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Old April 21st, 2013, 01:59 PM   #61
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Adrian_Swall View Post
Excellent programmme with aerial mapping and photography revealing more of the 'lumps and bumps' of Hadrian's Wall and much earlier settlements prior to the Roman arrival.
That's one of the beauties of Google Earth, the satellite views you can get are stupendous.

I was recently at a talk on Epiacum Roman Fort (Whitley Castle) - http://www.epiacumheritage.org/ and its design became a lot clearer when I took the opportunity to have a look at the site via Google Earth.

This is a screen dump courtesy of Google Earth:


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Old May 18th, 2013, 06:34 PM   #62
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Backworth Hoard

Courtesy of the News Guardian @ http://www.newsguardian.co.uk/news/l...home-1-5682830

Roman items return home

Published on 17/05/2013 09:10

A personal stash of mystery Roman treasure that was unearthed in Backworth nearly 200 years ago is to return to the north east for the very first time.

The Backworth Hoard will be on display at Segedunum Roman Fort in Wallsend, on loan from the British Museum from Friday, until September 15, as part of the British Museum Spotlight loans and tours programme.

The hoard will feature as the centrepiece in an exhibition that will shed new light on life on the Roman – Barbarian frontier.

Geoff Woodward, manager of North Tyneside Museums at Tyne and Wear Archives and Museums, said: “It’s very exciting that these beautiful precious objects are going to be returning to the area where they were buried nearly 1900 years ago.

“The circumstances of their burial give us a connection with that individual and a glimpse into the overlap of cultures on this key frontier of the Roman Empire.”

The Backworth Hoard features gold and silver artefacts such as a silver pan, spoons and gilded silver brooches that were believed to be treasure deposits from a pagan shrine dedicated to the Mother-goddesses near the eastern end of Hadrian’s Wall.

Visit www.segedunumromanfort.org.uk for details.

British Museum description of the Roam artefacts @ http://www.britishmuseum.org/explore..._treasure.aspx


The Backworth treasure

Roman Britain, 1st - 2nd century AD
Possibly from Backworth, Tyne & Wear
A treasure from a pagan shrine

Inscriptions on the silver pan and on one of the rings indicate that the treasure was probably a votive deposit at a shrine of the Mother-goddesses near the eastern end of Hadrian's Wall.

The silver pan was probably the container for most of the objects. The decorated handle has a gold-inlaid inscription in Latin reading MATR.FAB DVBIT, signifying that it was a gift from Fabius Dubitatus to the Mothers. The three spoons are typical forms of the first or second centuries. The two gilded silver brooches are of a type known as 'trumpet brooches', but also sometimes Backworth brooches, after this pair. The necklaces have solar wheels as clasps and pendants in the shape of lunar crescents. This type of necklace was widespread in the Roman world. The rings include standard early-Roman gem-set rings and two snake-rings, one in gold and one in silver, of a form that we know was made in Roman Britain. One ring has no gem, but there is a dedication to the 'Matres' (Mothers) inscribed within the hollowed bezel. This may have been made specifically as a votive object.

The jewellery may be compared with rings and necklaces, which we know were made in Roman Britain, from the Snettisham jeweller's hoard from Norfolk.

The history of this hoard is obscure. We know that it was found around 1811, but not where it was found. The hoard was said to have included about 280 coins, but all but one of these, and probably other objects, were dispersed before The British Museum was able to acquire what was left of the treasure in 1850. The surviving coin is a denarius of Antoninus Pius (reigned AD 138-161) issued in AD 139.

T.W. Potter, Roman Britain, 2nd edition (London, The British Museum Press, 1997)

Image courtesy of Segedunum and British Museum



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Old August 19th, 2013, 12:29 PM   #63
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Roman Cemetery

Quote:
Originally Posted by AngerOfTheNorth View Post
I was quickly reading this article...

http://www.theguardian.com/commentis...lots-languages

...and noticed this line: "In a cemetery near Newcastle upon Tyne, there's a Roman gravestone inscribed in Latin and in Palmyrean (the ancient kingdom situated in what is now Syria)."

Anyone know where the gravestone is?
Writing 'In a cemetery near Newcastle upon Tyne' really helps the reader - depends on what they mean by 'near' and why not just say the actual location.

Perhaps the closest Roman Cemetery is the one discovered in the Hanover Square area? - article from the Journal back in August 2008 by Tony Henderson @ http://www.thejournal.co.uk/news/nor...ecrets-4499822

Roman graves to give up secrets



THE lid has been lifted on Roman life and death in the centre of Newcastle. A dig on a development site at the corner of Forth Street and Hanover Square has revealed lavish burials at the side of a road that led into the Roman fort of Pons Aelius, which now lies under the Castle Keep.

