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Old August 31st, 2007, 05:39 PM   #1
pappy
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NASRDA to build Ģ32m Nigerian satellite

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By Oscarline Onwuemenyi

Nigerian engineers are currently working on plans to launch a locally-built satellite, the Director-General of the Nigerian Space Research Agency, Prof. Robert Borrofice, has said.

In an interview on Thursday with our correspondent in Abuja, he said unlike the two previous satellites designed and fabricated for Nigeria by foreign experts, though with the participation of Nigerian engineers, the new one would be wholly-Nigerian affair.

He said, “I want to tell you that right now, we have some engineers working on what we call NIGERIASAT-X. This is a satellite being built wholly by Nigerians. We have 11 of our engineers working on it.

“However, it is being built in the United Kingdom because we do not have the infrastructure to build it.”

He said that the Federal Government had approved the acquisition of the infrastructural capacity for local engineers to use in developing the technology.

He added that few countries in the world had the capacity to launch satellites while government had given permission to proceed to acquire the capacity.

According to him, “NIGERIASAT-X is like our real first foray into making a satellite. It is an earth observation satellite and will carry a payload of 16 cameras. It is easier to manufacture an observation satellite than a communication satellite because the payload you put there are cameras, not transponders and antennas.”

He said that the country was spending about Ģ32m to build the new satellite.

Boroffice said Nigeria had acquired high technology, which was entrenched in all the satellite procurements.

He said the new satellite technology was vital in the production of maps.

It is more effective than using the conventional methods, the traditional survey or using aerial photographs. Moreover, the data generated from satellite can give you so much information, depending on what you want from it,” he said.

He said the communication satellite launched four months ago, was economically viable and was already yielding fruit for the nation.
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Old August 31st, 2007, 07:41 PM   #2
zexyworm
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I wonder how the glorious Nigerian engineers will build such a satellite with NO POWER?

How about building roads, hospitals, and power stations? The current installed power capacity is a disgraceful 4,000MW, less than 10% of Malaysia's and far short of a minimum requirement of 50,000 MW. Are the people at NASRDA serious?

Apparently, Nigeria is still in the dark ages when it comes to governance and accountability!!!

Learn to WALK before you run. Besides, I will bet you a thousand dollars that with Nigeria's current infrastructure AND projected growth, it will be cheaper to have China build Nigerian satellites until 2020 (and that's extremely optimistic!).

Nobody should believe Borrofice. What he said is hot air for consumption by gullible Nigerian journalists.

Piece of TRIVIA: Nigeria is still not in control of its OWN top internet domain. Go figure!
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Old September 1st, 2007, 01:03 AM   #3
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Originally Posted by zexyworm View Post
I wonder how the glorious Nigerian engineers will build such a satellite with NO POWER?

How about building roads, hospitals, and power stations? The current installed power capacity is a disgraceful 4,000MW, less than 10% of Malaysia's and far short of a minimum requirement of 50,000 MW. Are the people at NASRDA serious?

Apparently, Nigeria is still in the dark ages when it comes to governance and accountability!!!

Learn to WALK before you run. Besides, I will bet you a thousand dollars that with Nigeria's current infrastructure AND projected growth, it will be cheaper to have China build Nigerian satellites until 2020 (and that's extremely optimistic!).

Nobody should believe Borrofice. What he said is hot air for consumption by gullible Nigerian journalists.

Piece of TRIVIA: Nigeria is still not in control of its OWN top internet domain. Go figure!
I see what you're saying but that shouldn't stop them from being ambitious.
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Old September 2nd, 2007, 04:18 AM   #4
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Originally Posted by zexyworm View Post
I wonder how the glorious Nigerian engineers will build such a satellite with NO POWER?

How about building roads, hospitals, and power stations? The current installed power capacity is a disgraceful 4,000MW, less than 10% of Malaysia's and far short of a minimum requirement of 50,000 MW. Are the people at NASRDA serious?

Apparently, Nigeria is still in the dark ages when it comes to governance and accountability!!!

Learn to WALK before you run. Besides, I will bet you a thousand dollars that with Nigeria's current infrastructure AND projected growth, it will be cheaper to have China build Nigerian satellites until 2020 (and that's extremely optimistic!).

Nobody should believe Borrofice. What he said is hot air for consumption by gullible Nigerian journalists.

