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Old July 19th, 2015, 11:28 AM   #81
lancetop
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Originally Posted by Pan-Afro-Man View Post
Fayetteville NC

Its along I-95

Next to the largest US Army base

Large River runs through it

Large HBCU and community college plus a thriving unc affiliate university just 30 minutes away

Very diverse population unlike most southern cities

But very similar to small town southern cities with all the damn retard NIMBYs that hate growth and funding mass transit.

Metro Population almost 390k
Unfortunately Fayetteville is also saddled with a reputation for high crime.
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Old July 25th, 2015, 04:46 AM   #82
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Throughout the US, state capitols are generally booming....and many of them have easily become the premier city in their state. (or are in the process of becoming such)

examples: Indianapolis, Columbus, Nashville, Oklahoma City, Atlanta....

But Columbia, Tallahassee, and Raleigh seemed to have been left in the dust. For some reason I keep thinking Columbia would top this list, if I were compiling this sort of thing.

A quick read on Columbia shows it to be a progressive city....a good city with lots going for it----so I don't quite understand why Greenville and Charleston (and even Myrtle Beach) get so much attention.

Of course Raleigh has a large/significant sister city that dilutes Raleigh's development, and Raleigh is indeed growing. But still, North Carolina is now a mega-state. Seems like it's capitol city's downtown and urban fabric would be kicking major ass.

Poor Tallahassee got pushed aside decades ago. (and oddly enough, I've spent a little time there, and I think it's one of Florida's nicest cities)
Raleigh "left in the dust"? It's one of the fastest-growing cities in the nation and development is booming downtown.

I wouldn't think that the capital city necessarily needs to be the largest/most prominent city in each state. The capital's purpose is government, so it doesn't HAVE to be the commercial or population capital too in order to be effective - though it sometimes is all three. There are only a few examples of the largest city being the state capital...I think it more often isn't.
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Old July 25th, 2015, 04:52 AM   #83
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For skylines, I've always been disappointed with Raleigh. I know it has the big sis to the south and the Triad to the west, but still.... it has enough clout/influence and wealth to have more than it does.
Give Raleigh just a couple of years and it will be more inline with it's size and prominence. There is a building boom happening there that will change the skyline.

The main reasons that Raleigh has had a disappointing skyline are the existence of RTP and Durham/Chapel Hill. Raleigh is multi-nodal, causing development to be distributed throughout downtown RTP, Raleigh, Durham, and Chapel Hill. It dilutes each city's skyline.
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Old July 29th, 2015, 04:03 AM   #84
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A quick read on Columbia shows it to be a progressive city....a good city with lots going for it----so I don't quite understand why Greenville and Charleston (and even Myrtle Beach) get so much attention.
Yeah it's pretty progressive for a midsized Southern city with a lot going for it indeed. Charleston and Myrtle Beach get attention for being tourist hotspots on the coast. Greenville has done a very good job in promoting itself, particularly in combination with the ongoing revitalization of its downtown and its location in the foothills which make for easy trips to the Blue Ridge mountains. Columbia needs to do the same in terms of touting its advantages for the sake of more exposure.
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Old August 4th, 2015, 06:21 PM   #85
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Originally Posted by WeimieLvr View Post
Raleigh "left in the dust"? It's one of the fastest-growing cities in the nation and development is booming downtown.

I wouldn't think that the capital city necessarily needs to be the largest/most prominent city in each state. The capital's purpose is government, so it doesn't HAVE to be the commercial or population capital too in order to be effective - though it sometimes is all three. There are only a few examples of the largest city being the state capital...I think it more often isn't.
From 2010 Raleigh gain 35,804 coming in second in NC
From 2010 Charlotte gain 78,534 coming in first in NC
Charlotte and Raleigh gain 114,338 from 2010 to 2014.
North Carolina gain 408,273 from 2010 to 2014
Charlotte & Raleigh is 28% of North Carolina's growth.

