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Old August 18th, 2005, 11:03 PM   #21
FloridaFuture
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Quote:
Originally Posted by randommichael
I just hope Tampa can handle all this development. I think we need to see some real job growth in the area to support all of this development. Jobs bring in people, but retirement does too. I think the plans are coming together nicely...now, it just needs to happen.
Remember, and I'm not saying this should be all of it but when all of these people come DT hundreds of jobs will be created in DT. For all the restraunts, shops and other service jobs. As more and more people move DT bussinesses will be attracted to it and in comes the nicer jobs like Westshore. It'll take time but in the end. But soon Downtown will strike back.
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Old August 18th, 2005, 11:51 PM   #22
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There will be no problem with the jobs - just have to make sure people buy - and I think they will. Residents also bring better jobs to downtown and maybe, one day, and office building - but those seem to be passe everywhere.
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Old August 19th, 2005, 02:44 AM   #23
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Jobs are not a problem... The area is back to having solid job growth again, with the most recent 12 month YOY period having a net gain of 45k jobs.
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Old August 26th, 2005, 01:29 AM   #24
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Fortune 100 firm may build at Central Park Village

JANET ZINK. St. Petersburg Times

Developers planning to rebuild Central Park Village, a public housing complex north of downtown, have said a Fortune 100 company is interested in putting a regional corporate office in the project.

They won't say which company it is, but some of their own site plans offer hints: Graphics in the group's proposal show Bank of America offices at the corner of Cass Street and Seventh Avenue.

Bank of America has already signed on to finance the $137- million development, but is mum on whether its plans include regional offices.

"It's premature to comment on whether or not we would be doing that," said George Owen, a spokesman for Bank of America.

Last week, representatives of a financial services company spoke to Tampa Chamber of Commerce officials about employing 2,500 to 5,000 people in Tampa on a 500,000-square-foot campus.

It was unclear where the employees would come from or what type of work they would do.

The company is "internationally recognized" and considering sites in Tampa, Orlando, Jacksonville and Miami, according to an e-mail sent by Beatriz Bare, the chamber's director of corporate recruitment, to Mark Huey, the city's economic development manager.

Huey said he had not been told whether the company considering Tampa was Bank of America.

"It's early, and we have very sketchy information," Huey said.

Bare did not return calls from the St. Petersburg Times.

Myron Hughes, vice president of economic development for the chamber, declined to give details on last week's discussion.

"There is no timetable for what might take place," he said.

Bank of America is a partner in the Central Park Group, the developers chosen to rebuild the dilapidated neighborhood. Their plan calls for combining the 28 acres owned by the Tampa Housing Authority with surrounding land to create a 60-acre mixed-income community with more than 4,000 single-family houses, condominiums and apartments. Central Park currently has 484 units.

The Central Park Group's proposal says the project would be "backed by the balance sheet" of Bank of America, which tops $838 billion.

"There's no floor and no ceiling on what we're willing to commit," said Bank of America vice president Elon Metoyer during a presentation Aug. 9.

Bank of America is the nation's third-largest financial institution. Its Florida headquarters used to be in Tampa, but are now in Jacksonville.

Florida has historically been a chief profit center for the bank and its predecessor, NationsBank. Bank of America chief executive Ken Lewis spent his formative years learning the industry in Tampa, where he ran the statewide operation in the mid 1980s.

Bank of America's national headquarters is in Charlotte, N.C., where the company helped turn a public housing complex located within view of its offices into a mixed-income neighborhood.

Times staff writer Jeff Harrington contributed to this report. Janet Zink can be reached at (813) 226-3401 or [email protected].
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Old August 26th, 2005, 02:58 PM   #25
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That's interesting. I work for the bank and I haven't heard anything about it...not that I would. I think it would be a great thing for the city though.
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Old August 26th, 2005, 11:34 PM   #26
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The Central Park Group's proposal to redevelop the Central Park area states relocating current residents is first, then rebuiding the infrastructure (streets, utiltites) with the first construction to be completed in 2008. This gives you a few years to pack up your personal stuff at work prior to the move.
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Old January 6th, 2006, 06:35 PM   #27
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Village project minus 20 acres

An expired contract for 20 acres to combine with other land won't halt Central Park Village.

By JANET ZINK, Times Staff Writer
Published January 6, 2006

TAMPA - Plans to redevelop a dilapidated public housing complex near downtown into a mixed-income community have hit a snag.

A contract that developers had to buy a 20-acre piece of the proposed 60-acre project expired in late December with no deal. Developers were going to combine that land with the 28-acre Central Park Village public housing complex, and other land, to create an urban village that would include upscale condos along with apartments for the poor.

City officials heralded the project as an important element in the transformation of downtown Tampa into a residential hub.

"This is very disappointing to us all," wrote Don Wallace, founder of the Lazydays RV SuperCenter and one of the project's backers, in a Dec. 22 letter to Tampa Housing Authority officials. He and developer Bill Bishop had hoped to buy the 20-acre Tampa Park Apartments to complete their vision for Central Park Village.

