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Old May 17th, 2005, 07:19 AM   #1
The Collector
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Melbourne’s Events & Celebrations

Melbourne’s Events & Celebrations

A blast from the past

Federation, the Federation arches
Built to celebrate the federation of Australia in 1901.


Above and below, The Municipal Arch, Princes Bridge.



King Edward VII Arch, Swanston Street.


Above and below, the Chinese Arch, Swanston Street.



The German Arch, Collins Street.


The Citizen’s Arch, Bourke Street.


The Duke’s Arch, Bourke Street.


Queen Victoria’s Arch, Collins and Russell Street intersection.

All these arches were temporary structures.
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Old May 17th, 2005, 07:44 AM   #2
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1934 Centenary of Melbourne and Victoria


Sir Russell Grimwade purchased Captain Cook’s Cottage at Great Ayton in Yorkshire and had it carefully measured, drawn, labelled, packed up and moved to its new home in The Fitzroy Gardens, Melbourne.
Sit Macpherson Robertson funded an international air race and the more permanent mementoes in the form of MacRobertson Girls High school, South Melbourne; The MacRobertson Bridge over The Yarra at Grange Road; The National Herbarium at The Botanical Gardens and The MacRobertson Fountain near The Shrine of Remembrance.
For the part played by women in the foundation of the state we had The Pioneer Women’s Garden built.
The Shrine of Remembrance, arguably Melbourne’s most important public monument was completed and dedicated during The Centenary as well and for many it was the crowning ceremony of Melbourne’s Centenary celebrations.


The city lit up for the occasion.


The Dedication Ceremony for The Shrine of Remembrance was held on the morning of November 11th 1934.


Captain Cook’s Cottage.


Pioneer Women’s Memorial Garden, King’s Domain, Alexandra Avenue. Dedicated on November 24th 1934.


The MacRobertson fountain.


The MacRobertson Bridge.




One of the most successful events during the celebrations was The Centenary Floral Pageant. The City of Box Hill float shown above was the first prize winner.


Special Centenary Florin was minted and circulated during the period of the celebrations.


Special Centenary Stamps printed for the occasion.
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Old May 17th, 2005, 07:54 AM   #3
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excellent work Collector, i love learning more about our history, didnt realise there had been so many temporary arches erected in Melbourne over the years, i think the only one worth keeping would have been that one on the Princes bridge, but unfortunately they did not, no idea why, looks like a fairly solid structure, looks a lot more like a permanent structure unlike the Federation Arch that was on the Princes Bridge in 2001.
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Old May 17th, 2005, 08:00 AM   #4
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Agree and add the Queen Victoria Arch as well.
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Old May 17th, 2005, 08:09 AM   #5
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1984 Sesquicentenary of Melbourne and Victoria


The Royal Botanical Gardens were restored and The Westgate Park is established. Both The Museum of Australian-Chinese History and the now demolished Australian Gallery of Sport were built. Westpac donated a 50 metre flagpole which now flies the largest flag in Victoria at the Haymarket roundabout and Myer erected a temporary arch on Swanston Street next to Princes Bridge.
We also saw the temporary closure and greening of Swanston Street that drew crowds of half a million people and gave rise to The Swanston Street Walk concept that we now have realized.
Jennings also unveiled the Southgate development to coincide with the sesquicentenary celebrations. It was completed years later with a completely different design.


The Australian-Chinese Museum.


The Australian Gallery of Sport.


The Haymarket flag.


The Myer Arch on Princes Bridge.


Parade down Swanston Street.


Stamps released for the event.


Southgate proposal.
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Old May 17th, 2005, 08:58 AM   #6
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Christ, a good 10-20% of the city must have been in this photo:



1930s we were around 1 million.
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Old May 17th, 2005, 09:31 AM   #7
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Melbourne 1956, The XVI Olympiad
Text extracts from The Herald-Sun, Australian Olympic History


Melbourne’s Olympic Games, from the 22 November to 8 December 1956, marked the first time in Olympic history that the Games had been held in the southern hemisphere. They were preceded by a period of immense international tension, with the Cold War raging, and Soviet tanks rolling into Hungary. Armed forces from Israel. Briton and France had moved into Egypt to annex the Suez Canal, and relations between Taiwan and Mainland China were barely tolerable. All this led to a spate of boycotts of the Games, from the Netherlands, Spain, Switzerland, Egypt, Lebanon and Iraq. Because of the boycotts and Melbourne’s remoteness from Europe, the number of competitors (2958 men and 384 women) was the smallest since 1932 – although a surprisingly large number of 69 nations competed. At home, the pre-Games period was plagued by disorganization and industrial unrest, and at one stage the IOC threatened to take the Games from Melbourne. Another setback forced by Australia’s strict quarantine laws, was the decision to hold equestrian events in Stockholm, Sweden.