We have many counties and cities in NC losing population, which I hope can be corrected in the future.

All the large cities in North Caroline are gaining population so that is were most of the growth is happing.

Last edited by CLTNC; August 4th, 2015 at 06:28 PM.
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Old August 4th, 2015, 10:20 PM   #86
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From 2010 Raleigh gain 35,804 coming in second in NC
From 2010 Charlotte gain 78,534 coming in first in NC
Charlotte and Raleigh gain 114,338 from 2010 to 2014.
North Carolina gain 408,273 from 2010 to 2014
Charlotte & Raleigh is 28% of North Carolina's growth.

We have many counties and cities in NC losing population, which I hope can be corrected in the future.

All the large cities in North Caroline are gaining population so that is were most of the growth is happing.
Try percentages...Raleigh is leaving Charlotte in the dust if you look at it that way. Raw numbers are fine, but you have to consider the original size of the city and how many its adding by comparison. And I was talking about more recently than 2010 - like the past couple of years. Raleigh has been in the top 5 nationally by percentage growth.
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Old August 4th, 2015, 11:06 PM   #87
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From 2013 to 2014 Raleigh added 7,979
Percentage wise yes because its population is 362,283 less than Charlotte.
From 103 t0 21014 Charlotte added 14,007. Charlotte added 6,028 more people than Raleigh.
As Raleigh gets more people their percentage will go down if its growth does not increase over its current level..

If Raleigh keeps its same growth rate at about 7,979 and Charlotte over 14,000 Raleigh will never pass Charlotte in population.

New York City added- 222,080 from-2013 to 2014 and it percent rate is lower than Raleigh or Charlotte.
Percentage look great for small towns and cities of 500 that double its population for 100% growth, but they only add 500 people.

City of Charlotte has more people than city of Atlanta, but we all know Atlanta metro is more than 2 times as large as Charlotte metro. Atlanta center city is bigger than Charlotte.

Charlotte population grew by 2% from 2013 t0 2014
Raleigh population grew by 1.9% from 2013 t0 2014

http://www.charlotteobserver.com/new...e21523356.html

Last edited by CLTNC; August 4th, 2015 at 11:59 PM.
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Old August 11th, 2015, 03:46 AM   #88
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Quote:
Originally Posted by lancetop View Post
Throughout the US, state capitols are generally booming....and many of them have easily become the premier city in their state. (or are in the process of becoming such)

examples: Indianapolis, Columbus, Nashville, Oklahoma City, Atlanta....

But Columbia, Tallahassee, and Raleigh seemed to have been left in the dust. For some reason I keep thinking Columbia would top this list, if I were compiling this sort of thing.

A quick read on Columbia shows it to be a progressive city....a good city with lots going for it----so I don't quite understand why Greenville and Charleston (and even Myrtle Beach) get so much attention.

Of course Raleigh has a large/significant sister city that dilutes Raleigh's development, and Raleigh is indeed growing. But still, North Carolina is now a mega-state. Seems like it's capitol city's downtown and urban fabric would be kicking major ass.

Poor Tallahassee got pushed aside decades ago. (and oddly enough, I've spent a little time there, and I think it's one of Florida's nicest cities)
Tallahassee has never been Florida's premier city. It only became the capitol because it was in the middle of the state's largest cities (excluding Key West) at the time. Nevertheless, by 1900, even Tampa had suburbs larger than it. With that said, it's a booming place these days. I went to college there from 1996 to 2001. It's literally a different place now.
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Old August 13th, 2015, 02:24 AM   #89
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Originally Posted by CLTNC View Post
From 2013 to 2014 Raleigh added 7,979
Percentage wise yes because its population is 362,283 less than Charlotte.
From 103 t0 21014 Charlotte added 14,007. Charlotte added 6,028 more people than Raleigh.
As Raleigh gets more people their percentage will go down if its growth does not increase over its current level..

