk/p...opers-studios/
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Old April 9th, 2013, 06:09 PM   #54
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Hadrian's Wall through Newcastle upon Tyne

I am sure there are some stones in the Westgate Road, Newcastle Art Centre courtyard at the bottom of the stairs there.

I have some pictures.

Story was there was some building work being carried and the stone was rescued from a builders skip!

The line of the wall would have been straight up Westgate Road, Westgate Hill, the West Road towards the still visible remains next to Solomons Indian Restaurant at Denton Burn, then onto the next remains at Denton Circle just off the A69.
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Old April 9th, 2013, 07:51 PM   #55
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Stamford View Post
I'm sure there was some of part of the wall discovered / preserved in the basement of the Coopers building, further along Westgate Road towards Castle Keep from Lit & Phil. There is something to that effect written on the windows of the Coopers building.

http://*************************/new...rs_studios.htm

http://www.english-heritage.org.uk/p...opers-studios/
Another case of "I never knew that" - certainly puts the report that I posted this morning about the wall being located in Collingwood Street in the shade.

Found this on the Newcastle City Planning Portal:

Reference 2007/1754/06/DCC
Alternative Reference Not Available
Application Received Wed 05 May 2010
Address 14-18 Westgate Road Newcastle upon Tyne NE1 3NN
Proposal Submission of details of interpretation of discovery of remains of Hadrian's Wall, as amended by panel received 14.09.2010 to comply with condition 10 of permission 2007/1754/01/DET dated 21.09.2007: Change of use from car rental (sui generis) to offices (Class B1) and external alterations to front elevation including shopfront, full height frameless glazing, infilling with brickwork, extension to roof to form plant room and lift shaft extension to rear.
Status Grant

http://publicaccess.newcastle.gov.uk...=L1YD84BS09700

This was the consented HADRIAN'S WALL INTERPRETATION PANEL



Anyone interested in the archaeological assessment and report on this site it can still be seen on the main PA @ http://publicaccess.newcastle.gov.uk...=JM379VBS08B00
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Old April 9th, 2013, 11:54 PM   #56
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Guys, esp. Newcastle Historian for transferring this q to this thread and steve for digging up evidence through the planning portal thank you! Its really insightful to get your opinions as it is larger a matter of conjecture. I have trawled through the archives on the forum and found pretty much all the evidence i put in my previous post, however i may have missed or glossed over some important points so i will review when i have the time.

It would be fascinating to hypothesise as to what the 1822 discoveries were. I wouldnt like to say past historians are so poor that they would misread what is roman construction and what is not, but the evidence by the dig at coopers it seems that is more likely the case. Either that or the wall turns sharply North from the coopers site! Perhaps unlikely as no evidence was found around the old town hall. I cannot see how a roman structure of 9 foot thick would be found North of the wall? Unless it was the fort that projected north of the wall, connected at its southern side, again, unlikely.
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Old April 10th, 2013, 10:00 AM   #57
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Steve Ellwood View Post
Another case of "I never knew that" - certainly puts the report that I posted this morning about the wall being located in Collingwood Street in the shade.

Found this on the Newcastle City Planning Portal:

Reference 2007/1754/06/DCC
Alternative Reference Not Available
Application Received Wed 05 May 2010
Address 14-18 Westgate Road Newcastle upon Tyne NE1 3NN
Proposal Submission of details of interpretation of discovery of remains of Hadrian's Wall, as amended by panel received 14.09.2010 to comply with condition 10 of permission 2007/1754/01/DET dated 21.09.2007: Change of use from car rental (sui generis) to offices (Class B1) and external alterations to front elevation including shopfront, full height frameless glazing, infilling with brickwork, extension to roof to form plant room and lift shaft extension to rear.
Status Grant

http://publicaccess.newcastle.gov.uk...=L1YD84BS09700

This was the consented HADRIAN'S WALL INTERPRETATION PANEL



Anyone interested in the archaeological assessment and report on this site it can still be seen on the main PA @ http://publicaccess.newcastle.gov.uk...=JM379VBS08B00
Quote:
Originally Posted by No Opinion View Post
Guys, esp. Newcastle Historian for transferring this q to this thread and steve for digging up evidence through the planning portal thank you! Its really insightful to get your opinions as it is larger a matter of conjecture. I have trawled through the archives on the forum and found pretty much all the evidence i put in my previous post, however i may have missed or glossed over some important points so i will review when i have the time.

It would be fascinating to hypothesise as to what the 1822 discoveries were. I wouldnt like to say past historians are so poor that they would misread what is roman construction and what is not, but the evidence by the dig at coopers it seems that is more likely the case. Either that or the wall turns sharply North from the coopers site! Perhaps unlikely as no evidence was found around the old town hall. I cannot see how a roman structure of 9 foot thick would be found North of the wall? Unless it was the fort that projected north of the wall, connected at its southern side, again, unlikely.
The information and map is on the window adjacent to the main entrance into the Coopers building. I took these last night having thought I already had some, but failed to find them. The text is a bit hard to read but I can do a transcript if anyone wants....and the map similar to one Steve already found on the planning portal, apart from the hypothesis of the route continues to the castle rather than a question mark.



