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Old April 14th, 2006, 06:34 AM   #1
hkskyline
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[HK] Hong Kong Highways

Source : http://www.building.com.hk/photoessa.../r3cfront.html



Ting Kau Bridge, at the northern end of the Rambler Strait, is one of the major sections linking Route 3 from the north-western New Territories to Kowloon. This photo was taken in July 1997, when the first section of the bridge deck in the middle tower could barely be seen.



A detailed look at the top of the bridge tower. A steel gantry with two pairs of strand-jacks was erected on top of each tower to lift the 190-tonne steel tower heads on which the cable anchors are housed. The 4.5 m x 31 m slot on the top of the tower is for the placement of the tower heads.



The steel tower head rests on the 29 m radius cofferdam on the Tsing Yi side. It will be lifted to the top of the tower after final inspection. The lifting bracket on the right side has already had the strands tightened to the strand-jack on top of the tower.



December 1997: the bridge as seen from the Tsing Yi side looking towards Ting Kau. The 1,177-metre cable-stayed bridge is supported by three towers, with the 200 m middle tower being the tallest. Erection of the steel/concrete composite deck started from the tower on Ting Kau towards the Tsing Yi side, with a lapse of about a month between each tower. At the peak of construction, six frontages were provided at the ends of the deck sections, making the progress of work extremely fast.



Typical set-up for deck erection as seen from the Ting Kau bridge tower. The deck on the trunk of the tower was initially erected by forming a working base with standard struts and girders. Four derrick cranes are lifted by strand-jack to the base for onward extension of the bridge deck on both sides. In order to stabilise the partially completed deck from wind, the deck was temporarily anchored with tie cables.



As the bridge is a single-tower design with decks on both sides, a separating slot connected by cross girders, is formed between the two decks. This slot provides an aerodynamic effect and helps stabilise the bridge structure under strong wind. The steel anchor heads for the stay cable and transverse cable can be seen here.



The connection of the deck to the Tsing Yi Abutment, as viewed from the top of the tower. The layout of the precast concrete panels which form the composite deck structure is clearly shown.



The bridge deck as seen from the underside. The cross struts that rest on the waist of the tower, the main and cross girders, and the underside-mounted sliding work platform, can be seen in the photo.



The slip road at Au Tau takes the form of a viaduct passing over wetlands. It is constructed by a segment launching machine using precast box section girder units.







Detail of the bridge abutment on the Tsing Yi side. This abutment is designed to house the bridge expansion joint. Rows of nozzle-link tubes are the dead anchors for the stay cable (those on the tower head are known as stressing anchors).



Looking up to the approach viaduct. The viaduct, which was constructed using a balanced cantilever method, spans Castle Peak Road 60 metres below.



The formwork gantry used to construct the box section viaduct. The construction spread outward, section by section, from the central pier. When a four-metre section is completed and the concrete is cured, the gantry on top of the deck slides a section forward, suspending the form below to repeat the construction of the next section.



The layout arrangement of the approach viaduct on Ting Kau as seen from the top of the bridge tower. Castle Peak Road, Tuen Mun Highway, and the entrance to Tai Lam Tunnel are barely visible.



The slip road from Tuen Mun Highway to Tai Lam Tunnel was constructed using two different methods. The section near the approach viaduct utilised a balanced cantilever method due to its larger span. The farther section, as seen in the photo here, is constructed of precast beams with in situ reinforced concrete deck. To overcome the problem of access, a temporary mini-rail was erected on the deck of the slip road.



Close-up of the mini-rail transporter and the launching machine used to install the precast beams for the slip road deck.



A 700 m x 150m x 90 m section links the approach viaduct at Ting Kau and the Tai Lam Tunnel. The road was cut from hard and highly abrasive granite, and the photo shows rows of 100 mm bore holes, drilled to a 12 m depth in staggered layers to facilitate the blasting process.
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Old April 15th, 2006, 09:59 PM   #2
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Impressive and interesting pictures.
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Old April 22nd, 2006, 09:59 PM   #3
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From the Mei Foo to Rambler Channel Bridge section, Route 3 is an elevated expressway, 3 km in length. The construction of this section makes use of precast U-section beams with an average span of 34 m, which are lifted to the top of the portal by the beam launcher. In the early stage of construction, a portal frame constructed of in-situ concrete is used to support the precast beams and the bridge deck on top. The supporting rail of the launcher is then erected on the top of the portal frame. By using this launcher, the precast concrete beams are lifted and placed on the frame to support the bridge deck. The red steel beam seen in the photo is the supporting rail of the launcher. The Airport Railway Viaduct can also be seen below the portal frame.