Two 1,800-year-old sandstone raised coffins, or sarcophagi, each weighing a tonne, have been found in what is likely to have been the burial plot of a wealthy and elite family.

Several cremation pots have also been uncovered, confirming the presence of a Roman cemetery on the approach to the fort.

A Durham University team is conducting the dig for a development company which is building offices around a listed 19th Century Presbyterian church on the site.

One of the sarcophagi has been opened and was found to contain the remains of a child of around six and possibly also the bones of an adult.

It appears that the head of the child had been removed and placed elsewhere in the coffin.

Richard Annis, project manager with Archaeological Services at Durham University, said: “This practice is rare, but it is known to occur in Roman burials and nobody knows why.”

Today, the second coffin will be opened after sawing through iron pegs, which were sealed with molten lead to secure the lid.

“These sarcophagi would have been a prominent feature of the landscape, and are the expensive burials of grand persons of wealth and significance who could afford such things – possibly the fort commander or high ranking officers,” said Richard.

Read more @ http://www.thejournal.co.uk/news/nor...ecrets-4499822

These photographs courtesy of the Newcastle City Libraries Archive Collection on Flickr from a 1903 excavation:

003357:Roman Coffin Newcastle-Upon-Tyne 1903
Description : Roman coffin found at Clavering Place. further information can be found at Archaeologia Aeliana XXV p. 148

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Old August 19th, 2013, 03:25 PM   #64
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Quote:
Originally Posted by AngerOfTheNorth View Post
I was quickly reading this article...

http://www.theguardian.com/commentis...lots-languages

...and noticed this line: "In a cemetery near Newcastle upon Tyne, there's a Roman gravestone inscribed in Latin and in Palmyrean (the ancient kingdom situated in what is now Syria)."

Anyone know where the gravestone is?
I have a vague recollection of this being Hadrians Wall -ish [obviously] but in the Hexham area, or Vindolanda possibly even a re used stone. I can t find it at the moment, but I am sure I have seen this in a TV show.

Edit:

There's this at Arbeia [South Shields]:

Quote:
Another tombstone of a native British woman named Regina (RIB 1065 infra) is most interesting. Regina's tribe were the Catuvellauni, the most populous in southern Britain, who inhabited the area now covered by the modern shires of Hertford, Northampton, Buckingham, Bedford and Cambridge. Her bereaved husband Barates' home city of Palmyra lay on the eastern edge of the province of Syria, at the opposite end of the Roman empire (2,500 miles away by falcon). It is very likely that he was numbered among the unit of Tigris Bargemen stationed at the fort during the fourth century. The stone below was also inscribed RGYN BT HRY T HBL; anyone read Palmyrene?

D M REGINA LIBERTA ET CONIVGE BARATES PALMYRENVS NATIONE CATVALLAVNA AN XXX
"To the spirits of the departed and Regina, freedwoman and wife of Barates of Palmyra, a Catuvellaunian by race, thirty years old."
http://www.roman-britain.org/places/arbeia.htm#rib1065

There's also, [or it's close.... Pannonia was Hungary/Yugoslavia - ish. Grauniad crossed wires and all that]:

Quote:
D M CORN VICTOR S C MIL ANN XXVI CIV PANN FIL SATVRNINI P P VIX AN LV D XI CONIVX PROCVRAVI

"To the shades of the departed Cornelius Victor, Singularis Consularis with twenty-six years service, a citizen of the Pannonians, son of Saturninus the Primus Pilus, he lived fifty-five years and eleven days. His wife saw to this [memorial]."
http://www.roman-britain.org/places/vindolanda.htm
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Old August 19th, 2013, 04:47 PM   #65
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Hadrian's Wall



I visited the Roman Army Museum at Walltown last week and it's a tremendous experience.

They had a rounded helmet (no tittering at the back) which was worn by the Syrian bowmen who were brought to the Wall.

I found this on the netty courtesy of adrianmurdoch.typepad.com

http://adrianmurdoch.typepad.com/my_...-barathes.html
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Old November 25th, 2013, 02:56 PM   #66
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Hadrian's Wall hosts international conference

From today's Journal Live, copyright NCJMedia Ltd @ http://www.thejournal.co.uk/news/nor...erence-6337017

Hadrian's Wall hosts international conference
By Tony Henderson - 25th November 2013



A conference opens today which will explore how Hadrian’s Wall still has a part to play in the modern world.

The event at Tullie House Museum in Carlisle aims to investigate how studies of the Wall, the way it operated and its legacy over the centuries means it can have a role in the promotion of world peace.

“After nearly two millennia frontier walls are still part of the world’s political and geographical landscape,” said conference organiser Mark Gibbs. “We will compare and contrast our ancient frontier with modern border conflicts, from the viewpoint of historians, politicians, academics, medics, filmmakers and artists.