Piece of TRIVIA: Nigeria is still not in control of its OWN top internet domain. Go figure!
i do think the federal government is distance from the people. a terrible thing but it also mm\eans the infrastructure for this satelitte would likely be provided by the feds even though people have no good roads or electricity.

anyway, nigeria now controls its internet domain name
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Old September 2nd, 2007, 02:55 PM   #5
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some times i dont think u guys think before talking...so basically we should build all the roads first before launching ourselves into the 21st century... for your information the amount of power projects going on now are numerous and would add no less than 10,000 or mre in about a yrs time so please stop making it seem like they are folding their arms and only building a satellite..have you thought of the long term economic benefits of nigerians building their own satellite...in the long run it will reduce costs and besides china started somewhere and now people are going to them to build satellites for them nt to even mention the economic benefits...even the roads and hospitals are being worked on...no where is built in a day
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Old September 2nd, 2007, 06:26 PM   #6
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Iluvnaija,

Sure, Rome wasn't built in a day. This is exactly what Borrofice should comprehend and digest:

Nigeria cannot industralize before building the infrastructure. We could sit here and argue all day, the result will be the same conclusion: no infrastructure = no industries.

To illustrate my point, do you realize that Nigeria's only GSM handset manufacturer closed its Abuja plant last year? Reason: interruption of power supply and bureucratic bottlenecks.

Nobody said Nigeria shouldn't build its own satellite. What Nigeria lacks, as usual, is a sense of focus. Obasanjo constantly beat his chest in self-praise about building IPPs. Where are they now? Nigeria's power capacity has even SHRUNKEN to less than 4,000 in the last year.

The focus should be on power plants both conventional and nuclear. Everyone talking about Nigeria building its own satellite is just dreaming, because it's not a feasible activity until at least 2020. Another issue it technical competence. If Nigerians currently can't manufacture computer parts, how will they build a satellite?

i wish someone would answer this with sincerity.
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Old September 2nd, 2007, 07:57 PM   #7
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Well said, Zexyworm. In Nigeria we like to thump our chests at things like this satellite venture (which is really a UK venture by Nigerians) or the the prior Nigerian-built car (to be manufactured in SA). Folks, infrastructure, infrastructure, infrastructure. Even the article about the satellite says it all ... “However, it is being built in the United Kingdom because we do not have the infrastructure to build it

Yes, we need the roads and normalized electricity production before we start thinking about things like satellite construction. Along the lines of ZW's example of the GSM factory closing in Abuja, from a personal example, my dad owned a plastics manufacturing plant in Agege area in Lagos in the '80s to early '90s. Constant lack of electrical power eventually destroyed so much of the machinery and production equipment that the factory ended up shutting down. Add to that the cost of owning and maintaining an industrial generator plus fueling cost and the expenses just piled up.

Talk about power plants coming online is good. But until it happens and we see the results, it will be only talk. Same thing has been happening for years. Fix the electricity situation in Nigeria and that country will achieve even mightier things. Walk before trying to run.
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Old September 2nd, 2007, 08:44 PM   #8
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Originally Posted by zexyworm View Post
Iluvnaija,

Sure, Rome wasn't built in a day. This is exactly what Borrofice should comprehend and digest:

Nigeria cannot industralize before building the infrastructure. We could sit here and argue all day, the result will be the same conclusion: no infrastructure = no industries.

To illustrate my point, do you realize that Nigeria's only GSM handset manufacturer closed its Abuja plant last year? Reason: interruption of power supply and bureucratic bottlenecks.

Nobody said Nigeria shouldn't build its own satellite. What Nigeria lacks, as usual, is a sense of focus. Obasanjo constantly beat his chest in self-praise about building IPPs. Where are they now? Nigeria's power capacity has even SHRUNKEN to less than 4,000 in the last year.

The focus should be on power plants both conventional and nuclear. Everyone talking about Nigeria building its own satellite is just dreaming, because it's not a feasible activity until at least 2020. Another issue it technical competence. If Nigerians currently can't manufacture computer parts, how will they build a satellite?

i wish someone would answer this with sincerity.
In your definition projects such as these shouldn't happen until we fix every single road and completely solve the power situation? Please development doesn't work that way.
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Old September 2nd, 2007, 11:07 PM   #9
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Originally Posted by Africmento View Post

Well said, Zexyworm. In Nigeria we like to thump our chests at things like this satellite venture (which is really a UK venture by Nigerians) or the the prior Nigerian-built car (to be manufactured in SA). Folks, infrastructure, infrastructure, infrastructure. Even the article about the satellite says it all ... “However, it is being built in the United Kingdom because we do not have the infrastructure to build it

Yes, we need the roads and normalized electricity production before we start thinking about things like satellite construction. Along the lines of ZW's example of the GSM factory closing in Abuja, from a personal example, my dad owned a plastics manufacturing plant in Agege area in Lagos in the '80s to early '90s. Constant lack of electrical power eventually destroyed so much of the machinery and production equipment that the factory ended up shutting down. Add to that the cost of owning and maintaining an industrial generator plus fueling cost and the expenses just piled up.