Since the segment launcher is used to lift the precast beam vertically, traditional corbel projected from the portal cannot be used to support the precast beam. A steel clip is applied to support and fix the precast beam temporarily in this case. Tensioned steel tendons are applied to tie the precast beams both front and back. Finally, reinforced concrete are placed on top in order to stiffen the beams, as well as to form the surface of deck. The red rows in the photo are the temporary steel clips.



After passing through the Rambler Channel Bridge from the Tsing Yi side, Route 3 runs into Kwai Tai Road and joins the Airport Railway again. This section, as a result, becomes a 25 m-high, double-deck elevated expressway. The segment launcher and the supporting rail can also be seen in the photo.



The full view of the segment launcher. This launcher system starts from the Mei Foo section, and lifts the precast beams onto the portal frame to become the bridge deck. When finishing one section, the system slides on top of the frame to the next section and repeats the work. By using this method, the segment launcher occupies fewer ground spaces. The launcher slides from Mei Foo to the interchange before the Rambler Channel Bridge to complete this dual four-lane viaduct. When the project is near completion, the launcher will be dismantled at the interchange.



The most magnificent section of Route 3. Essentially, the whole construction process can be seen here. In the upper right corner, the segment launcher has lifted the precast beams on the portal frame to form the bridge deck. The precast beams in the centre of the photo have been tightened on the frame by the use of tensioning, and thus, the temporary steel clips have been removed. The bridge deck on the left has had the reinforcement fixed. On the far left side, concrete placing to the bridge deck can be seen.



Smaller precast box section beam that was lifted by a girder-type segment launcher is used to build the viaduct of the Airport Railway. The overall view of the segment launcher can be seen in this photo. This method allows for occupation of fewer ground spaces and the road can remain basically unobstructed during construction.



Close-up look at part of the pedestral-type segment launcher. One of the large pedestrals, the cable winch car on the girder and the control cabin can also be seen here.



Interior view of the box-section beam member. The two iron rods on the underside are used to straighten and tighten the beam members, before the tensioning work can be effectively applied.



Work platform suspended on the segment launcher and the hydraulic jack for tensioning work that is placed on the platform.



The end section of the bridge deck viewed from the bottom of the launcher.



The launcher uses its cable winch car to transport a beam member to the deck fro erection.



There are two precast yards on the site for the Route 3 (Kwai Chung Section) projects. One is located between Mei Foo and Container Terminal 6; another is located at the former Kwai Chung Park. Shown in this photo is the precast yard near Mei Foo. Some precast U-section beam members can also be seen, which will later be transported to the required position for erection.



The steel mould that is used to cast the U-section beam. The precast beam member, steel tendons for pre-tensioning and the hydraulic stressing device can also be seen.
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Old April 22nd, 2006, 11:12 PM   #4
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Wow, there must thousands of engineers involved!!!!!!!!!!!!
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Old April 23rd, 2006, 03:42 AM   #5
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Crazy pics
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Old April 23rd, 2006, 05:36 PM   #6
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Man... civil engineering is horrible!
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Old April 25th, 2006, 09:17 AM   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Halawala
Wow, there must thousands of engineers involved!!!!!!!!!!!!

Ya, engineers are sprouting in large numbers in China.

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Old April 25th, 2006, 07:49 PM   #8
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... not really very related to Highway construction in Hong Kong though.
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Old January 4th, 2007, 07:47 AM   #9
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Hong Kong highways

Ok, HK is such a small place but the territory has an excellent highway system. Though it may have be as long or impressive as the ones in the United States or Germany, it still provides some scenic views of the city.

In HK, there are 9 routes with route 6 being proposed

From Wikipedia



Route 1: The route begins at Aberdeen Praya Road in southern Hong Kong Island, which then turns into Wong Chuk Hang Road. The route then travels through the Aberdeen Tunnel to Happy Valley and Causeway Bay along the Canal Road Flyover, where it intersects with Route 4 (Gloucester Road).