“The idea is to show that although Hadrian’s Wall is an ancient structure it still has a great deal of significance. We will be exploring how it is not just about archaeology and old stones but that the Wall has modern relevance.”

Experts will examine how barriers, from Hadrian’s Wall and the Berlin Wall to the Gaza Wall in Palestine, divide communities and create borders.

“To many people, Hadrian’s Wall represents the border between England and Scotland, and we still talk about the Border country,” said Mr Gibbs.

Another area of exploration will focus on the debate about borders in Europe against increasing number of immigrants fleeing poverty and unrest in Africa.

The likely experiences of the Roman governors appointed to run the conquered lands to the south of Hadrian’s Wall and how they dealt with the threat from the north will also be considered.

This will tie in with contribution at the conference by speaker Rory Stewart MP, who in 2003 was coalition deputy governor of the Marsh Arab region of Southern Iraq.

Read more @ http://www.thejournal.co.uk/news/nor...erence-6337017
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Old December 19th, 2013, 02:13 PM   #67
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Restoration work begins on Hadrian's Wall temple treasure

Courtesy of yesterday's Journal Live, copyright NCJMedia Ltd @ http://www.thejournal.co.uk/news/nor...s-wall-6415733

Restoration work begins on Hadrian's Wall temple treasure
By Tony Henderson - 18th December 2013


Andrew Parkin, from the Discovery Museum with the statue of the Roman god Mithras

On what is now our Christmas Day, troops on Hadrian’s Wall 1,800 years ago were celebrating the birthday of the god Mithras.

Reputedly born on December 25, Mithras was worshipped at sites on at least three locations along the Wall.

Now conservation work is to be carried out on a sculpture of Mithras which was discovered at Housesteads Roman fort in the 19th Century.

The stone relief shows Mithras emerging from an egg – the symbol of eternal time.

The god is surrounded by an egg-shaped representation of the signs of the zodiac, representing the cosmos.

This is the earliest representation of the signs of the zodiac to be found in Britain.

It would have been lit from behind to present a powerful image for worshippers entering the semi-underground temple at Chapel Hill at Housesteads.

The sculpture is one of the main exhibits in a collection of Mithraic items from the Wall on show at the Great North Museum in Newcastle.

“It is one of the best collections of Mithraic material in the world,” said Andrew Parkin, keeper of archaeology at Tyne Wear Archives and Museums.

Repair and conservation work will now take place on restoration measures carried out on the sculpture in the 1950s, which are deteriorating.

“It will be painstaking work undertaken by our experienced conservation team,” said Andrew.

It is hoped that the sculpture will be back on display in February.

The carving is usually on display underneath a relief sculpture which shows a scene of Mithras slaying a bull, which was also found at Housesteads and was a common depiction in Mithraic temples.

Andrew said: “Our Mithras stone is a unique and powerful Roman object that blends several religious traditions.

“We still have offerings left at the museum at this time of year. Previously we’ve had a pot plant, pine cones, money and even a Chocolate Orange.”

The stone is part of the Society of Antiquaries of Newcastle upon Tyne’s collection.

Read more and see image gallery @ http://www.thejournal.co.uk/news/nor...s-wall-6415733
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Old January 24th, 2014, 06:25 PM   #68
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Final design unveiled for for landscape centre on Hadrian's Wall

From today's Journal Live, copyright NCJMedia Ltd @ http://www.thejournal.co.uk/news/nor...centre-6558103

Final design unveiled for for landscape centre on Hadrian's Wall
By Tony Henderson - 24th January 2014


An image of the final design for the The Sill landscape discovery centre

The final designs were revealed last night for a landscape discovery centre on Hadrian’s Wall.

Representatives from the North East business and tourism community gathered for the official unveiling of the final designs for The Sill.

The £11.2m centre is planned by Northumberland National Park Authority and YHA (England and Wales).

The designs went on show at Bardon Mill Village Hall near the proposed centre’s lcoation at Once Brewed and will now be taken into the planning stages with an outcome predicted by summer.

The plans have been created by architects Jane Darbyshire and David Kendall, including a roof reflecting the whin sill habitat of Northumberland National Park.

The building will include local woodchip heating, photovoltaic canopies and solar water heating.

Around 1,700 people contributed suggestions in a series of open consultation events, meetings, focus groups and activity sessions. The centre will house education facilities, superfast broadband, five external activity areas, serviced office accommodation for outdoor activity businesses, areas for the sale of of local products and a local produce cafe.

The Sill’s vision is to create a hub which will open up the landscape of the whole of Northumberland National Park and offer substantial economic benefits to the region, with a £3.35m contribution predicted in its first year as it acts as a shop window for the rural businesses in and around the park.