Despite all this, the XVI Olympiad was a magnificent success, and – because of goodwill between the teams and the generous spirit of the crowds – became known forever as the Friendly Games. The mood of goodwill was consolidated by the decision of the organizers to adopt a suggestion from John Ian Wing, an Australian-born Chinese apprentice carpenter, that all teams should mingle and walk (not march) during the closing ceremony. This has been done ever since.

Competing on home soil for the first time, Australia fielded a record team of 291 (including 35 women) at the 1956 Olympic Games, and had its most bountiful medal haul. The team won 13 gold medals, 8 silver and 14 bronze. After a glorious Opening Ceremony in which Ron Clarke lit the Olympic flame and John Landy took the Olympic oath on behalf of assembled athletes, the Games ushered in a new crop of Australian heroes and heroines with names like Cuthbert, Fraser, Crapp, Rose and Henricks.
On the Melbourne Cricket Ground, Betty Cuthbert won three gold medals, in the 100 and 200 metres and 4 x 100 relay. Her team-mate Shirley Strickland, who had already won gold in Helsinki in the 80 metres hurdles, defended that title successfully and combined with Cuthbert, Fleur Mellor and Norma Croker to win in the relay.

At the swimming pool young Australians, who had trained in Townsville during winter, shocked the world by winning every freestyle gold medal, men’s and women’s. Murray Rose. A 17 year old raised on a diet that included raw seaweed, matched Cuthbert’s performance by winning gold in the 400 and 1500 metres and 4 x 200 relay. Dawn Fraser won the first two gold medals of a remarkable career, in the 100 freestyle and the relay, and Lorraine Crapp won the 400 and shared the relay win. Jon Henricks took the 100 metres freestyle, with another gold in the relay. Queensland’s David Theile won the first of his two successive 100 metres backstroke championships.

At the velodrome, Ian Browne and Tony Marchant took over the tandem title that had been won in Helsinki by Russell Mockridge and Lionel Cox. On the running track, Kevan Gosper, later an IOC vice-president, won silver in the 4 x 400 relay.

Medal Tally

Country Gold Silver Bronze Total
1 USSR 37 29 32 98
2 USA 32 25 17 74
3 Australia 13 8 14 35
4 Hungary 9 10 7 26
5 Italy 8 8 9 25

________________________________________________________________

Sports and locations

Opening and closing ceremonies – MCG
Athletics – MCG
Basketball – The Glaciarium
Fencing – StKilda Town Hall
Soccer – MCG and Olympic Park
Weightlifting – Royal Exhibition Building
Modern pentathlon – Oaklands Huntclub and various arenas
Boxing – Melbourne Festival Hall
Hockey – MCG and Olympic Park
Yachting – Port Phillip Bay
Shooting – Williamstown range and RAAF station at Laverton
Rowing – Lake Wendouree, Ballarat
Swimming and Diving – Olympic Swimming Pool
Wrestling – Royal Exhibition Building
Cycling – Olympic Velodrome and country road course, Broadmeadows
Gymnastics – The Glaciarium
Demonstrations – MCG

The Olympic Village was at Heidelberg.


The Olympic Stadia during the games.


Ron Clarke lighting the Olympic flame.


The Olympic Village.


REB, location for wrestling and weightlifting.


The now demolished Glaciarium, location for basketball and gymnastics.


The Olympic Pool, location for swimming and diving.


Lake Wendouree, Ballarat, location for rowing events.

________________________________________________________________

From my collections…


Olympic Guide.


Ornament from Olympic Official car.


Souvenir plate.


The official stamps released for the event.


Stamp miniature sheet.
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Old May 18th, 2005, 02:41 AM   #8
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The Australian Open


The Australian Open at the old Kooyong Stadium.

Centenary of the Australian Open 1905-2005
Text extracts from Australia Post prestige booklet

In the beginning

The Australian Open began as the Australian Tennis Championships at the Warehousemen’s Cricket Ground in Melbourne on Tuesday 21 November 1905. In order to join the Davis Cup competition (which had begun in the US in 1900) a national association had to be formed, but it was not until 1904 that the Australian Lawn Tennis Association, which also included New Zealand, was formally constituted. The Association was required to organize the Davis Cup challenge, to control interstate matches and to run an annual Australian Championships. It was agreed that the first championship would take place in Melbourne in 1905 and thereafter on a rotating basis in various capital city locations and in New Zealand.

Finding a home

In 1972 the LTAA (now Tennis Australia) decided that the Australian Open required a permanent site and the Kooyong Lawn Tennis Club in Melbourne won the honour because it had the largest capacity and had attracted the greatest patronage.

By 1980 the facilities at Kooyong were considered inadequate with little room to expand. Because of the necessity to maintain the Australian Open as a Grand Slam tournament on the world stage, the Victorian government decided to construct a purpose-built venue at Flinders Park (now Melbourne Park), situated on the Yarra River, close to the city centre.

Designed to be adapted for various events the main stadium included a retractable roof allowing the game to continue despite rain or excessive heat. Another consequence of the retractable roof was that a grass surface could not be used and so a rubberized synthetic surface designed in Australia and known as Rebound Ace was chosen.

