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Old May 23rd, 2017, 03:47 PM   #14601
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Originally Posted by mappero View Post
We (here on the forum) know that, the Dutch road authorities too, but why this is not widely spread among other the EU road authorities ???
Because most road authorities are not really concerned with long-term working sites, some of them are cozy with construction unions who'd rather have a steady flow of worksites that don't require night/Sunday work, and then they can stick the traffic jams to the public who accept it as the way it must be.
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Old May 23rd, 2017, 03:48 PM   #14602
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Rijkswaterstaat uses 'Best Value Procurement'. This does not mean the cheapest possible offer, but the best offer that also includes the impact on traffic, duration, social conditions, environment, etc. Though the starting point for such procurements is usually that such works will be done outside office hours anyway. If they have a construction company making an offer to close lanes during the day it will probably be denied.

It's a whole different thing in Germany, many repairs are actually only during office hours. Especially more urgent repairs are often between 09:00 - 16:00 hrs instead of at night.

What strikes me in Germany is the amount of repaving works that 1) last for 6-7 months per section and 2) strip the motorway down to the sand. You don't see that in the Netherlands. If you have to remove the entire pavement including foundation you're probably too late with the repairs anyway.

If that is the case, cracks have gone down beyond the wearing course so the foundation has fractured or cannot be repaired effectively. Some motorways in the Netherlands still have the original 1960s and 1970s asphalt, it is just overlaid and strengthened multiple times.
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Old May 23rd, 2017, 03:53 PM   #14603
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A4 in this section has 3+3 lanes + shoulder, hasn't it? 2+2 lanes could be easily arranged in the free carriegeway. I have no exact data but I suppose for weekend traffic 2+2 lane would be dense but OK. So why is it better to force southbound traffic to make a detour instead of make 2+2 lanes in the free carriageway (just like usual in Germany)?
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Old May 23rd, 2017, 04:18 PM   #14604
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It takes too much time to set up a two-way workzone configuration for weekend construction only. For example in Germany it may take up to several weeks to install a Baustelle (it can be faster, but it's still too much work for a single weekend).
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Old May 23rd, 2017, 04:26 PM   #14605
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The government formation between 4 parties collapsed.

The conservative Liberals (VVD), Christian Democrats (CDA), more centrist Liberals (D66) and Greens (GL) attempted to form a coalition government, which would have a comfortable majority in parliament.

However, after 61 days of negotation, they felt that the differences were too big. They say the talks collapsed over migration standpoints, but it is likely more than that, especially the Greens had a radical programme of converting billions of taxes to environmental taxes. Although most parties have some kind of climate agenda, the Greens went much farther in it than other left-wing parties, not to mention right-wing parties which were to form the largest portion of the coalition.

So it's probably a good thing for consumers and motorists that this government coalition failed. The Greens wanted to significantly increase taxation on motorists, including a kilometer charge for every road and increased taxation on new cars. Not to mention their positions on infrastructure.

The next step appears to be a coalition with VVD+CDA+D66 and Christian Union, which is a smaller socially liberal christian party. It has 5 out of 150 seats and would result in a 1 seat majority.

The Netherlands has a long tradition of coalition governments, not once was there a single party in control of parliament. But 4 or even 5 parties would be a first.


5 parties has occured in the past though, Den Uyl is a good example, but he invited two more parties than strictly required when counting from 76 seats.
It was also that cabinet when much regulations were passed and lots of motorways were cancelled.
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Old May 23rd, 2017, 04:27 PM   #14606
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Suburbanist View Post
Because most road authorities are not really concerned with long-term working sites, some of them are cozy with construction unions who'd rather have a steady flow of worksites that don't require night/Sunday work, and then they can stick the traffic jams to the public who accept it as the way it must be.
In Romania the road authority and different governmental levels do not even (want) to realize that waiting 20 minutes for a double rail road crossing costs money, as labour is cheap in Romania (DN7, northern ring road around Arad, connecting the A1 with Oradea).
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Old May 23rd, 2017, 04:50 PM   #14607
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Suburbanist View Post
Because most road authorities are not really concerned with long-term working sites, some of them are cozy with construction unions who'd rather have a steady flow of worksites that don't require night/Sunday work, and then they can stick the traffic jams to the public who accept it as the way it must be.
I've read that in Germany rules are much more strict regarding working at nights and during weekends. In the Netherlands being a construction worker in the road sector means that night work and weekend shifts come with the job.

