search the site
 daily menu » rate the banner | guess the city | one on oneforums map | privacy policy | DMCA | news magazine | posting guidelines

Go Back   SkyscraperCity > Continental Forums > North American Skyscrapers Forum > United States > Southeast

Southeast TX, OK, LA, MS, AL, GA, NC, SC, VA, TN, KY
» Development News | Atlanta | Florida | Miami | Nashville | Orlando | Tampa Bay | Texas



Global Announcement

As a general reminder, please respect others and respect copyrights. Go here to familiarize yourself with our posting policy.


Reply

 
Thread Tools
Old January 18th, 2013, 08:41 PM   #61
Lakelander
Registered User
 
Lakelander's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2003
Location: Jacksonville/ Lakeland, FL
Posts: 2,664
Likes (Received): 1246

I wish they would not have done a loop at all. If done as a single, bi-directional line, they could have stretched this thing to hit more urban destinations and neighborhoods for the same costs.
__________________
Modern Cities
Lakelander no está en línea   Reply With Quote

Sponsored Links
Old January 18th, 2013, 10:48 PM   #62
TampaMike
Oh Hey!
 
TampaMike's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2005
Location: Tampa
Posts: 6,997
Likes (Received): 937

I can't see it failing. I would wish they moved it further north closer to the aquarium and future Civil Rights Museum, but it connects many popular spots.
__________________
Corporations Are People Too - Mitt Romney
For the People that dress up like Corporations.
TampaMike no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old January 20th, 2013, 08:55 PM   #63
RaiderATO
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jan 2010
Location: ATL
Posts: 385
Likes (Received): 13

Quote:
Originally Posted by TampaMike View Post
I can't see it failing. I would wish they moved it further north closer to the aquarium and future Civil Rights Museum, but it connects many popular spots.
While we might have a different definition of failure, I can't see it succeeding. Also, I'm curious what you consider a "popular spot", 'cause I don't see "many" of them on this route.

I hope it succeeds (helps improve business along the route), but I don't see that happening without significant tax breaks etc. along the route. (Which makes me wonder what would happen with just tax breaks etc. and no streetcar.)

Dedicate a bus route, get a new "sexier" bus for the route, designate a lane for it too, launch a PR campaign to improve the bus' image. All of that 10 times over is cheaper than this waste of federal and local public funds.
RaiderATO no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old February 12th, 2013, 03:37 AM   #64
desertpunk
Whiskey Tango Foxtrot
 
desertpunk's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2009
Location: ELP ~ ABQ
Posts: 55,648
Likes (Received): 52936

$63 Billion In New Transit Projects In The Works This Year



Note the 'donut hole' in the middle of the Southeast...

Quote:
http://www.thetransportpolitic.com/

New Transit Capital Projects Opening in 2013

•Atlanta Downtown Streetcar (2.6-mile streetcar), opening in late 2013 from Martin Luther King, Jr. National Historic Site to Centennial Olympic Park

•Austin Capital MetroRapid (BRT), running along Lamar, South Congress, and Burnet.
•Boston Fairmount Line Improvements, adding Four Corners and Newmarket stations to Fairmount Commuter Rail Line.
•Denver West Line (12-mile light rail), part of Denver’s FasTracks program, from Union Station to Jefferson County Government Center/Golden.
•Miami Central Station, new interchange between commuter rail, metro, and AirportLink.
•New Orleans UPT/Loyola Avenue Corridor (1-mile streetcar), opening in January from Union Passenger Terminal to Canal Street.
•New York Nostrand/Rogers Avenues BRT (9.3-mile BRT), opening in late 2013 from Williamsburg Bridge to Sheepshead Bay.
•Roaring Fork Valley VelociRFTA (BRT), from Aspen to South Glenwood.
•Salt Lake City Sugar House Streetcar (2-mile streetcar), opening in December 2013.
•Salt Lake City Airport TRAX (6 mile light rail), from Downtown Salt Lake City to Salt Lake International Airport, part of Salt Lake FrontLines 2015 program.
•Seattle RapidRide E Line (BRT), opening in September from downtown to Shoreline.
•Seattle RapidRide F Line (BRT), opening in September from Burien to Renton via Tukwila.
•Tampa MetroRapid North-South (17.5-mile BRT), from downtown to Temple Terrace Park and Ride, via Nebraska and Fletcher Avenues.
•Tucson Modern Streetcar (3.9-mile streetcar), from University of Arizona to Downtown Tucson.
•Twin Cities Cedar Avenue BRT (16-mile BRT), opening in the Spring from 28th Avenue Station and Mall of America in Bloomington to 215th Street in Lakeville, via Eagan and Apple Valley.
•Washington, DC Dulles (Silver Line) Metrorail Extension Phase 1 (11.6-mile metro rail), from East Falls Church to Wiehle Avenue.
•Washington, DC H Street/Benning Road Streetcar (streetcar), from Union Station to Oklahoma Avenue.