The road then runs through the Cross Harbour Tunnel to Hung Hom; along Princess Margaret Road, where it intersects with Route 5 (Chatham Road North); Waterloo Road, where it intersects with Route 7 (Lung Cheung Road); and through the Lion Rock Tunnel to Tai Wai.

The route then runs along Lion Rock Tunnel Road and Sha Tin Road until it meets Route 9 in Sha Tin, where it terminates.

With the notable exception of a stretch of Waterloo Road in Kowloon Tong between Hereford Road and Lancashire Road, Route 1 has no level intersections with other roads along its length (through the use of side-exits, flyovers and underpasses).





Route 2: This route runs from Quarry Bay of Hong Kong Island to Ma Liu Shui of the New Territories, formerly known as route 6, and renamed as route 2 in 2004 under the route numbering scheme proposed in the same year.

Route 2 consists of 4 parts, from South to North:

* Eastern Harbour Crossing starting from Quarry Bay, where it joins into Island Eastern Corridor of Route 4, across the Victoria Harbour and ending at Lam Tin. Exit 1 is present in the starting point; exit 2 is present around Lei Yue Mun Interchange.

* Kwun Tong Bypass succeeds the EHC at Lei Yue Mun Interchange and goes along the coast of Kowloon Bay to Diamond Hill. On the Kwun Tong Bypass, Route 2 junctions Route 5 and Route 7. Exit 3 is at Kowloon Bay which leads to Route 5 and the Kowloon Bay Industrial Area; exit 4 joins the Prince Edward Road at the entrance of Tate's Cairn Tunnel.

* Tate's Cairn Tunnel continues the route from Diamond Hill, cutting through Tate's Cairn to Shek Mun Interchange. Exit 5 in the section runs down to Siu Lek Yuen.

* Tate's Cairn Highway, at last, takes the route 2 to an end at Ma Liu Shui, where it joins into Tolo Highway of Route 9.



Route 3: is a series of expressways in Hong Kong from Sai Ying Pun on the Hong Kong Island to Yuen Long in the New Territories, via Yau Ma Tei, Kwai Chung and Tsing Yi Island.

From south to north, Route 3 can be divided into four parts. The first part runs across the Victoria Harbour through the Western Harbour Crossing from Sai Ying Pun to Yau Ma Tei.

The next section travels between Yau Ma Tei and Lai Chi Kok on the West Kowloon Highway. This section has interchange with Route 5 in Tai Kok Tsui and junctions Route 7 in Butterfly Valley.

The third section is the Tsing Yi section, which includes Tsing Kwai Highway from Lai Chi Kok to Tsing Yi Island, with the Rambler Channel Bridge on its way; Cheung Tsing Highway, across the Tsing Yi Island going through the Cheung Ching Tunnel, through the Tsing Yi Northwestern Interchange, where Route 3 junctions with Route 8 leading to Chek Lap Kok Airport to the entrance of Ting Kau Bridge.

The last part is the Tsing Long Highway, which literally and actually runs from Tsing Yi Island to Yuen Long, crossing the Ting Kau Bridge, Tai Lam Tunnel and the Route 3 Country Park Section that runs from the northern exit of Tai Lam Tunnel to Kam Tin, and joins Route 9 near Pok Oi Hospital.

[IMG][/IMG]

Route 4: an east-west road artery along the north shore of Hong Kong Island. Formerly divided into routes 7 and 8, Route 4 (completed in 1990) consists of two sections:

From Chai Wan the route travels west towards Central via Island Eastern Corridor, Victoria Park Road, Gloucester Road, Harcourt Road Flyover, and finally to Connaught Road Central.

Part two of the roadway extension which took Route 4 from Connaught Road Central to Kennedy Town via the Connaught Road West Flyover was completed in 1997.

[IMG][/IMG]

Route 5: is a route artery in Hong Kong from eastern to western Kowloon and New Kowloon, and ends in Tsuen Wan in the New Territories, linking Route 9.

Part one of the road begins in the east from Kowloon Bay westwards via central Kowloon to Yau Ma Tei.

From Yau Ma Tei the road heads north to Tsuen Wan and meets with Route 9 (Hong Kong).

Route 6: is a road route number reserved for future by Hong Kong Government. It is proposed to run through central Kowloon in Hong Kong.