If Raleigh keeps its same growth rate at about 7,979 and Charlotte over 14,000 Raleigh will never pass Charlotte in population.

New York City added- 222,080 from-2013 to 2014 and it percent rate is lower than Raleigh or Charlotte.
Percentage look great for small towns and cities of 500 that double its population for 100% growth, but they only add 500 people.

City of Charlotte has more people than city of Atlanta, but we all know Atlanta metro is more than 2 times as large as Charlotte metro. Atlanta center city is bigger than Charlotte.

Charlotte population grew by 2% from 2013 t0 2014
Raleigh population grew by 1.9% from 2013 t0 2014

http://www.charlotteobserver.com/new...e21523356.html
If Raleigh continues to grow at a faster rate than Charlotte then (mathematically) it will catch up.

Midtown or Buckhead in Atlanta are more like Uptown Charlotte. Downtown Atlanta is a whole different ballgame.

Last edited by WeimieLvr; August 16th, 2015 at 06:34 AM.
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Old August 16th, 2015, 04:05 AM   #90
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Raleigh will likely never catch up to Charlotte in population. The Triangle however, may pass Charlotte's metro area in population at some point in the future.

Raleigh's skyline could stand to be a lot larger than it is. With its current city government I'm skeptical that will happen. At least the cluster of buildings it has is attractive.
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Old August 16th, 2015, 06:37 AM   #91
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Raleigh will likely never catch up to Charlotte in population. The Triangle however, may pass Charlotte's metro area in population at some point in the future.

Raleigh's skyline could stand to be a lot larger than it is. With its current city government I'm skeptical that will happen. At least the cluster of buildings it has is attractive.
I assumed we were talking about the MSA/CSA. Raleigh's skyline has taken off a bit...it seems to have surpassed Winston-Salem as the 2nd largest/tallest in the state and is growing pretty quickly. I expect it to boom in the next few years.
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Old August 16th, 2015, 05:10 PM   #92
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If Raleigh continues to grow at a faster rate than Charlotte then (mathematically) it will catch up.

Midtown or Buckhead in Atlanta are more like Uptown Charlotte. Downtown Atlanta is a whole different ballgame.
I will never understand those comparisons other than maybe skyscraper size. In my opinion, Uptown is a cohesive downtown urban core area, much like downtown Atlanta on a much smaller scale. Although nice, Buckhead and Midtown don't feel that way to me but both serve their purposes as (business and shopping district) extensions to downtown ATL.
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Old August 16th, 2015, 05:19 PM   #93
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Give Raleigh just a couple of years and it will be more inline with it's size and prominence. There is a building boom happening there that will change the skyline.

The main reasons that Raleigh has had a disappointing skyline are the existence of RTP and Durham/Chapel Hill. Raleigh is multi-nodal, causing development to be distributed throughout downtown RTP, Raleigh, Durham, and Chapel Hill. It dilutes each city's skyline.
Raleigh is finally beginning to show its size downtown wise via skyscraper development and urban core energy. Durham has a few developments in the balance as well, but that's a tougher go. It's hard to knock RTP since it's such a financial beast, but it does take a toll on both Raleigh and Durhams potential to expand the downtown's business districts.
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Old August 18th, 2015, 04:23 PM   #94
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It's hard to knock RTP since it's such a financial beast, but it does take a toll on both Raleigh and Durhams potential to expand the downtown's business districts.
Cummings Research Park, NASA and Redstone Arsenal combine to have a very similar effect in Huntsville (AL). The vast majority of jobs are concentrated outside of downtown.
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Old August 18th, 2015, 04:56 PM   #95
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Originally Posted by WeimieLvr View Post
If Raleigh continues to grow at a faster rate than Charlotte then (mathematically) it will catch up.