New Construction Starts in 2013

•Charlotte Blue Line Extension (9.3-mile light rail), opening in 2017 from Center City Charlotte to UNC Charlotte.

•Cincinnati Downtown Streetcar (2-mile streetcar), opening in 2015 from Over-the-Rhine to Riverfront.
•Dallas Oak Cliff Streetcar (1.5-mile streetcar), opening in 2014 from downtown Dallas to Oak Cliff.
•Detroit M1 Rail (3.4-mile streetcar), opening in 2015 from downtown Detroit to New Center.
•Kansas City Streetcar (2-mile streetcar), opening in 2015 on Main Street Downtown.
•Los Angeles Downtown Streetcar (streetcar), opening in 2015 in a loop from Civic Center to Fashion District and Staples Center, via Financial District.
•New Orleans French Quarter Expansion Project (2.5-mile streetcar), opening in 2015 from Canal Street to Esplanade Avenue.
•Ottawa Confederation Line (light rail), opening in May 2018 from Tunney’s Pasture to Blair, via downtown Ottawa.
•Phoenix Northwest Extension Phase 1 (3.2-mile light rail), opening in 2016 from Montebello Avenue to Dunlap Avenue. Phase 2 will extend line to Metrocenter Mall.
•St. Louis Loop Trolley (streetcar), opening in 2014 from Missouri History Museum to University Gate.
•Seattle North Link (4.3-mile light rail), opening in 2021 from Brooklyn to Northgate.
•Seattle South Link (1.6-mile light rail), opening in 2016 from SeaTac Airport to South 200th Street.

Already Under Construction, Opening After 2013

Opening in 2014


•Anaheim ARTIC Station, opening late 2014 as a multimodal transit station.
•Boston Assembly Square Station, opening in fall 2014 as an infill station to Orange Line.
•Dallas Orange Line Phase 2 (4.7-mile light rail), from Belt Line to Dallas-Fort Worth International Airport.
•Denver Union Station, redevelopment of city’s major transit hub, part of Denver’s FasTracks program.
•Edmonton North to NAIT (2-mile light rail), opening in April 2014 from Churchill Station to the Northern Alberta Institute of Technology.
•Fort Collins Mason Corridor (BRT), from South Transit Center to Downtown Transit Center.
•Hartford CTfastrak (9.4-mile dedicated-guideway BRT), from downtown Hartford to New Britain.
•Houston East End Line (3-mile light rail), opening mid-2014 from downtown to Altic/Howard Hughes. Later extension to Magnolia Park Transit Center.
•Houston North Line (5.2-mile light rail), opening mid-2014 from downtown to Northline Transit Center.
•Houston Southeast Line (6.1-mile light rail), opening mid-2014 from downtown to Palm Center, via University of Houston.
•Montréal Train de l’Est (32-mile commuter rail), from Downtown Montréal to Mascouche.
•New York City 7 Line Extension (1.3-mile metro rail), from Times Square to 34th Street.
•New York City Fulton Street Transit Center, redevelopment of downtown’s largest subway interchange, opening in June 2014.
•New York City WTC/PATH Transportation Hub, redevelopment of downtown’s station for subway service to New Jersey.
•Orlando SunRail (31-mile commuter rail), opening in May 2014 from DeLand to DeBary. Phase II will extend project by an additional 30 miles.
•Salt Lake City Draper Transit Corridor (3.8-mile light rail), from Sandy Civic Center to Pioneer Road, part of Salt Lake FrontLines 2015 program.
•San Bernardino sbX (15.7-mile BRT), opening in 2014 from downtown to Cal State San Bernardino on E Street.
•San Francisco Bay Area Santa Clara-Alum Rock (7.4-mile BRT), from Eastridge Transit Center to HP Pavilion.
•San Francisco Bay Area Oakland Airport Connector (3.2-mile metro rail), from BART Coliseum Station to Oakland Airport.
•Seattle First Hill Streetcar (2.2-mile streetcar), from Capitol Hill to King Street Station, via Broadway.
•Twin Cities Central Corridor (11-mile light rail), from Target Field in downtown Minneapolis to Union Depot in downtown St. Paul.

