daily menu » rate the banner | guess the city | one on oneforums map | privacy policy | DMCA | news magazine

Go Back   SkyscraperCity > European Forums > UK & Ireland Architecture Forums > Projects and Construction > Scottish Architecture Forum

Scottish Architecture Forum Architecture, Design and Urban Development for for Glasgow, Edinburgh, Aberdeen, Dundee, and the rest of Scotland.



Reply

 
Thread Tools
Old February 22nd, 2013, 09:51 PM   #21
M_Riaz
MORI
 
M_Riaz's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Location: Glasgow
Posts: 8,646
Likes (Received): 242



Sorry didnt realise DJ had formed this thread, posting over from the M8 thread

BBC


27 September 2012

The Star of Caledonia public artwork to mark the Scotland-England border at Gretna has cleared a funding hurdle.Creative Scotland awarded the project development funding in order to work up a bid for £1m support.
The total cost of the scheme, designed by Cecil Balmond, has been estimated at more than £4m.The head of the Gretna Landmark Trust, Alasdair Houston, said it was a "bold project" which could have social and economic benefits for the area.He said the "hard work" would now begin in order to try to see the structure built in time for the 2014 Commonwealth Games in Scotland.As well as internationally renowned designer Mr Balmond, the project also involves renowned land artist Charles Jencks who lives in Dumfries and Galloway.







__________________
Memento mori-Remember that you are mortal!
M_Riaz no está en línea   Reply With Quote

Sponsored Links
 
Old February 23rd, 2013, 12:11 AM   #22
Quirinalian
Registered User
 
Quirinalian's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2009
Location: Edinburgh
Posts: 848
Likes (Received): 113

I really like this.
Quirinalian no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old February 28th, 2013, 02:09 PM   #23
Pious Fraud
Registered User
 
Pious Fraud's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2010
Location: Glasgow
Posts: 2,044
Likes (Received): 764

Star of Caledonia secures planning permission

Urban Realm 28th February 2013

Dumfries & Galloway Council have granted planning permission to the Gretna Landmark Trust to erect the ‘Star of Caledonia’, a sculptural landmark conceived by designer Cecil Balmond and landscape architect Charles Jencks.

Intended to demark the Scotland/ England border at a presently unprepossessing motorway bridge the plans are inspired by James Clerk Maxwell’s development of electro-magnetic theory.

Jencks said: “Crossing the border to Scotland, across the River Sark, is now a passage obscured under a bridge by cars travelling at speed. Instead of marking this with motorway signs we are using a landform and sculpture that pulls together the adjacent site, the distant hills and the Solway.

“Nestled into the curving mound and springing from it is Cecil Balmond’s whirling creation. In one sense it is a scintillating piece of calligraphy seen against the sky which will signify various meanings as you approach it.”

Gretna Landmark Trust chairman Alasdair Houston added: “As an opportunity for a country to herald its border, this is remarkable.

The Star is a timeless work, which for 365 days a year will be a bold and confident statement of Scotland’s innovation and energy.”

£3.8m of funding has still to be secured for the scheme although it is hoped this can be achieved to allow construction to commence this year.

Pious Fraud no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old February 28th, 2013, 05:21 PM   #24
M_Riaz
MORI
 
M_Riaz's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Location: Glasgow
Posts: 8,646
Likes (Received): 242

Wonderful News and a Beautiful Artisitc Art piece. is it just me or does it resemble a thistle from certain angles
__________________
Memento mori-Remember that you are mortal!
M_Riaz no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old March 2nd, 2013, 02:21 PM   #25
Quirinalian
Registered User
 
Quirinalian's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2009
Location: Edinburgh
Posts: 848
Likes (Received): 113

Quote:
Originally Posted by M_Riaz View Post
Wonderful News and a Beautiful Artisitc Art piece. is it just me or does it resemble a thistle from certain angles
Yep, think that's part of the design...
Quirinalian no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old March 13th, 2014, 12:15 AM   #26
Kenspeckle
Registered User
 
Kenspeckle's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2010
Location: Midlothian
Posts: 2,049
Likes (Received): 487

Star of Caledonia can repay ‘£16m every year’

The Scotsman - 12th March, 2014



Quote:
The multi-million pound bill for a controversial new star-shaped landmark set to be created at the border between Scotland and England will almost be recouped every year from tourism spin-offs, its backers claim.

The giant Star of Caledonia sculpture in Gretna is expected to be seen around around 10 million motorists, their passengers and rail commuters every year.

Experts called in to analyse the potential impact of the 40-metres tall work of art have predicted it could boost the area to the tune of £16 million in its first year.

And the proposed new “gateway to Scotland” would be used to promote Dumfriesshire internationally as a home of world-class environmental art. Comparisons have been drawn with Yorkshire Sculpture Park, which attracts 250,000 visitors a year.