Tony Gates, chief executive of Northumberland National Park Authority, said; “In just a short space of time, we have consulted people at 130 meetings and our design team have created concepts which are both sympathetic to the environment and inspiring in their vision.

“Over the course of the development phase of the project, which has been backed by the Heritage Lottery Fund, we have invited members of the public to contribute to the design process, and their feedback and ideas have helped to shape the design.”

Read more @ http://www.thejournal.co.uk/news/nor...centre-6558103
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Old February 17th, 2014, 02:06 PM   #69
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Pub's accommodation plan for Hadrian's Wall visitors looks set to fail

From today's Journal Live, copyright NCJMedia Ltd @ http://www.thejournal.co.uk/news/nor...s-wall-6715781

Pub's accommodation plan for Hadrian's Wall visitors looks set to fail

By Brian Daniel - 17th February 2014


The Robin Hood Inn at East Wallhouses in Northumberland

A pub close to a world heritage site looks set to be knocked back in its contentious bid to provide accommodation for tourists.

The Robin Hood Inn, near Hadrian’s Wall , is seeking to build an 18 bedroom facility to provide four star accommodation which bosses say is needed for visitors to the heritage site.

The plan has split opinion with claims the facility would be out of keeping with the rural setting close to the wall, and counter claims that it is needed to support the viability of the pub.

Council officers are siding with objectors, recommending that it be refused at a meeting this week.

The pub on the Military Road at East Wallhouses is seeking planning permission for the building on land to the north-west and rear of the premises, within the Hadrian’s Wall Heritage Zone.

Northumberland County Council papers say the proposal “aims to develop four star quality accommodation which is currently not catered for along the Hadrian’s Wall Trail.”

They say it would create year-round accommodation and provide employment for four full-time equivalent roles.

However, four letters of objection have been lodged, along with one from Matfen Parish Council.

The council has claimed the building, by virtue of its size and scale, would be “totally out of keeping with the rural setting”, would disturb the occupant of, and overlook, a nearby property, and that the vehicular access is already a “well-known accident black spot”.

It voiced fears over flooding and called for a full archaeological survey because of the proximity to the wall. Fears have also been voiced over light pollution.

Chairman Robin Douglass last night said: “Nobody in the area wants it, none of our parishioners want it. The person who lives next door to it certainly does not want it.

Read more @ http://www.thejournal.co.uk/news/nor...s-wall-6715781
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Old February 21st, 2014, 06:23 PM   #70
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View over Hadrian's Wall scoops international award

From today's Journal Live, copyright NCJMedia Ltd @ http://www.thejournal.co.uk/news/nor...scoops-6729745

View over Hadrian's Wall scoops international award
By Laurence Dodds - 21st February 2014


One of Rich Bunce's photographs

Richard Bunce, 32, from Ilkley in Yorkshire, beat thousands to win a commendation from the Garden Photographers’ Association.

His picture of foxgloves at the Wall earned a place in the GPA’s gigantic coffee table book and shows just how stunning the county can be.

Mr Bunce said: “I love the rugged and wild atmosphere of the Northumberland landscape. It’s very easy for your imagination to run wild as you roam through such an ancient and well-preserved environment.

“You feel a bit closer to everything – a bit closer to nature, closer to history. There’s the sense of all those people that have walked the paths and roads before.

“It’s amazing to think that you would have found foxgloves around this same area during the Roman occupation of the wall.”

The London-born rambler, who calls himself ‘the walking photographer’, was travelling with his wife Caroline in the summer of 2013 when he spotted the flowers “regimented, all lined up.”

His photo looks down onto Crag Lough towards the hills looming over Cawfield Quarry.

Mr Bunce said: “It was a really grey day when I took the photo. I’m always saying in my workshops that you can take great photos in any weather. Now I have a great example I can use!”

He hopes to return to Northumberland soon with his dog Alfie – a two-year-old lurcher rescued by the RSPCA a few months after the winning picture was taken.

And he told budding photographers to experiment with angles and try for a different perspective when walking the great North hills.

He said: “It’s very easy to take good photos in that area because it’s so stunning.

“There’s so many lines – the walls, the horizons, the clouds – so you need to think about where you position them and how your eye is drawn through the scene.”

Italian Rosanna Castrini won the grand prize with a snap of flowers growing in her own garden ‘prairie’.
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Old March 25th, 2014, 04:57 PM   #71
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Hadrian's Wall Trust to close down after English Heritage pulls the plug on support

From today's Journal Live, copyright NCJMedia Ltd @ http://www.thejournal.co.uk/news/nor...s-wall-6873928

Hadrian's Wall Trust to close down after English Heritage pulls the plug on support
Mar 25, 2014 12:02 By Adrian Pearson



The Trust set up to safeguard Hadrian’s Wall is to be closed down as a result of funding cuts. Staff at the Hadrian’s Wall Trust face an uncertain future after English Heritage decided it had no option but to pull the plug on support for the Hadrian’s Wall Trust.