Opening in 2015

•Charlotte Streetcar (Phase 1) (1.5-mile streetcar), from downtown transit center to Presbyterian Hospital.

•Los Angeles Gold Line Foothill Extension (11.3-mile light rail), from Sierra Madre Villa to Azusa.
•Los Angeles Expo Line Phase II (6.6-mile light rail), running from Culver City to Santa Monica.
•Phoenix Central Mesa Extension (3.1-mile light rail), from Sycamore Street to Main Drive.
•Portland-Milwaukie Corridor (7.3-mile light rail), from downtown Portland to Milwaukie.
•Sacramento Blue Line to Cosumnes River College (4.3-mile light rail), extending the Blue Line south.
•San Francisco Bay Area BART to Warm Springs Extension (5.4-mile metro rail), from Fremont Station south to Warm Springs.
•Sonoma-Marin SMART Train (38-mile commuter rail), opening in 2015 from Railroad Square in Santa Rosa to downtown San Rafael.
•Toronto Georgetown South Project and Union Pearson Express (commuter rail upgrade and 2-mile extension), including spur to Toronto-Pearson Airport.
•Toronto Union Station Revitalization, renovation and expansion of the city’s primary commuter rail hub.

Opening in 2016

•Denver Northwest Rail Segment (2-mile electric commuter rail), from Pecos St Station to South Westminster, part of Denver’s FasTracks program.
•Denver East Corridor (22.8-mile electric commuter rail), from Denver Union Station to Denver International Airport, part of Denver’s FasTracks program.
•Denver Gold Line (11.2-mile electric commuter rail), from Denver Union Station to Ward Road, part of Denver’s FasTracks program.
•Denver I-225 Line (10.5-mile light rail), from Nine Mile to Peoria/Smith.
•New York City Second Avenue Subway Phase 1 (2-mile metro rail), opening December 2016 from 63rd Street to 96th Street.
•San Francisco Bay Area eBART (10-mile commuter rail), from Pittsburgh/Bay Point to Hillcrest Avenue.
•Seattle University Link (3.2-mile light rail), from Capitol Hill to University of Washington.
•Toronto Spadina Extension (5.6-mile metro rail), from Downsview to Vaughan Corporate Center.
•Vancouver Evergreen Line (7-mile metro rail), from Lougheed Town Centre to Douglas College.

Opening in 2017

•Boston Green Line Extension Phase 1 (light rail), from Lechmere to Washington Street Station and Union Square Station.
•Honolulu Rail Transit Phase 1 (metro rail), from Kapolei to Aloha Stadium.
•San Francisco Transbay Transit Center, downtown’s planned major bus and rail terminus, first phase.

Opening in 2018

•Los Angeles Crenshaw Corridor (8.5-mile light rail), from Exposition Boulevard to LAX/Aviation Station.
•San Francisco Bay Area BART to Silicon Valley Phase I (10-mile metro rail), from Warm Springs to Berryessa in San Jose.
•Washington, DC Dulles Metrorail (Silver Line) Extension Phase 2 (11.6-mile metro rail), from Wiehle Avenue to Route 772, via Dulles Airport.

Opening in 2019

•Boston Green Line Extension Phase 2 (light rail), from Washington Street Station to College Avenue Station.
•Honolulu Rail Transit Phase 2 (metro rail), from Ala Moana Center to Aloha Stadium, via Airport.
•Los Angeles Regional Connector (2-mile light rail), from Union Station to 7th Street/Metro Center and unifying the Gold Line with the Expo and Blue Lines.
•New York City Long Island Railroad Eastside Access (4-mile commuter rail), connecting Long Island rail lines to Grand Central.
•San Francisco Central Subway (1.7-mile light rail subway), from 4th and Brennan Station to Chinatown.

Opening in 2020

•Toronto Eglinton Crosstown (15.5-mile metro rail), from Keele Street to Scarborough Town Centre.
__________________
We are floating in space...