But the project - partly inspired by the pioneering electromagnetic work of Scottish physicist James Clerk Maxwell - has been delayed due to problems raising the £4.8 million costs of constructing the work of art, which is roughly twice the size of the famous “Angel of the North” in Gateshead and would also be much higher than the 30 metres tall Kelpies horse head sculptures in Falkirk.

The project has been in development for more than a decade and winner of a major design contest to boost tourism in Dumfriesshire was unveiled almost three years ago, with the work due to be completed in time for the Commonwealth Games in Glasgow this summer.

The project would see a huge star-shaped sculpture placed on top of a new “landform” next to the M74 motorway, adjacent to the River Sark and will be lit up at night-time to help raise awareness of the area’s status in being home the first “Dark Sky Park” in Europe.

The Star of Caledonia has been designed by American-born landscape architect Charles Jencks, who now lives in Dumfries, and London designer Cecil Balmond, who was behind the spiralling sculpture built for London’s Olympic Park.

But the nine-month construction programme on the Star of Caledonia is now not likely to get underway until next year, at the earliest, with the cost to the public purse having risen substantially.

Ahead of a crucial decision on a possible £1 million grant from Dumfries and Galloway Council, its supporters have highlight independent reseach showing there would be an initial boost of £16 million for the area from its construction, publicity and additional visitors to the area, with an annual boost of £4.6 million thereafter.

The Scottish Government has also been asked to plough £2 million into the project - which has already received a £1 million grant from the national arts agency, Creative Scotland.

However the economic impact report, jointly commissioned by the local authority and arts consultancy Wide Open, found that it would generate an additional 70 permanent jobs every year, on top of £10 million worth of media coverage and international publicity in the first four months after it is unveiled and the £2 million benefit for the construction industry.

The report states: “The Star of Caledonia is a unique and ambitious project that is likely to result in a range of important economic and social benefits for Dumfries and Galloway, as well as for Scotland.

“It is clear - although nothing is guaranteed at this relatively early state of project delivery - that there is a strong likelihood of the returns significantly outweighing the investment.

“It will be a highly visible contemporary landmark that will help brand and raise the international profile of the area as the gateway to Scotland and a creative and vibrant place to live and wok.”

The report, by consultants BOP, said the development of the project, originally instigated to help Dumfriesshire recover from the impact of the foot and mouth outbreak, had reached a “crucial moment,” with the future of the scheme dependant on the council’s backing as it would “unlock” possible support from the government.

Project director Dr Jan Hogarth, head of the Gretna Landmark Trust, said: “We have our fingers crossed for a positive decision next week, we’ve not been given any guarantees and it is significant sum of money we’re looking for.

“The whole project doesn’t hinge on this funding from the council, but it would make a big difference. At the moment we are hoping to start construction work early next year”

Balmond said: “James Clerk Maxwell’s realisation that light is energy was a truly great achievement, paving the way for Einstein and other great thinkers of the modern world.

“The Star of Caledonia captures the powerful energy, scientific heritage and magnetic pull of Scotland and the design pays homage to Scottish innovation. Penicillin, television, telephone, logarithms, the steam engine, discovery of the circulation of blood in the body, the postulation of electromagnetism — our world owes much to Scottish genius.”

Dumfries and Galloway Council said it could not comment ahead of next week’s decision.
__________________

djmaxliving liked this post
Kenspeckle no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old April 16th, 2014, 02:58 PM   #27
Kenspeckle
Registered User
 
Kenspeckle's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2010
Location: Midlothian
Posts: 2,049
Likes (Received): 487

Cecil Balmond - Sculpture Works

Urban Realm - 15th April, 2014

Quote:
Star of Caledonia designer Cecil Balmond has found himself at the heart of the debate around the nature of Scottish identity as the independence referendum looms. Following publication of his new book, Crossover, Urban Realm caught up with the Sri Lankan/British designer to find out more about the creative process. All photography taken from Crossover, published by Prestel.

Amidst the on-going debate about national identity and Scotland’s place in the world it is perhaps ironic that it should fall to British/Sri Lankan designer Cecil Balmond to symbolise the nation in a single set piece. The Star of Caledonia forms one of more than a dozen case studies featured in ‘Crossover’, a visual study of the creative process from the earliest hand drawn jottings through the ‘tipping point’ - ‘Crossover’ - to the finished product. It documents a wide range of work from The Orbit at London’s Olympic Park to the Central China Television Headquarters in Beijing through a sequence of Balmond’s thoughts, notes and ideas.

Within this collection the structural gymnastics showcased at Gretna is perhaps the richest in symbolism and, intentionally or not, the most political. Its conception has been a painstaking process guided by Balmond at every stage. Outlining the spark behind this process Balmond said: “At first I come up with some kind of dynamic idea and shape for a site. I’m quite abstract in the way I work, deliberately so. Over the years I’ve learnt not to jump and be figurative straight away.