The body had being tasked with managing the World heritage Site, but control will now have to be shared among various councils along the route.

English Heritage, Natural England and the eight local authorities who part fund the Hadrian’s Wall Trust are working with Northumberland National Park Authority and the Chairman of the World Heritage Site Management Plan Committee, to put new arrangements in place to safeguard one of the country’s most famous landmarks.

Henry Owen-John, English Heritage planning and conservation director for the North West, said the funders were left with little choice. He said: “The Trust as a charity is working in a pretty tough financial climate, as are the people who contribute funds to it, such as English Heritage. The Trust has been very successful in raising money for specific projects, but the difficulty is finding funding to cover its core costs, the day to day costs, and it is this which has led us to our decision. These are difficult times that we all have to operate under. The Hadrian’s Wall World Heritage Site is unusual in that we do not normally cover the management sites, it is really just this and Stonehenge where this happens, and we have to bring that situation here to an end, and try to get the management self sustaining. The people who will take over after the closure of the trust are committed to the future management and coordination of the sites. Northumberland County Council will take a lead role in coordinating this now.” Mr Owen-John said promotional work this year will continue. “It will take approximately six months to bring the affairs of the trust to a satisfactory conclusion, and the spring and autumn promotional work will continue as planned this year. We want to continue marketing Hadrian’s Wall as a whole rather than each council just marketing its bit of the wall.”

English Heritage has had a hard time when it comes to securing Government cash. In 2010 it had some 30% of its budget axed.

Read more @ http://www.thejournal.co.uk/news/nor...s-wall-6873928
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Old March 27th, 2014, 02:53 PM   #72
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Bronze Roman eagle lands back at Hadrian's Wall treasure display

From today's Journal Live, copyright NCJMedia Ltd @ http://www.thejournal.co.uk/news/nor...esters-6882979

Bronze Roman eagle lands back at Hadrian's Wall treasure display
Mar 27, 2014 11:15 By Tony Henderson


Frances McIntosh, curator of Roman Collections at Chesters with the Coventina Eagle

The eagle has landed at Hadrian’s Wall near the spot where it had its origins 138 years ago.

In 1867, lead miners discovered a well at the site of the Roman fort of Carrawburgh in Northumberland. This alerted John Clayton, lawyer, Newcastle town clerk and antiquarian who lived at the nearby Chesters estate. He arranged an excavation and the well, on the site of a spring, produced more than 13,000 coins, at least 22 altars, vases, incense burners, pearls and brooches. They were gifts to the water goddess Coventina, who is shown on a stone carving dedicated to her by the fort commander. Most of the coins went to the British Museum but around 3,000 very worn specimens were melted down to produce a bronze eagle for the bookcase of Clayton’s fellow antiquarian John Collingwood-Bruce. He was headmaster of the Percy Street Academy in Newcastle and the author of the 19th Century Handbook to the Roman Wall, which was published in 1863.

The eagle eventually ended up with Tyne Wear Archives and Museums in the Laing Art Gallery in Newcastle and has been in storage for years. But yesterday it went on display at English Heritage’s Chesters Roman fort in time for the new visitor season which opens on April 1.

Kevin Booth, English Heritage senior curator for the North of England, said that the British Museum has just handed back 9,000 of the coins to the organisation. A selection of the coins will go on show with the eagle. The display will be completed by an exhibition of images of the coins by top American photographer Steven Sack. Last November he examined 8,000 of the coins in four days at the British Museum, photographing 80. He said: “My speciality is photographing objects that have been transformed through time and wear, and reveal a deeper and almost dream-like image. They are like memories. One does not see the coin in the image, but the image on the coin. I seek to create magical images, which inspire the spectator and give the museum at Chesters an avenue to engage the public. I am particularly happy with the result as I find the images seem to tell the story of the goddess Coventina when, in fact, almost nothing is known about her.”

Coventina is known from only two other sites in the Roman world. Kevin Booth said: “Coventina’s Well was an incredibly exciting find that shed new light on the life and culture of Roman citizens. Coventina is really an unknown goddess and yet this significant shrine sheds new light on these stories from history. Examples of the coins are now back close to the place where they were found.”
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Old April 2nd, 2014, 11:21 AM   #73
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Northumberland National Park will oversee Hadrian's Wall path

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From today's Journal Live, copyright NCJMedia Ltd @ http://www.thejournal.co.uk/news/nor...s-wall-6873928

Hadrian's Wall Trust to close down after English Heritage pulls the plug on support
Mar 25, 2014 12:02 By Adrian Pearson



The Trust set up to safeguard Hadrian’s Wall is to be closed down as a result of funding cuts. Staff at the Hadrian’s Wall Trust face an uncertain future after English Heritage decided it had no option but to pull the plug on support for the Hadrian’s Wall Trust.