Last edited by desertpunk; February 12th, 2013 at 03:46 AM.
desertpunk no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old February 12th, 2013, 03:29 PM   #65
GunnerJacket
Oh look - a doughnut!
 
Join Date: Jan 2008
Location: Chicken City, GA
Posts: 7,978
Likes (Received): 2991

Quote:
Originally Posted by desertpunk View Post
Note the 'donut hole' in the middle of the Southeast...
That's the first thing that came to mind even before I saw your quote. Granted, helps that I live there...

Atlanta is losing opportunities quickly, or put another way fading as an economic engine through simple stagnation. CA may have some shaky State finances but at least a large part of that State spending is investment in infrastructure. Right now the GA DOT is so cash poor it's silly, and Atlanta's urbanization could be stifled due to such limited mass transit. A shame given how MARTA was a trailblazer when their light rail was built.

The Beltline could go a long way to resolving this, obviously, built they'll need more. Long term it would be worthwhile to start straightening rail lines between ATL and Toccoa in hopes of speeding the connection to Charlotte. As that city grows it would behoove ATL to build that connection and relationship, rather than letting Carolina simply become solely focused on it's relationship with VA and DC. I doubt we'll see rail get us from ATL to DC in less than 8 hours in my lifetime, but if we can get from ATL to Charlotte in under 3 that would do wonders for business travel.
__________________
"How can anybody be enlightened? Truth is after all so poorly lit."
GunnerJacket no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old February 13th, 2013, 08:12 AM   #66
desertpunk
Whiskey Tango Foxtrot
 
desertpunk's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2009
Location: ELP ~ ABQ
Posts: 55,648
Likes (Received): 52936

Quote:
Originally Posted by GunnerJacket View Post
That's the first thing that came to mind even before I saw your quote. Granted, helps that I live there...

Atlanta is losing opportunities quickly, or put another way fading as an economic engine through simple stagnation. CA may have some shaky State finances but at least a large part of that State spending is investment in infrastructure. Right now the GA DOT is so cash poor it's silly, and Atlanta's urbanization could be stifled due to such limited mass transit. A shame given how MARTA was a trailblazer when their light rail was built.

The Beltline could go a long way to resolving this, obviously, built they'll need more. Long term it would be worthwhile to start straightening rail lines between ATL and Toccoa in hopes of speeding the connection to Charlotte. As that city grows it would behoove ATL to build that connection and relationship, rather than letting Carolina simply become solely focused on it's relationship with VA and DC. I doubt we'll see rail get us from ATL to DC in less than 8 hours in my lifetime, but if we can get from ATL to Charlotte in under 3 that would do wonders for business travel.
Atlanta is actually kicking ass in job creation right now so I'm not sure about the ill effects of not having more new transit projects...for now. but the population pressures are going to overwhelm the region and when people finally get sick of all the roadwork, something's going to change. Getting HSR in the Southeast is another story. Texas is soon (next 2-3 years) to begin building a $10 billion HSR line between Dallas and Houston much of which will be privately funded. But even if TxDOT has to jump in and share the costs, they have enough fresh oil wealth to pay for it. Given the federal mess, states like Georgia, SC, VA and NC should look into forming a regional HSR authority to develop a system out there.
__________________
We are floating in space...
desertpunk no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old February 13th, 2013, 03:30 PM   #67
GunnerJacket
Oh look - a doughnut!
 
Join Date: Jan 2008
Location: Chicken City, GA
Posts: 7,978
Likes (Received): 2991

I fear much of ATL's current pace is due to readily available office space, low costs, available labor pool, etc. Beyond that, however, something will have to happen. Texas and California have resources not available to the SE, and sooner or later Atlanta may be hampered by the lack of natural amentities (shore line for tourism, etc) and remote proximity to another major urban hub to spur investment in next generation transit. I'm not suggesting ATL won't grow, but that other places are absorbing more economic growth because of this.

Charlotte seems the best match. Another hub of financial businesses, shared interest in the I-85 corridor, and ATL is the closer and easier international travel center compared to DC. Pursuing this connection has more value, IMO, than working towards Macon and Savannah or toward Florida. If it's possible to hop the train and swing a functional overnight business trip to Charlotte that will land some support. Then the long term viability of HSR to DC becomes more realistic.