Midtown or Buckhead in Atlanta are more like Uptown Charlotte. Downtown Atlanta is a whole different ballgame.
From April 1, 2010 t0 July 2914 Charlotte gain 78,534
From April 1, 2010 t0 July 2914 Raleigh gain 36,004

Charlotte gain 2.18 times as many people as Raleigh.
Percentage does not tell the compete comparison between Charlotte & Raleigh.

There are counties and cities in North Carolina are losing population, and I do not see anything Changing anytime soon.
Charlotte Metro, The Triad, And RT will lead NC in jobs and growth in NC.

Last edited by CLTNC; August 18th, 2015 at 05:05 PM.
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Old August 18th, 2015, 05:38 PM   #96
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I will never understand those comparisons other than maybe skyscraper size. In my opinion, Uptown is a cohesive downtown urban core area, much like downtown Atlanta on a much smaller scale.
I somewhat have to agree that overall, Uptown Charlotte is a bit more like Midtown. Of course both downtown Atlanta and Uptown Charlotte are traditional CBDs with the big venues (sports arenas and convention centers), but downtown Atlanta is also noticeably more historic and has a large university there also which contrast pretty sharply with Uptown Charlotte. Also Midtown has after-hours activity that is more in line with Uptown Charlotte.
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Old August 18th, 2015, 09:50 PM   #97
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I somewhat have to agree that overall, Uptown Charlotte is a bit more like Midtown. Of course both downtown Atlanta and Uptown Charlotte are traditional CBDs with the big venues (sports arenas and convention centers), but downtown Atlanta is also noticeably more historic and has a large university there also which contrast pretty sharply with Uptown Charlotte. Also Midtown has after-hours activity that is more in line with Uptown Charlotte.
Not to mention that uptown is normally an urban district outside of the CBD...like the uptowns in Chicago, Houston, Cincinnati, Minneapolis, New Orleans, etc. Uptown Charlotte just reminds me more of Midtown Atlanta than downtown, especially due to the differences you mentioned above. Downtown Atlanta is gritty, historic, and just more of a traditional downtown; Midtown is newer, cleaner, and more of an entertainment area - similar to uptown Charlotte - and the skylines are more similar.

I didn't mean anything derogatory by it.
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Old August 18th, 2015, 09:50 PM   #98
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I somewhat have to agree that overall, Uptown Charlotte is a bit more like Midtown. Of course both downtown Atlanta and Uptown Charlotte are traditional CBDs with the big venues (sports arenas and convention centers), but downtown Atlanta is also noticeably more historic and has a large university there also which contrast pretty sharply with Uptown Charlotte. Also Midtown has after-hours activity that is more in line with Uptown Charlotte.
Not to mention that uptown is normally an urban district outside of the CBD...like the uptowns in Chicago, Houston, Cincinnati, Minneapolis, New Orleans, etc. Uptown Charlotte just reminds me more of Midtown Atlanta than downtown, especially due to the differences you mentioned above. Downtown Atlanta is gritty, historic, and just more of a traditional downtown; Midtown is newer, cleaner, and more of an entertainment area - similar to uptown Charlotte - and the skylines are more similar.

To anyone who might be offended, I didn't mean anything derogatory by it.
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Old August 18th, 2015, 10:19 PM   #99
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Raleigh is a very suburban minded metro. People like it for the large houses and big yards with winding cul-de-sacs. Just a simple look at google earth will show this city is NOT without it's issues when talking urban fabric.
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Old August 19th, 2015, 08:59 PM   #100
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Not to mention that uptown is normally an urban district outside of the CBD...like the uptowns in Chicago, Houston, Cincinnati, Minneapolis, New Orleans, etc. Uptown Charlotte just reminds me more of Midtown Atlanta than downtown, especially due to the differences you mentioned above. Downtown Atlanta is gritty, historic, and just more of a traditional downtown; Midtown is newer, cleaner, and more of an entertainment area - similar to uptown Charlotte - and the skylines are more similar.

To anyone who might be offended, I didn't mean anything derogatory by it.
Agreed.
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