The current proposed route starts off Route 3 near Yau Ma Tei, passes through the new Central Kowloon Tunnel and an untitled submarine tunnel which together leads to the underground of former Kai Tak Airport, junctioning Route 5 on the way. Then the route junctions Kwun Tong Express of Route 2 in Kowloon Bay, and runs through an underground tunnel to Lam Tin, where it junctions with Route 2 again at the entrance to Eastern Harbour Crossing and runs into another proposed route, Tseung Kwan O - Lam Tin Tunnel to southern Tseung Kwan O.

Route 7: is an arterial road through New Kowloon in Hong Kong with Tseung Kwan O and Kwai Chung as its terminals.

Built in the 1970s as a 2 lane trunk road (then called Route 4 and renamed when Route 7 on Hong Kong Island was renamed Route 4), it was expanded to the current 3 lane highway. The highway has 8 interchanges and grade separation

Route 7 consists of three parts:

Route 7's begins in the east at Tseung Kwan O and travels west towards Kwun Tong via Tseung Kwan O Tunnel.

From Kwun Tong, the road turns north passing Kowloon Bay and then onto Choi Hung.

From Choi Hung the road turns west again and ends at Kwai Chung and connects with Route 5 (Hong Kong).

Route 8: is a 2.2 km 3-lane carriageway dual 3-lane highway under construction which will link Lantau Island, Tsing Yi Island, Cheung Sha Wan in West Kowloon, and Sha Tin in the Northeast New Territories of Hong Kong. It is a combination of many sections.

The section from Lantau to Tsing Yi is made up of the existing North Lantau Highway and Lantau Link, which was opened in 1997. Route 8 becomes Airport Road, Hong Kong at Chep Lap Kok.

The next section between Tsing Yi and Cheung Sha Wan, formerly known as Route 9, will be a 7.6 km dual 3-lane highway. This section consists of the Stonecutters Bridge, which will span the Rambler Channel from Stonecutters Island and link with the Tsing Ma Bridge through the Nam Wan Tunnel and West Tsing Yi viaduct. This section is due to be completed by 2008.

Knitting bridges interchage of Route 8 and Route 3 at the border of Cheung Sha Wan and Lai Chi Kok

The remaining section links Cheung Sha Wan and Tai Wai. It was formerly known as Route 16 and will be composed of the Eagle's Nest Tunnel and Sha Tin Heights Tunnel. The length of the section is 6 km and construction works will be completed in 2007, linking Route 9.

Route 9: in the form of expressway, circumscribing the New Territories. Starting from the Shing Mun Tunnels, Route 9 goes in the counter-clockwise direction, linking Sha Tin, Tai Po, Fanling, Sheung Shui, Yuen Long, Tuen Mun and Tsuen Wan. This Route 9 came into being after the rationalization of route number system in January, 2004, replacing the old system which has been used since 1974.

Like other strategic routes in Hong Kong, Route 9 consists of several sections.

The section from Tsuen Wan to Sha Tin is derived from the former Route 5, which includes the Shing Mun Tunnels and most part of the Tai Po Road - Sha Tin. This section, opened in 1990, is not recognized as an expressway, however.

Route 9 then runs in a northerly direction by the remaining portion of Tai Po Road - Shatin until at the Ma Liu Shui Interchange (interchange with Route 2), where it is continued by the 12.3 km-long Tolo Highway (opened in 1985) to Lam Kam Road Interchange, at the north of Tai Po. The widening of Tolo Highway between Ma Liu Shui and Tai Po to dual-4 has been finished in 2003. It is built to full British motorway standards (3 lanes + hard shoulder).

The next section is another dual-3 expressway, Fanling Highway, which was completed in three stages between 1985 and 1987, running due north and north-west, connecting Tai Po North and Pak Shek Au, near San Tin.

At San Tin Interchange near Lok Ma Chau, Route 9 turns south towards Au Tau, near Yuen Long on an expressway known as San Tin Highway. After interchanging with Route 3, Route 9 is carried along the Yuen Long Highway to Lam Tei Interchange, followed by Tuen Mun Highway, all the way to Tsuen Wan.

