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Old November 28th, 2005, 04:06 AM   #101
Metropolitan
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Falubaz
good job.
how did you get the informations needed to show us that evolution of the metro in Paris?
I've found them on a website : http://www.metro-pole.net
Quote:
do you have the old original maps??? could u post them here? i/m looking for old metro maps, but only few are available on the net.
I have several...




This is Paris subway in 1900.

This is the first metro map from Paris I've found. It shows a map similar to those we could find in Paris trams from that time. You can see the line 1 and the embryos of the actual line 2 and 6 (which were then called 2North and 2South). Actually, at that specific period of time, all subways were going to Porte de Vincennes, trains were simply changing directions at Etoile to go either to Porte Maillot, Porte Dauphine or Trocadéro (in front of the Eiffel Tower).




This is Paris subway in 1908.

It's the earliest complete network map I've found showing all Paris. However, I don't know if it was the official map or a map from another source. It shows both the lines already built and those in project. Actually, a large part of Paris subway has been planned in the late 19th century, but we had to wait the 30's to finish a large part of what was planned then.

It's important to notice that Paris subway don't go outside city borders. That was the ultimate condition for Parisians to accept the métro to be built. To give a guarantee to Parisians it wouldn't be the case, Paris métro has been thought to be driven on the right lane, and not on the left lane as the rail network (we can also see on that map). This way, they were sure the subway wouldn't be connected to commuter rails, as it's been the case in London.




This is Paris subway in 1929.

That map comes from the "Editions Leconte". It's an editor of Paris streets atlas. Hence, it's not an official map.

It's been published right before the "CMP" company has merged with the "Nord-Sud" company. Unfortunately, the names aren't given to the lines. If it would be the case, you would see that line 12 and 13 were then called A and B because they were managed by a different company, the "Nord-Sud". Finally, the CMP has bought in 1930 Nord-Sud which had important financial difficulties.




This is Paris subway in 1937. (Click here to enlarge)

That map is stictly showing Paris métro network. However, you can see the "ligne de Sceaux" appearing on that map. It's a rail line built in 1848. If it appears on the map, it's because it's been bought by the CMP company (managing the métro) at the beginning of 1937.

As you can also see on the map, despite Parisian strong wish in the late XIXth century, it's been finally decided in the late 20's to extend Paris métro to the suburbs. It should be noticed that Paris wasn't surrounded by few sparsed houses then but already by a huge urban environment. Most factories in Paris have always been outside the city in what was called the "ceinture rouge" (the red belt), red as the colour of communism which have always been really strong in those industrial workers neighbourhoods.

Here is a small map showing the extensions of Paris métro to the "banlieue" as they were planned in 1928. However, because of the economical crisis and the war which has followen, many of those extensions have been postponed, or completely cancelled :






This is Paris subway in 1939.

It's simply a smaller black and white version of the 1937 map. However, you can see on it the previewed extension of the line 5 to Pantin in the North, of the lin 7 to Ivry and of the line 8 to Charenton in the South.




This is Paris subway in 1940.

That's a map of Paris métro right before the German invasion. As you can see, because of the bombings many stations are closed, even several lines are completely closed such as the line 2, 5 or 6. Those lines and stations will re-open very slowly during the occupation or even later. Some stations will remain definitly closed. Finally, some stations will stay open only during working days. Still today, the station "Liège" on the line 13 is still open only during working days. The station "Rennes" on the line 12 has been re-opened fully only in 2002.




This is Paris subway in 1942.

It pictures the metro during the German occupation. That map from 1942 is similar to the map of 1939. The only difference being an inscription at the bottom of it saying : "Attention, consultez les affiches donnant les stations fermées" (Beware, read posters showing closed stations). We'll have to wait 1969 to see that inscription disappearing.




This is Paris subway in 1949.

As you can see from the design of the map, we aren't far from the 50's. In 1949, the CMP managing the metro will be merged with Paris bus companies to create a state-owned brand new company : the RATP. This is the current company managing the subway, and it still belongs to the government.




This is Paris subway in 1964.

There is not much to say about that map. After the war, Paris métro network hasn't evolved much, mainly because of the war recovery but also because it was then judged more important to modernize the network and the trains which were severly aging.




This is Paris subway in 1969.