Which is also why expanding local options is also crucial. The appeal of coming into ATL from afar is greater knowing once you arrive you can easily navigate to the business centers in the suburbs. We need the Beltline and then more outward expansion!

Granted, I'm preaching to the choir here!
__________________
"How can anybody be enlightened? Truth is after all so poorly lit."
GunnerJacket no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old February 13th, 2013, 09:38 PM   #68
diablo234
Oh No He Didn't
 
diablo234's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2008
Posts: 5,297

Quote:
Originally Posted by GunnerJacket View Post
Charlotte seems the best match. Another hub of financial businesses, shared interest in the I-85 corridor, and ATL is the closer and easier international travel center compared to DC. Pursuing this connection has more value, IMO, than working towards Macon and Savannah or toward Florida. If it's possible to hop the train and swing a functional overnight business trip to Charlotte that will land some support. Then the long term viability of HSR to DC becomes more realistic.
One problem with building an HSR line from Atlanta to Charlotte is that it would need political backing in South Carolina, and given the political climate there I don't see that happening anytime soon.
diablo234 no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old February 13th, 2013, 09:43 PM   #69
Dale
Registered User
 
Join Date: Sep 2002
Location: Charlotte, NC
Posts: 9,090
Likes (Received): 5445

If I could just interject, I just got back from LA, spent about a week there. Yes, it's building rail to beat the band. BUT the LA basin is so vast that, practically speaking, it serves almost no one.

Meantime, the road conditions are the worst I've ever experienced. And the signage is ABYSMAL.

Made me appreciate some of Orlando's redeeming features. LAX is a dump. OIA is comparatively pristine and altogether friendlier. And driving the freeway from OIA home was like driving on glass compared to LA roads.

Otherwise, I had a great time.

Last edited by Dale; February 13th, 2013 at 09:50 PM.
Dale no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old February 14th, 2013, 01:21 AM   #70
GunnerJacket
Oh look - a doughnut!
 
Join Date: Jan 2008
Location: Chicken City, GA
Posts: 7,978
Likes (Received): 2991

Quote:
Originally Posted by diablo234 View Post
One problem with building an HSR line from Atlanta to Charlotte is that it would need political backing in South Carolina, and given the political climate there I don't see that happening anytime soon.
Well I'm not talking about a new build or bypassing existing Amtrak stops (save possibly Clemson). I'm talking about taking existing rail and straightening the bends, as it were, so the existing trains could at least move at higher speeds. 10+ hours between DC and Atlanta at costs higher than plane tickets is laughable. If you're taking 3+ people a car ride is cheaper by far and about the same time.

If we could simply get to where our trains could travel another 20+MPH faster (on avg) that would make a big difference. 30-40 MPH faster, at the low end of HSR, even, and you've shaved hours off that trip (likely saving fuel, as well) and made the logistics of rail travel much, much more appealing.

IMO the barometer is being able to make a work or social visit to someplace by traveling there and back on consecutive days. Right now you can't do that by rail between any metros of note within the southeast. Start building those opportunities and the rest becomes viable.
__________________
"How can anybody be enlightened? Truth is after all so poorly lit."
GunnerJacket no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old February 16th, 2013, 06:22 PM   #71
RaiderATO
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jan 2010
Location: ATL
Posts: 385
Likes (Received): 13

Georgia Tech students are hosting Baruch Feigenbaum, Transportation Policy Analyst at Reason Foundation (and City & Regional Planning Grad from GT). He'll be presenting "Realistic Solutions to America's Transportation Problem" this Thursday Feb. 21. 6:30 pm in the GT College of Business (Tech Square, I believe?). https://www.facebook.com/events/406962106060195/?ref=22

Details are scant on the Facebook event page, but I'd assume it to be a presentation on the benefits of private action, and less public investment in the field.
RaiderATO no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old February 19th, 2013, 03:11 AM   #72
howow2012
Registered User
 
howow2012's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2012
Location: Fairfield/Vallejo CA
Posts: 66
Likes (Received): 17

Quote:
Originally Posted by Dale View Post
If I could just interject, I just got back from LA, spent about a week there. Yes, it's building rail to beat the band. BUT the LA basin is so vast that, practically speaking, it serves almost no one.

Meantime, the road conditions are the worst I've ever experienced. And the signage is ABYSMAL.