At Tsuen Wan, the section of Route 9 linking Chai Wan Kok and Shek Wai Kok is still under construction. After its opening in mid 2006, traffic can continue its way back to the Shing Mun Tunnels via the new road and the existing Cheung Pei Shan Road.
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Last edited by Manila-X; January 4th, 2007 at 10:57 AM.
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Old January 4th, 2007, 08:12 AM   #10
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Some related Hong Kong highway threads lurking around in SSC :

Central-Kowloon Route Proposal
http://skyscrapercity.com/showthread...+kong+highways

Highways Department 20th Anniversary Roving Exhibition
http://skyscrapercity.com/showthread...+kong+highways

Keeping Hong Kong's Roads Safe
http://skyscrapercity.com/showthread...+kong+highways

Route 8 & Stonecutters Bridge
http://skyscrapercity.com/showthread...+kong+highways

Highway Infrastructure at a Glance Photo Contest
http://skyscrapercity.com/showthread...light=highways

Hong Kong - Shanghai Highway
http://skyscrapercity.com/showthread...light=highways
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Old April 13th, 2007, 08:48 PM   #11
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Contract No.HY/2003/27 -
Reconstruction of Causeway Bay Flyover and Associated Widening of Victoria Park Road

January 2007











February 2007







March 2007











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Old April 21st, 2007, 07:24 PM   #12
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Contract No. HY/2000/16 - Route 8 & Nam Wan Tunnel & West Tsing Yi Viaduct
Larger photos : http://www.r8nscv.net/nwt/eng_project.htm

































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Old June 22nd, 2007, 08:07 PM   #13
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Lai Chi Kok Viaduct is a high rise elevated road connecting between Ngong Shuen Chau Viaduct and Eagle's Nest Tunnel of Route 8. It is a 1.4km dual 3-lane carriageway with 4 slip roads. 2 of which connect with Ching Chueng Road near Mei Foo and join with Castle Peak Road at Butterfly Valley Interchange. The other 2 slip roads provide access for traffic on and off Route 8 at Lai Wan Interchange.

2007/04


Construction of embankment near Hoi Lai Estate


Construction of sign gantry foundation in Lai Wan Overpass


Butterfly Valley Interchange


Laying of bituminous layer in Mainline Viaduct at Butterfly Valley

2007/03


TCSS Access Provision at Lai Po Road


TCSS Access Provision between Ching Cheung Road to east of Lai Wan Road Overpass


TTA Implemented at Lai Po Road


TCSS Access Provision at Lai Po Road


TTA Implemented at Lai Wan Overpass Widening eastbound

Eagle's Nest Tunnel is an integral part of Route 8 between Cheung Sha Wan and Sha Tin. The contract consists of the construction of the Eagle's Nest Tunnel, associated portal buildings and administration building, associated roadworks and drainage works, and E&M works for Eagle's Nest Tunnel, Shatin Heights Tunnel and Road T3.

2007/04









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Old June 22nd, 2007, 09:02 PM   #14
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Fantastic structure
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Old September 16th, 2007, 08:22 AM   #15
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Hong Kong Expressways

I think one of the cities that show off the best urban access-controlled freeways. Somebody get real pictures! Almost every road near the shore on HK island seems to be at least partly access controlled






There isn't a lot of info and pics online, so contribute!

http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&ll=2...&t=k&z=18&om=1
http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&ll=2...&t=k&z=17&om=1
http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&ll=2...&t=k&z=17&om=1
http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&ll=2...&t=k&z=18&om=1
http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&ll=2...&t=k&z=18&om=1
http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&ll=2...&t=k&z=18&om=1
http://maps.google.com/?ie=UTF8&ll=2...&t=k&z=17&om=1
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Old February 25th, 2008, 12:39 PM   #16
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Route 8 Cheung Sha Wan to Sha Tin Section is going completed!

From news.gov.hk:
New Kowloon-Sha Tin link to open

Photo Gallery

Photo Link from HKiTalk for Community Chest Route 8 Walk for Millions
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Old February 25th, 2008, 10:08 PM   #17
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wow, isnt it amazng how they make theses strucures without falling down ! especialy the bridge !
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Old March 15th, 2008, 07:37 PM   #18
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Route 8 - Eagle's Nest Tunnel and Associated Works Computer Animation

http://www.hyd.gov.hk/eng/major/road...st-english.wmv

2008/01











2007/12





Source : http://www.hyd.gov.hk/contractwebsit...NT/Project.htm
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Old March 15th, 2008, 08:22 PM   #19
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Nam Wan Tunnel & West Tsing Yi Viaduct
Source : http://www.r8nscv.net/nwt/eng_project.htm

2008/01









2007/12











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Old March 15th, 2008, 08:36 PM   #20
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Very impressive
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