On that map, you can see the RER project being shown on the west and on the east. This is about the "ligne de St Germain" and the "ligne de Vincennes" which had been just bought by the RATP. The idea of the RATP has been to connect those lines through a tunnel in order to make of it one single line. The works were a lot more important than you could imagine as the expected traffic was enormous. Those lines, together with the lignes de Sceaux (the future RER B) will be severly modernized. This is a pure RATP project then.

Another observation from that map is that the line 7 which used to be divided in two branches on the North East, has now been divided and has given the birth to a mini-line, the line 7bis. That division is mainly due to the fact there was a lot more traffic going to Porte de la Villette than to Pré St-Gervais.




This is Paris subway in 1973.

This is the last map where will appear the former line 14 of the métro. You can see it on the south bank of the river Seine, between Invalides and Porte de Vanves. Indeed, that line will be connected in 1976 to the 13 which will be extended to Invalides. Hence those two small lines of Paris subway will become a big one... the modern line 13.

You can also see that the line 3 has changed its path on the East side. Now it goes to Bagnolet when it used to go up in the 20th arrondissement. The former path of the line 3 will give the birth to the second mini-line of Paris subway, the line 3bis.





This is Paris subway in 1980.

Finally the RER is here in the shape it was designed ! The line A (in red) crosses Paris from the West to the East and the line B joins Chatelêt, the most important station of Paris subway in the center of the city. The inauguration happened in 1977.

The SNCF, the national rail network, had the monopoly on commuter trains then. And when they've heard about the RER project from the RATP, they had the idea to create their own RER, which appears here as the line C in yellow. However, the SNCF RER is very different from the RATP RER. Firstly, few tunnels have been built as the RER C is about rail lines which existed beforehand. Secondly, the RER C has not the "express subway" feeling of the line A and B... actually the line C is not express at all. It's simply about former suburban lines which used to be used independantly and which are now joined.





This is Paris subway in 1985.

The line B of the RER (in blue) crosses Paris from North to South. The look of the map is getting closer to what we know before




This is Paris subway in 2005. (Click here to enlarge)

Finally here's the métro today. The RER network has been extended (all lines being extended, line D and E being created). There's a brand new line 14 which is fully automatic (and really express).

Hope you enjoy the little History lesson !

Last edited by Metropolitan; November 28th, 2005 at 05:20 AM.
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Old November 28th, 2005, 10:58 AM   #102
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Great thread, thanks Metropolitan!
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Old November 28th, 2005, 11:37 AM   #103
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You really should think about doing a book... There's a big market for this sort of thing
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Old November 28th, 2005, 11:50 AM   #104
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Very good work! I Like to see the evolution of the metro network into what it is now.
You can really see the difference between times, when there is money and need for expansion, and when there is not..
Maybe someone can show the evolution of the public transport above the ground also? I am curious to see if there are much similarities in growth, or big differences.
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Old November 28th, 2005, 12:47 PM   #105
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Quote:
Originally Posted by juanico
The municipality prefers developing tramways...



Same problem here in Barcelona...

The thing is that metro and tramways are complementary: we want both!!
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Old November 29th, 2005, 12:53 AM   #106
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Tubeman


You really should think about doing a book... There's a big market for this sort of thing
That's very nice from you to propose such an idea, but I haven't invented those informations. They are stolen from other books or internet websites.

But anyway, I'm glad you appreciated it.
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Old November 29th, 2005, 01:28 AM   #107
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Metropolitan
That's very nice from you to propose such an idea, but I haven't invented those informations. They are stolen from other books or internet websites.

But anyway, I'm glad you appreciated it.
Where do you think I found all my information? I wasn't born with it

Seriously, think about it... I was already considering producing a Paris atlas before I saw this thread, but sadly I know bugger all about it. If you wanted to collaborate then I'd be happy to pursue it.
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Old November 29th, 2005, 08:38 PM   #108
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bitxofo
Same problem here in Barcelona...

The thing is that metro and tramways are complementary: we want both!!
First, there is no more room in the Paris underground to build more lines (it's known as "swiss cheese").
Second, the city of Paris run by socialist/green (hippies) just want to get rid of cars, they don't care about metro/tram, the only thing they want is to allow less space for cars, tram a good solution
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Old November 29th, 2005, 08:51 PM   #109
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furthermore, you don't build tramway lines on the busiest sections of a 25,000 inh. per km² city... there are already two tramway lines operating in the suburbs, and they are overcrowded, let alone in Paris!