“At Gretna I was one of three shortlisted in an open competition and had to present three ideas to the jury, one based on Highland dancing, a figurative representation of the Thistle and a more abstract idea which ended up winning.” Balmond’s approach when fleshing out these broad-brush ideas is to question the design at every stage. “Is it heavy and dense, or perforated? What are the features I want from it?” Balmond said. These questions lead to some sketching by hand before it’s rationalised on the computer to some extent, allowing the process of realisation and testing to begin.

In the case of Gretna the proposal was born of a questioning of what it means to be Scottish. Balmond added: “The piece has some sort of semblance of that identity but it’s also a metaphor for power, wind and energy. I tried to switch off my ideas of Scotland in a literal sense and think of the people I’d met there. I suddenly got the idea that the brains of Scotland had contributed something special to our modern world.” Amongst the grey matter singled out by Balmond were John Logie Baird, inventor of the television, Alexander Fleming, the biologist who discovered penicillin, Alexander Graham Bell, who developed the first telephone andJames Clerk Maxwell, the physicist who first proposed the idea of electromagnetism.

“I thought I’d go for the abstract idea of brain power and the enlightenment so I first sketched a star with power and then I thought of Maxwell a little more and realised that electricity and magnetism, as he postulated them, were at right angles to each other in wave form. I then thought of the border as being perforated, it is not one hard line but rather a boundary that can be crossed in many ways. A local farmer takes a short journey across it while a businessman takes a much long journey. So the idea grew on me that the border is perforated, like a series of waves overlapping each other and if I can create an art object that has waveforms in it I can site them at right angles to create a kind of metaphor for Maxwell’s invention, making it a piece of discovery.”

When pressed as to whether he sees himself as an engineer or an architect Balmond is unequivocal. “I see myself as a designer, a designer of anything really from books, to architecture and structures. I haven’t done any structural engineering for 20 years - that was done by my company Arup. but I understand the principles of structure and I think that helps a lot in going beyond normal architecture training. It’s only in the last five or seven years that I’ve entered the art scene and become involved with public sculpture. It’s about organisational principles, structure is one of them, architecture is another and music a third. For me it’s more a general way of showing rhythm and dynamics in a piece of work whether that be a book as in Crossover or in principles of organisation and contemporary ideas of flux as opposed to the classical idea of the frame as a border. “

In that sense the Scottish project was ideal for Balmond, who relished the opportunity to grapple with something as intangible as a border with associated opportunities to make a significant statement on the landscape, something Britain as a whole has gotten rather good at in recent years as witnessed by the aforementioned Orbit and even Andy Scott’s recently unveiled Kelpies at Grangemouth. Acknowledging this backdrop Balmond noted: “it began with Antony Gormley and the Angel of the North. It’s not easy; there are a lot of bad examples in the world, but I think Britain’s done well. I was talking to Ian Rankin and he was very supportive of this project as being a progressive one for the real Scotland, rather than the picture postcard Scotland. I think Scotland is a very progressive country. “

Balmond believes that much more can be done to push the design agenda in this country, noting that much of his work is now international. In America for example many states have adopted the so-called 1 per cent rule; whereby a portion of the costs of major developments are diverted toward funding public art. These opportunities have helped persuade Balmond to be more active across the pond, including entering a competition to design a sculpture at Folsom Prison, immortalised in a live album by Johnny Cash. “We don’t have the same rules in Britain but it does help artists,” observes Balmond.

By its very nature sculpture is the most public of the arts, freed from the confines of the art gallery and placed in prominent locations, sculpture is in your face and inevitably every one has an opinion about it. With The Orbit those opinions were heavily divided but Balmond doesn’t see his role as that of pleasing the maximum number of people. Nor does he try to shock and outrage like much modern art. “You shouldn’t try to please people, nor should you try to shock them,” Balmond says. “I think they’re both very simplistic positions. You should do what is right to activate that site. You should have an idea and know why you’re doing it but then you should do it true to its own integral values. Some will like it and some won’t but it provokes debate around the work. If you deliberately try to shock people or please people the work is of limited value, it dies out after you’ve shocked everyone. “

With such a broad based background Balmond is well placed to marry the best of the many disciplines at his command and he is not afraid to push the envelope to avoid being typecast like some of his contemporaries. This is evidenced by the rich body of work presented in Crossover, much of which will be familiar to knowledgeable readers but all of which come with a narrative which paints their delivery in a new light. It is a concept which demands a fresh approach and in Crossover Balmond delivers it.
Kenspeckle no está en línea   Reply With Quote


Reply

Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off



All times are GMT +2. The time now is 07:12 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
Feedback Buttons provided by Advanced Post Thanks / Like v3.2.5 (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2014 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.

vBulletin Optimisation provided by vB Optimise (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2014 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.

SkyscraperCity ☆ In Urbanity We trust ☆ about us | privacy policy | DMCA policy

Hosted by Blacksun, dedicated to this site too!
Forum server management by DaiTengu