Made me appreciate some of Orlando's redeeming features. LAX is a dump. OIA is comparatively pristine and altogether friendlier. And driving the freeway from OIA home was like driving on glass compared to LA roads.

Otherwise, I had a great time.
We agree to disagree Los Angeles has long turn the corner from a car centric urban landscrape to a Mega Metropolis of Subways and Rail Transit options.
howow2012 no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old February 19th, 2013, 03:21 AM   #73
Dale
Registered User
 
Join Date: Sep 2002
Location: Charlotte, NC
Posts: 9,090
Likes (Received): 5445

Quote:
Originally Posted by howow2012 View Post
We agree to disagree Los Angeles has long turn the corner from a car centric urban landscrape to a Mega Metropolis of Subways and Rail Transit options.
Turned the corner ? Sure. Long, long way to go before it's a Mega Metropolis of Subways and Rail Transit options.
Dale no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old February 20th, 2013, 02:55 AM   #74
spencer114
Registered User
 
spencer114's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2004
Location: Richmond
Posts: 1,638
Likes (Received): 443

LA seems less car centric than most cities in the USA.
spencer114 no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old February 21st, 2013, 07:43 AM   #75
diablo234
Oh No He Didn't
 
diablo234's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2008
Posts: 5,297

Quote:
Originally Posted by GunnerJacket View Post
Well I'm not talking about a new build or bypassing existing Amtrak stops (save possibly Clemson). I'm talking about taking existing rail and straightening the bends, as it were, so the existing trains could at least move at higher speeds. 10+ hours between DC and Atlanta at costs higher than plane tickets is laughable. If you're taking 3+ people a car ride is cheaper by far and about the same time.

If we could simply get to where our trains could travel another 20+MPH faster (on avg) that would make a big difference. 30-40 MPH faster, at the low end of HSR, even, and you've shaved hours off that trip (likely saving fuel, as well) and made the logistics of rail travel much, much more appealing.

IMO the barometer is being able to make a work or social visit to someplace by traveling there and back on consecutive days. Right now you can't do that by rail between any metros of note within the southeast. Start building those opportunities and the rest becomes viable.
Oh, I see what you are saying but still I would expect a lot of political opposition in South Carolina to have any taxpayer funds for rail. Anyways I think it would be best if Georgia focused on funding/expanding MARTA first, building commuter rail to Athens and Macon, and then later worry about HSR.
diablo234 no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old February 21st, 2013, 12:26 PM   #76
desertpunk
Whiskey Tango Foxtrot
 
desertpunk's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2009
Location: ELP ~ ABQ
Posts: 55,648
Likes (Received): 52936

Is Scaled-Back TSPLOST a Viable Transit Option?



Quote:
Just when Atlantans thought that pesky acronym that rhymes with "We Lost" had been purged from our collective lexicon, TSPLOST is making news again. Earlier this month, a bill was introduced in the state House of Representatives that revisits a permanent funding mechanism that lawmakers had considered a few years ago but left behind — in favor of regional TSPLOST votes that, in Atlanta, resulted in a resounding thud last year, the Atlanta Business Chronicle reports. In metro Atlanta, you'll recall, only 38 percent voted in favor of the 1 percent sales tax.

Anyhow, House Bill 195 "would let two or more contiguous counties ask their voters to approve a sales tax of up to a penny to pay for transportation improvements," the newspaper writes. "Participating counties would determine a project list, anticipated construction schedule and cost estimates." The idea was last volleyed about in 2008 as a proposed constitutional amendment, but it fell just three votes short in the Senate after passing the House. Next thing we knew, legislation was passed that divided the state into 12 regions that voted on a 1-cent tax bump for transportation. It failed in all but three regions.

The newspaper quotes one legislator who says the 12-region set-up was too rigid to stand a chance. In metro Atlanta, the 10-county region was so sprawling it lumped urban transit advocates with suburbanites pining for more highways — a recipe for disaster. Would a two-county approach have been more reasonable all along?