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Old April 13th, 2013, 11:25 AM   #58
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Roman heritage artwork unveiled at Wallsend Metro Station
by Tony Henderson, The Journal, April 13th 2013


North East photographer Graeme Peacock at Wallsend Metro Station

A NEW METRO station artwork, celebrating a Tyneside town's Roman heritage, was unveiled yesterday. North Tyneside MP Mary Glindon launched the artwork to mark the refurbishment of Wallsend Metro station. It takes the half-a-million people who use the station every year on a photographic journey along Hadrian’s Wall, from the town’s Segedunum Fort and museum to Bowness on Solway 76 miles away in Cumbria.

The images by North East photographer Graeme Peacock present modern views from the Wall out across the surrounding country, capturing changing seasons and times of day from urban Tyneside through Northumberland to the coastline of the Solway Firth. The commission marks 10 years since Wallsend became the only station in the world to have signs in Latin – as well as English – to mark its unique position at one end of the Hadrian’s Wall world heritage site.

Nexus, which owns and manages the Metro, is now close to completing the refurbishment and rebuilding of all six stations from Wallsend to North Shields as part of its £385m Metro modernisation programme.


Read More - http://www.journallive.co.uk/north-e...#ixzz2QKkO4ztZ
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Old April 20th, 2013, 01:32 PM   #59
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The Flying Archaeologist

Programme on last night about Hadrian's Wall which I clean forgot about but it is on the BBC iplayer....

http://www.bbc.co.uk/iplayer/episode..._the_Frontier/

Hope this is the right thread?

Should we have a 'The Romans in Newcastle and the North East' thread?
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Old April 21st, 2013, 12:43 PM   #60
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The Flying Archaeologist

Excellent programmme with aerial mapping and photography revealing more of the 'lumps and bumps' of Hadrian's Wall and much earlier settlements prior to the Roman arrival.

Wonder if the actual line of the Wall was influenced by where these earlier settlements were situated?

Here is more info>>

Excavations at the vicus (Roman civilian settlement) outside Vindolanda fort are shedding new light on life along the Roman frontier
Hundreds of miles away from Hadrian's Wall, a man surfing the internet from the comfort of his home stumbled across something that astonished the professionals.
Bryn Gethin's discovery on his computer in Warwickshire, was one of a number, based on aerial photography and imaging techniques, that are rewriting a whole era of Roman history.
He spotted something while browsing old LIDAR (light detection and ranging) images, which show remains even if covered by trees or buildings.
Experts say he had potentially discovered the camp of the men who actually built the wall that runs across the country from Tyneside to Cumbria.
Surveyor Humphrey Welfare, currently investigating the site, said the camp would not have been seen without aerial images.
"It gives us another little insight, a little window into what happened during the construction of the wall," he said.
"And that's how archaeology builds up, piece by piece."
It was known the wall supported civilian communities which provided goods and services in a local economy that benefitted both occupiers and natives.
But it seems there were Iron Age settlements hundreds of years before the arrival of the Romans who, rather than being an aggressive conquering force, forged working relationships with the resident population.
"What we thought we saw was a very militaristic landscape, very sparsely populated and all we saw was what survived at the surface," said Dr David Woolliscroft from Liverpool University.
"Then suddenly, when we started to fly, a whole new world emerged. Huge numbers - tens of thousands - of isolated farms, completely undefended.
"You can only have a landscape like that when people are so used to peace that they take it for granted.
"And that utterly changes the story of how we see the Romans."
There is also evidence, discovered from the air, that throws into doubt the accepted belief that the wall was a barrier between the empire and the barbarian north.
Aerial pictures of a Roman aqueduct show it built north of the wall and right next to a native settlement.
"That shows a comfort in their own security and power, in that they're happy for something as important as a water resource to be placed north of the frontier," Dave Macleod, from English Heritage aerial survey team, said.
"You don't put your water supply into enemy hands," Dr Woolliscroft agreed. "Clearly they were very confident that this was an area that was theirs, even though it was beyond the wall."
The area around Hadrian's Wall has been mapped from the air by English Heritage but amateur research has also thrown up some surprising findings.
Ancient camps, ovens, rubbish pits and ditches show up from the air as crop marks, where plants grow differently - often invisible from the ground.
Work on Emperor Hadrian's wall began in 122AD.
Archaeologists believed soldiers had settled in a nearby fort - Vindolanda - from about 85AD.
But another photograph shows something Dr Andrew Birley from the Vindolanda Trust believes is a fort built ten years earlier, 50 years before the wall.
"As we started excavating the ditches we were getting more and more evidence to suggest that this actually could pre-date anything on this part of the site that we'd previously known about," he said.
If they find the timber fort gates - and it might take years - the rings on the wood could lead conclusively to a construction date.
It might prove the Romans established their frontier long before the history books currently say.

There's more than just 'Sycamore Gap' along there!
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