Talk about power plants coming online is good. But until it happens and we see the results, it will be only talk. Same thing has been happening for years. Fix the electricity situation in Nigeria and that country will achieve even mightier things. Walk before trying to run.
these things can be done side by side. despite india being trumpeted as a global IT haven, it runs on generators like much of africa and suffers the same infrastructural problems
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Old September 2nd, 2007, 11:46 PM   #10
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these things can be done side by side. despite india being trumpeted as a global IT haven, it runs on generators like much of africa and suffers the same infrastructural problems
Exactly but the world showers India with countless tons of praise. ...black outs in India are common feature of every day, even in the big cities...but A. Roney holds up this country as a shiny reference frame for Africa while he spits on the latter. Thatīs not fair play!

The only difference between much of Africa and India is that India invested into grand-scale marketing campaigns which helped to fuel their newly built IT campuses that dot the cityscape of Bangalore and Hyderbad among others. But their infrastructure and energy problems donīt really differ greatly from Africa.
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Old September 3rd, 2007, 09:52 AM   #11
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Exactly but the world showers India with countless tons of praise. ...black outs in India are common feature of every day, even in the big cities...but A. Roney holds up this country as a shiny reference frame for Africa while he spits on the latter. Thatīs not fair play!

The only difference between much of Africa and India is that India invested into grand-scale marketing campaigns which helped to fuel their newly built IT campuses that dot the cityscape of Bangalore and Hyderbad among others. But their infrastructure and energy problems donīt really differ greatly from Africa.
Their are many aspects in which the Indian economy holds advantages over Nigeria and Africa as a whole.

1.For one, the buisness enviroment makes it alot easier for foreign investors to pour their money in.

2.Their growing at a faster rate than Africa.

3. The Indian economy is commodity based and importance is based in High Tech development.

4. India is the most attractive destination for outsourced jobs

5. It's one nation with a population of 1.1 billion people (larger population than Africa)

Again this doesn't go to say that India is still VERY VERY poor. Malnutrition is higher than in sub saharan Africa, their are more than 700 million people that live on less than 2 dollars a day. The infrastructure is crumbling, especially in its largest cities. India's growth is quite different from China, while in China the growth is coming from the bottom up, in India its an opposite trend.
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Old September 3rd, 2007, 10:53 AM   #12
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Their are many aspects in which the Indian economy holds advantages over Nigeria and Africa as a whole.

1.For one, the buisness enviroment makes it alot easier for foreign investors to pour their money in.

2.Their growing at a faster rate than Africa.

3. The Indian economy is commodity based and importance is based in High Tech development.

4. India is the most attractive destination for outsourced jobs

5. It's one nation with a population of 1.1 billion people (larger population than Africa)

Again this doesn't go to say that India is still VERY VERY poor. Malnutrition is higher than in sub saharan Africa, their are more than 700 million people that live on less than 2 dollars a day. The infrastructure is crumbling, especially in its largest cities. India's growth is quite different from China, while in China the growth is coming from the bottom up, in India its an opposite trend.
Suddenly you are more balanced in your arguments (although I donīt agree with all the points you have mentioned which you seem to take out of their context). There are countries in Africa that are growing well and will continue to grow faster than India in the next decade.

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India the most attractive destination for outsourced jobs
Yes, agreed but only because they invested billions into grand-scale marketing campaigns and the building IT Campuses, that is not out of reach for African states, my dear Alex R. (even if you donīt want to believe it)
Quote:
1.For one, the buisness enviroment makes it alot easier for foreign investors to pour their money in.
As for the first point, you lumb all African countries into one bag! how ridiculous you are....moreover, the fact that investors come to India also has a lot to do with potential profit and psychology of investors. ("once the run started, everybody wants to jump onto the ship") There are numerous countries in Africa where business runs smoothly but investors - apart from Chinese investors - simply stay away.
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Old September 3rd, 2007, 04:22 PM   #13
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Suddenly you are more balanced in your arguments (although I donīt agree with all the points you have mentioned which you seem to take out of their context). There are countries in Africa that are growing well and will continue to grow faster than India in the next decade.



Yes, agreed but only because they invested billions into grand-scale marketing campaigns and the building IT Campuses, that is not out of reach for African states, my dear Alex R. (even if you donīt want to believe it)


As for the first point, you lumb all African countries into one bag! how ridiculous you are....moreover, the fact that investors come to India also has a lot to do with potential profit and psychology of investors. ("once the run started, everybody wants to jump onto the ship") There are numerous countries in Africa where business runs smoothly but investors - apart from Chinese investors - simply stay away.
How am I more balanced? The thing is when we discussed India in another thread, I said the same exact things. With regards that even though its an emerging giant, it has some serious issues. I've never denied this and you know it. I'm well aware that their are nations growing faster than India, Angola is one of them however India represents a larger share of the global economy, thus making it more important. That doesn't go to show that we shouldn't commend African nations that are growing faster than India. Even the ones that are growing slower should also be commended if due.

Yes, well investments in the right sectors will reap rewards. You can't blame them for doing something that has helped them and will give a benchmark for further growth.