----
__________________
We are floating in space...
desertpunk no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old February 21st, 2013, 12:29 PM   #77
desertpunk
Whiskey Tango Foxtrot
 
desertpunk's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2009
Location: ELP ~ ABQ
Posts: 55,648
Likes (Received): 52936

Quote:
Originally Posted by diablo234 View Post
Oh, I see what you are saying but still I would expect a lot of political opposition in South Carolina to have any taxpayer funds for rail. Anyways I think it would be best if Georgia focused on funding/expanding MARTA first, building commuter rail to Athens and Macon, and then later worry about HSR.
Or all the states could work with Amtrak on improving rail service to max out speeds. A 110 mph line would be a good first step in developing HSR ...whenever funds become available.
__________________
We are floating in space...
desertpunk no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old February 21st, 2013, 03:19 PM   #78
Dale
Registered User
 
Join Date: Sep 2002
Location: Charlotte, NC
Posts: 9,090
Likes (Received): 5445

Quote:
Originally Posted by desertpunk View Post
Or all the states could work with Amtrak on improving rail service to max out speeds. A 110 mph line would be a good first step in developing HSR ...whenever funds become available.
This is what Florida is currently doing. A private firm is going to build 'fast rail' (not HSR) from Orlando to Miami. I think the speeds will vary from 79 to 125.

Not as sexy as HSR, but feasible and faster than we've currently got.
Dale no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old February 21st, 2013, 04:29 PM   #79
desertpunk
Whiskey Tango Foxtrot
 
desertpunk's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2009
Location: ELP ~ ABQ
Posts: 55,648
Likes (Received): 52936

Quote:
Originally Posted by Dale View Post
This is what Florida is currently doing. A private firm is going to build 'fast rail' (not HSR) from Orlando to Miami. I think the speeds will vary from 79 to 125.

Not as sexy as HSR, but feasible and faster than we've currently got.
Even Michigan is doing this and they're not exactly swimming in diamonds and emeralds.
__________________
We are floating in space...
desertpunk no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old February 21st, 2013, 08:44 PM   #80
GunnerJacket
Oh look - a doughnut!
 
Join Date: Jan 2008
Location: Chicken City, GA
Posts: 7,978
Likes (Received): 2991

Quote:
Originally Posted by diablo234 View Post
Oh, I see what you are saying but still I would expect a lot of political opposition in South Carolina to have any taxpayer funds for rail.
That's fine. If NC and GA improve their portions eventually Amtrak and SC would see the light. Bottom line there needs to be a commitment to making this route faster or else rail travel will whither in the southeast until it's too late.

Quote:
Anyways I think it would be best if Georgia focused on funding/expanding MARTA first, building commuter rail to Athens and Macon, and then later worry about HSR.
It's a catch 22. Internally there are no routes within GA to sustain the investment needed. After Atlanta's 5M+ people the next largest metro is approx. 800k and there is not the daily volume of inter-city commuting to make it work. I worked on a study for the Macon-ATL line and the bottom line is rail would be slower and more expensive than driving alone for 30+ years, unless the State plunked down $45M to straighten the route and bypass all the small cities that supported it. The same story is echoed around the horn.

MARTA should be expanded but as the article cited above illustrates it remains a tough sell. For now our best hope is to improve the viability of the Amtrak runs we do have and let that eventually feed into long-term connections to the HSR envisioned along the shoreline through Savannah. Thus, I say invest as possible in straightening and double tracking portions of existing routes.

Quote:
Originally Posted by desertpunk View Post
There's also a measure @ the capital to do away with the "TSPLOST penalty," the higher match rate local governments must use to get GDOT funds if they failed to pass the tax. Neither of these will fly and in the short term the legislators will tell everyone to use conventional LOST dollars on road improvements. Which also means the larger projects dependent on funding too large for one community (transit) will not happen soon.

Quote:
Originally Posted by desertpunk View Post
Even Michigan is doing this and they're not exactly swimming in diamonds and emeralds.
I'd hope not. Sounds painful!
__________________
"How can anybody be enlightened? Truth is after all so poorly lit."
GunnerJacket no está en línea   Reply With Quote


Reply

Tags
atlanta streetcar, hampton roads wave, high speed rail, lynx, marta

Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Related topics on SkyscraperCity


All times are GMT +2. The time now is 05:39 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.11 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions Inc.
Feedback Buttons provided by Advanced Post Thanks / Like (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2017 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.

vBulletin Optimisation provided by vB Optimise (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2017 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.

SkyscraperCity ☆ In Urbanity We trust ☆ about us | privacy policy | DMCA policy

Hosted by Blacksun, dedicated to this site too!
Forum server management by DaiTengu