The body had being tasked with managing the World heritage Site, but control will now have to be shared among various councils along the route.

English Heritage, Natural England and the eight local authorities who part fund the Hadrian’s Wall Trust are working with Northumberland National Park Authority and the Chairman of the World Heritage Site Management Plan Committee, to put new arrangements in place to safeguard one of the country’s most famous landmarks.

Henry Owen-John, English Heritage planning and conservation director for the North West, said the funders were left with little choice. He said: “The Trust as a charity is working in a pretty tough financial climate, as are the people who contribute funds to it, such as English Heritage. The Trust has been very successful in raising money for specific projects, but the difficulty is finding funding to cover its core costs, the day to day costs, and it is this which has led us to our decision. These are difficult times that we all have to operate under. The Hadrian’s Wall World Heritage Site is unusual in that we do not normally cover the management sites, it is really just this and Stonehenge where this happens, and we have to bring that situation here to an end, and try to get the management self sustaining. The people who will take over after the closure of the trust are committed to the future management and coordination of the sites. Northumberland County Council will take a lead role in coordinating this now.” Mr Owen-John said promotional work this year will continue. “It will take approximately six months to bring the affairs of the trust to a satisfactory conclusion, and the spring and autumn promotional work will continue as planned this year. We want to continue marketing Hadrian’s Wall as a whole rather than each council just marketing its bit of the wall.”

English Heritage has had a hard time when it comes to securing Government cash. In 2010 it had some 30% of its budget axed.

Read more @ http://www.thejournal.co.uk/news/nor...s-wall-6873928
Follow up to this story in today's Journal Live, copyright NCJMedia Ltd @ http://www.thejournal.co.uk/news/nor...drians-6905506

Northumberland National Park will oversee Hadrian's Wall path

Apr 02, 2014 07:25 By The Journal

Northumberland National Park has been asked to take over the care of a cross-country path following the collapse of a tourism body.

The park is to take over the running of the Hadrian’s Wall National Trail – which brings thousands of tourists to the North East – after Hadrian’s Wall Trust announced its closure due to funding problems.

The Trail runs the length of the UNESCO World Heritage Site, passing through some of the most beautiful parts of England. It is currently managed through a partnership including Natural England, English Heritage, Northumberland County Council, Cumbria County Council, Northumberland National Park Authority (NNPA), North Tyneside Council and Newcastle City Council, but Hadrian’s Wall Trust had been in charge of it.

Tony Gates, chief executive of Northumberland National Park Authority, said: “We understand the synergy and value of the trail to the work of the National Park and its economic importance to the whole World Heritage Site. We want to demonstrate our commitment by agreeing to be lead partner managing this unique resource for the businesses and the 1.75 million visitors they serve each year. We now look forward to a smooth and timely transfer of this service so that businesses, users of the National Trail and other stakeholders can be reassured of its ongoing management.”

The condition of the trail impacts directly on the archaeology of the Roman frontier, many of which are important tourist destinations. Mike Collins, inspector of ancient monuments for English Heritage, said: “With spring around the corner, we want to reassure people that the partnership recognises the importance of maintenance work on the trail in the protection of the World Heritage Site. We are encouraged to see the rapid response of the Highway Authorities and the National Park Authority to ensure the trail is maintained and the Wall is protected.”

Read more @ http://www.thejournal.co.uk/news/nor...drians-6905506
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Old April 7th, 2014, 12:55 PM   #74
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Public consultation to be held in the region about
the future of Hadrian's Wall.

By Tony Henderson, The Journal, 7th April 2014



Controversy over funding for Hadrian's Wall will be the backdrop to a public consultation on how the world heritage site will be managed over the next five years.The monument has been the focus of protests by MPs over Government funding cuts and the demise of the Hadrian’s Wall Trust. Now people in the region are being given the chance to have their say when workshops will be held on the new five-year management plan for the Wall. This is the fourth rolling five-year management plan, covering 2015 to 2019. The plans are commissioned by the site’s management plan committee, a voluntary body made up of representatives of key organisations associated with the site. The committee is the advisory and lobbying body for the world heritage site. Members are voluntary representing interests such as English Heritage, Northumberland National Park Authority, National Trust, sites and museums, local authorities, landowners, farmers, and businesses.