Their are numerous countries that are great investments and have strong institutions to back them up, but you cannot deny that these nations represent a minority in the continent. Foreign investors, invest where their is an opportunity, every succesful African country is heavely westernized. The excuse that "their is a lack of investment because people don't know about it" is simply not true. How is that small relatively unkown Latin American countries get plenty of investment, but the same according to you does not hold in Africa?
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Old September 3rd, 2007, 04:44 PM   #14
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How am I more balanced? The thing is when we discussed India in another thread, I said the same exact things. With regards that even though its an emerging giant, it has some serious issues. I've never denied this and you know it. I'm well aware that their are nations growing faster than India, Angola is one of them however India represents a larger share of the global economy, thus making it more important. That doesn't go to show that we shouldn't commend African nations that are growing faster than India. Even the ones that are growing slower should also be commended if due.

Yes, well investments in the right sectors will reap rewards. You can't blame them for doing something that has helped them and will give a benchmark for further growth.

Their are numerous countries that are great investments and have strong institutions to back them up, but you cannot deny that these nations represent a minority in the continent. Foreign investors, invest where their is an opportunity, every succesful African country is heavely westernized. The excuse that "their is a lack of investment because people don't know about it" is simply not true. How is that small relatively unkown Latin American countries get plenty of investment, but the same according to you does not hold in Africa?
please give examples of these latin american countries you speak of.

and what do you mean every successful africa country is heavily westernized
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Old September 3rd, 2007, 04:46 PM   #15
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This all sounds like very good news, I just hope the countrys wealth isnt stolen and mis-used as is the case like so many countrys.
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Old September 3rd, 2007, 07:26 PM   #16
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please give examples of these latin american countries you speak of.

and what do you mean every successful africa country is heavily westernized
Costa Rica, Panama and Uruguay. All very small nations (all numbering less than 5 million people), with an influx of primarily American investment.

With regards of African countries and "westernization" this comes in the form of western products. Be it McDonalds, GM, mobile phones, music ect. Poorer more closed countries don't have this, it ain't a new concept.
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Old September 3rd, 2007, 07:28 PM   #17
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Not sure if you speak spanish or not. Good report on the Costa Rican economy.

http://uk.youtube.com/watch?v=b7jQM8HO0tc
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Old September 3rd, 2007, 10:02 PM   #18
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With regards of African countries and "westernization" this comes in the form of western products. Be it McDonalds, GM, mobile phones, music ect. Poorer more closed countries don't have this, it ain't a new concept.
Agreed Costa Rica is the only exception, a true success story in Central America (if you take out the weathier Carribean isalnds and the overseas territories) , forget about Panama, it is glitzy, yes, but also heavily drug-infested and an oasis of money-laundering.

As for Mc Donaldīs there are only three countries/territories in Africa that have Mc Donaldīs, it is South Africa, Mauritius and Réunion Island. So just because the rest doesnīt have Mc Donalds it is non-"westernized" which you equate with being "under-developped", right?!

Brunei - South East Asiaīs richest country didnīt have a Mc Donaldīs till recently, it now has, so had been "under-developped" before?
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Old September 3rd, 2007, 10:02 PM   #19
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Costa Rica, Panama and Uruguay. All very small nations (all numbering less than 5 million people), with an influx of primarily American investment.

With regards of African countries and "westernization" this comes in the form of western products. Be it McDonalds, GM, mobile phones, music ect. Poorer more closed countries don't have this, it ain't a new concept.
i thought you were referring to westernernization not americanization. (besides i dont see how the use of those products you mentioned equate to westernisation; the way you have describe it is a new concept)

american investment is not a surprise in the americas, especially with a state like panama that held the canal. it makes sense from a national security position for the US. investment in this region goes back a 100 years.

This hardly goes against mattews argument that many african countries have just as fertile investment grounds as those that exist in other parts of the world.
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Old September 3rd, 2007, 10:21 PM   #20
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i thought you were referring to westernernization not americanization. (besides i dont see how the use of those products you mentioned equate to westernisation; the way you have describe it is a new concept)

american investment is not a surprise in the americas, especially with a state like panama that held the canal. it makes sense from a national security position for the US. investment in this region goes back a 100 years.

This hardly goes against mattews argument that many african countries have just as fertile investment grounds as those that exist in other parts of the world.
Hardly a new concept, just a consequence of nations living in a globalized world. I didn't notice that I mentioned only American products, lets assume its all the same whether its European or American.

But its also the type of investments. For example, Hewitt Packer is setting up its Latin American HQ in Costa Rica. Costa Rica's most important export is Intel. Panama for example is Latin America's fastest growing nation, how much attention does it recieve? None.

Latin America is no different, its fertile in the sense that for most nations global instability that used to plague them, affects them no more. They might not be known to most, but investors know. This makes Matthias argument hold little plausibility.
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