City leaders, housing authority officials and the developers pledged Thursday to continue with the project.

"From a long-range planning perspective, it would be so much better if Tampa Park Apartments were part of the larger redevelopment," said Mayor Pam Iorio. "But didn't happen. Central Park Village can still go forward. It's viable by itself."

The developers say they will present a scaled-down plan to the Housing Authority, which owns Central Park Village, this month. They also will continue to try to buy the remaining 12 acres envisioned for the project, though the overall plan could now change.

"We continue to be willing and able to close on the Tampa Park Apartments in accordance with the terms of the contract," said Deanne Roberts, a spokeswoman for the Central Park Group. "Meanwhile, we're moving on and creating a reconfigured site plan without that parcel since we and the Tampa Housing Authority feel an urgency to replace Central Park Village."

Officers in Tampa Park Apartments Inc., who include former City Council member Perry Harvey Jr., Florida Sentinel Bulletin chairman C. Blythe Andrews Jr., and former Housing Authority Board member Kay Andrews, did not return phone calls or said they had no comment. The Hillsborough County property appraiser puts the assessed value of the land at $13.1-million.

"If they're not willing to sell, they're not willing to sell," said Jerome Ryans, executive director of the Tampa Housing Authority. "If Tampa Park is not a part of it, we've still got (28) acres. We're going to move ahead. Nothing is going to stop this."

The Tampa Housing Authority board in August chose the Central Park Group, which includes Bishop, Wallace and Bank of America, from three competing teams to redevelop the 484-unit complex. The Central Park Group got high marks for being able to incorporate adjacent properties into its proposal, an edge the other bidders didn't have.

Their plan called for more than 4,000 apartments, condominiums and townhomes, parks, sidewalk cafes and a town center.

Now, they'll have to come up with a new plan with one-third less land.

"It will be the same plan, the same mix, just less of it," Roberts said.

The contract to buy Tampa Park Apartments, which provides subsidized housing in more than 350 units, dates back to 2003. That's when Bishop and Wallace first proposed redeveloping Central Park Village and the surrounding land into a 157-acre community. Those plans fell apart when, under a tight deadline to apply for federal funding for the project, the city and county failed to reach an agreement on creating a special taxing district to support the effort. Bishop and Wallace came back with a smaller proposal last year.

Officials with the Housing Authority and the Central Park Group say they are working now on an even smaller initiative.

"Twenty-eight acres is big enough to make it a feasible project," said Elon Metoyer, senior vice president of Bank of America.

Mark Huey, Tampa's manager of economic development, said the redevelopment of Central Park is one of the city's most significant projects and would continue even without Tampa Park Apartments.

"Redevelopment of that scale takes a lot of twists and turns," he said.

It's likely Tampa Park Apartments will be redeveloped eventually, too, he said, "whether it's now or five to 10 years from now."

Janet Zink can be reached at 813 226-3401 or [email protected]

http://www.sptimes.com/2006/01/06/Hi...ct_minus.shtml
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Old January 7th, 2006, 02:11 AM   #28
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It's pretty clear that the Tampa Park owners are seeing dollar signs even bigger than the ones they saw before, when Civitas first bought the right to buy them out.

It's a shame that their greed may well cripple this project, and stagnate proper redevelopment of the nieghborhood for who knows how long.
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Old January 7th, 2006, 02:49 AM   #29
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Don't think it will stagnate anything anymore that it would have stagnated before. . . Everybody wants to build and cash in.
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Old January 7th, 2006, 03:51 AM   #30
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This will still go on right?....but not as large.correct? Sorry spead read through it.
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Old January 7th, 2006, 03:35 PM   #31
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Although the article does not really say why the owners will not close, I think Jason may be right. Why risk being sued unless you think there is more $$$ to be made on the deal.
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Old January 7th, 2006, 05:52 PM   #32
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There is no risk of being sued, The contract expired. They can do what they want.
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Old May 23rd, 2006, 01:29 PM   #33
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Here's the proposal for Cental Park, I'm surprised it has two 26 story towers along with retirment apertment towers. Should be interesting.

Central Park Village Proposal Pitched
Skip directly to the full story.
By JOHN W. ALLMAN [email protected]



TBO.com Site Search | Tribune archive from 1990

TAMPA - A neighborhood with ample parking, local shops, a prominent museum and a refurbished park.

That's the plan for the Tampa Housing Authority's 28-acre Central Park Village as proposed Monday by Bank of America and a group of private investors. The large-scale urban redevelopment project, if approved, would take four years to complete and stretch from Cass Street north to Scott Street, flanked by Nebraska Avenue to the east and Orange Avenue to the west.

The proposal includes:

• Up to 2,030 new housing units in 11 proposed buildings: five buildings of multifamily units for rent or for sale, two high-rise 26-floor towers of luxury condominiums for sale, three retirement towers with apartments for sale, and one senior facility with rental apartments.