The site runs through rural and urban areas, and its survival is dependent on cooperation between many different stakeholders including county and local councils, 70 parish councils, Natural England, English Heritage, the National Trust, national park authorities, museums and Roman sites, and approximately 700 landowners. funding remains a challenge though, as was highlighted by the fact that the Hadrian’s Wall Trust, which has coordinated development work with partners across the whole world heritage site, will be wound up in six months. The consultation is being run by the Centre for Applied Archaeology at University College London on behalf of the world heritage site management plan committee.

The workshops take place from 2pm-4.30pm or from 7pm-9.30pm at the Wave Centre in Maryport today; Carlisle Civic Centre tomorrow; the Beaumont Hotel in Hexham on Wednesday; the Mining Institute on Westgate Road, Newcastle on Thursday and Segedunum Roman Fort and Museum in Wallsend on Friday. There are 30 places at each workshop on a first come, first served basis. To attend, contact Isa Benedetti-Whitton, by email to [email protected] or on 020 7679 4778. The online consultation is open from today until April 26 via www.ucl.ac.uk/caa/.


Read More - http://www.thejournal.co.uk/news/nor...s-wall-6927217
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Old May 20th, 2014, 02:03 PM   #75
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I thought the roman wall was located underground next to the mining institute?
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Old May 20th, 2014, 05:30 PM   #76
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Superunknown90 View Post
I thought the roman wall was located underground next to the mining institute?
Indeed next to...I think the plan is for funding to raise the pavement outside (thereby with the added bonus of a disabled access to the front). This would be over the wall to show it off (somehow).

As our guide stated, he believed that there was a 95% chance that the Roman wall was there, although historically when first discovered, the historians thought that it had to be 100% due to its proximity to other sites (and the angle of the wall itself).

Nice guy who took us around - very knowledgeable and interesting...
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Old May 20th, 2014, 05:44 PM   #77
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Superunknown90 View Post
I thought the roman wall was located underground next to the mining institute?

Information about the Roman Wall in Central and Suburban Newcastle included within here . . .

Quote:
ROMAN SITES IN NEWCASTLE & THE NORTH EAST, INCLUDING THE ROMAN WALL / HADRIANS WALL . . .
A
Arbeia Roman Fort and Museum, South Shields
http://www.skyscrapercity.com/showpo...&postcount=320
http://www.skyscrapercity.com/showpo...&postcount=321
C
Condercum - Roman Temple of Antenociticus at Condercum, Benwell
http://www.skyscrapercity.com/showpo...postcount=3115
Culverts and Bridges for ancient 'Burns' (Streams) that ran under the Roman Wall in Newcastle
http://www.skyscrapercity.com/showpo...&postcount=314
E
Epiacum Roman Fort (Whitley Castle Roman Fort) at Alston
http://www.skyscrapercity.com/showpo...postcount=3699
F
Flying Archaeologist - BBC Programme about Hadrians Wall (April 2013)
http://www.skyscrapercity.com/showpo...&postcount=949
http://www.skyscrapercity.com/showpo...&postcount=952
H
HADRIAN'S WALL - The "Roman Wall" across England from Wallsend to Bowness on Solway (Discussion Thread in "Communal Area" of Forum)
http://www.skyscrapercity.com/showthread.php?t=1694335
Hadrians Wall - Hidden Areas of Hadrians Wall
http://www.skyscrapercity.com/showpo...postcount=3000
I
Illuminating the line of Hadrians Wall, in 2010
http://www.skyscrapercity.com/showpo...3&postcount=71
http://www.skyscrapercity.com/showpo...9&postcount=72
M
Milecastles - On the Roman Wall, in Newcastle
http://www.skyscrapercity.com/showpo...postcount=1192
R
Roman Camp in North Shields
http://www.skyscrapercity.com/showpo...&postcount=316
Roman Numerals (though not usually from 'Roman Times') in use around the Region
http://www.skyscrapercity.com/showpo...postcount=1474
http://www.skyscrapercity.com/showpo...postcount=2017
Roman Wall - Through Central and Suburban Newcastle
http://www.skyscrapercity.com/showpo...postcount=1516
http://www.skyscrapercity.com/showpo...postcount=1522
http://www.skyscrapercity.com/showpo...postcount=1523
http://www.skyscrapercity.com/showpo...postcount=1527
http://www.skyscrapercity.com/showpo...postcount=1528
http://www.skyscrapercity.com/showpo...postcount=1529
http://www.skyscrapercity.com/showpo...postcount=1530
http://www.skyscrapercity.com/showpo...postcount=3657
http://www.skyscrapercity.com/showpo...postcount=3661
S
Segedunum - An Exhibition about its discovery and the diggings that took place from 1975
http://www.skyscrapercity.com/showpo...postcount=3114
Segedunum (from) to the Spanish City - A BOOK by Keith Armstrong and Peter Dixon
http://www.skyscrapercity.com/showpo...3&postcount=35
V
Vindolanda - Roman Tablets go on show at Vindolanda
http://www.skyscrapercity.com/showpo...3&postcount=99
.
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Old May 20th, 2014, 06:18 PM   #78
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Hadrians Wall - Westgate Road/Neville Street

I thought I had posted this photograph of an excavation of the wall outside of the Lit & Phil, Neville House in the 1930's - I don't have any details as to the copyright holder.