However it has its effect. Only some 3% of traffic congestion in the Netherlands is due to road works. In Germany it is over 30%, ten times as much. And it may be understated given how many traffic jams are the result of a crash in a construction zone.

Dutch work zones are usually more comfortable to drive through. Their goal is to keep traffic flowing at 90 km/h, but 100 or even 120 km/h workzones are also used. There are a few exceptions though (for example A6 at Joure had a 'Versetzt fahren' layout recently). 70 km/h is only used for short-term emergency repairs. At 90 km/h they have to use solid barriers and not cones / barrels.

It helps that Dutch shoulders are pretty wide, so whenever they do require a 4+0 system, it has wider lanes than those 2 m + 60 km/h lanes in Germany. Along A9 through Amsterdam they used six permanent lanes where there used to be four lanes and shoulder lanes (see photos on the previous page). With some projects, expanded capacity becomes available at the start of construction, when they move traffic into a workzone setup with six lanes and remove the shoulder. For example A6 at Almere has more lanes today during construction, than before construction.
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Old May 23rd, 2017, 04:53 PM   #14608
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A1/A6 Amsterdam - Almere

I filmed A1/A6 from Amsterdam to Almere last weekend. It is more or less completed except for some repaving at the Diemen interchange (ramp closure visible at the start of the video) and the construction and testing of the two reversible lanes.

At the end of the video you can see the next phase under construction, it has recently started and there is already expanded capacity through the workzone, tapering off from 4 to 3 to 2 lanes while there used to be 2 lanes only.

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Old May 23rd, 2017, 08:49 PM   #14609
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They are going to rehabilitate the A4 pavement in the direction of Amsterdam during six weekend closures. During these weekend closures, the direction of Amsterdam will be switched over to the other carriageway. That means that the direction of The Hague will be closed, and traffic detoured.

The planned weekend closures (all 9 p.m. to 5 a.m.);
* 26-29 May
* 9-12 June
* 16-19 June
* 29 September to 2 October
* 6-9 October
* 13-16 October

They also planned two reserve weekends if the weather is too bad to do the paving works.
Thanks for sharing that information. I had booked a room in hotel close to the A4 during one of those weekends. A good moment to find another hotel to stay.
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Old May 23rd, 2017, 09:09 PM   #14610
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ChrisZwolle View Post
It takes too much time to set up a two-way workzone configuration for weekend construction only. For example in Germany it may take up to several weeks to install a Baustelle (it can be faster, but it's still too much work for a single weekend).
OK, I see, thanks.
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Old May 23rd, 2017, 09:45 PM   #14611
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ChrisZwolle View Post
Rijkswaterstaat uses 'Best Value Procurement'. This does not mean the cheapest possible offer, but the best offer that also includes the impact on traffic, duration, social conditions, environment, etc. Though the starting point for such procurements is usually that such works will be done outside office hours anyway. If they have a construction company making an offer to close lanes during the day it will probably be denied.

It's a whole different thing in Germany, many repairs are actually only during office hours. Especially more urgent repairs are often between 09:00 - 16:00 hrs instead of at night.

What strikes me in Germany is the amount of repaving works that 1) last for 6-7 months per section and 2) strip the motorway down to the sand. You don't see that in the Netherlands. If you have to remove the entire pavement including foundation you're probably too late with the repairs anyway.

If that is the case, cracks have gone down beyond the wearing course so the foundation has fractured or cannot be repaired effectively. Some motorways in the Netherlands still have the original 1960s and 1970s asphalt, it is just overlaid and strengthened multiple times.
Interesting.

Quite a big fraction of repavement works in then Finnish main roads are using the Remix method: The repavement is done in one pass, and the new surface contains 80% of recycled asphalt and 20% new:



The equipment is kind of a train of 100 meters in length. The front devices heat the old asphalt to 200 degrees centigrade to the depth of 4-5 centimeters. Then the mixer device eats the heated asphalt, and mixes it with the new material. The mixed asphalt mass is put back onto the road, and made even by rollers. The train moves 2.5 to 3.5 kilometers per shift. Thus, in three shifts, up to 10 kilometers of lane may get a new surface, and 100% of the removed old surface is recycled without transporting it anywhere.

A new surface (not recycled) can be remixed twice.

The throughput of the busiest roads (mainly in the Helsinki area as well as the radials from Helsinki) is secured by working in the night time only, or pausing the works during the peak hours (6-9, 15-18, Friday and Sunday afternoons and evenings). The busiest motorway ramps are closed one at a time overnight 22-6 for the works.
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