The new venue opened in 1988 and was an immediate hit with the players and public alike. Today these world-class facilities include five show courts (two with retractable roofs) and 19 other outdoor match and practice courts, as well as four indoor practice courts. The Australian Open is now the biggest sporting event on the Australian calendar, attracting over 500,000 visitors each year.


Melbourne Park aerial, including Olympic Park in foreground and MCG in background.
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Old May 18th, 2005, 02:52 AM   #9
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Net gain for Aussie Open
From MX 16/5/2005

Record attendance at this year’s Australian Open served up more than $200 million to the state’s economy, research revealed today.
The turnstile tally was 4.3 percent up on last year, with a record 543,873 fans attending the grand slam.
For the second year, the event lured more than 100,000 visitors, which resulted in $209.6 million pouring into the state’s balance sheet, the National Institute of Economic and Industrial Research found.
Early predictions by chief executive Paul McNamee that this year’s event – boosted by the campaigns of dad-to-be Lleyton Hewitt and Alicia Molik – would be 50 percent bigger than last year failed to happen.
But Major Events Minister John Pandazopoulos said the tournament made the equivalent of 3760 full-time jobs.
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Old May 18th, 2005, 05:51 AM   #10
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great stuff again Collector, just one question if u dont mind, do u know how the attendence of 543,873 compares to the other major tournaments around the world? ie. US Open, Wimbledon etc.......
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Old May 18th, 2005, 06:09 AM   #11
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Very cool!
Are there many history of melbourne books?
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Old May 18th, 2005, 06:21 AM   #12
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plenty,
i cant think of any names and authors of books off hand tho except for one i have about Melbourne's lane ways in the city, called 'Essential but Unplanned' by Weston Bate, it is an excellent read.
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Old May 18th, 2005, 07:17 AM   #13
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Quote:
Originally Posted by uewepuep
Very cool!
Are there many history of melbourne books?
Hundreds, I'll have to start a thread on it one day.
I'm lucky to have a lot in my personal library (looking out for more).
Nearly all of the old photographs you see posted by me are from books I have scanned from my collection.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Barsby
great stuff again Collector, just one question if u dont mind, do u know how the attendence of 543,873 compares to the other major tournaments around the world? ie. US Open, Wimbledon etc.......
Don't know the answer to that.
I am hoping someone else who knows their tennis can answer that for both of us.
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Old May 18th, 2005, 01:16 PM   #14
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we truly do live in such a great city, both past and present.
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Old May 19th, 2005, 07:09 AM   #15
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Henley-on-the Yarra


Before Moomba there was Henley-on-the Yarra.
The first Henley-on-the Yarra rowing regatta was held in 1904.
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Old May 19th, 2005, 08:26 AM   #16
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Barsby
great stuff again Collector, just one question if u dont mind, do u know how the attendence of 543,873 compares to the other major tournaments around the world? ie. US Open, Wimbledon etc.......
Second to the US open, it has a record total attendance of around 640,000. The Oz open has the record for the highest single day attendance of 60,000.

The French and Wimbledon have far smaller crowds due to no night sessions.
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Old May 19th, 2005, 09:10 AM   #17
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Bigger than Wimbledon.
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Old May 19th, 2005, 12:53 PM   #18
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I just thought I'd use the arch theme at the start of this thread to put forward an idea for an iconic structure I reckon would be great for Melbourne. I think a massive and architecturally modern arch over the Yarra River where the river meets Port Phillip Bay could be built. Kind of like the Gateway Arch, St.Louis except bigger and better:



It could have "Melbourne" emblazened on it as a kind of welcome for cruise ships that come to Melbourne, in a similar fashion to the way visitors are welcomed coming from the tulla on the Freeway under the yellow rod thing. I think the arch could be a touristy thing where people could climb it, and it would also be great in a photo from the right angle as a kind of rainbow over the city.

Any comments on this idea?
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Old May 20th, 2005, 03:39 AM   #19
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I love the St.Louis Gateway Arch, and if we had one here it would look like a copy,
no matter how good we make it.
So no, I don't think it's a good idea, especially if it had Melbourne emblazonned all over it.
Kitsch comes to mind.
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Old August 17th, 2005, 04:31 AM   #20
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Failed bids

Throughout its recent history Melbourne has bid for quite a few international events and failed in its attempt to stage them.

The ones I can recall are:

1976 Expo
1988 Olympic Games
1996 Olympic Games
2014 World Cup*

*The world cup attempt was nipped in the bud before it was submitted as a serious bid during the Kennet years that also saw us canvass the idea of even staging the Eurovision Song contest (no joke).
The 1988 bid for the Olympic Games saw us pull out just before the International Olympic Committee started the voting stage, and as for the 1996 games we got as far as the second vote where we came 5th if my memory serves me correct.

Anyone out there who can remember any more please list.
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