• A refurbished St. James Episcopal Church, which would be converted into a black history museum.

• A refurbished Perry Harvey Park.

• Up to 60,000-square-feet of office space and up to 35,000-square-feet of neighborhood retail shopping.

• Space for a new, 50,000-square-foot, four-story Tampa Housing Authority main office building, which would be built at THA's expense.

The amount of public housing would be nearly double what is available currently, with up to 800 units. Those buildings would stand between seven and nine stories each.

All of the buildings would have their own designated multilevel parking as well as retail and office space on the ground floors.

Bank officials also said that preliminary discussions have been ongoing about building a middle school just outside the Central Park boundary.

Overall reaction was mixed, particularly from housing board Chairwoman Hazel Harvey, who expressed concern about the height of some of the buildings and the possible effect of clustering large numbers of low-income residents in such tight quarters.

Harvey and Mary Williams, Central Park Village resident council president, questioned how well families with small children might integrate into the more-urban environment. Board member Gerald White welcomed the building heights and higher density, saying he would fight to see as many people as possible be allowed to move into the new neighborhood.

The housing board is traveling Thursday to Orlando to view a mixed-income, urban redevelopment project similar to Central Park's redesign.

The two-hour presentation Monday emphasized the potential community benefit while reiterating the hurdles left to clear.

"We remain just as committed as we've ever been to seeing this through to completion," said Don Wallace, chairman of the Central Park Group, which is working with Bank of America.

It hasn't been an easy road to this point. The last redevelopment plan, brought by the Civitas Group, failed to secure approval for a joint Community Redevelopment Area designation from Hillsborough County commissioners in 2004. And the current plan almost was dealt a crippling blow in January when the owners of Tampa Park Apartments opted to remove their 20-acre site from consideration, forcing Bank of America and the Central Park Group to significantly overhaul the site design.

Central Park's 1,300 residents are set to begin moving out in July regardless of whether a redevelopment plan has been approved. The move is expected to take nine months, with the demolition of Central Park's existing buildings estimated for May 2007.

Everything but the relocation of residents now hinges on a June 7 vote by the Hillsborough County Commission - for the same CRA designation that was denied two years ago.

Roxanne Amoroso, Bank of America's vice president of community development banking, did little Monday to ease concerns. She reiterated several times that without a CRA, the proposal would be killed. A CRA is critical because it would create a special tax district allowing private developers to pay for street, storm sewer and other repairs.

The proposed 143-acre CRA encompasses much more than the Central Park site, which is why it should be approved, Mayor Pam Iorio said after the meeting. She said city staff members are meeting individually with each county commissioner to discuss issues they may have with the project.

http://www.tbo.com/news/metro/MGBPCC2NJNE.html
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Old May 23rd, 2006, 07:11 PM   #34
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It also says that the public housing units will be housed in mid-rise buildings...

In all, it sounds like there would be around 6-10 buildings of 7 floors or more as part of this initial portion of the revelopment project.
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Old May 23rd, 2006, 10:05 PM   #35
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The project keeps getting smaller and smaller with the buildings getting taller and taller. I think the two towers are a great addition but I don't think they fit for low-income housing. Low-income housing should be fit for children which is four stories max! I pictured the area much like a traditional Chicago, Boston, or downtown Baltimore neighborhood. Lots of nice rowhouses with porches that would get people out on the street and not confine them to a unit 5-25 stories up.

That being said I really think this would be a much better addition to downtown than a Belmont Heights type development. I would rather see this built than what some pople are calling for regarding a low-density development.

With all of the new housing projects going up at least people will have a good choice as far as the type of housing they would like to live in. Hilslborough County will have everything from downtown urban to suburban residential. Even in low-income housing there should be choice.
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Old May 24th, 2006, 12:12 AM   #36
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^with such low densities, they would never be able to make the units any cheaper than they are now.

Besdies, not all units in this project are supposed to be cheap... They are providing public housing units and some "affordable" housing, but the bulk of housing units will be market rate.
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Old May 24th, 2006, 12:22 AM   #37
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It's still a nice project. I like how it brings the Black History Museum and the rennoevated park, along with new headquarters for the Housing Authoruty. The density is a plus and should be a nice neightborhood.
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Old May 24th, 2006, 02:20 AM   #38
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Sounds like a nice plan that has the potential to be a showpiece for the city. I'm assuming the subsidized units will be mixed in with the market rate units. Perhaps, if they were able to incorporate the other complex into the project they would've been able to do some lower buildings. I still think families would be fine, as long as designed with families in mind (play areas, play rooms, open space, etc.) Hope it comes to fruition. If this works out, perhaps something similar could be done with West Tampa.
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Old May 24th, 2006, 05:50 AM   #39
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I think a project like this with this much height, and this much children, will need a major park for them to release their energy. They will definitely need their space.
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Old May 24th, 2006, 02:10 PM   #40
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Personally, I wouldn't want to live in an area that has people on welfare living right beside me. I think this will be a big turn off to many buyers.
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