@ Bender :
"First, there is no more room in the Paris underground to build more lines (it's known as "swiss cheese")."
sous les Maréchaux je pense qu'il y a de la place pour des lignes souterraines.
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Old November 29th, 2005, 09:09 PM   #110
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Fabulous job !
There is a good book on the entire history of the Parisian network published last year
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Old November 30th, 2005, 12:36 AM   #111
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[Metropolitan] thanks for that maps. it's so great to can see the evolution of the system. the idea of the book it's also good, think about it. i would buy this
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Old December 1st, 2005, 02:32 PM   #112
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what an evolution!!!.........
so dense.............
Thanks.....
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Old December 1st, 2005, 04:53 PM   #113
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merci, outstanding work!
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Old December 1st, 2005, 05:32 PM   #114
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The 1975 map, by Lebre:



based on the lines 2 and 6, represented as a perfect circle.
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Old December 1st, 2005, 08:00 PM   #115
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Quote:
Originally Posted by juanico
The 1975 map, by Lebre:

based on the lines 2 and 6, represented as a perfect circle.
Thanks for this map Juanico, I didn't know it. It's indeed a very curious map.

By the way, just a quick observation, the RER, which is still under construction then, is called "métro régional" (regional metro). That's exactly the way it's been thought by the RATP. I remember an old newspaper story from the 70's about the RER being called "Giving to the Greater Paris a subway at its scale". We must remember that it was at the times when the Greater London has been created (in 1965).

When we see how fantastic are the lines A and B from the RER, we can be disappointed the SNCF has taken over the further extension of the RER network. The line E is terrific I must confess, but a much better work could have been done on the lines C and D.
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Old December 3rd, 2005, 05:11 PM   #116
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I've just found a map on Wikipedia about the central network of the RER at a geographically accurate scale. As I find it interesting, I post it here.

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Old January 8th, 2006, 09:16 PM   #117
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Paris metro "cultural stations"

Here is a list of "cultural stations", that's about stations which have been decorated in an original way. I would simply add that it's worth it to get out of the station and see what is above ground... as all those stations have been built in very nice areas of Paris.



  • Arts et Métiers : As its name has been attributed after one of the most famous French engineering school (which is located right above), the station has been decorated in honour of the Engineers. There's also a museum dedicated to science and engineering above. It's a really beautiful station, integrally covered of copper panels with portholes and big wheels coming out from the ceiling. It gives a bit the impression of being in the Nautilus submarine from the book "20000 Leagues under the Sea" by Jules Vernes.





  • Assemblée Nationale : That station is very specific as the frescos on its walls are constantly changed. It used to picture stylised heads symbolizing the representatives of the people (the station is located at the French National Assembly). Now it pictures only circles changing colours.



  • Bastille : If we believe our History books, it's at the place de la Bastille that officially started the French revolution. It's been decorated with frescos picturing the insurrection against the despotic power. That station is also very interristing since it offers a view on the St-Martin Canal before it becomes underground. The station is built right above the tunnel entrance of the canal.



  • Carrefour Pleyel : The theme in here is the music, as Pleyel was a famous composer who left his name to a company building pianos of a very high standard which is located in Paris.



  • Chaussée d'Antine-La Fayette : The ceiling pictures a huge fresco picturing the US war of Independence and the common cultural past shared between the United States and France.





  • Cluny-La Sorbonne : That station have been decorated with a huge painting "Les Oiseaux" (The Birds) from Jean Bazaine and with a myriads of signatures of the most famous authors from the Quartier Latin (Latin Quarter).



  • Concorde : That station is covered with tiles having all one letter. If you start reading it in French, you'll realize that it's the text of the declaration of the Human Rights from 1789.




  • Europe : That station is located at the Place de l'Europe (Europe Circus), and hence exhibits pictures about our European neighbours. Last time I was there, there were plasma TV showing documentaries about each country. I don't know if it's still the case today.



  • Hotel de Ville : That station got its name after the Hotel de Ville de Paris (Paris City Hall). It's been then decorated with a documented gallery picturing the History of Paris City Hall.