Image hosted on http://www.fototime.com/237C2AB6AF2BAF5/orig.jpg
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Old June 4th, 2014, 02:44 PM   #79
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Game of Thrones writer reveals Hadrian's Wall inspired hit TV series

From today's Journal Live, copyright NCJMedia Ltd @ http://www.thejournal.co.uk/news/nor...drians-7214397

Game of Thrones writer reveals Hadrian's Wall inspired hit TV series
Jun 04, 2014 12:05 By Sarah Scott



Tourism bosses are hoping for an influx of visitors after it emerged the inspiration for one of the world’s most talked-about TV shows is Hadrian’s Wall.

The author of the bestselling Game of Thrones books, which have been turned into the award-winning TV show on Sky Atlantic, has revealed that seeing Hadrian’s Wall planted the seeds of inspiration back in the 1980s for his popular fantasy tale.

In an interview with American magazine Rolling Stone, George RR Martin said it was the Northumberland landmark which first got him thinking about the plot and inspired The Wall, an integral part of the series. Martin said “The Wall predates anything else. I can trace back the inspiration for that to 1981. I was in England visiting a friend, and as we approached the border of England and Scotland, we stopped to see Hadrian’s Wall. I stood up there and I tried to imagine what it was like to be a Roman legionary, standing on this wall, looking at these distant hills. It was a very profound feeling. For the Romans at that time, this was the end of civilization; it was the end of the world. We know that there were Scots beyond the hills, but they didn’t know that. “It could have been any kind of monster. It was the sense of this barrier against dark forces – it planted something in me. But when you write fantasy, everything is bigger and more colorful, so I took the Wall and made it three times as long and 700 feet high, and made it out of ice.”

In the TV show, The Wall is a massive fortification which stretches for 300 miles along the northern border of the Seven Kingdoms, defending the realm from the wildlings who live beyond. The Wall is reported to be over 700 feet tall and is made of solid ice.

Tourist bosses in the North East are now hopeful this latest revelation will help further promote the region to fans of the books and show and attract even more visitors to Hadrian’s Wall.

Read more @ http://www.thejournal.co.uk/news/nor...drians-7214397
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Old June 30th, 2014, 12:34 PM   #80
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Wind turbine proposal close to Hadrian's Wall set to get the green light

From today's Journal Live, copyright NCJMedia Ltd @ http://www.thejournal.co.uk/news/nor...oposal-7342387

Wind turbine proposal close to Hadrian's Wall set to get the green light
Jun 30, 2014 08:30 By Brian Daniel



Plan for two wind turbines close to Hadrian’s Wall look set to be given the green light, despite opposition based on their proximity to the World Heritage Site.

A farmer at Bardon Mill in Northumberland is seeking planning permission for two turbines up to 21.6m high at a site 1.3km from the Hadrian’s Wall Heritage site. The proposal is facing opposition from the local parish council and 27 residents, with concerns voiced over the proximity of the proposed site to the Roman Wall.

Yet Northumberland County Council officers are recommending the application be approved at a meeting tomorrow night. The application has been submitted by Robert Charlton of Brown Rigg Farm and seeks permission for 10kw turbines on agricultural land North of the property, within open countryside. The turbines would be mounted on 15m high tubular steel towers, with a blade diameter of 13.2m, an overall maximum height of 21.6m. They are proposed to generate electricity for the farm. The application follows withdrawal of an initial proposal following an objection from the council’s ecologist due to proximity to a site possibly used by bats, with the turbines now proposed to be further away.

However, Henshaw Parish Council has objected, along with the 27 residents. The parish council has questioned the necessity for two turbines, claiming the number makes the scheme a commercial venture. Residents argue the turbines would have an adverse impact on the landscape character and visual amenity of the area, would have a detrimental impact on residential amenity through noise disturbance and that they may result in shadow flicker. They have also cited the proximity of the site to the Hadrian’s Wall World Heritage Site and Northumberland National Park, potential impact on local wildlife and ecology and claimed the turbines would result in industrialisation of the landscape.

Read more @ http://www.thejournal.co.uk/news/nor...oposal-7342387
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