  • Louvre-Rivoli : The station have been decorated with copies of sculptures and paintings from the museum of the Louvre. The walls of the stations are covered with the same stone that's been used to build the Palais du Louvre.



  • Luxembourg : The station has been dedicated to the year of Brazil in France and pictures various scenes about that huge Latin American country. As the year was ending last December 31st, I wonder if there's still the exhibition there. However, the station is still really nice.





  • Pont-Neuf : As the station is located near the Hotel de la Monnaie (Currency Hall). That's why it's been decorated with huge replicas of coins coming from various countries.


  • St Germain des Prés : That station is decorated with lights illustrating the neighbourhoods which is known for its intellectual and typically Parisian feeling. It's really a well-done work.
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Old January 8th, 2006, 09:18 PM   #118
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Other stations of interests :
  • Abbesses : That station has been built at a very deep level because it's located on the Butte Montmartre, which is a big hill. When you get into it, don't take the elevator... take the stairs instead, it is surprisingly long ! By the way, the Rue des Abbesses is a particulary nice street, I advise you walk around.

    Here is a picture of the stairs at Abbesses :


  • Cadet : That station is decorated with stars.
  • Chateau d'Eau : That station is decorated with beautiful frescos at the level of its extremities.
  • Cité and Saint-Michel : Those stations are very tall because of their depth. Very beautiful stations.
  • Gare de Lyon : All stations on line 14 are very well made. It is the most recent of all métro lines. However, if I insist on Gare de Lyon, it's because we can admire a garden at that station, and this even if the station is fully underground !
  • Haussmann-St-Lazare and Magenta : Those are the two most recent RER stations built in Paris. They are huge and very well illuminated. Very beautiful.
  • Lamarck-Caulaincourt : That station is also located on the Butte Montmartre. Outside its Nord-Sud decoration, Lamarck-Caulaincourt has also a fantastic entrance which is surrounded by the typical stairs from Montmartre :


  • Liège : There are beautiful sceneries about the city of Liège in Belgium. Furthermore, Liège is a weird station as there as the two platforms aren't in front of one another. Indeed, as the street above was too thin, they had to build two successive stations hosting each one a single platform for a single direction.
  • Passy : Outside the outstandin view you have on the Eiffel tower while crossing the Bir-Hakeim bridge, Passy is also interesting as it starts on a viaducts and it ends inside a hill, the line becoming underground again.
  • Porte des Lilas : That station is also decorated with beautiful frescos.
  • Saint-Jacques : Graffitis on the walls of that stations have been preserved with glass windows.
  • Varennes : As the Musée Rodin is just above it, that station is decorated with copies of his sculptures.



Nord-Sud stations :

The subway network has been build originally by two companies. Most lines were built by the CMP, but the lines 12 and 13 have been build by a competitor which was known as "Nord-Sud". Hence many older stations of those lines have a specific "Nord-Sud" decoration. The most interesting of those stations is certainly Liège, even if Solférino has the interests to be fully authentic. But there are other stations which are decorated this way.
  • Lamarck-Caulaincourt
  • Liège
  • Pasteur
  • Place de Clichy
  • Porte de la Chapelle
  • Porte de la Clichy
  • Porte de Versailles
  • Sèves-Babylone
  • Solférino (That station is the only one remaining which is fully authentic)

Typical Nord-Sud decoration :





Other points of interests :
  • Well, as Juanico has told, the lines and are really nice experiments as they are in a big part built on viaducts. The best parts would certainly be around Barbès and La Chapelle on , and on the Bir-Hakeim bridge between Passy and Bir-Hakeim on .

Bir-Hakeim Bridge .


Barbès station. Really a great place you shouldn't miss .
  • The RER network is also very impressive, especially the . The line A is indeed one of the busiest urban rail line in the world, if not actually the busiest. Stations are huge and traffic is very dense during the rush hours.

at Charles de Gaulle-Etoile.
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Old January 8th, 2006, 09:20 PM   #119
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Arts et Métiers is my favourite. You get a very 'WOW' feeling walking onto the platform. Louvre-Rivoli's design is also very tasteful. It seems like an extension of the Louvre rather than a Metro station.
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Old January 8th, 2006, 09:36 PM   #120
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Thank for that report Metropolitan

I love so much Paris metro system
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